Decimal Currency - Teacher Resources Galore

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Margaret Frost
Before 1966, Australia’s money system was
based on the British Sterling System. We
had Pounds (£), Shillings (s) and Pence (d).
20 shillings made up 1 Pound and 12 pennies
made up 1 shilling.
Decimal currency came in on 14th February
1966.
Pre Decimal Coins
Pre-Decimal notes
Decimal Currency
1 Shilling
Florin
sixpence
Click on each coin to find out more
about it.
threepence
half penny
1 penny
This coin was called ‘two bob’ and was
worth 2 shillings or 24 pence.
It was written as 2/-.
back
This coin was called ‘one bob’ and was
worth 1 shilling or 12 pence.
It was written as 1/-.
back
This coin was called a ‘zac’ or
sixpence. It was worth 6 pennies. It
was written as 6d.
back
This coin was called a threepence
which was pronounced ‘thripence’ or
‘throopence’. It was also called a
‘thripenny bit’. It was worth 3 pennies
and was written as 3d.
back
This coin was a penny. It was worth 1
penny and was written as 1d.
If you put a penny in a glass of coke
and left it for a while, it would come
out nice and clean and shiny.
back
The name for the half penny was
pronounced “haypenny.” It was worth
a half a penny and was written ½d.
back
Over the years there were many different versions
of the notes, just as there has been with the
decimal notes. These notes were made of paper. The
paper wore out quickly and new notes had to be made
to replace them. They were easy to copy and many
counterfeit notes were printed and used.
On the next page you will see pictures of very early
versions of the notes. These changed often over the
years.
10 shilling note
10/-
1 pound note
£1
5 pound note
£5
Click on each
note to see a
bigger picture.
20 pound note
10 pound note
£ 10
There was also
a fifty pound
note.
£ 20
Decimal Currency was introduced into Australia on 14th February, 1966.
The first notes were made of paper. The then Prime Minister, Sir Robert
Menzies, wanted to call the currency the “Royal” but people didn’t like this
name, so the Dollar was decided on.
Shortly after the changeover, a large amount of counterfeit $10 notes
were found.
In 1988, a polymer $10 note was released to commemorate Australia’s BiCentennial. Between 1992 and 1996, polymer notes were slowly introduced
to replace the old ones. These notes were harder to counterfeit, stronger
and could be recycled.
In 1984, the one dollar coin replaced the dollar note. In 1988, the two
dollar coin was introduced.
The last 1 cent coin was made in 1990 and the last 2c coin was made in
1992. They were gradually taken out of circulation from 1992.
Decimal Coins
Decimal Notes
Decimal Currency Song
Decimal Currency Timeline
Before the change over, there was a large advertising campaign to get people
used to the change. The jingle that was sung was very catchy and some
people who were around in those days can still remember it. It is sung to the
tune “Click Go the Shears.”
Decimal Change Over Song
In come the dollars and in come the cents
To replace the pounds and the shillings and the pence
Be prepared for change when the coins begin to mix
On the fourteenth of February 1966.
Chorus:
Clink go the coins, clink, clink, clink
Change over day is closer than you think
Learn the value of the coins and the way that they appear
And things will be much smoother when the decimal point is here.
In come the dollars and in come the cents
To replace the pounds and the shillings and the pence
Be prepared folks when the coins begin to mix
On the fourteenth of February 1966.
10c
5c
20c
Click on each coin to find out more
about it.
2c
1c
50c
$2
$1
The 1c coin had a ring tailed possum on the
back. The last 1c coin was made in 1990.
100 1c coins made up $1.00
The 2c coin had a frilled necked lizard on its
back. The last 2c coin was made in 1992.
5 2c coins made up 10c and 50 2c coins made
up $1.00
The 5c coin has an echidna on its back.
2 5c coins makes 10c and 20 5c coins makes
$1.00.
The 10c coin has a lyre bird on the back. 10
10c coins make up $1.00.
The 20c coin has a platypus on the back. 5
20c coins make up $1.00.
The 50c coin has the Australian Coat of arms on the back. The Coat of
Arms has an kangaroo on the left and an emu on the right. 2 50c coins make
$1.00.
The fifty cent coin was originally circular and made of 80% silver. However
the price of silver went up and it was too dear to make the coins from
silver. People did not like the coin because it felt too much like the 20c
coin.
No 50c coins were minted (made) in 1967 & 1968. In 1969, the 10 sided
(dodecagonal) coin was first minted and released.
Round 50c
coin – minted
in 1966.
The $1.00 coin has kangaroos on the back of
it. It was first minted in 1984 to replace the
$1.00 note.
The $2.00 coin has an aboriginal elder on the
back. It was first minted in 1988 to replace
the $2.00 note.
The notes were originally made from paper but were easy to
counterfeit. In 1988 the first polymer notes were introduced. These
were the first notes to be made from polymer anywhere in the world.
Many other countries have since copied Australia and make their
notes from polymer.
$2
$1
$5
$20
$10
Click on each note to
find out more about it.
$50
$100
Originally there was a $1 note. This was replace by the $1 coin in
1984.
The front of the note had a
portrait of Queen Elizabeth
II, and the Australian Coat of
Arms.
The back of the note had an
Aboriginal bark painting by
David Daymirringu and other
paintings and carvings.
Like the $1.00 note, the $2.00 note was made of paper. It was
replace by the $2.00 coin in 1988.
On the front of the note featured
John Macarthur (1767–1834) and
the wool industry. Macarthur and
his wife, Elizabeth, contributed to
the development of the wool
industry, especially through the use
of high-quality Spanish sheep to
breed the Australian merino.
William James Farrer (1845–1906)
played a major role in developing
wheat varieties more resistant to
rust disease and to drought. He
created a type of wheat, which he
called, Federation. This type of wheat
could be grown in drier areas.
The $5.00 note is now made of polymer, though it was originally made
of paper. The first polymer $5.00 note was issued in 1992.
The front of the note carries a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II
with a branch of a gum tree.
The back of the note depicts Parliament House, Canberra. The
first Parliament House, opened in 1927, is in the foreground.
Dame Mary Gilmore (1865–
1962) was a writer. She
campaigned for better voting
rights for women, pensions and
Aboriginal rights. One of her
famous poems was No Foe Shall
Gather Our Harvest.
Andrew Barton Paterson (Banjo
Patterson) (1864–1941), was born
in New South Wales. He was a
famous Australian poet. In his
thirties, he became famous for
writing Waltzing Matilda, The
Man from Snowy River, and many
other poems.
Mary Reibey (1777–1855),
featured on one side of the note,
was transported to Australia in
1794 after a conviction for
horse stealing. She became a
business woman including
property, shipping and
warehouses. In later life she
became widely known for her
charitable works and interest in
church and education affairs.
The other side of the $20 note
carries a portrait of Reverend
John Flynn (1880–1951) who
started the Royal Flying Doctor
Service.
David Unaipon (1872–1967),
a South Australian writer,
inventor and public speaker,
was a spokesman for the
Aboriginal people. He was
the first Aboriginal author
to be published.
Edith Cowan (1861–1932) is best
remembered as the first female
member of an Australian
Parliament. She was elected to
Parliament in 1921. She worked
throughout her life on a wide
range of educational, family,
church and social issues.
Sir John Monash (1865–1931) was
a soldier, engineer and
administrator. After earning
degrees in engineering, arts and
law, Monash had a distinguished
career during World War I,
becoming a Lieutenant General.
Monash University and the Monash
Freeway are both named after him.
Dame Nellie Melba (1861–1931) was
probably the most famous soprano in
the world in the early part of the
twentieth century. Born Helen Porter
Mitchell, she took the stage name of
Melba as a part of her native city of
Melbourne. She lived in Europe for
long periods but toured Australia
extensively. Melba worked tirelessly
to raise funds for charities in
Australia during World War I. In
1920, she became the first artist of
international reputation to
participate in direct radio
broadcasts.
Polymer is a plastic like material. The word Polymer means many
parts.
Australia was the first country in the world to use Polymer for its
notes. Now, more than 22 countries use this material for their bank
notes.
The first 10
sided 50c
1966
coin was
th
14 February made.
Decimal
Currency
introduced
in Australia
1969
$2.00 coin
replaced the
$2.00 notes.
1984
$1.00 coin
replaced the
$1.00 notes.
$10.00
polymer note
released 1990
1988
The
last 1c
coin
was
made.
The last 2c
coin was
made.
Polymer
notes were
released to
replace the
paper notes.
1992
Bi-Centennial – 200 hundred years
Botanist – one who studies plants
Circulation – move about
Commemorate – remember, celebrate
Counterfeit – fake, copy
Unique – unusual or rare
Bi-Centennial – 200 hundred years
Botanist – one who studies plants
Circulation – move about
Commemorate – remember, celebrate
Counterfeit – fake, copy
Unique – unusual or rare
Bi-Centennial – 200 hundred years
Botanist – one who studies plants
Circulation – move about
Commemorate – remember, celebrate
Counterfeit – fake, copy
Unique – unusual or rare
Polymer is a plastic like material. The word Polymer means many
parts.
Australia was the first country in the world to use Polymer for its
notes. Now, more than 22 countries use this material for their bank
notes.
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