PPT: Common Core 111 CBR

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NAVEDTRA 43904-C
SEABEE COMBAT
WARFARE
COMMON CORE
October 2010
Unit 111
Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Warfare
Fundamentals
CBR Warfare
• References
(a) TM EE168-DB-OMP-010, Operators and Unit
Maintenance Manual for Alarm, Chemical Agent,
Automatic, M-22
(b) NAVEDTRA 14057, Damage Controlman
(c) NAVEDTRA 14235 Seabee Combat Handbook,
Vol 2
(d) TM 3-4240-346-109 Chemical Biological Mask,
Type M-40A
CBR Warfare
(e) NAVEDTRA 14234 Seabee Combat Handbook,
Vol 1
(f) FM 3-4, NMC Protection
(g) NAVMED P-5041 Treatment of Chemical Agent
Casualties
(h) FM 3-3 Chemical and Biological Contamination
Avoidance
(i) FM 3-5, NBC Decontamination
(j) Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures
for NBC Protection
CBR Warfare
(k) TM SS200-AP-MMO-010 Operator
Manual for Joint Service Lightweight
Integrated Suit Technology (JLIST) Chemical
Protective Ensemble
(l) FM 3-7, NBC Field Handbook
US POLICY
NUCLEAR WEAPONS
• The US may use nuclear weapons to terminate a conflict
or war at the lowest acceptable level of hostilities. This is
interpreted to mean that the US may use nuclear
weapons first. The employment of nuclear weapons by
the US is governed by guidance to the joint force
commander (JFC) as contained in JP 3-12, Doctrine For
Joint Nuclear Operations, and other strategic level
directives. The US is party to treaties and international
agreements that limit proliferation, testing, and
possession of nuclear weapons.
US POLICY
CHEM WEAPONS
• The US will never use chemical weapons. The
Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which the
US ratified on 29 April 1997, bans the acquisition,
development, production, retention, stockpiling,
transfer, and use of chemical weapons.
US POLICY
BIO WEAPONS
• The US will never use biological weapons. Under
the terms of the Biological Weapons Convention
(BWC), which the US ratified on 29 March 1975,
parties agreed not to develop, produce, stockpile, or
acquire biological agents or toxins of types and in
quantities that have no justification for prophylactic,
protective, or other peaceful purposes.
»FM 3-11
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.1 Explain the following:
– Chemical Warfare
– Biological Warfare
– Radiological Warfare
– Routes by which agents enter the body.
• Reference: (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234 Seabee
Combat Handbook, Vol 1
Chemical Warfare
Chemical Warfare
• Produces physiological and psychological effect
• Delivered in liquid and vapor form
• Causes casualties
• Degrades performance
• Disrupts support
• Restricts maneuvers
Chemical Warfare
• Chemical agents are used to produce death,
injury, temporary incapacitation, or irritating
effects.
• Three types of antipersonnel agents
– Casualty (nerve, blister, choking, blood)
– Incapacitating (symptoms vary)
– Harassing (tear and vomiting gases)
Biological Warfare
Biological Warfare
The intentional release of living organisms or
substances produced by living organisms to cause
Death or Disease
Biological Warfare
• Biological operations use living organisms to cause
disease or death.
• Cause diseases such as typhoid fever, cholera, and
influenza.
• Difficult to detect because evidence of attack isn’t
discovered until after personnel show signs of
exposure.
Radiological Warfare
• Nuclear weapons produce explosions of great
force and heat and release nuclear radiation.
Their primary purpose is the mass destruction of
property and personnel.
CBR Warfare
• Routes by which agents enter the body
– Breathing
– Absorption through skin, eyes, mucus
membranes
– Ingestion
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.2 Describe the purpose of the
following:
–
–
–
–
Protective mask (ref b, ch. 9, p 9-1)
Chemical protective JSLIST ensemble (reb b, ch. 9, p 9-4)
Atropine/2pam chloride (ref e, ch. 9, p 9-8)
Pocket dosimeter (ref b, ch. 11, p 11-5)
• Reference: NAVEDTRA 14057, Damage
Controlman
Chemical Weapons
MCU-2/P Protective Mask
• Protects face, eyes, nose, throat and lungs from
CBR agents or contamination
• Offers no protection against carbon monoxide or
ammonia
• Filters the air removing particles of dust that may
be radioactive or otherwise contaminated
• Purifies the air of many poisonous gases.
Protective
Equipment
• Chemical Protective Ensemble
The JSLIST overgarment is designed to replace the
Battle Dress Overgarment, the USMC Saratoga, and
the Navy Chemical Protective Overgarment. It is lighter
and less bulky than the previous Battle Dress
Overgarment (BDO) chemical protective garments, is
durable for 45 days, can be laundered up to six times
and provides 24 hours of protection against liquid and
vapor chemical challenges.
Protective
Equipment
• Wet-weather clothing
– Provides complete protection against
alpha/beta radiological contamination
when worn with battle dress and antiflash
gear
– Provides an extra layer of protection for
the chemical protective overgarment.
Protective
Equipment
• Atropine/2Pam Chloride auto-injector
–Used to counteract the effects of and
relieve the symptoms of nerve agents
only.
Protective
Equipment
• Pocket Dosimeter
–Size and shape of a fountain pen.
–Measure exposure to radiation over
a period of time
Protective Mask
• PQS Question 111.3 Describe the operation
and maintenance of the protective mask.
• Reference: (d, Ch 2 & 3) TM 3-4240-346-109
Chemical Biological Mask, type M-40A
M-40A
• 1. Place your chin in.
• 2. Cover openings at bottom of outlet valve and breathe
out hard so that air escapes around the edges of
facepiece.
• 3. Cover inlet port of canister and breath in. Facepiece
should collapse against your face, and remain so while
you hold your breath. If it does, you have an airtight
seal. If it does not collapse check for matter between
face piece and your face.
• 4. Grasp tab and pull head harness over your head after
establishing an airtight seal.
M-40A
• The only authorized cleaning agent for your FPM
is WARM SOAPY WATER.
• Remove the canister before cleaning the mask.
Clean the mask. Clean the mask inside and out,
using a clean cloth dipped in the soapy water.
• Rinse by wiping with a clean cloth that has been
dipped in warm clear water.
• Either wipe the facepiece with a clean, lint free
cloth or air-dry.
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.4 Explain the three types
of anti-personnel agents and their physical
symptoms.
• Reference: [e, ch. 9-1]
Anti-personnel agents
• Casualty Agents - Highly poisonous and are intended to kill or
seriously injure. Included in this group are nerve, blister, choking,
and blood agents. Nerve agents, as a group, are probably the most
effective because only small doses are needed to produce death.
• Incapacitating - It renders personnel incapable of performing
their duties by interfering with the mental processes that control
bodily functions.
• Harassing - include tear and vomiting gases that cause
temporary disability.
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.5 Describe the following
types of nuclear explosions. [ref b, ch. 10]
– Air burst
– High altitude burst
– Surface burst
– Underwater burst
– Underground burst
• Reference: NAVEDTRA 14057, Basic
Damage Control
Nuclear Explosions
Air Burst
– Fire ball does not touch
the earth
– All materials in fireball
vaporized
– Maximize blast and
thermal effect over
large area
High Altitude Burst
High Altitude Burst
– Point of detonation is above 100,000 ft
– Produces air blast, thermal radiation,
EMP, initial nuclear radiation, and
atmospheric ionization.
– Last from minutes to hours
Surface Burst
Surface Burst
– Detonation is on, or
above the surface of
the earth, and the
fireball touches the
surface.
– Air blast, thermal
radiation, EMP.
– Over water causes
damage to Submarines
Nuclear Explosions
Underwater Burst
– Practically all thermal radiation absorbed
– Large base serge is formed which billows
up several hundred feet
Underground Burst
Underground Burst
– Produces a severe earth shock, especially
near point of detonation.
– Thermal radiation, air blast, initial nuclear
radiation, and fallout will be negligible or
absent if the burst is confined below the
surface.
– Ground shock will cause damage within
about three crater radii but little beyond
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.6 Describe the following
effects of nuclear explosions.
– Air Blast
– Thermal radiation
– Nuclear radiation
– Electromagnetic Pulse phenomenon
– Fallout
• Reference: [b, ch. 10]
Nuclear Explosions
• Air Blast
– Primary blast injuries result from the direct
action of the air shock wave on the human
body.
– Secondary blast injuries are caused mainly
by collapsing buildings and by timber and
other debris flung about by the blast.
Nuclear Explosions
• Thermal Radiation
– Radiant energy (heat and light) emitted by
fireball.
– Travels at the speed of light and persists
as long as the fireball is luminous.
– Over land – ignites fires
– As weapon yield increases, the range at
which thermal radiation can cause skin
burns and eye injuries to exposed
personnel increases
Nuclear Explosions
• Nuclear Radiation
– Alpha particles: Must be taken into the
body through ingestion or cuts to be
injurious.
– Beta particles: Enter through the skin or
ingestion, carried in contaminated dust,
dirt, or bomb residue
Nuclear Explosions
• Nuclear Radiation
Gamma Rays: Pure energy and not
easily stopped, can penetrate every
region of the body.
Gamma rays strike atoms in the body
cause ionization of these atoms, which
may result in any number of possible
chemical reactions that damage the
cells of the body.
Nuclear Explosions
• Nuclear Radiation
– Neutrons: Have the greatest penetrating
power of the nuclear radiation hazards,
create hazards to personnel when the
neutron is captured in atoms of various
elements in the body, atmosphere, water,
or soil.
– The captured elements become radioactive
and release gamma rays and beta
particles.
Nuclear Explosions
• Electromagnetic Pulse phenomenon
– An EMP is an intense burst of radiofrequency radiation generated by a nuclear
explosion.
– The strong, quick-rising surges of electric
current induced by EMP in power
transmission lines and long antennas could
burn out most unprotected electrical and
electronic equipment.
Nuclear Explosions
• Fallout
– Major effect of a surface, shallow
underground, or underwater burst.
– Radioactive material that falls from the
nuclear cloud and is deposited on exposed
surfaces.
– Consists primarily of fission products
(gamma/beta emitters) mixed with material
that was vaporized by the fireball and
drawn up into the nuclear cloud.
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.7 Define Mission
Oriented Protective Posture and describe the
levels.
• Reference: [f, ch. 2, pp 2-1 thru 2-3]
MOPP Levels
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.8 Describe the correct
procedures for inspecting, maintaining, the
JSLIST chemical protective ensemble.
• Reference: [k, ch. 2, pp. 2-1 thru 2-11]
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
Protective Clothing
NATO NBC Markers
• PQS Question 111.9 Describe the colors
and markings on the NATO biological,
chemical and radiological marker signs.
• Reference: [e, ch. 9, p. 9-19]
NBC Markers
NBC Marking Kit
• NATO-standard
triangular signs
• Markers are placed
outside the
contaminated area
• Markers face out from
contamination
NBC Markers
Chemical Marker
GAS
H
091900ZAPR99
NBC Markers
Biological Marker
BIO
Anthrax
091900ZAPR99
NBC Markers
Radiological Marker
ATOM
091900ZAPR99
150 R/hr
H/hr 091200ZAPR99
M9 Paper
• PQS Question 111.10 Describe the color
that the M-9 chemical agent detector paper
turns after it comes in contact with a liquid
nerve or blister agent.
• Reference: [e, Ch 9, p. 9-6]
M9 Paper
M9 Paper
• Detects the presence
of liquid nerve and
blister agents.
• Spots or streaks on the
paper appear pink, redbrown, red-purple, or
any shade of red,
assume it has been
exposed to a chemical
agent.
M8 Paper
• PQS Question 111.11 Describe the color
that the M-8 paper turns after it comes in
contact with a liquid nerve or blister agent.
• Reference: [b, ch. 9, p. 9-11]
M9 Paper
•
•
•
•
Yellow-gold indicates G (nerve) agent
Red-pink indicates H (blister) agent
Dark green indicates V (nerve) agent
If any other color or no color change, liquid cannot be identified
Nerve Agents
• PQS Question 111.12 Explain the following
as it applies to nerve agents.
– Symptoms [ch. 2, p. 2-11]
– Contents of NAA kit (NAAK) [app e, p. e-1]
– Treatment (self and buddy aid) [app e, p. e-4]
• Reference: [g]
Nerve Agents
• Symptoms of nerve agent poisoning
» Unexplained sudden headache
» Unexplained runny nose
» Drooling
» Difficulty with vision (dimness of vision)
» Tightness in chest/difficulty in breathing
» Localized sweating/muscle twitching in
contaminated area of the skin
» Stomach cramps
» Nausea
Nerve Agents
• Severe symptoms. Casualties with severe
symptoms can experience most or all of the mild
symptoms and most or all of the symptoms listed
below:
– Strange or confused behavior
– Wheezing, severe difficulty in breathing, and
coughing
Nerve Agents
»Red eyes with possible tearing
»Vomiting
»Severely pinpointed pupils
»Severe muscular twitching and general
weakness
»Involuntary urination and defecation
»Convulsions
»Unconsciousness
»Respiratory failure
Nerve Agents
Nerve Agent Antidote Kit (NAAK)
• Auto-injectors:
• 1 ea Atropine
• 1 ea 2PAM Chloride
Nerve Agents
• Treatment (Self)
• Don the protective mask
• Remove a NAAK from the protective mask
carrier
• Inject the thigh with the first injector from the
kit (atropine) hold against thigh for at least 10
seconds
Nerve Agents
• Follow immediately with second injector of 2-pam
chloride and hold for at least 10 seconds.
• Bend needle to form a hook and place on the protective
outergarment
• Massage injection site if time permits
• Wait 10 - 15 minutes before administering second series
of injections (no more than three)
• Administer the back pressure arm-lift method of artificial
ventilation if breathing is difficult or has ceased.
Nerve Agents
• Treatment (Buddy Aid)
• Mask the casualty.
• Using the Naak belonging to the victim,
administer three sets of injections
immediately and in rapid succession in the
thigh muscle of the log.
• Hook the expended auto injectors to the
overgarment pocket flap of the victim.
Nerve Agents
– Administer the back pressure arm-lift
method of artificial ventilation if
breathing is difficult or has ceased.
– Seek medical attention NOW
Decontamination Kits
• PQS Question 111.13 Describe the steps
and procedures in utilizing the M258A1 and
M291 decontamination kits.
• Reference: [i, ch. 2, p. 2-1 thru 2-2]
Decontamination Kits
M258A1 Decontamination
• Currently being removed
from service
• Replaced by M-291 Kit
• 6 Packets per kit
– 3 - #1 Packets (Use
for 1 minute)
– 3 - #2 Packets (Use
for 2 minutes)
• M-280 is large version of
M258A1 and is used for
equipment decon.
Decontamination Kits
• Steps and procedures for using the M258A1and
M291 decontamination kit for skin:
• Open the decontamination kit, and pull out one
DECON 1 pad packet by the tab
• Fold the packet on the solid line marked "BEND",
then unfold it
• Tear the packet open quickly at the notch, remove,
and unfold the pad.
Decontamination Kits
• Wipe your skin for 1 minute.
• Deposit the pad in a proper container.
• Pull out one DECON 2 pad packet. Crush the
enclosed glass ampoules between your thumb and
fingers.
• Fold the packet on the solid line marked "CRUSH
AND BEND", then unfold it.
• Tear the packet open quickly at the notch, and
remove the pad.
Decontamination Kits
• Fully open the pad. Let the encased crushed glass
ampoules fall into a proper container.
• Wipe the contaminated skin for 2 to 3 minutes.
Decontamination Kits
M291 Skin Decontamination Kit
• Replaces the M258A1
• Wallet-like pouch with 6 decon
packets
– Black, reactive, and
absorbent resin power
– Attached strap for
inserting finger
• M-295 is large version of M291
and is used for equipment
decon.
JSLIST
• PQS Question 111.14 State how long the Joint
Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology
(JSLIST) will provide protection from chemical
agents once they are removed from the packaging
under the following conditions.
– Exposed to Chemical Agents
– Not exposed to Chemical Agents
• Reference: [k, par. A]
JSLIST
The Joint Service Lightweight
Integrated Suit Technology
(JSLIST) will replace the CPO suit.
It can be worn over the uniform, or
over undergarments. It can be worn
up to 45 days in an uncontaminated
environment, or up to 120 days with
up to six launderings.
JSLIST
• It can be worn up to 24 hours in a
contaminated environment, and is available in
a woodland or desert camo pattern.
JSLIST Laundering
• PQS Question 111.15 Discuss the laundering
procedures for the JSLIST
• Reference: [k, para. B]
JSLIST
• Make sure all slide and hook-and-pile fasteners
are secured to prevent rips during laundering
-Use a mild detergent
-Wash on PERMANENT PRESS
-Tumble dry on GENTLE or hang it up on a
plastic hangar and let it air dry
-Do NOT use bleach or fabric softener
-Never dry clean, steam press, or try to
remove stains on JSLIST
Decontamination
• PQS Question 111.16 Describe the following
types of decontamination.
– Immediate
– Operational
– Through
• Reference: [c, ch. 6, p 6-6]
Decontamination
• Immediate:
– Skin decon
– Operator spraydown
• Operational:
– Removal of gross contaminants
– MOPP gear exchange
• Thorough:
– Detailed troop and equipment decon
– Reduce contaminants to a negligible risk
Decontamination
Decontamination
Decontamination
Decon Station
• PQS Question 111.17 Describe the
procedure for setting up a personnel
decontamination station. (Detailed Troop
Decontamination)
• Reference: [i, ch. 3, p. 3-1]
Detailed Troop
Decontamination
• The DTD is set up in a secure, uncontaminated area
located as far forward as the tactical situation
permits.
• Personnel from both the decontamination and the
supported unit operate the DTD under the
supervision of the Chemical, Biological, and
Radiological Defense Officer or the Disaster
Preparedness Operations and Training Specialist.
Detailed Troop
Decontamination
• Removing contaminated MOPP gear, including
the Protective mask, is the major action in
Detailed Troop Decontamination (DTD).
• If DTD is not performed chemical agents may
eventually penetrate the over-garment and
contaminate under clothing or skin.
Detailed Troop
Decontamination
• The contaminated unit is responsible for setting
up, Operating, and closing the DTD in a thorough
decon site.
• The CBR Officer recommends to the COC the
general location of the DTD within the decon site.
Detailed Troop
Decontamination
CONTAMINATION
CONTROL LINE
INDIVIDUAL
GEAR DECON
OVERBOOT
AND HOOD
ALTERNATE FOR
DECON
OVERGARMENT
REMOVAL
OVERBOOTS
AND GLOVE
REMOVAL
MASK
DECON
POINT
RADIOLOGICAL DECON
SOAPY WATER
RINSE
SPONGES
TOWELS
MONITOR
MASK
REMOVAL
LIQUID
CONTAMINATION
CONTROL LINE
VAPOR
CONTAMINATION
CONTROL LINE
REISSUE
POINT
Detailed Equipment
Decontamination
• PQS Question 111.18 Discuss the procedures for
setting up a detailed equipment contamination line.
• Reference: [i, ch. 3, p. 3-1]
Detailed Equipment
Decontamination
• Procedures for setting up a Detailed
Equipment Decon are shown in the following
slides.
• DED occurs simultaneously with the DTD,
with consideration for utilizing the same
Vapor Contamination Control Line.
Equipment
Decontamination
250 - 500 METERS
NON-CONTAMINATED
VEHICLE ROUTE
Detailed
Equipment
Decontamination
Site
WIND
PRE-DECON
ACTIONS
M12A1
M17
50-100 METERS
BETWEEN
STATIONS
M12A1 STATION 1
PRIMARY
WASH
DETAILED TROOP DECON
STATION 2
DS2
APPLICATION
KEY
STATION 3
CONTACT TIME
INTERIOR
DECON
TROOPS
TRASH CAN
WATER BLADDER
M17
WATER RESUPPLY
M17
STATION 4
RINSE
HOTLINE
STATION 5
CHECK
TO TACTICAL
ASSEMBLY AREA
CLEAN PERSONNEL
CBR Teams
•PQS Question 111.19 Describe the duties
and responsibilities of the following CBR
teams.
Personal DECON [i, ch. 4, p. 4-6]
Equipment Decon [i, ch. 4, p. 4-18]
Survey/Monitor team [h, ch. 5, p. 5-1]
Duties of CBR Team
• Personnel Decontamination
– Set up and operate the Detailed Troop
Decontamination
• Equipment Decontamination
– Set up and operate the Detailed Equipment
Decontamination
• Survey/Monitoring Teams
– Find/identify contamination or monitor
movement/levels of existing contamination
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.20 State the purpose
and the optimum location of the M-22
Chemical Alarm
• Reference: NAVEDTRA 12003, Seabee
Combat Handbook, Volume1
M22 Alarm
• Primary means of detecting blister and nerve agents
arriving in a unit area from an upwind chemical
attack.
• Detects chemical agents in vapor and aerosol form
• Alerts by audible and visual signal
• Interfaceable with communications systems to
support battlefield automation
M22
M22 Alarm
• Consist of
– M88 detector unit
– M42 alarm unit
M22 Alarm
M22 Alarm
M88
300M
M88
300M
M88
M88
M88
M88
300M
300M
M42 M42 M42
M42 M42 M42

M42


CBR Surveys
• PQS Question 111.21 Explain the three types
of CBR surveys and their uses.
• Reference: (h, Ch 5) FM 3-3, Chemical and
Biological Contamination Avoidance
Point Survey
• The point surveillance mission is conducted for a
specific period of time, oriented to key terrain.
• It is typically conducted to ensure that time sensitive
or critical operations can be conducted without
unwarned encounters with chemical agent clouds or
transfer hazards resulting from munitions event
Route Survey
• Routes and specific points may be surveyed if that
information is usually found during recon operations
• If conducted, the survey team goes to a specific
point or points along a route and tests for the
presence of liquid contamination with M8 or M9
detector paper.
Area Survey
• The goal of an area surveillance mission is to
provide a tailored detection capability in those
tactical situations where it is impractical to
employ remote point samplers, such as M22
system.
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.22 What type of standard
decontamination reacts violently with liquid
mustard agent.
• Reference: (i, app D) FM 3-5, NBC
Decontamination
CBR Warfare
• Super-tropical bleach: STB reacts violently by
igniting spontaneously upon contact with liquid
mustard agent.
• STB should not be inhaled or come in contact
with the skin. STB gives off toxic vapors upon
contact with G agents.
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.23
relates to CBR:
Describe the following as it
– Pre-attack actions
– Attack
– After
• Reference: (j, Ch 2) FM 3-7, NBC Field Handbook
Chemical Attack Actions
• Pre-Attack Actions:
• Extended wear of protective clothing. (The individual may
have to adapt to wearing protective clothing and
equipment for extended periods).
• M9 Chemical Agent Detector Paper. Attach to clothing. If
spots or streaks on the paper appear pink, red-brown, redpurple or any shade of red, assume it has been exposed
to a chemical agent.
Chemical Attack Actions
• Pre-Attack Actions
• Alertness and Proficiency. Individuals must remain alert and
constantly aware of the chemical threat.
• Protection of Individual Equipment. Keep equipment and
supplies organized and covered.
Chemical Attack Actions
During Attack Actions
•
•
•
•
•
Stop breathing
Don Protective mask
Give the alarm
Continue the mission and wait for further orders.
Assist others when the situation permits.
Chemical Attack Actions
• After Attack Actions
– Remain in protective gear and continue your
mission.
– Give first aid to casualties in the immediate vicinity
when the situation and mission permit.
– Await the commander’s order for unmasking.
Nuclear Attack Actions
Pre-Attack Actions
• Fighting Hole:
– The deeper the fighting hole, the more protection it
provides
– An overhead covering of earth or other material
will help reduce the amount of thermal and initial
nuclear radiation and fallout material from
reaching the individual.
– Cover must be sturdy enough to withstand the
blast wave.
Nuclear Attack Actions
Pre-Attack Actions
• Field Shelters. Tunnels, caves, and storm drains
provide effective shelter. Vehicles made of steel provide
some protection.
• Supplies and Equipment. Equipment and supplies
not being worn should be placed in the fighting hole to
prevent them from becoming missiles.
Nuclear Attack Actions
During Attack Actions
• Drop Flat on Ground facedown or to the bottom of a
fighting hole.
• Close your eyes.
• Protect exposed skin from heat by putting hands and
arms near or under your body. Keep your helmets
on.
Nuclear Attack Actions
Nuclear Attack Actions
• Remain down until after the blast has passed and
debris has stopped falling.
• Stay calm, check for injury, check weapons and
equipment for damage, and prepare to continue the
mission.
Nuclear Attack Actions
• Nuclear Attack
– Begin fallout monitoring
– Bathe and change clothes as soon as
possible
– Avoid breathing dust (place handkerchief or
similar cloth over mouth)
– Remember run off water is contaminated
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.25 Discuss the
following regarding the M-256 detection kit
Types of agents detected
Time required to complete test
Reference: FM 3-3
CBR Warfare
•
Capable of detecting both liquid and vapor concentrations of chemical
agents.
•
Detects chemical agents in the following concentrations:
Nerve (G series; .005 mg/m3 VX; .02 mg/m3 within 15 minutes)
Blister (H; 2mg/m3 12mg/m3 within 10 minutes)
Blood (AC; 7 mg/m3 within 10 minutes)
Issued at squad level
Contains ABC-MS Chemical agent detector paper for liquids/samplers
Causes OPSEC problems during hours of limited visibility
A white light is needed to read both ABC-M8 paper and
sampler/detector.
•
•
•
•
CBR Warfare
• PQS Question 111.26 Explain the proper
steps for donning the JSLIST chemical
protective ensemble
• Reference: NAVEDTRA 12003, Seabee
Combat Handbook, Volume1
Donning the JSLIST
•
Chemical Protective Undergarment. The CPU is a two-piece undergarment
consisting of a formfitting undershirt and drawers. The CPU is not removed from
its bag until it is needed for use. When the CPU is removed from its VB bag, its
protective qualities last for a minimum of 15 days. The wear time for the CPU
begins when it is removed from the VB bag. If the original bag is not available,
use a replacement bag that, as a minimum, is water-resistant or water-repellent.
The CPU can be laundered once for personal-hygiene purposes during its 15day use. It provides protection from CB agents (solid, liquid, and vapor) for up to
a 12-hour period. The CPU also protects against radioactive alpha and beta
particles. When worn under a duty uniform, the CPU has also shown enhanced
flash fire protection capabilities. The CPU is generally used by SOF, explosive
ordnance disposal (EOD), technical escort, and depot personnel.
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