ROSC & Jackson Recovery Court - MI-PTE

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12th Annual MI
Substance Use
Disorder
Conference
September 13, 2011
Collaboration between
Jackson 4th Circuit Court,
Mid-South Substance Abuse Commission,
&
Home of New Vision
 Mary
Kronquist, Mid-South Substance Abuse
Commission
 Glynis Anderson, Home of New Vision
 To
increase understanding of how the
Michigan 16 ROSC Principles and the 10 Key
Components for Drug Courts work together.
 To describe how having a Recovery Coach
housed within the Recovery Court improves
connections with the recovery community.
 To describe how the ROSC holistic model
impacts community wellness.
 Michigan’s
recovery-oriented system of care
supports an individual’s journey toward
recovery and wellness by creating and
sustaining networks of formal and informal
services and supports. The opportunities
established through collaboration,
partnership, and a broad array of services
promote life-enhancing recovery and wellness
for individuals, families, and communities.

Adopted by the ROSC Transformation Steering Committee, September 30, 2010.
 The
mission of drug courts is to stop the
abuse of alcohol and other drugs and related
criminal activity. Drug courts offer a
compelling choice for individuals whose
criminal justice involvement stems from AOD
use: participation in treatment. In exchange
for successful completion of the treatment
program, the court may dismiss the original
charge, reduce or set aside a sentence, offer
some lesser penalty, or offer a combination of
these.

Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components
 ROSC
is the acronym for Recovery Oriented
Systems of Care
 ROSC is a systems change which effects how
substance use disorder treatment services are
delivered to individuals and their families
 ROSC is a philosophy shift that focuses on
Recovery Management over the lifespan,
instead of acute treatment episodes
 ROSC is a culture shift that invites increased
reliance on persons in recovery and their
experience
 First
Drug Court opened in Miami, FL in 1989
 As of December 31, 2009, there were 2,459
Drug Courts in the United States
 As of December 31, 2009, there were 1,189
Problem-Solving Courts other than Drug
Courts in the United States (i.e., truancy, mental
health, domestic violence, etc.)
 As
of December 31, 2009, there were a total of
3,648 Drug Courts and other types of
Problem-Solving Courts in the United States

2009 is the latest data available sited in the National Drug Court
Institute’s ; Painting the Current Picture, July 2011
 $975,000
over 3 years
 Beginning second year of grant
 Enhancing services:





1 Recovery Coach
1 Case Manager
1 Anchor Provider
Working with Prevention Coalition to do a
Community Recovery Resource Needs Scan
Health Care – primarily dental
 The
mission of the Jackson Recovery Court is
to eliminate drug and alcohol use by the
participants in an effort to restore their self
worth and productivity. Recovery from the
disease of addiction is a difficult process that
requires commitment, honesty, openness, and
willingness.

Made decision to call it a Recovery Court rather
than a Drug Court to focus on the recovery
aspects of the process.

The entrance criteria for the Jackson Recovery
Court (JRC) are:
individuals meeting sentencing guidelines for an
intermediate or straddle cell offender with a SUD
diagnosis,
 non-violent felons who are charged with any of the
following:




OUIL 3rd, a drug offense (possession and delivery if not for
profit but to obtain drugs),
or certain select financial crimes such as forgery and
uttering and publishing.
All JRC participants are involved in a
comprehensive and integrated program of SUD
treatment and habilitation services.

The program is a 5 phase program, each phase being at
a minimum of three months long.
 As
part of participation in the JRC, a participant
is required to:
 attend SUD treatment (which may include detox, residential,
intensive or outpatient),
submit to regular random drug screens,
attend a minimum of five 12-step meetings per week,
have a curfew,
placed on intensive supervision,
must appear for status hearings every 2 weeks.
The JRC team consists of:
 Judge Susan Beebe,
Recovery Court Coordinator,
two case managers,
a Recovery Coach,
treatment providers, and probation officers,
a member of the Prosecutor’s Office and a defense attorney are
part of the team as well.
in the process of recruiting a person from the recovery
community to be on the team
 Key
Component #1: Drug courts integrate
alcohol and other drug treatment services
with justice system case processing.
 ROSC
Principle #2: Inclusion of the voices and
experiences of recovering individuals, youth,
family, and community members.
 ROSC Principle #6: Family and significantother involvement.
 ROSC Principle #8: Individualized and
comprehensive services across all ages.
 ROSC Principle #14: Continuity of Care
 Key
Component #3: Eligible participants are
identified early and promptly placed in the
drug court program.
 ROSC
Principle #3: Integrated strength-based
services.
 ROSC Principle #4: Services that promote
health and wellness will take place within the
community.
 Principle #14: Continuity of Care.
 Key
Component #4: Drug courts provide
access to a continuum of alcohol, drug, and
other related treatment and rehabilitation
services.
 ROSC
Principle #8: Individualized and
comprehensive services across all ages.
 ROSC Principle # 10: Responsive to cultural
factors and personal belief systems.
 ROSC Principle #14: Continuity of care.
 Key
Component #5: Abstinence is monitored
by frequent alcohol and other drug testing.
 ROSC
Principle #3: Integrated strength-based
services.
 ROSC Principle #5: Outcome driven.
 Key
Component #6: A coordinated strategy
governs drug court responses to participants’
compliance.
 ROSC
Principle #3: Integrated strength-based
services.
 ROSC Principle #11: Partnership-consultant
relationship.
 Key
Component #7: Ongoing judicial
interaction with each drug court participant is
essential.
 ROSC
Principle # 12: Ongoing monitoring and
outreach.
 ROSC Principle #15: Strength-based
 Key
Component #8: Monitoring and
evaluation measure the achievement of
program goals and gauge effectiveness.
 ROSC
Principle #5: Outcomes driven.
 ROSC Principle #8: Ongoing monitoring and
outreach.
 ROSC Principle #13: Research based.
 Key
Component #9: Continuing
interdisciplinary education promotes effective
drug court planning, implementation, and
operations.
 ROSC
Principle # 7: System-wide education
and training.
 Key
Component #10: Forging partnerships
among drug courts, public agencies, and
community-based organizations generates
local support and enhances drug court
program effectiveness.
 ROSC
Principle #2: Inclusion of the voices and
experiences of recovering individuals, youth,
family, and community members.
 ROSC
Principle #4: Services that promote
health and wellness will take place within the
community.
 ROSC
Principle #9: Commitment to peer
support and recovery support services.
 Key
Component #2: Using a non-adversarial
approach, prosecution and defense counsel
promote public safety while protecting
participants’ due process rights.
 ROSC
Principle #1: Adequately and flexibly
financed.
 ROSC Principle #16: Promote community
health and address environmental
determinants to health.
Mid-South Substance Abuse Commission
Jackson Resource Recovery
Center
407 W. Michigan Ave
Jackson, MI 49201
Hours of Operation
Computer Room and Peer Support
Monday and Wednesday 3-5 pm
General Operating Hours
Wednesday - Friday: 5-9 pm
Scheduled Activities
Monday-Thursday 6-7
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•12 STEP SUPPORT GROUP- WEEKLY
•YOGA GROUP-3X/WK
•OPEN COMPUTER LAB
•MEDITATION/MINDFULNESS
•RECOVERY FILM SERIES
•HEALTH EDUCATION (TBD)
•MOVIE NIGHT-MEETUP GROUP
(BI- Monthly)
•MEETUP.COM RECOVERY
•COMMUNITY CALANDER (SOCIAL
EVENTS)
Resume Building
Employment Search
Computer skill building
Peer Support
Case Management
Meditation and mindfulness
G
A
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D
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N
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L
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Drug Court Participant Project
ROSC Peer Advisory Group Volunteers
Newel Turpel
Jerry Michalowicz
Mike Kerche
Peggy Smith
Tim Smith
Heather Nichols
Sheila Lorenz
ROSC Advisory Committee
Barbara O'Connor- Allegiance Substance Abuse Services
Melissa Cerqueira- Allegiance Substance Abuse Services
Megan Springer- Jackson Interfaith Shelter
Kitrina Sims-Jackson Interfaith Shelter
Kelsey Haynes- Jackson County Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition
Wendy Murdock- Jackson County Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition
Debra McDonald- Jackson Community Foundation
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