3A-1100-GROD - National Town Meeting on Demand Response

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Demand Response in Ontario
Paul Grod, CEO, Rodan Energy July 11, 2013
About Rodan Energy
• Leading smart grid integrator
• Focus on metering, demand response, utility services and energy
management
• Connecting power producers, power consumers and utilities to the
smarter grid
• Manage over 350MW of demand response resources
• Monitor over $9 Billion in annual electricity supply on behalf of our
clients
• Over 60 utilities and ISOs throughout North America trust Rodan to
provide DR capacity and manage DR resources on their behalf
• Our Network Operations Centre controls and operates several hundred
thousand homes and businesses by operating multiple leading
software platforms for the residential and commercial/industrial
markets
Presentation Outline
1.Overview of demand response in Ontario
2.Residential case study – peaksaver
3.Electricity Market dynamics
4.Future of DR in Ontario
State of Demand Response in Ontario
•North American leader in CDM
•Demand reduction of >1,700 MW since 2005
(includes DR & EE)
•Demand response resources
•
•
•
•
•
600MW – Dispatchable Load/Operating Reserve
400MW – DR 2 & 3
300MW - Global Adjustment (+5MW customers)
150MW – PeakSaver (residential & small commercial)
10MW Regulation (IESO pilot)
Case Study: peaksaver ®
Understanding the Smart Home or Business
The Smart Grid
Source: IESO Smart Grid Forum Report 2011
Case Study: peaksaver ®
•More than 230,000 residential and small business
participants
•150 MW of demand response capacity.
•Delivered by 80 local electricity distribution companies
•Managed by the Ontario Power Authority (OPA)
•Rodan is the OPA’s Dispatch Administrator and
Aggregation Operator
•Rodan’s NOC operates multiple technologies allowing
utilities to operate a wide variety of devices offering greater
choice to their customer
•Able to deliver province-wide, regional or local control
Case Study: peaksaver ®
Ontario’s Electricity Market Dynamics
Ontario’s Electricity Market Dynamics
Peak Demand 2012 - 24,600MW
Highest peak 2006 – 27,000MW
Generation capacity of 38,000MW
6300MW of CDM by 2015
Ontario’s Electricity Market Dynamics
Historical
Projected
Ontario GDP
Population
Energy Per Capita
Source: IESO/OPA
12
Ontario’s electricity demand is declining
Historical
180
30,000
28,000
Projected
26,000
Energy Consumption (TWh)
160
24,000
22,000
140
20,000
120
18,000
Energy Consumption
16,000
100
14,000
80
12,000
10,000
60
Peak Demand (MW)
200
Ontario electricity demand is
Peak Demand
declining
8,000
40
6,000
4,000
20
2,000
0
0
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Source: IESO/OPA
13
45,000
45,000
45,000
45,000
45,000
45,0
40,500 MW
40,000
40,000
40,000
38,300 MW
670 MW
31,600 MW
30,000
30,000
30,000
100
25,000
25,000
25,000
8,100
20,000
20,000
20,000
300 MW
700 MW
500 MW
5,700 MW
30,000
30,000
30,0
8,400
5,100 MW
8,900
4,300 MW 2,000 MW
4,900
8,700
3,300 MW
2,900 MW
40,000
40,000
40,0
700
35,000
35,000
35,0
3,000
25,000
25,000
25,0
20,000
20,000
20,0
10,000
9,300
15,000
15,000
15,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
30 MW
670
35,000
35,000
35,000
Installed Capacity (MW)
Installed Capacity (MW)
Installed Capacity (MW)
Ontario’s electricity resource mix (2005-15)
10,900
15,000
15,000
15,0
10,000
10,000
10,0
12,900
5,0005,000
5,000
12,900
5,000
5,000
5,00
7,600
0
0 0
20052005
2005
3,300
20122012
2012
2015
0 0 0
2015
Nuclear
Natural
GasGas
Hydro
Non-Hydro
Renewables
Demand
Response
Coal CoalCoal
Nuclear
Nuclear
Natural
Gas
Natural
Hydro
Hydro
Non-Hydro
Non-Hydro
Renewables
Renewables
Demand
Demand
Response
Response
Source: IESO/OPA. Figures have been rounded.
14
Supply to exceed demand until 2020
200
180
Potential Surplus Energy
Energy Production (TWh)
160
140
120
Ontario Energy Demand
100
80
60
40
20
0
2013
15
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Future of DR in Ontario
• Do we need DR in a surplus supply environment?
• Long Term Energy Plan calls for 7,100MW of
demand reduction by 2030
• Energy efficiency (residential and C&I)
• Building code updates and standards for
appliances and products
• Demand response programs to help reduce
peak demand
• Time-Of-Use rates
• Move to a more robust intelligent load
management
Opportunities for DR in a surplus supply
Regulation
Potential
Surplus
Energy
What does
a changing
supply mix
impact?
Ramping &
Load
Following
17
Operating
Reserve
Conclusion
• Ontario a NA leader in smart grid and CDM
• Supply surplus and soft demand is a detractor
to DR
• DR needs to have a long-term, consistent
commitment
• Evolution to intelligent load management
which adds operating flexibility to traditional
peak load management.
Enabling tomorrow’s Smart Grid today
Paul Grod, President & CEO
RODAN ENERGY SOLUTIONS INC.
165 Matheson Blvd. East, Suite 6
Mississauga, ON L4Z 3K2
(905) 625-9900 x225
[email protected]wer.com
www.rodanenergy.com
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