NEI Driving the Roads Act. 1 - neiphysics2014-2015

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SCIENCE PRACTICES
1.
Ask questions and define problems.
2.
Develop and use models.
3.
Plan and carry out investigations.
4.
Analyze and interpret data (i.e., observations, graphs).
5.
Use mathematics and computational thinking.
6.
Construct explanations (claims, evidence, reasoning) and design
solutions.
7.
Engage in arguments (rebuttal) from evidence.
8.
Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information.
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL KNOW…
•Moving objects’ positions, velocity, and acceleration.
•How to calculate and convert SI units to common
forms of measurement.
•Slope of a velocity vs. time graph at any point is
object acceleration at that time.
•Slope of a position vs. time graph at any point is
velocity at that point in time.
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL KNOW…
1. Moving objects’ positions, velocity, and acceleration.
2. How to calculate and convert SI units to common forms of measurement.
3. Slope of a velocity vs. time graph at any point is object acceleration at
that time.
4. Slope of a position vs. time graph at any point is velocity at that point in
time.
5. Newton's laws are used in a variety of design processes such as vehicle
safety, aerospace, bridge design and interplanetary probes.
6. An understanding of forces leads to safer building designs such as
earthquake-safe buildings.
7. Forces present in the earth lead to plate tectonics.
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND
1. Functions, words, tables, and graphs facilitate the modeling of
relationships between forces and motion.
2. Why does velocity change but not acceleration? How can velocity decrease
while maintaining uniform acceleration?
3. What consumer product designs are influenced by the relationship
between velocity and acceleration?
4. How can object velocity equal zero yet have nonzero acceleration?
5. What consumer product designs are influenced by the relationship
between velocity and acceleration?
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO (DO)
•Explore the time it takes to react.
•Take and compare accurate measurements.
•Use sloped tracks to investigate speed, velocity, and
acceleration.
•Draw graphs to study changes in motion.
•Model traffic intersections. *Anchor Activity
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO (DO)
1. Gather, analyze and interpret data and create graphs regarding position,
velocity and acceleration of moving objects (DOK 1-3)
2. Develop, communicate and justify an evidence-based analysis of the forces
acting on an object and the resultant acceleration produced by a net force
(DOK 1-3)
3. Develop, communicate and justify an evidence-based scientific prediction
regarding the effects of the action-reaction force pairs on the motion of two
interacting objects (DOK 1-3)
4. Examine the effect of changing masses and distance when applying
Newton's law of universal gravitation to a system of two bodies (DOK 1-2)
5. Identify the limitations of Newton’s laws in extreme situations (DOK 1)
DRIVING THE ROADS – KUD
STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO (DO)
1. Use an inquiry approach to answer a testable question about an application
of Newton’s laws of motion. (DOK 1-4)
2. Share experimental data, respectfully discuss conflicting results, and
analyze ways to minimize error and uncertainty in measurement. (DOK 2-3)
3. Differentiate between the use of the terms “law” and “theory” as they are
defined and used in science compared to how they are used in other
disciplines or common use. (DOK 1-2)
4. Use technology to perform calculations and to organize, analyze and report
data. (DOK 1-2)
DRIVING THE ROADS –
INQUIRY QUESTIONS
• Why is reaction time critical to avoid accidents while driving?
• How does understanding the Laws of Motion create a safer and/or
more dangerous world?
• How is automobile speed related to stopping or braking distance?
• Why is it important to slow down when going around curves?
• How can forces be acting on an object without changing the object’s
motion?
• Why do equal but opposite action and reaction forces not cancel?
DRIVING THE ROADS – CRITICAL LANGUAGE
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reaction time
average speed
force
speed
accuracy
precision
•
•
•
•
•
velocity
Instantaneous
speed
positive
acceleration
negative
acceleration
centripetal force
DRIVING THE ROADS – MISCONCEPTIONS
1. If speed increases, acceleration
also increases.
2. Zero velocity means zero
acceleration.
3. Same position means same
speed.
DRIVING THE ROADS – CONTENT STANDARDS
Newton’s Laws of Motion and Gravitation describe relationships among forces acting
on and between objects, their masses, and changes in their motion — but have
limitations. (SC09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1)
a. Gather, analyze, and interpret data and create graphs regarding moving
objects’ positions, velocity, and acceleration.
b. Develop, communicate, and justify evidence-based analyses of forces acting
on objects and resultant accelerations produced by net forces.
c.
Develop, communicate, and justify evidence-based scientific predictions
regarding effects of action-reaction force pairs on the motion of two
interacting objects.
d. Examine effect of changing masses and distances when applying Newton’s
Law of Universal Gravitation to a system of two bodies.
e. Identify limitations of Newton’s laws in extreme situations.
Student Learning Objective:
SW conduct research projects to answer
questions or solve problems
WHST.11–12.7
INTRODUCTION TO MOTION
Content Language Objective:
SW describe in writing or verbally the
motion of moving objects through
precise vocabulary, graphs and
equations.
(SC09-GR.HS-S.1-GLE.1)
UNIT 1: DRIVING THE ROADS
How will we make this happen:
Make graphs, read graphs, create
graphs, discuss graphs regarding
moving objects’ positions, velocity,
and acceleration.
UNIT 1: DRIVING THE ROADS
Performance Criteria
 By the end of the period all students will
be able to verbally or in written language
express the motion of an object using
words, graphs, and equations
representations.
 [LO 3.A.1.1, SP 1.5, SP 2.1, SP 2.2]
REACTION TIME
Key vocabulary that
should be used:
Reaction time
Velocity
Acceleration
Displacement
*time
vertically
horizontally
constant speed
speeding up or
down
• one dimension or
two
•
•
•
•
REACTION TIME
In small groups, work together to
describe the actions in words, graphs
and equations.
Each group will then share and defend
what their answer using science
vocabulary.
GROUP INTRO. ACTIVITY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Vertically vs. Horizontally
Constant speed or Changing Speed
Speeding up or speeding down
One dimension or two dimensions
Displacement vs. Time Graph
Velocity vs. Time Graph
Acceleration vs. Time Graph
Force vs. Time Graph
What is the Equation?
ROLES FOR TYPES OF MOTION DEMO.
MOTION GRAPHS: WHAT IS THE EQUATION FOR
THE DEPENDENT VARIABLE (Y VALUE)
Ex: y = ??? y = m(x) + b, Y = ax2 + bx + c
1.a marble rolling across a slick tabletop,
2.a box sliding to a stop on same table top,
3.an object dropped from ceiling height,
4.A toy dart gun that fires a dart downward
5.a toy dart gun that fires a dart horizontally
6.a lab cart rolling down an inclined plane,
7.an inverted lab cart sliding slowly down the same
incline,
8.a ball tossed straight up,
9.a ball tossed with an arc,
YOU ALREADY KNOW PHYSICS…INSTRUCTIONAL
ACTIVITY:
In small groups, work together to group the
actions according to similar types of motion.
Each group will then share and defend what was
seen using science vocabulary.
Objects involved
& What is happening
GROUP INTRO. ACTIVITY
types of motion
1.If you got help, then who helped you.
2.Why you think your answer is correct.
1.Group Count: How many vocabulary
words did you use?
SHARE OUT!
How can you measure reaction time using a timer(s)?
Two Stop watches
Start both at the same time (experimenter)
Hand one to a partner (lab rat)
Experimenter says “stop” and stops timer at the same
time
Lab rat hears “stop” and stops the 2nd timer
(Lab rat reaction time) =
(Lab rat time) – (experimenter time)
REACTION TIME: STOPWATCHES
How can you measure reaction time using a ruler?
• Experimenter holds a ruler from the 30 cm end
• Lab rat positions thumb and index finder at 0 cm end
of ruler, NOT TOUCHING the ruler and ready to catch
it when released
• Experimenter releases ruler without warning
• Lab rat catches the ruler as quickly as possible
• You reaction time is actually a reaction distance???
REACTION TIME: RULER
1.If you got help, then who helped you.
2.Why you think your answer is correct.
1.Group Count: How many vocabulary
words did you use?
WHAT TYPE OF MOTION IS SEEN IN A FALLING
OBJECT?
Cameras and Science
Video a partner dropping a brightly
colored object
Tape a meter stick to an object close to
the person and out of the way of the
object falling.
TECHNOLOGY : LAPTOPS - “TRACKER”
MOTION GRAPHS
Describe the the motion
of a free-falling object
using words, graphs,
and equations.
CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING
LEAP FRAMEWORK – OBSERVATION TEMPLATE
I.1 – CLO
I.2 – Rigorous tasks that require critical thinking
I.4 – Academic language
I.6 – Differentiation
(content, process, product)
I.8 – Collaboration / Digital Resources
PHYSICS UNIT 1 PLANNING PROTOCOL
(FOR USE WITH SCOPE AND SEQUENCE)
Step 1: Read the Grade-Level Expectations
(GLEs) for Unit 1 and their aligned Standards
CAS and CCSS.
Students should know
Students should be able to do
Possible misconceptions
PHYSICS UNIT 1 PLANNING PROTOCOL
(FOR USE WITH SCOPE AND SEQUENCE)
Step 2: Review provided chapters/activities. Note how
each supports students’ learning of the GLEs and
Standards.
Chapter
Support for student learning of GLEs and Standards
Sections 1, 2
Sections 3, 4
Sections 5, 6, & 7
PHYSICS UNIT 1 PLANNING PROTOCOL
(FOR USE WITH SCOPE AND SEQUENCE)
Step 3: Identify rigorous tasks to monitor student learning on the GLEs and
Standards.
 Rigorous Tasks
 Connection to GLEs and Standards
 Section 1
 Section 2
 Section 3
 Section 4
 Section 5
 Section 7
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