BMS Presentation - Seattle University

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Dr. Sylvia Oliver
PLTW Biomedical Science Affiliate Director
WSU Spokane
[email protected]
PLTW: 21st Century Model for Education
 Students can see the relevance of what
they are learning— academics made real.
 Students are prepared for both college and
career— in whatever order they choose, in
whatever combination.
 Students gain the knowledge and skills in
order to compete in the 21st Century global
economy—both academic and technical.
Approximately 5,000 programs
over 400,000 students
more than10,500 teachers trained
100s of partners
Program Benefits
Increased Engagement in School
More Interested in Math and Science
Increased College Enrollment, Persistence and
Performance
Closed the Achievement Gap
Students Learn to:
• Communicate effectively, both orally
and in writing
• think critically
• practice professional conduct
• work effectively in teams
• design experiments
• understand the interdisciplinary
nature of science, healthcare,
mathematics and English language
arts.
BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM
The PLTW Biomedical Sciences
Curriculum Engages and Prepares
Students for Careers in Medicine,
Healthcare and Science.
Experience a PLTW Classroom
Where students learn content in context through:
• Case-based scenarios
• Hands-on learning
• Activities, project and problems
• Real world application
• Open-ended problems
Teacher as facilitator -Student as director of learning
…and the classroom becomes a collaboration space.
PLTW Classrooms:
• Launch critical thinking
• Challenge students to make mistakes
• Integrate technology into the classroom
• Encourage teachers and students to learn
together.
Biomedical Science Program
Principles of the Biomedical
Sciences
Human Body Systems
Medical Interventions
Biomedical Innovation/Capstone
Course
Biomedical Careers
• Physician
• Research Scientist
• Nurse
• Health Information
Manager
• Dentist
• Veterinarian
• Pharmacist
• Paramedic
• Dietician
• Surgeon
• Medical Technologist
• Medical Technical Writer
• Physician Assistant
• Biomedical Engineer
• Pharmaceutical
Manufacturing Engineer
Course #1: Principles of the
Biomedical Sciences
 Students investigate human body systems
through disease conditions including: heart
disease, diabetes, cancer and infectious
diseases.
PBS Topics:
 Literary research skills
 Human body systems
 Basic chemistry
 Structure and function of DNA
 Protein structure
 Bioinformatics
 Causes of infectious diseases
PBS – Units
• Unit 1 – Human Body Systems
• Unit 2 – Heart Attack
• Unit 3 – Diabetes
• Unit 4 – Sickle Cell Disease
• Unit 5 – Hypercholesterolemia
• Unit 6 – Infectious Diseases
• Unit 7 – Medical Interventions
Unit 3: Diabetes
• Analyze food labels
• Measure energy in food
samples
• Detect macromolecules in food
samples
• Build model of an enzyme
• Perform dialysis experiment
• Prepare presentation on
diabetes
Unit 4: Sickle Cell Disease
• Make chromosome spreads
• Isolate DNA from cells
• Build models of DNA and
proteins
• Read a genetic map
• Use computer simulation
software to build a
designer protein
PBS Activity
Students learn about chromosomes and DNA by
making a chromosome spread using HeLa cells.
Course #2: Human Body Systems
 Students study basic human anatomy and
physiology, especially in relationship to
human health.
 Students use data acquisition software to
monitor body functions and use the
Anatomy in Clay® Manikens ® to study
body structure.
HBS Topics:
 Relationship between structure and
function
 Maintenance of health
 Defense against disease
 Communication within the body and
with the outside world
 Movement of the body and of
substances around the body
 Energy distribution and processing
HBS – Units
• Unit 1 – Identity
• Unit 2 – Communication
• Unit 3 – Power
• Unit 4 – Movement
• Unit 5 – Protection
• Unit 6 - Homeostasis
Unit 2: Communication
• Build a model brain and
design a “map” of brain
function
• Use data acquisition
software and sensors to
compare reaction time for
reflex and voluntary actions
• Diagnose a mystery
endocrine disorder
• Dissect a cow eye and
experiment with lenses
Unit 4: Movement
• Build muscle groups on a skeletal
Anatomy in Clay Maniken
• Design experiments to determine
the energy requirements for
muscle contraction
• Use data acquisition software to
evaluate muscle function
• Measure pulses to monitor blood
flow
• Design a training plan for an
athlete
HBS Activity
Students use Manikens from Anatomy in Clay
Course #3: Medical Interventions
 Students learn to diagnose and treat diseases using
surgery, bio-nanotechnology, pharmacology,
prosthetics, rehabilitation, and lifestyle choices.
• Student projects investigate interventions related to
diagnostics, immunology, surgery, genetics,
pharmacology, medical devices, and lifestyle
choices.
MI Topics:
 Molecular biology and genetic
engineering
 Design process for pharmaceuticals
and medical devices
 Medical imaging, including x-rays, CT
scans, and MRI scans
 Disease detection and prevention
 Rehabilitation after disease or injury
Medical Interventions
MI – Units
• Unit 1 – How to Fight Infection
• Unit 2 – How to Screen What is
in Your Genes
• Unit 3 – How to Conquer
Cancer
• Unit 4 – How to Prevail When
Organs Fail
Unit 1: How to Fight Infection
• Identify pathogens using
bioinformatics
• Run simulated ELISA to
diagnose disease
• Transfer antibiotic resistance
from one bacterial strain to
another
• Assess hearing loss and
evaluate assisted hearing
devices
• Investigate production of
vaccines
Unit 3: How to Conquer Cancer
• Explore cancer diagnostic
techniques
• Evaluate cancer cell genes
using simulated DNA
microarrays
• Use data acquisition
software and sensors to
monitor biofeedback
• Build a prosthetic arm
• Design a clinical trial for a
nanotechnology-based
cancer treatment
MI Activities
• Students insert DNA that
codes for a fluorescent
protein into bacterial cells.
•Students work with a
laparoscopic surgery trainer
box simulation.
Biomedical Innovation Capstone Class
• Students design innovative solutions
for the health challenges of the 21st
century as they work through
progressively challenging openended problems.
Course 4:
Biomedical Innovation
• Flexible design
• Apply knowledge and skills
learned in previous courses
• Multiple presentations to
adult audiences
• Design innovative solutions
for the health challenges of
the 21st century
• Opportunity to work with
mentor(s)
Biomedical Innovation Problems:
• design a more efficient emergency room.
• design a medical intervention to aid
patients
• design a solution to a local or global
public health challenge
• complete an independent problem
Dr. Sylvia Oliver
PLTW Biomedical Science Affiliate Director
WSU Spokane
[email protected]
Curriculum Structure
34
Curriculum Structure







Title Page
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Course Description
Teacher Guidelines
Units with Lessons
Glossary
Example from the PLTW™ PBS
35 curriculum
Teacher Guidelines (resources)
 Website Master List
 Teacher Notes
 Student Resource
Documents
 Generic Assessment
 Rubrics
 Answer Keys or
Samples
 National Standards
Example from the PLTW™ 36PBS curriculum
Units with Lessons
Unit folders
contain the
lessons.
Example from the PLTW™ HBS curriculum
37
PLTW OUTCOMES
SUMMARY REVIEW
Wheaton HS, Maryland
Bioscience Academy
• 2006: 3 of 13 non-PLTW Bioscience Academy
students passed AP Biology.
• 2007: 24 PLTW students in Academy.
• 2010: 228 PLTW students. 20 of 38 students
who took the AP Biology exams passed.
• 2010: More PLTW students passed the
Biology Assessment exam (41%) than nonPLTW students (16%).
PLTW Alumni Data
Rochester Institute of Technology
378 former PLTW students
91.9% Retention (first year)
81.3% Retention (fourth year)
Average PLTW GPA is 0.10 higher
(past 3 years)
San Diego State University
12 former PLTW students
100% Retention
Marquette University
62 former PLTW students
97% Retention (first year)
PLTW OUTCOMES
College Credit
Current College Credit Options
for Biomedical Sciences
 Stevenson University
 Missouri University of Science and
Technology
 Indiana University – Purdue University
Indianapolis
Steps to Implementation
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
Signing Contract with PLTW
• Determine which programs and courses to
offer
• Complete online New Program Registration
– Select School District Delegate
• Review STEM Agreement
– Budget
– Course Scheduling
– District, school and teacher impacts
Average Costs to Implement BMS
• Assumptions: School has computers, basic
lab supplies; costs are for one section of 24
students.
• Principles of the Biomedical Sciences:
– Annual participation fee
– Annual consumables
– Equipment/supplies
– Teacher training
$ 2,000
$ 400
$15,500 (one time fee)
$ 4,000 (one time fee)
Average Costs to Implement BMS
• Human Body Systems:
– Annual participation fee none
– Annual consumables
$ 1,200
– Equipment/supplies
$ 9,000 (one time fee)
– Teacher training
$ 4,000 (one time fee)
Average Costs to Implement BMS
• Medical Intervention:
– Annual participation fee none
– Annual consumables
$ 1,200
– Equipment/supplies
$ 3,500 (one time fee)
– Teacher training
$ 4,000 (one time fee)
Average Costs to Implement BMS
• Biomedical Innovation:
– Annual participation fee none
– Annual consumables
$ 600
– Equipment/supplies
$ 300 (one time fee)
– Teacher training
$ 4,000 (one time fee)
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
Teacher Selection and Training
▪ One year college biology highly recommended for BMS.
▪ Complete online registration for Core Training Institute.
▪ Complete Readiness Training.
▪ Attend two-week summer Core Training Institute.
▪ WSU Spokane will offer PBS, HBS, MI and BI
training during summer 2014.
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
Implementing School Program
▪ Spring 2014:
•Review the online purchasing manual.
--Determine what is available and what is needed.
--Determine consumables for all sections.
• Confirm course scheduling and credits.
• Recruit 8th grade students. Get parent buy-in.
Recruitment materials available through PLTW.
▪ Attend two-week summer Core Training Institute.
Steps to Implementation
Attend an informational session
Signing contract with PLTW
Teacher selection and Core Training
Implementing program in school
Certification Process and Articulation
National PLTW Certification
▪ Schools can start certification process after two years
• School and program evaluation procedure
• PLTW directed Site Visits
Benefits:
• National Recognition
• Teachers eligible to become Master Teachers
• Opportunity for students to apply for college credit and
scholarships
• Increased potential for grant funding to support PLTW
For More Information:
Sylvia Oliver, PhD
PLTW Biomedical Sciences
Affiliate Director
WSU Spokane, [email protected]
Project Lead The Way Website
www.pltw.org
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