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Sona Koyo Steering Systems Limited (SKSSL) the flagship company
of The Sona Group, is currently the largest manufacturer of steering
systems for the passenger car and utility vehicle market in India. Its
collaborator and partner, JTEKT Corporation, is the market leader in
Japan and in the recent past announced a merger with Toyota
Machine Works. Post this merger, JTEKT will become the world's
largest steering systems manufacturer. The company also has a
technical collaboration with Mando Corporation, Korea.
As part of Sona Koyo Steering Systems Ltd's (SKSSL) globalization
strategy, the company has acquired a position in Fuji Autotech.
France, SAS, the 4th largest steering system supplier in Europe. Via
Fuji Autotech, The Sona Group footprint extends to Eastern Europe
and South America.
38/6, Delhi-Jaipur Road, NEAR HERO HONDA CHOWK, Gurgaon (Haryana),
India
38 Km from New Delhi,
22 Km from Delhi Airport,
10 Km from Maruti Udyog Ltd.
Total Site Area
56,970 square meters
Total floor Area
14,125 square meters
PLANT -1
PLANT -2
PLANT - 3
PLANT - 4
 Power Rack and Pinion Steering
 Tilting and Collapsible Column
System
 Clutch Driven Plates

Power Re-circulating Ball Screw
Steering System
 Ball Joints
 Electrical Power Steering System
 Tie Rod Ends
 Manual Rack and Pinion Steering
System
 Suspension Components
 Warm forged Synchronizer Rings









Assembly
Universal Joints
Cold Forged Steering Studs
Propeller Shafts
Cold Forged Ball Studs
Rear Axle Assemblies
Cold Forged Case/Socket
Sub-differential Assemblies
Cold Forged Spiders and Yokes
Rigid Type Collapsible Column
Assembly
RACK AND PINION STEERING
(RPS)
RECIRCULATING BALL TYPE
STEERING (RBS)
In the rack and pinion type steering, the steering main shaft has a
steering pinion at the lower end. This steering pinion meshes with the
steering rack. As the steering wheel is turned, the steering pinion rotates
to move the steering rack to the right or left. The movement of the
steering tack is transmitted to the knuckle arms via the steering rack
ends and the tie rod ends.
The rack-and-pinion gear set does two things:
It converts the rotational motion of the steering wheel into the linear
motion needed to turn the wheels.
It provides a gear reduction, making it easier to turn the wheels.
THE AUTOMOTIVE STEERING COLUMN IS A DEVICE
INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR CONNECTING THE STEERING
WHEEL TO THE STEERING MECHANISM BY TRANSFERRING
THE DRIVER'S INPUT TORQUE FROM THE STEERING WHEEL.
A STEERING COLUMN MAY ALSO PERFORM THE FOLLOWING
SECONDARY FUNCTIONS:
Energy dissipation management in the event of a frontal collision;
Provide mounting for: the multi-function switch, column lock, column
wiring, column shroud(s), transmission gear selector, gauges or other
instruments as well as the electro motor and gear units .
Offer (height and/or length) adjustment to suit driver preference.
The cross-shaped inner member of a universal
joint is sometimes called a spider. Universal joints
allow for a small variable angle between the axis
of the transmissions output shaft and the
axis of the propeller shaft, and between the axis
of the propeller shaft and the axis of the input
shaft of the rear axle
(1)The spider (6) ends (3)
are called gudgeon. Around
the gudgeons there are
rollers (4) kept in place by
a cap (5), that allows them
to roll freely. The Circlip (7)
fits into the (2) hole in the
yoke and lock the cap.
An axle is a central shaft for a rotating wheel or gear. In some cases
the axle may be fixed in position with a bearing or bushing sitting
inside the hole in the wheeler gear to allow the wheel or gear to
rotate around the axle. In other cases the wheel or gear may be fixed
to the axle, with bearings or bushings provided at the mounting
points where the axle is supported.
A straight axle or the front axle is a
single rigid shaft connecting a wheel on
the left side of the vehicle to a wheel on
the right side. The axis of rotation fixed
by the axle is common to both wheels.
Such a design can keep the wheel
positions steady under heavy stress,
and can therefore support heavy loads.
Straight axles are used on trains, for
the rear axles of commercial trucks,
and on heavy duty off-road vehicles.
The axle can be protected and further
reinforced by enclosing the length of
the axle in a housing.
In split-axle designs, the wheel on each side is attached to a separate shaft.
Modern passenger cars have split drive axles. In some designs, this allows
independent suspension of the left and right wheels, and therefore a smoother
ride. Even when the suspension is not independent, split axles permit the use of a
differential, allowing the left and right drive wheels to be driven at different
speeds as the automobile turns, improving traction and extending tire life
A drive shaft, driveshaft, driving shaft, propeller shaft, or shaft is a
mechanical component for transmitting torque and rotation, usually used
to connect other components of a drive train that cannot be connected
directly because of distance or the need to allow for relative movement
between them.
Drive shafts frequently incorporate one or more universal joints or jaw
couplings, to allow for variations in the alignment and distance between
the driving and driven components.
There are a couple of key components in power steering in addition to the rack-and-pinion or recirculating-ball mechan
THERE ARE A COUPLE OF KEY COMPONENTS IN POWER
STEERING IN ADDITION TO THE RACK-AND-PINION OR
RECIRCULATING-BALL MECHANISM.
The hydraulic power for the steering is provided by a rotary-vane
pump (see diagram below). This pump is driven by the car's engine via a belt
and pulley. It contains a set of retractable vanes that spin inside an oval
chamber.
As the vanes spin, they pull hydraulic fluid from the return line at low
pressure and force it into the outlet at high pressure. The amount of flow
provided by the pump depends on the car's engine speed. The pump must be
designed to provide adequate flow when the engine is idling. As a result, the
pump moves much more fluid than necessary when the engine is running at
faster speeds
A power-steering system should assist the driver only when he is exerting
force on the steering wheel (such as when starting a turn). When the driver is
not exerting force (such as when driving in a straight line), the system
shouldn't provide any assist. The device that senses the force on the steering
wheel is called the rotary valve.
The key to the rotary valve is a torsion bar. The torsion bar is a thin rod of
metal that twists when torque is applied to it. The top of the bar is connected
to the steering wheel, and the bottom of the bar is connected to the pinion or
worm gear (which turns the wheels), so the amount of torque in the torsion
bar is equal to the amount of torque the driver is using to turn the wheels.
The more torque the driver uses to turn the wheels, the more the bar twists.
The input from the steering shaft forms the inner part of a spool-valve
assembly. It also connects to the top end of the torsion bar. The bottom of
the torsion bar connects to the outer part of the spool valve. The torsion bar
also turns the output of the steering gear, connecting to either the pinion gear
or the worm gear depending on which type of steering the car has.
As the bar twists, it rotates the inside of the spool valve relative to the
outside. Since the inner part of the spool valve is also connected to the
steering shaft (and therefore to the steering wheel), the amount of rotation
between the inner and outer parts of the spool valve depends on how much
torque the driver applies to the steering wheel.
When the steering wheel is not being turned, both hydraulic lines provide
the same amount of pressure to the steering gear. But if the spool valve is
turned one way or the other, ports open up to provide high-pressure fluid to
the appropriate line.
It turns out that this type of power-steering system is pretty inefficient.
Let's take a look at some advances we'll see in coming years that will help
improve efficiency
EPS in modern cars can significantly reduce fuel consumption when
compared to cars using hydraulic solutions. Industry studies have shown that
EPS can save up to 85 percent of the energy normally needed to steer a
vehicle with conventional hydraulic systems. The result is fuel consumption
reductions of up to 0.3 liters per 100 kilometers driven. EPS is so efficient
because the system is only activated when steering support is really needed.
As a result, a permanent engine load is not required.
EPS systems also can help ensure safer driving. The steering torque is
adapted to the vehicle’s speed and optimized for different driving situations.
For example, during low-speed driving maneuvers, such as parking, EPS
provides a higher level of assistance than it does at higher speeds, when
electronic power assist is gradually reduced to enable more direct steering
and better feedback from the road.
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