Why Take the Preventing Heat Stress Training?

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Preventing Heat Stress
Disclaimer
• This training material presents very important information.
• Your organization must do an evaluation of all exposures,
applicable codes and regulations, and establish proper controls,
training, and protective measures to effectively control
exposures and assure compliance.
• This program is neither a determination that the conditions and
practices of your organization are safe nor a warranty that
reliance upon this program will prevent accidents and losses or
satisfy local, state or federal regulations.
• All procedures and training, whether required by law or not,
should be implemented and reviewed by safety and risk
management professionals, and legal counsel to ensure that all
local, state and federal requirements are satisfied.
Course Outline – Preventing Heat Stress
1. Why Take the Preventing Heat Stress Training?
2. Physical Effects of Heat
3. Heat Stress Control
4. Heat Illness Prevention
5. Summary
Why Take the Preventing Heat Stress Training?
Understanding the importance of preventing heat stress:
•
Heat illness is a medical condition
associated with the body’s inability to
cool itself as it is being heated.
•
Fatalities occur because of this condition.
•
Those who work outside are at the
highest risk because of prolonged
exposure to the sun.
•
It is important that all employees use
caution during the summer months.
Why Take the Preventing Heat Stress Training?
Thermal comfort:
•
A comfortable thermal environment results from control of
temperature, humidity, and air distribution within a worker’s vicinity.
•
The following environmental factors help determine the amount of
heat stress a worker can endure:
– Radiant heat exchange with surrounding surfaces.
– The body’s ability to gain and lose heat load.
– Air temperature
– Air exchange
– Humidity
Why Take the Preventing
Introduction
Heat Stress Training?
Heat transfer:
•
Conduction: Physical contact with a
•
Convection: Transfer of heat to
•
Radiant heat: Transfer of heat to
surface and transfer of heat from
the surface to the human body.
body surface from air.
body surface from energy source
such as the sun or certain job
activities.
This smelting operation is a source of radiant
heat. The sun is an example of radiant heat.
Physical Effects of Heat
Heat Stroke:
•
Characterization: Abnormally elevated body temperature.
•
Symptoms: Body stops perspiration and hot, dry skin.
•
First aid: Remove victim to cool area, soak clothes with cool water
and give water to the conscious victim.
If a victim is suffering from heat stroke, immediate cooling of the
body from a water source such as this garden hose is time crucial.
Physical Effects of Heat
Heat exhaustion:
•
Characterization: Dehydration caused by depletion of water.
•
Symptoms: Fatigue, nausea, headache, clammy, moist skin, perfuse
•
First aid: Give water to conscious victim.
•
Move victim to cool location.
sweating, etc.
If a victim is suffering from heat exhaustion,
immediately administer small sips of water.
Physical Effects of Heat
Heat cramps:
•
Characterization: Muscle spasms caused by salt imbalance.
•
Symptoms: Painful muscle spasms in heavily used muscle groups.
•
First aid: Drink clear juice or a sports beverage to replace
•
Bananas are excellent sources of natural,
bioavailable electrolytes.
electrolyte levels and seek medical attention.
If a victim is suffering from heat cramps,
immediately administer sports drink.
Heat Stress Control
Acclimatization:
•
This is the process of becoming accustomed to
hot environmental conditions.
•
Adjustments occur over the first week of
exposure to heat.
•
The body must maintain environmental
conditions at relatively constant levels and
increase gradually over a 1 week period to
properly acclimate.
•
Time will be reduced from to lack of water.
Heat Stress Control
Control of radiant heat:
•
Provide reflective shields between the heat source and worker.
•
Use reflective screens.
•
Use reflective clothing.
•
Cover exposed parts of body.
Fire fighters use reflective
clothing to reduce heat potential.
Heat Stress Control
Control of convective heat:
•
If temperature is greater than 95oF:
– Decrease ambient temperature.
– Decrease air velocity.
– Wear clothing to cover exposed parts of body.
Lowering air temperature will
decrease heat stress.
Heat Stress Control
Control of convective heat:
•
If temperature is less than 95oF:
– Decrease ambient temperature.
– Increase air velocity.
– Reduce clothing.
Increasing air velocity will
decrease heat stress potential.
Heat Stress Control
Other heat stress controls:
•
Drink plenty of water.
•
Take frequent breaks in shaded areas.
•
If you experience symptoms of heat
stress, stop and treat the condition.
•
Ensure proper acclimatization prior to
continuous work in hot environments.
•
Wear proper clothing to prevent solar
load and allow cooling with specified
protective equipment.
Drink plenty of water in
hot environments.
Heat Illness Prevention
Basic 5 step plan to help ensure workplace safety:
1. Develop and implement written procedures for Heat Illness Prevention.
2. Provide heat illness prevention training to all employees, including
supervisors.
3. Provide enough fresh water so that each person can drink at least 1
quart per hour, and encourage them to do so.
4. Provide access to shade for at least five minutes of rest if someone
believes they needs a preventative recovery period. Do not wait until
they feel sick.
5. Observe behaviors and ensure personnel are following the required
safety procedures.
Summary
Some of the physical effects of heat :
• Heat stroke
• Heat exhaustion
• Heat cramps
A few remedies for heat exhaustion:
• Drink plenty of water.
• Take frequent breaks.
• Sit in the shade if needed.
• Stop what you are doing if you feel symptoms of heat stress.
• Wear proper clothing to allow cooling.
• Use reflective clothing to reduce heat potential.
Preventing Heat Stress
This form documents that the training specified above was presented to the listed participants. By signing below, each participant
acknowledges receiving this training.
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