RayatHossain-RobertFrost - West Fargo Public Schools

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Biography
List Of Works
Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
Bibliography
Presented by Rayat Hossain
Biography
List Of Works
Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
Bibliography
Biography
“I know more of farm life than I did before I had read his poems. That means I know more about ‘Life’”
(Pritchard 2).
The quote mentioned by Erza Pound shows the effect that the poems of Robert Frost has
on fellow poets. The works of Robert Frost are considered to be some best of the twentieth-century.
Robert Lee Frost was born in San Francisco, California, on March 26, 1874, to William Frost and Isabelle
Moodie. The Frost family later moved to Salem, Massachusetts after William Frost’s death to bury him
there, as written in his will. Due to the lack of money, the Frost family could not go back to California,
and they eventually settled in Salem. As a boy, Frost had always loved when his mother read to him,
which in turn exposed Frost to various types of literature in his early childhood. Frost graduated from
high school, but didn’t finish his undergraduate in college. Frost soon worked in various jobs after
college such as a mill worker, reporter and a teacher, all while still writing poetry (“Robert Frost
Biography” 1). In 1894, he sold his first poem, “My Butterfly,” to the New York Independent, which can
be considered as Frost’s first debut as a poet. In 1895, he married Elinor Miriam White and went into
teaching. Frost soon had a son later that year and started to study for an undergrad in Harvard (“Robert
Frost Biography” 2). Unfortunately, Frost’s life took a turn for the worse when his first son died, which
was later followed by Frost contracting pneumonia, almost leading to his death, and a year later his
fourth daughter died. The grief and sadness due to his losses and his steadily growing financial
problems turned Frost more towards poetry as a relief to the morose events. In 1912, he sold his farm
and used the money collected from the published poems to travel to England.
Biography
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Inspired
Poems
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Biography
After years of writing and publishing many successful poems in Europe, he returned to the United States
where he received the first of four Pulitzer Prizes in 1924 (“Robert Frost Biography” 3). Shortly before his
wife’s death in 1938 due to a heart attack, he settled in Amherst where he became an Honorary
Doctorate in Harvard University as a staff member. The same year, he was elected to the Board of
Overseers Harvard College. In 1940, his final son took his own life, which only fed the grief onto Frost.
Frost became the first poet to read a program in a presidential inauguration in 1961, in John F. Kennedy’s
inauguration, reciting “The Gift Outright” (“Robert Frost Biography” 3). Frost later died in Boston,
Massachusetts due to complications of a lung surgery in January 29, 1963. Frost’s first inspiration came
from the New England setting he was raised in, which served as the basis for any of his poems.
Afterwards, Frost was inflicted with sorrow and grief, which only lead to inspire his poetry to a greater
extent. The various life experiences have influenced Robert Frost’s work greatly, and have changed the
face of poetry forever.
Robert Frost’s early start in poetry made him into the poet that everyone now reveres. Frost
started composing poetry as a student in Lawrence High School, where he graduated as a valedictorian.
His poetry during those times was inspired by his New England settings, which was where he grew up as
a child. Frost’s education didn’t last as much as others would expect of a poet, but he would later strive
on it. It was when the series of unfortunate series occurred that Frost developed a theme for his poetry:
grief (Pritchard 1). His new theme helped with his success in England, and it also helped him socialize
with the European poets such as Wilfred Gibson and Lascelles Abercrombie who both inspired some of
Frost’s poems. He was also influenced by Edward Thomas, Rupert Brooke and Robert Graves.
Biography
List Of Works
Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
Bibliography
Biography
He also established a friendship with fellow American poet Erza Pound, who helped with publishing his
poets (“Robert Frost” 1). Soon after his returned to the United States due to World War One, he
released his fourth book, New Hampshire, which won his first Pulitzer Prize in 1924 (Pritchard 2). He
went on to win three more Pulitzer Prizes for his works in later years. The Witness Tree was arguably
Robert Frost’s last significant book of verse. Some of his best poems such as “I Could Give All to Time”,
“The Silken Tent”, and “The Most of It” all are from The Witness Tree. Frost returned to England to
finally receive an honorary degree in Oxford (1957), and he did his final mass reading in Boston (1962).
With many achievements and honors, Robert Frost solidified himself as one of the greatest poets of the
twentieth-century.
Many traits about Robert Frost’s work make his poems distinct and noticeable when
compared to others. His poems have traits of ambiguity and irony and contain an adherence to language
as if it were actually spoken in that specific dialect or accent. His poems also are greatly based on the
New England landscape that has made it popular over the years. Daniel Hoffman explains Frost’s career:
“He became a national celebrity, our nearly official Poet Laureate, and a great performer in the tradition
of that earlier master of the literary vernacular, Mark Twain” (“Robert Frost” 1). He also tries to explain
grief in his poems, especially in his book A Witness Tree. Robert Frost was a poet of tradition that always
included the simple things of life, which appear so homely that the reader can relate to a mass majority
of his work (Pritchard 2). Frost is important to poetry due to him setting a standard to poems that
remain aloof to the modern poetic movements of the time. President John F. Kennedy perfectly
describes Frost by saying, “He has bequeathed his nation a body of imperishable verse from which
Americans will forever gain in joy and understanding” (“Robert Frost” 1).
Biography
List Of Works
Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
Bibliography
Out, Out A Dream Pang
A Patch of Old Snow
A Prayer in Spring
A Soldier
Acquainted with the Night
An Old Man's Winter Night
Blue-Butterfly Day
Canis Major
Desert Places
Fire and Ice
Fragmentary Blue
Going for Water
Hyla Brook
Into My Own
Love and a Question
Mending Wall
My Butterfly
Nothing Gold Can Stay
October
Once by the Pacific
Reluctance
Spring Pools
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
The Armful
The Bear
The Cow in Apple Time
The Hill Wife
The Mountain
The Oven Bird
The Road Not Taken
The Secret Sits
The Star-Splitter
The Tuft of Flowers
The Witch of Coos
To Earthward
Tree at my Window
Waiting
Wind and Window Flower
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Biography
Inspired
Poems
List Of Works
Original Poems
Sample Poems
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The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.
Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.
His sister stood beside him in her apron
To tell them "Supper." At the word, the saw,
As if it meant to prove saws know what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy's hand, or seemed to leap He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Click to Analysis
by Rayat Hossain
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man's work, though a child at
heart He saw all was spoiled. "Don't let him cut
my hand off The doctor, when he comes. Don't let him,
sister!"
So. The hand was gone already.
The doctor put him in the dark of ether.
He lay and puffed his lips out with his
breath.
And then - the watcher at his pulse took a
fright.
No one believed. They listened to his
heart.
Little - less - nothing! - and that ended it.
No more to build on there. And they, since
they
Were not the one dead, turned to their
affairs.
Biography
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Robert Frost’s “Out Out-” uses personification in a way to express and convey his feelings
to the readers, something Robert Frost strives to accomplish in many of his works. The poem is about
the young people in the workforce that are prone to dangers due to inexperience. Robert Frost’s “Out
Out-” is about a young man in Vermont who had received a job as a lumber jack that asks for overtime
work, which his supervisor was reluctant to give him, but ultimately did. It was at this time that his
sister had announced that supper was ready that the buzz saw “came to life” and had cut off the young
man’s arm. The young man then succumbed to death, and was later forgotten, as everyone had
returned to their work. The lines have specified that the man was given a man’s job, but still had a
child’s heart, further suggesting the theme to be the dangers of being inexperienced. Robert Frost’s
usage of personification is represented by the characteristics of the buzz saw. In the line, “To tell them
‘Supper.’ At the word, the saw, / As if it meant to prove saws know what supper meant, / Leaped out at
the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap-,” the quotes represent personification since personification means
giving inanimate objects human characteristics. The buzz saw is given thought and perception,
something that a buzz saw is not commonly known to possess. The buzz saw also was able to leap on
its own will, which is another example of personification. Robert Frost usage of personification lets the
reader comprehend the thoughts and lessons of Frost’s work as it makes the theme more
distinguishable. Robert Frost’s usage of personification and his New England themed poems have
launched him into being the legendary figure everyone reveres and loves, changing the seemingly
tamed outdoor life into the rampant wilderness that Frost loved so much. Robert Frost’s “Out Out-”
allow the readers to dive into the New England wilderness to discover the beauty and the true
meaning to life.
Biography
List Of Works
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Inspired
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Original Poems
Bibliography
These pools that, though in forests, still
reflect
The total sky almost without defect,
And like the flowers beside them, chill and
shiver,
Will like the flowers beside them soon be
gone,
And yet not out by any brook or river,
But up by roots to bring dark foliage on.
“Spring Pools” had truly hit home when
it comes to its meaning of life and
nature. “Let them think twice before
they use their powers.” The line is a
warning to the trees about absorbing
the pool water during spring, as the
absorption of pool water represents the
The trees that have it in their pent-up buds short length of spring. The smaller the
To darken nature and be summer woods -- pool is, the sooner fall and winter will
Let them think twice before they use their arrive. In a way, it reflects life as well;
powers
the sooner you mature, the sooner you
To blot out and drink up and sweep away
wish you had more time for your youth
These flowery waters and these watery
after realizing all that you have missed. I
flowers
chose this poem as it reflects North
From snow that melted only yesterday.
Dakota’s brief springtime and it’s
unpredictable weather, where in one
week, it can go from snowy winter to
warm spring, then back to winter.
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Some say the world will end in
fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if I had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say thay for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
“Fire and Ice” has accurately recorded
the situation that is present in the world
we have come to live in today. The lines
containing “Some say the world will end
in fire, Some say in ice,” really had a
profound meaning to me. The “fire” and
“ice” could mean war and disease, two
things that can very much end the
physical existence of the human race.
The two subjects in the poem could also
represent the anger and the desire of
the human race, which can destroy the
conscience of a human being, or even
the human race, which it can corrupt
greatly. I chose this poem as it describes
the two most common yet unnoticed
flaws of human nature, hate and greed,
which drives our problems to this day.
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Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.
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The innocence of a child is pure,
Her soul is of silver, so sure;
Her obliviousness to anxiety,
Her persistence to understand
difficulty;
As time has passed,
I’ve come to ask,
After many years, the child is
mature,
But why no longer with innocence
that is pure?
Inspired by “Nothing Can Stay Gold”
By Rayat Hossain
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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the tether, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I I took the one less traveled by
And that has made all the difference.
Biography
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Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
One which my friends tell me to travel
on,
A path that seemed to be far easier, for
my good,
As it never winds or bends upon;
As for the other path, the vines
surround it,
Enveloping the path to the point of
creating a wall of jungle,
There was no clear way to travel that
would deem fit,
As the path would roll around and
tumble;
I stood, looking at the paths as I
wonder,
If I should be unique and take a risk,
Or if I should be influenced and ponder,
What I possibly could have missed;
I took the one less traveled by
And that has made all the difference.
Inspired by “The Road Not Taken”
By Rayat Hossain
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I am a legend.
I am the one and only,
The Survivor of a plague,
To clear all that is vague,
I am the epitome of all that is holy,
I am a legend.
I commit acts of just,
To fight all that I despise,
To bring evil to its demise,
To turn wealth to dust,
I am a legend.
My life is recorded in history through fame,
I judge the world to my criteria,
I prevent cries of genocide and hysteria,
Every person now knows my name,
I am a legend.
By Rayat Hossain
Biography
List Of Works
Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
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Enter to the burning site,
There was nothing left for him to unfold.
Of a rocket crash;
It was only years later that they find out,
No one really knows what it was,
Through investigation and science,
Since it went down so fast.
That it was a fluke, a scam, a scheme,
The site is still on fire,
That was presented to the audience.
Releasing its radiation up high;
He was no alien,
They all say it’s a missile,
Not even close to Christ;
It’s really all just a lie.
He just used some special effects
Well, the one and only witness,
To perform the number one greatest heist.
Never said extraterrestrials,
As gullible as the world was,
But only that he’s come again,
We would buy anything in a dash,
Referring to him as Jesus.
Just like the familiar burning site,
The news teams all hurried there,
Of a rocket crash.
Swarming in like flies,
All had cameras rolling,
To the sight of the Alien Christ.
In time, he became rich and famous,
As if he had just hit gold,
By Rayat Hossain
Endorsements, interviews, and speeches left and right,
Biography
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Sample Poems
Inspired
Poems
Original Poems
Bibliography
Pictures
-http://wallpaperstock.net/aero-woods_wallpapers_1505_1024x768_1.html-Picture in the poem “Unique”
-http://s447.photobucket.com/albums/qq199/Opp_Nasty/Inspirations/Backgrounds/?action=view&current=naturewallpaper.jpg&newest=1-Background
-http://www.creativeplaydate.com/-Picture in the poem “The Road Not Taken”
-http://www.internal.org/Robert_Frost -Robert Frost Picture in the menu
-http://cafephilos.wordpress.com/2008/06/10/-Picture in the poem “Spring Pool”
-http://mi9.com/innocence-baby_76418.html-Picture in the poem “Innocence”
-http://dietraeume.blogspot.com/2010/12/fire-and-ice.html-Picture in the poem “Fire and Ice”
-http://poemshape.wordpress.com/2011/01/09/the-making-of-robert-frosts-nothing-gold-can-stay/-Picture in the menu
(with axe)
-http://www.developria.com/2010/07/-Picture in the poem “Legend”
-http://kotaku.com/#!210039/carmacks-rocket-crashes-for-good-Picture in the poem “Gullible”
-http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/04/25/specials/frost.html-Picture in the Biography
-http://eatapyzch.blogspot.com/2009_10_01_archive.html-Picture in the poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay”
Information Sources
-http://www.internal.org/Robert_Frost-Poems
-http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/frost/life.htm
-http://www.notablebiographies.com/Fi-Gi/Frost-Robert.html
-http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/192
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