Developing IEP Goals

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Developing IEP Goals
Janice Gray
Resource Teacher
MSD Warren Township
Why Measurable Annual Goals?
• Allows for better progress monitoring
• It’s the law! If a goal is not
measurable, it violates IDEA and may
result in the denial of FAPE.
Goal Writing as a Process
Expected Outcome: long term goals
Present Levels: snapshot of student’s current levels
Educational Needs: difference between expected outcomes and present levels
Annual Goals: measurable (ABCD method)
Services: professional activity delivered with fidelity
Progress Monitoring: monitor progress towards performance and evaluate
instruction
Evaluation of Effectiveness: make changes if student is not making progress
Present Levels
• Snapshot of student performance
• Includes strengths and challenges
• Functional and academic skills
• Backed up by data
• Identify areas of deficit that lead to goals
• Specific, focused, and detailed
• No subjective material
• Current info only!
Progress Monitoring Data
• Include all areas: academic, behavioral, social/emotional,
functional skills, adaptive behavior, and vocational
• Types of Data
• FORMAL: ISTEP+, Terra Nova, ISTAR, Acuity, DRA2, achievement
tests, classroom assessments, teacher-made assessments, pre-post
test
• INFORMAL: observations, inventories, checklists, tracking sheets,
rating scales, rubrics, peer and self evaluations, discussions,
running records, writing samples, journals, logs, etc.
• ALSO INCLUDE: attendance and tardies, missing
assignment, discipline referrals, current grades
• Summarize previous IEP goals (unless initial)
Always ask yourself…
Would the present levels and goal pass
the stranger test?
ABCD Method
A = Audience
B = Behavior
C = Condition
D = Degree
A = Audience
• Learner or student
Example:
Student (audience) will complete 6 independent tasks per
day, with no more than one verbal prompt, to show
improvement from 30% accuracy on skills to 90%
accuracy on skills by the next Annual Case Review.
B = Behavior
• WHAT you want the audience to do
• Can be observed, counted, summarized, and
evaluated
Example:
Student (audience) will complete 6 independent tasks per
day (behavior), with no more than one verbal prompt, to
show improvement from 30% accuracy on skills to 90%
accuracy on skills by the next Annual Case Review.
C = Condition
• Context in which you expect the student to
perform the new skills or reduce occurrences
Example:
Student (audience) will complete 6 independent tasks per
day (behavior), with no more than one verbal prompt
(condition), to show improvement from 30% accuracy on
skills to 90% accuracy on skills by the next Annual Case
Review.
D = Degree
• Criteria to be met and to what level of mastery
Example:
Student (audience) will complete 6 independent tasks per
day (behavior), with no more than one verbal prompt
(condition), to show improvement from 30% accuracy on
skills to 90% accuracy on skills by the next Annual Case
Review (degree).
Examples
Not measurable
Student will comply with adult directives 4 out of
5 times.
Measurable
Student will improve his compliance with adult directives by
listening and following directions given from 1 out of 5 times
with 5 verbal prompts to 5 out of 5 times with 2 verbal prompts
by the next Annual Case Review.
Benchmarks/Objectives
• Purpose is to assess progress
• Allows for additional action is necessary
• Breaks down goal into components and
provides a roadmap that leads to the final
goal
• Allow for regular progress checks (required)
Questions?
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