Hitcher

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Hitcher: An Analysis
By Alice Kirkness and Billy Forsyth
Hitcher
I'd been tired, under
the weather, but the ansaphone kept screaming:
One more sick-note, mister, and you're finished. Fired.
I thumbed a lift to where the car was parked.
A Vauxhall Astra. It was hired.
I picked him up in Leeds.
He was following the sun to west from east
with just a toothbrush and the good earth for a bed.
The truth he said, was blowin' in the wind,
or round the next bend.
I let him have it
on the top road out of Harrogate - once
with the head, then six times with the krooklok
in the face - and didn't even swerve.
I dropped it into third
and leant across
to let him out, and saw him in the mirror
bouncing off the kerb, then disappearing down the verge.
We were the same age, give or take a week.
He'd said he liked the breeze
to run its fingers
through his hair. It was twelve noon.
The outlook for the day was moderate to fair.
Stitch that, I remember thinking,
you can walk from there.
First person
narrative.
Brings reader
into poem
immediately
Hitcher
I'd been tired, under
Fed up with life
Pronunciation
the weather, but the ansaphone kept screaming:
One more sick-note, mister, and you're finished. Fired.
I thumbed a lift to where the car was parked.
A Vauxhall Astra. It was hired.
Sounds
romantic. The
hitcher has
freedom and no
responsibilities
I picked him up in Leeds.
People putting
pressure on him
Used to replace apostrophes.
Matter of fact
tone
He was following the sun to west from east
with just a toothbrush and the good earth for a bed.
The truth he said, was blowin' in the wind,
or round the next bend.
Takes his
frustrations out
on the hitcher.
The narrator
envies him and
his upbeat
attitude to life.
I let him have it
on the top road out of Harrogate - once
with the head, then six times with the krooklok
in the face - and didn't even swerve.
Really violent
images
I dropped it into third
and leant across
to let him out, and saw him in the mirror
bouncing off the kerb, then disappearing down the verge.
We were the same age, give or take a week.
He'd said he liked the breeze
to run its fingers
Personification.
through his hair. It was twelve noon.
Ironic. For the
Hitchhiker has
been thrown
out of the car
door and is
possibly dead
The outlook for the day was moderate to fair.
Stitch that, I remember thinking,
you can walk from there.
Return to
normality, as if
nothing
happened
What’s the mood of the poem?
Not a happy one. The author talks of how his
boss is screaming at him constantly. He has
been threatened by his job. To emphasise
the negative atmosphere he writes: ‘ I'd
been tired, under the weather.’
How does the writer use
language in this poem
He writes down certain words literally how
they were pronounced. For example
‘Ansaphone’ but he also uses the smallest of
details to set the scene. ‘Vauxhall Astra. It
was Hired’ and ‘ Krooklok’.
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