ELA 9.1 - bj101englishlanguagearts10

advertisement
DOL
I wants to celebrate halloween
with my classmates but me have
to stop chronic getting detention
firstly.
Linda to her daughter reads the
unconventional poem
grasshopper over the weekend
Homework
Homework
 Complete a 3 Column Analysis of Going Down
Hill on a Bicycle by Henry Charles Beeching
 Read The House on Mango Street DUE 11/14
Homework
 Checking the 3 Column Analysis of Vultures
 Column 1: Factual information about the poem
only. No inferences or conclusions.
 Column 2: Notes about the syntax of the poem.
Physical marking of the text of the poem with
information about things like parts of speech or
syntax function
 Column 3: Inferences about the poem. No facts
that can be observed by simply reading the text.
Homework
 How to use the 3-Column Analysis to support
thinking
 Column 1 and 2 are literal information about the
poem (Level 1, Objective information)
 Column 3 is inferred information about the
poem (Level 2, Inferential information)
 Use the information you gather in the first 2
columns to inform the inferences you make in
Column 3
 Consider:
Why did the poet write this poem in this way?
What is the eventual effect on us as readers?
Mechanics
Mechanics
 Mechanics—The basic conventions of written
style in a language. This may include spelling,
capitalization, punctuation, where text is
situated on a page or in a composition, &c.
 The movie Inception, which came out last
night (to great reviews by Ebert and Roeper),
was surprising and impressive!!
Grasshopper
By E. E. Cummings
Grasshopper
 Vocab you may need
 None!
Figurative Language
Figurative Language
 Figures of Speech/Figurative Language—language that
is not intended to literally depict its meaning, but rather,
suggests meaning by creating imagined images for the
reader.
Strange
indeed how love in other
ways so particular
will pick a corner
in that charnel-house
tidy it and coil up there, perhaps
even fall asleep - her face
turned to the wall!
From Vultures by Chinua Achebe
Figurative Language
 Simile—a figure of speech that makes comparisons
using like or as.
 “He fought like a lion” implies:
Figurative Language
 Simile—a figure of
speech that makes
comparisons using
like or as.
 “He fought like a
lion” does not
imply:
Figurative Language
 Simile—a figure of speech that makes comparisons
using like or as.
 My mind is as quick as lightning
Figurative Language
 Metaphor—a figure of speech that makes comparisons
not using like or as, sometimes directly attributing an
inappropriate characteristic to something.
 In the final note of their song, the band was fire, was
lightning, was the sun and the stars, and everyone
cheered.
 We thought we would miss our train, so we flew to the
station.
Figurative Language
 Personification—a
metaphor in which an
inanimate object is
compared to a person.
 The volcano belched fire
into the sky.
 The sky shuddered, and
heaved, and wept wave
after wave of rain down
on us.
Figurative Language
 Hyperbole/Overstatement—deliberate exaggeration.
 Rene is almost 10 meters tall!
 The smog was so thick I could not see my hand in front of
my face.
 Litotes/Understatement—intentionally representing
something as much less than it is.
 “I could easily live on just 200,000,000 RMB.”
 “Don’t worry, a little hurricane never hurt anyone.”
Figurative Language
 Let’s try identifying figurative language together.
 My back is killing me!
 I’ll never finish all this homework!
 Tanya is giving him the cold shoulder.
 Jack slept like a rock last night.
 ID students work a little harder than the students in the
regular program.
Going Down Hill
on a Bicycle
By Henry Charles Beeching
Going Down Hill on a Bicycle
 Stanza—A group of lines of a poem that are separated from the rest
of the poem by a visual break, and often a shift in ideas or focus.
 Vocab you may need
 Poised (adj)—ready for something
 Heedful (adj)—aware of, paying attention
 Aught (pron)—anything
 Shod (v)—past tense of the verb shoe, meaning to put on shoes
 Treadles—pedals
 Vale—valley
 Toil—hard work
Compound Sentences
Syntax
Syntax: Compound Sentences
 Clause—A group of words with a subject and a
predicate. [we will indicate clauses with (pink
parenthesis); do not indicate the clause in a simple
sentence]
 Compound Sentence—A sentence with two or more
clauses in it.
 (I went to the park with my family on Saturday,) but (it
rained all day.)
Conjunctions
Parts of Speech
Parts of Speech: Conjunctions
 Conjunction—A word that connects 2 words, phrases, or
clauses
 Phrase—A group of words that function as a single part of
speech
 Connecting words: Christina or Catherine will meet me at the
park on Saturday.
 Connecting phrases: The park was beautifully maintained and
full of people.
 Connecting clauses: (I went to the park with my family on
Saturday,) but (it rained all day.)
Parts of Speech: Conjunctions
 Independent Clause—A clause that is able to stand as a
sentence on its own.
 Coordinating Conjunction—A conjunction that connects two
independent clauses. Coordinating conjunctions are
preceded by a comma (,). It is never a part of a clause. The
coordinating conjunctions are: and, nor, but, yet, or, for, so
(may also have a different function).
 (I like riding my bike,) but (Robby likes riding his skateboard.)
 (I like running by the lake,) but (Robby likes riding his
skateboard.)
Parts of Speech: Conjunctions
 Dependent Clause/Subordinate Clause—A clause that depends on
an attached independent clause in order to have meaning.
 Subordinating Conjunction—A conjunction that connects an
independent clause with a subordinate clause. Subordinating
conjunctions are part of the subordinate clause they are in. Some
common subordinating conjunctions are: because, since, if, unless,
after, so, for &c.
 (Robby brings his skateboard to school) (because Robby likes riding
his skateboard.)
 (Robby brings his umbrella to school) (because Robby likes riding
his skateboard.)
Parts of Speech: Conjunctions
 Let’s try analyzing sentences with conjunctions together.
 I have not been to the school library, nor have I been to the gym.
 (I have not been to the school library,) nor (have I been to the
gym.)
 Doris’s mother makes her eat her vegetables whether she wants to
eat them or not.
 (Doris’s mother makes her eat her vegetables) (whether she wants
to to eat them or not.)
 Although Iris and I want to stay healthy, we often stay up late.
 (Although Iris and I want to stay healthy,) (we often stay up late.)
Exit Slip
 Write three sentences using conjunctions and analyze
their syntax.
 1 sentence must use a conjunction to connect words.
 1 sentence must use a conjunction to connect phrases.
 1 sentence must use a conjunction to connect clauses.
 1 sentence must use 2 independent clauses.
 1 sentence must use a subordinate clause.
Download
Related flashcards

Rhetoric

51 cards

Socratic dialogues

46 cards

Right-wing populism

62 cards

Create Flashcards