Classroom PBS Workshopprt1 (1)

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Positive Behavior
Supports
for the Classroom
Part 1
Presented by
Tim Ylagan, Nancy Maxfield and
Carleen Andrews
Overview
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Brainstorm-Introductions
What is PBS?
Classroom Systems
Brain Break - 4 Corners
Pair Share-Classroom Routines Matrix
More Classroom Systems
Reflect
Brainstorm
Effective classroom management…
PBS Basics
 Positive Behavior Supports (EBS/PBIS)
 Based on the Behavioral Model
 Is evidence based practice
 Systems Approach
 It about building effective classroom
management
Connection
 Research
suggests that students who feel
connected (enjoy going to school, like their
teachers & fellow students) have fewer
behaviour issues, greater emotional well
being (Eccles, 1993) and better academic
outcomes (Osterman, 2000)
Relationships
 “The
quality of the teacher/student
relationship is the single most important
factor to consider when rethinking
classroom management”

Patricia Sequeira Belvel & Maya
Marcia Jordon
Relationships and PBS
 Positive
•
•
Relationships are:
The foundation of any classroom-based
approach to positive behaviour
Key to creating a safe and caring
classroom climate that invites/supports
positive behaviour and skilled problem
solving
Alberta Ministry of Education
School-Wide PBS
Levels of Intervention
Classroom
1. Classroom-wide positive expectations taught
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
& encouraged
Teaching classroom routines & cues taught &
encouraged
Ratio of at least 4 positive to 1 negative
adult-student interaction
Active supervision
Design a Functional Physical Layout for the
Classroom
Maximize Engaged Academic Time
Brain Break
4 Corners
1. What percentage of students in
a classroom would typically respond
to green-zone interventions?
A.
B.
C.
D.
80%
15%
5%
75%
What is the recommended ratio of
positive to negative adult-student
interactions?
2 to 1
B. 3 to 1
C. 4 to 1
D. 7 to 1
A.
3. Classroom behaviour
expectations should look like…
A.
C.
B.
D.
1. Behavioral Expectations
 Define and teach 3-5 expectations
for your classroom early in year.
 Positively stated expectations
 Easy to remember
 Posted in the classroom
 Consistent with School-wide
rules/expectations
 Taught Directly
 Positive and negative examples
Rights, Respect and Responsibilities
Reflect
2. Classroom Routines
 Define and teach classroom routines
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How to enter class and begin to work
How to predict the schedule for the day
What to do if you do not have materials
What to do if you need help
What to do if you need to go to the bathroom
What to do if you are handing in late material
What to do if someone is bothering you.
Signals for moving through different activities.
How to determine if you are doing well in class
 Establish a signal for obtaining class
attention
 Teach effective transitions
Designing Classroom Routines
Routine
Desired Behavior Signal
Entering Class
Walk in, sit down, Instruction on board
start work
Bell Activity
Obtaining class
attention
Orient to
teacher, be quiet
?
Getting Help
during seat work
?
?
Small Group Activity: 5 min
Identify Routines
 Pick a different routine common across
classrooms in your school.
 Complete the matrix for your classroom.
 How do you share and find out good
strategies in your school?
 1-min reports.
Classroom Routines Matrix
Routine
What do you
expect?
What is the
signal?
Steps for Teaching a Routine
 Explain
 Demonstrate/Model
 Guided
Practice
 Perform Independently
 Review/Re- teach
Cool Tools
Teach Students to SelfManage
 Once students know the routines, allow
routine initiation to be prompted by normal
events
 (the bell… completion of an assignment)…
rather than rely on teacher prompts.
 Teach self-management
 The target behavior
 The self-management behavior
 Prompts
 Consequences
3. Establish a “positive
environment”
 (4-1)At least four instances of positive
interaction for every correction.
 Begin each class period with a celebration.
 Your first comment to a child establishes
behavioral momentum.
 Engelmann, Mace, “interspersed requests”
 Provide multiple paths to success/praise.
 Group contingencies, personal contingencies, etc
4. Active Supervision
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Move
Interact
Acknowledge
Proximity makes a difference
Redirections for minor, infrequent
behavior errors
Frequent pre corrections for chronic
errors
5. Design a Functional Physical Layout
for the Classroom
 Different areas of classroom defined for
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different activities
 Define how to determine “what happens where”
Traffic patterns
Groups versus separate work stations
Visual access
 Teacher access to students at all times
 Student access to relevant instructional materials
Density
Your desk
Reflect and Share
 1 thing to try this week
PBS view of the class
Positive Behavior
Supports
for the Classroom
Part 2
Presented by
Karen Gonzales and
Tim Ylagan
Classroom Pt. 2
6. Maximizing academic engagement time
7. Ensure academic success: match curriculum
to students’ skills
8. Vary modes of instruction
9. Establish an effective hierarchy of
consequences for problem behavior
10. Teacher has a system to request assistance
6. Maximize Academic
Engagement Time
 Plan
for transitions
 Maximize opportunities for student
responses
 Active supervision
 Pacing
 Student feedback
 Planning and engaging students with
disability ie Autism
7. Ensure Academic Success
match the curriculum to students
skills
 Academic
failure leads to problem
behaviour.

How can we teach with success and still teach
the required curriculum?
 Monitor


and adapt
Maintain instructional objective, but adjust the
curriculum/instruction
Curricular adaptation (strategies)
 Have
fun
8. Varying the Modes of
Instruction
 Group
lecture
 Small group
 Independent work
 Integrating Activities
 Peer tutoring
9. Establish an effective hierarchy of
consequences for problem behavior
 Do

not ignore problem behavior
(unless you are convinced the behavior is
maintained by adult attention).
 Establish
predictable & reasonable
consequences
 Establish individual consequences AND
group consequences
10. Teacher has System to
Request Assistance
 Teacher
should be able to identify need for
assistance and request help easily.
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Does your school have a form for requesting
help?
How do you initiate the identification process
for students needing extra support.
• School based resource people
• District resource people
• Provincial resource programs/outside agencies
Classroom
1. Classroom-wide positive expectations taught
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
& encouraged
Teaching classroom routines & cues taught &
encouraged
Ratio of at least 4 positive to 1 negative
adult-student interaction
Active supervision
Design a Functional Physical Layout for the
Classroom
Maximize Engaged Academic Time
Classroom Pt. 2
6. Maximizing academic engagement time
7. Ensure academic success: match curriculum
to students’ skills
8. Vary modes of instruction
9. Establish an effective hierarchy of
consequences for problem behavior
10. Teacher has a system to request assistance
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