Colonial America

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Vanessa Cobb
Stephanie Lofton
Jessica Tillman
Jessica Vincent
Essential Question
Suppose your family was setting off
for the new world. What would
your colonial life be like? How were
the colonial people like me?
 Gather all of your completed activities an bind them
together to form your personal Colonial Life Journal.
 You keep this journal for study and reference.
In the Southern Colonies
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Standards
Essential Question
Timeline of the Southern Colonies?
Who was here?
Large Landowners
Farmers
Artisans
Women
Indentured Servants
Slaves
Native Americans
Activity
Reference Page

SS4H3: The student will explain the factors
that shaped British Colonial America

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b. Describe colonial life in America as experienced
by various people, including large landowners,
farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants,
slaves, and Native Americans.
Table of Contents
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Imagine you were taken back in time. No
more cars, no more computers, TVs, radio, or
even an iPod! All you have is the wide open
land! What are you going to do? How are
you going to survive? How or what are you
going to eat? Come along and join me on this
travel back in time to see how the different
economic groups made it during the early
days of America!
Table of Contents
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Virginia ~ 1607
Maryland ~ 1634
North Carolina ~ 1663
South Carolina ~ 1663
Georgia ~ 1732
Click on horse to
watch video
Table of Contents
Large
Landowners
Native
Americans
Farmers
Indentured
Servants
Artisans
Slaves
Table of Contents
Women
Large Landowners
Owned HUGE plantations.
Owners of the plantation
lived in the Planters house.
Their children had private
teachers, and they learned to read,
write, and dance.
Boys were also taught classical languages,
science, geography, history, and etiquette.
In later years, the boys were taught how to
manage the large plantation because it was
handed down to them.
Table of contents
Girls were usually taught by
a governess. They were
taught enough reading,
writing, and math to run a
household
Girls were also taught social
skills in order to attract a
husband.
Grew tobacco, indigo, cotton,
and rice.
Had many buildings and
workers (slaves).
Boys
Girls
Had private teacher
Had Governess
Science
Reading
Geography
Writing
History
Math
How to run plantation
Skills to find husband
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Most colonist lived on small farms in the
backcountry.
Farmers grew much of the same things as did
Landowners: wheat, barley, corn, tobacco, rice, and
indigo.
Did not live near schools or towns..
Farmers children learned to read
and write ONLY if their parents
were able to teach them.
Table of Contents
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Ability to Sign Name
Ability to Sign
Name
Upper Laborers Upper
Class
Class
Men
Women
Slaves
Ability to Sign Name
Upper Class
Men
Laborers
Upper Class
Women
Slaves
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Carpenters
Wheelwrights
Blacksmiths
Shoemakers
Tailors
Table of Contents
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Women’s full time job was homemaking.
 cook meals
 make clothing
 doctor their family
 Cleaning
 making household goods to use and sell
 taking care of their animals
 maintaining a fire
To find out about one of the recipes
from colonial time, click on the
underlined site.
Higher Level Math.pptx
Table of Contents
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This is a person who would sign a contract with a
wealthy landowner.
They would agree to work for this person typically 3
– 7 years in exchange for their transportation to the
colonies, food, clothing, and a place to live.
Once their contract was up, they were free to leave
the plantation, but often times they would stay, and
continue to work for the Planter.
Table of Contents
Most lived in Southern Colonies.
 Were treated as property, not people.
 Worked on Plantations.
 They formed close communities
among themselves.
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Table of Contents
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In this area there were the Creek and
Cherokee Indians.
The Cherokee called Georgia "the Enchanted
Land."
Indians taught colonist how to
grow crops on the land.
Taught how
to survive.
Table of Contents
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Each student will be given a piece of a quilt. On one
side of the quilt, the student will design how the
quilt should look as a representation of their life if
they were from one of the following groups: a
farmer, large landowner, artisans, indentured
servant, slave, Native American, or a woman living
during the colonial times. On the back side of the
quilt, students will write in narrative form about a
person from the group he chose to illustrate. The
student will write the reasons he would have wanted
to be in that particular economic group. Students
will compare/contrast their person with a group
they would not have wanted to be a part of.
Table of Contents
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http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles
/ushistory/13coloniespark.htm
http://www.history.org/Almanack/life/trade
s/tradebla.cfm
www.watertown.k12.ma.us/cunniff/.../A_Southern
_Pla.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/HistoryGals/C
hloe.html
http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/
Table of Contents
Watch this!
Vocabulary Voyage!
Table of Contents
1634
Title Page
 Statistics
 Task & Roles
 Passages
 Extra Quest
 Standard
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1607
1663
1732
Check Out These Statistics…
Survival Rate: First 18
Years
Population of First Colony
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
Surived
Didn't
Survive
Total
Population
Survived
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0
Didn't
Survive
Task & Roles
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Ahoy, matey! We’re going on a Vocabulary Voyage! We’re seeking
hidden treasures in our text… just like the colonists found treasures in
uncharted territories, we’re looking for words unknown! As a group,
read your passage of the text and locate and creatively define
unfamiliar or interesting words.
It’s time to test your sea legs! Click on each icon below to discover
your role in the treasure hunt.
Vocabulary Enricher

Your job is to record the interesting or unfamiliar words that the
group identifies while reading the passage. Write down the
word and the sentence it’s used in. Write down at least 3.
Word
Sentence
hardships
Had you known the
hardships you would face,
would you still have wanted
to be an American colonist?
1.
2.
3.
Literary Luminary

Your job is to
relate the new
words back to
the content in
the passage,
and provide
definitions
from
dictionaries or
other sources.
Context
clues
Dictionary
How to
find
definitions
textbook
internet
Connector
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Your job is to use what you already know about the words to make a
connection between the meaning of the words and your life.
For example: Look at this short paragraph and the word unpredictable.
The weather is unpredictable. Sometimes it’s hot and humid, with
sudden violent winds and thunderstorms. Other times, it’s freezing!
How can you connect that with your life? The weather in Georgia
changes often, so it’s hard to figure out what to wear to school.
Discussion Director
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Your job is to lead a discussion with your group about the
unknown words.
Some questions that you may ask are:
What are some synonyms of this word?
What are some antonyms of this word?
How can we use this word in
a new sentence?
Summarizer

Your job is to record the important details
about your group’s unknown words and
report them to the whole class.
STOP
Stop here!
STOP

Click on your group’s assigned passage and
begin your treasure hunt.

After your groups is finished with the tasks,
click here.
Passage 1
Passage 2
Passage 3
Passage 4
Passage 5
Passage 1
Passage 2
Passage 3
Passage 4
Passage 5
Congratulations!

Your treasure hunt is complete! You’ve
found unknown words and made them
treasures of your own.
Put your group’s
work together to use
as a map for the next
time you come across
these words.
Ready for Another Quest?

Test your survival skills
here:
Standard

ELAR3: The student understands and
acquires new vocabulary and uses it
correctly in reading and writing.
(The Southern Colonies)
Table of Contents
What do you
need to know?
1634
Southern Crops
1607
Exploring Area
Time to Think
Design Your
Own Fields
1663
1732
crops
land
planting
harvest
The Southern Colonies’ Main Crops
Virginia
&
Maryland
Tobacco
Georgia
Cotton
Georgia
&
Carolinas
Sugar
Cane
South
Carolina
Indigo
Indigo
The Southern
Colonies’ Main
Crops
Tobacco
Click to
watch video
Cotton
Sugar Cane
Main Crops Exported in
Southern Colonies
Cotton
Tobacco
Sugar Cane
Indigo
Farmers and plantation owners during
colonial times needed to know exactly
how much land they had to grow
crops on. To do so, they had to find the
area of their fields.
What is Area?
Is the area
represented by the
black line that
outlines the figure or
the blue part inside
it?
If you said that area is the blue
part inside the figure, you are
RIGHT!
The black line
around the
figure is
the
perimeter.
area
area
area
9… that’s right!
How many So, the area for this
blocks are in square is 9 square
the square?
blocks.
What is the length = 3 blocks
length of this width = 3 blocks
square?
What’s the
width?
Width
Length
1
2
3
Width = 13 units
4
5
Length = 13 units
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
To quickly find
the area of a
square or
rectangle,
multiply the
length x width
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Remember the answer is always ___ square units.
13 units
Length
1
Area
width
3
4
5
2
3
4
13 units
Try it!
What’s the area?
2
5
6
7
8
9
13 11
X 13 12
39 13
+130
169 square units
10
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Let’s say you wanted to grow tobacco in a field
that is a rectangle. If you know that the length of
the field is 64 feet and the width is 43 feet, what
is the area of the tobacco field?
1. Draw a picture to
represent the tobacco
field.
2. Label the length and
width.
3. Solve for the area of the
field.
Don’t forget to write the units, which in this case is square feet.
Stop!
Take a few
minutes
to work on the
problem!
You have an empty space on your farm with an
area of 970 square feet. Is there room to plant your
sugar cane crops that have to be planted in a square
field with a length of 31 feet and width of 31 feet?
1. Draw a picture to represent the
rice field.
2. Label the length and width.
3. Solve for the area of the rice
square field.
4. Write a sentence telling
whether or not the rice field
will fit in the empty space and
why.
I have a job
for you…
1. Get a handout, graph paper ,
a pencil, and a partner.
2. Draw a field on your graph
paper that has the length of
30 inches and width of 25
inches.
3. Divide your field into 3
spaces: tobacco, cotton, and
sugar cane.
4. Answer the questions from
the handout.
G
Get Started
To get you started:
3 fields on graph
paper example:
Cotton
Tobacco
Sugar
Cane
Bar graph example:
Area of Crop Fields
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
Cotton
Tobacco
Sugar
Cane
Cotton
Tobacco
Sugar
Cane
Georgia Performance
Standards:
M4N3: Students will solve problems involving
multiplication of 2-3 digit numbers by
1 or 2 digit numbers.
M4P2: Students will make connections among
mathematical ideas and to other
disciplines.
Did you ever wonder
what it was like to be a
kid in George
Washington's time?
What did kids do? What
was school like? What
games did they play?
What was life like for
them?
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•
Standards
Essential Question
Schooling
My first job
Map of Southern Colonies.
Hobbies
Resources
Standards
• ELAR3: The student understands and acquires
new vocabulary and uses it correctly in
reading and writing.
• ELA4W1: b. Writes texts of a length
appropriate to address the topic or tell the
story.
IMAGINE
If we had a time travel machine and
could bring Nathan Smith to 2009,
what do you think Nathan would
have questions about? What would
you want to learn from him?
Colonial schools were small and
had only one room. There was a
schoolmaster who taught
everyone. Boys went to school
longer than girls. Nice
handwriting was considered more
important than spelling. If you
did not behave in colonial school,
you were severely punished.
Colonial school was very hard!
Click here to
see a video
about our
education
What we learned in my school.
At school we are taught to read, write, and do some arithmetic, which is like math. We need to learn this
because then we can read the bible, write letters to people and keep track of our amount of money. Our
town is considered lucky to have a schoolhouse because most towns don’t have one. If we didn’t have a
school our parents would teach us some things. Then we would probably have the same job that our father
has when we grow up.
Here’s what I used to
write with. This is my quill pen.
Remember, nice handwriting
was important!
This is my hornbook. Hornbooks are wooden paddles
that have the lower case and upper case alphabet, and
a scripture on it. Then the hornbook is covered with a
thin covering of horn from a ram.
Ps. We had to
be at school by
7A.M. We also
had school
Mon-Saturday!
In addition to school, we have other responsibilities.
The girls help around the house, and the boys learn a
trade or find a job. I just got my first job. Click the
Post Office below to find out what job I got and how
you can help me solve my problem!
Here’s a map of the Southern
colonies: Georgia, South
Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia,
and Maryland.
This map shows the different
resources that each colony has.
As you can see, my colony’s
emphasis is Indigo, pigs, and
rice. Do you remember what
state I’m from? See if you can
guess based on the resources
I’ve told you we have.
When the
Colonies
were
established.
1634
1607
1663
1663
1732
Maryland Virginia
North Carolina South Carolina Georgia
Tobacco
Tobacco
Tobacco
Indigo
Indigo
Pigs
Pigs
Pigs
Pigs
Corn
Corn
Corn
Naval Stores
Naval Stores
Rice
Rice
Rice
Pigs
Naval
Stores
Rice
Corn
Indigo
Tobacco
I know what you’re thinking: did the colonial
children work and study all the time? NO!
Here are some things that we do:
•Foot races
•Shooting contests
•Corn husking contests
•Quilting bees
•Horse races
•Puppet shows
•Kite making
This is a
picture of
my little
sisters
playing with
their toys
Children also have toys
made for them. They have
miniature soldiers and
cannons. They have store
bought marbles, and musical
instruments.
This will show you how I spend an average day. According to
this chart, how do I spend most of my time?
•http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/
•http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vU_j05vVG4&feature=related
•http://www.kidinfo.com/american_history/colo
nization_colonial_life.html
•http://www.noahwebsterhouse.org/games.html
Click on the
picture!
Settlement Building in the Southern Colonies
Table of Contents
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Title Slide

Task

ToolsTools

Examples

Simple Machines

Lever

Inclined Plane

Wedge

Pulley

Screw

Wheel and Axle

Resource Chart

Build a Machine!

Process
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Standard
Hi! I’m William Henry.
Thank you for joining me
in the journey to build
our colony! We need all
the help we can get!
Fun Fact!
These were the
original colonies:
Virginia- est. 1607
Maryland- est. 1634
Carolinas- est. 1663
Georgia- est. 1732
Suppose you lived in the southern
colonies and your job was to build a
settlement like the one we saw in the
video in North Carolina. How would
you do this? What tools would you use?
What if you had to move the materials
for the structures many miles? What
would you do?
Tools
Colonists needed tools to clear land, build their
settlement, and farm, much like today. Though
some colonial tools look a little different from
those we use today, they were just as important
and performed many of the same tasks. Can
you think of some tools that we use today?
How do we use them?
You probably thought of
some of the tools that are
shown below. These tools
are called simple machines.
Simple Machines
a simple machine is any tool that only
requires the application of a single force to
work. It is a tool used to make work easier.
Simple machines use a force (a push or a
pull) to move a load.
Hmmm… so, what does that
mean? Think about it for a
minute, then watch the video
below to discover more about
simple machines.
click here!
So, let’s review…
Lever
A hammer is an
example of a lever.
Levers are used to
exert a large force
over a small distance
at one end by
exerting only a small
force over a greater
distance at the other.
Colonists used
hammers on
everything from
building houses to
shaping metal.
Inclined Plane
The inclined plane is a surface set at an
angle against a horizontal surface. The
inclined plane lets us move a large or
heavy object by applying a smaller force
through a longer distance than the load is
to be raised.
Wedge
Axes and hatchets
are examples of
wedges. The
colonists used them
for cutting down
trees and working
them into useful
pieces of wood.
The felling axe,
which has a long
narrow blade, was
used to chop down
trees and cut off
limbs.
Pulley
Pulleys are clever devices that allow you to lift
large weights with much smaller forces.
Screw
A screw depends
upon another
machine (the lever)
for its operation. It
can be looked at as
a twisted wedge
that gets its power
from being turned
by a lever. In other
words, it is a
cylinder with an
inclined plane
wrapped around it.
It can raise weights
and it can press or
fasten objects.
Wheel and Axle
A wheel and axle is really
two machines in one because
you can use each part in
different ways. The first way
is to roll something along.
Wheels help you move an
object across the ground
because they cut down on the
amount of friction between
what you're trying to move
and the surface you're pulling
it against. The axle is the
object that attaches the wheel
to the object it's moving. The
second way of using a wheel
is like a lever in the round. A
door knob or a faucet on a
sink are really round levers,
and the fulcrum is in the
middle where the axle turns.
RESOURCE CHART
SIMPLE
MACHINES
LEVER
INCLINED
PLANE
WHEEL AND
AXEL
SCREW
PULLEY
WEDGE
WHAT IT IS
A stiff bar that rests on a support called a
fulcrum
HOW IT HELPS
US WORK
Lifts or moves loads
EXAMPLES
Shovel,
nutcracker,
seesaw,
crowbar, elbow,
tweezers, bottle
opener
A slanting surface connecting a lower level to Things move up or
a higher level
down it
Slide, stairs,
ramp,
escalator, slope
A wheel with a rod, called an axel, through its
Lifts or moves loads
center: both parts move together
Car, wagon,
doorknob,
pencil
sharpener, bike
An inclined plane wrapped around a pole
A grooved wheel with a rope or cable around
it
An object with at least one slanting side
ending in a sharp edge
Screw, jar lid,
Holds things together
vise, bolt, drill,
or lifts
corkscrew
Moves things up,
down, or across
Curtain rod, tow
truck, miniblind, flag pole,
crane
Cuts or spreads an
object apart
Knife, pin, nail,
chisel, ax,
snowplow, front
of a boat
Build a simple machine!
Click
Here!
Process


Now you know what kinds of tools the colonists needed and used to build their
settlements.
For your book, write about how you could use simple machines to design and build
your own settlement. What kinds of buildings would you build? How would you use
your tools to accomplish this? Please include at least 3 of the 6 simple machines that
you’ve discovered and learned about.
Good
job!
Standard
S4P3a
Students will demonstrate the relationship between the
application of a force and the resulting change in position and
motion on an object.
a. Identify simple machines and explain their uses (lever, pulley,
wedge, inclined plane, screw, wheel and axle).
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