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MENG ET Course Guide

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School of Engineering
MEng (Hons) Electronic and
Telecommunications Engineering
Course Guide
2018-19
September
About this guide
This is your course guide. It provides the basic but fundamental information about your course of study. This
guide is yours for the duration of the course, we don’t re-issue it annually and if any information contained
within were to change then we will write to you to explain so.
In particular, if any important aspects relating to your modules were to change then we will inform you in
accordance with the Code of Practice for the Management of Changes to Modules and Courses. The teaching
and support teams which you will get to know over time will refer to this guide – it will be useful to you and
we advise you to make good use of it throughout your studies.
The Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the more general sources of information which relate to
all students at the University. The Student Handbook is a very detailed reference point for all issues relating to
your studies which aren’t specific to just your particular course. You might also want to refer to the Student
Charter; the University’s Policies and Regulations and the University Assessment Handbook documents which
will provide you with all of the information that we think you will need for your period of study here.
If you need additional information, or you simply want to discuss elements of any of these documents or other
aspects of your course, find that there is something you need to know, please contact your Faculty Student
Services:
Faculty Student Services
We can help with the administration and organisation of your time at University – from enrolment and
module registration, tuition fee enquiries, attendance support, course management and lifecycle queries,
extenuating circumstances, leave of absence, transfers and changes, assignment submission, SAMs
appointments, assessment and result queries, right through to Graduation.
You can also come and talk to us for impartial advice and support if things are starting to go wrong and you’re
not sure who else to talk to. The main thing to remember is that you are not alone. We see large numbers of
students over the course of a year on a variety of issues, so please don’t be afraid to approach us.
We are here to ensure that your transition into Higher Education is as smooth as possible. Normal office
opening hours are Monday-Friday 08:45-17:00.
You can contact us through the e:vision help desk, by phone or in person or by e-mail:
Faculty of Science and
Engineering (City
Campus)
Alan Turing Building MI 024
(01902) 322129
[email protected]
Faculty of Science and
Engineering (Telford
Campus)
The Darby Building SC 041
(01902) 322129
[email protected]
Help and Advice is also
available from Student
Support & Wellbeing…
Contact us at the Alan Turing
Building MI 001 for all enquiries and
referrals… Services operate at all
campuses by appointment.
(01902) 321074
(01902) 321070
[email protected]
[email protected]
Welcome from the Course Leader
On behalf of the teaching and support teams from MEng (Hons) Electronic and Telecommunications
Engineering course, I would like to extend to you a very warm welcome to the University of Wolverhampton,
and in particular your campus.
My name is Mike Basini and I am the course leader for your MEng (Hons) Electronic and Telecommunications
Engineering course and alongside your personal tutor, will be your main point of contact over the duration of
your studies. My contact details are below – please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you need any support or
guidance.
The successes which you will achieve whilst at the University are based upon a partnership between the
expertise and support from the staff here and the effort you put into learning. We welcome students who are
eager to think for themselves, to take control of their own learning and who are ready to get involved in
developing the skills required in a highly competitive job market. Make the most of the wide range of
opportunities available to you.
Studying at University can be difficult, and for many of you the transition into University life will be
challenging. However we will support you throughout your course, particularly whilst you develop into an
independent learner over the course of your first year with us.
We believe it is important that you are encouraged to make your own contribution to the effective operation
and development of your chosen course. We hope that you might consider acting as a Course Representative
during some of your time with us to help the University continue to improve your experience.
The School of Engineering also run ‘Club’ activities as below;
UWR - University of Wolverhampton Racing
Formula 3 Racing – the chance to join a student team taking on the professionals over a full race
season in a Dallara F3 car, the car is raced in every round of the season with a view to winning the
championship – the team is run like as a small F1 team & every bit as competitive.
IMechE Formula Student – the chance to work as a team with a goal of designing, building &
competing with other Universities internationally, the annual event is held at Silverstone Circuit
every July but the hard work begins in October to set about designing & building the car for the big
event.
Morgan Motor Company; Morgan Challenge – a chance to work with the factory at Malvern to act as
the factory works race team running two developmental Morgan sports cars – a quick link into
industry for you as a student & a great paddock to be involved with.
Human Powered Flight – a opportunity to be at the cutting edge of design to compete with numerous
other institutes all looking to take flight with nothing more than human power as the driving force – a
significant challenge but a rewarding pursuit.
Robotics – a club designed to offer those who have a calling for robotics a practical outlet with which to
test their theoretical knowledge
Simulation – a club designed for those who wish to continue working on all things simulation, from flight
simulation to the latest IMechE autonomous vehicle challenges and anything else of interest are here for
the taking.
In addition to the activities which are given time on Friday’s, the School of Engineering also arranges a
massive array of industrial visits, being situated in England’s industrial heartland, means the University of
Wolverhampton is privileged in its location near such industry as, RAF Cosford, i54 Jaguar Land Rover, Aston
Martin, Mercedes F1, Morgan Motors Company, UTC Aerospace, Denso, QinetiQ & many others.
I would like to wish you every success with your studies. We look forward to working with you and hope that
you enjoy your time with us.
Mike Basini
Course Management and Staff Involvement
Role
Name
Head of Department
Specialism
eMail
Tel. Ext.
Room
Dr Syed Hasan
[email protected]
1733
SA227
Course Leader
Mr Mike Basini
[email protected]
3897
SA225
Faculty Enabling Tutor
Dr Sarah Slater
[email protected]
1492
MI219
Student Advisor
Miss Kimberley Turner
[email protected]
3577
MI024
Educational Aims of the Course
The overall aim of this course is to ensure graduates have a comprehensive engineering education combined
with specialist knowledge of electronics and communications engineering recognised in the professional
engineering community by an accredited degree. This ensures that graduates are equipped with the
appropriate knowledge and enterprising spirit to practise professionally and ethically. Thus, the course will:
address industry’s demand for graduates who can integrate the principles and applications of electronics
and telecommunications engineering, and apply them to the analysis and synthesis of engineering
products and systems across the engineering sector
enable students to pursue professional careers in the electronics or telecommunications engineering field
at a level which requires the exercise of sound judgement, and initiative, and the ability to make informed
decisions in complex and unpredictable circumstances that reflect a responsible, ethical, and socially
aware outlook
furnish students with a detailed understanding of the principles of electrical engineering, electronics,
telecommunications and mechanical engineering science, enabling the rational selection of the most
appropriate approach to solve engineering problems
engender a top-down, systems approach to the analysis, synthesis and realisation of electronic and
telecommunications products and systems.
provide a broadly based education in electrical engineering, electronics, communications engineering and
design allowing scope for entry into a wide range of disciplines within the engineering field.
require students to participate in a group project where the project team members are drawn from a range
of cognate engineering disciplines
develop the ability to research unfamiliar subject areas in Electronics and Telecommunications
Engineering and cognate disciplines, thereby enhancing the creative aspects of engineering design and
innovation
What makes this programme distinctive?
The Department of Engineering and Technology specialises in the integration of the mechanical engineering
and electrical/electronic engineering disciplines. The MEng Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering
course reflects this emphasis and, in addition to gaining in-depth knowledge and understanding of the core
subject, students also gain experience of designing engineering systems that incorporate aspects of the
mechanical and electrical/electronic technologies.
You will be using industry-standard software. In addition to experimental work at the University you will use
Radar equipment at the Cosford Royal Air Force base - the same equipment used to train Air Force personnel.
You will be taught by lecturers who have a wealth of industrial experience in an environment focused on
working with, and supporting engineering and technology companies.
The MEng (Hons) Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering course is one of a small number of
accredited courses that you can undertake as either a full-time or part-time (day-release) student, thus
providing all graduates with equal recognition.
You will participate in a multi-disciplinary group project, necessitating the application of advanced
management techniques in a progressive technological environment.
Course Structure
September (Full-Time)
Year 1
Module
Title
Credits
Period
Type
4MA007
Engineering Mathematics
20
YEAR
Core
4MA008
Engineering Science
20
YEAR
Core
4MA020
Electronic Engineering
20
YEAR
Core
4MA022
Telecommunications Engineering
20
YEAR
Core
4MA021
Applied Engineering
40
YEAR
Core
September (Full-Time)
Year 2
Module
Title
Credits
Period
Type
5MA019
Signal Processing I
20
YEAR
Core
5MA021
Analogue and Digital Electronic Engineering
20
YEAR
Core
5MA022
Analogue and Digital Telecommunications
20
YEAR
Core
5MA023
Control Systems
20
YEAR
Core
5MA020
Embedded Systems Design
40
YEAR
Core
5MA016
Industrial Placement
40
YEAR
Core
September (Full-Time)
Year 3
Module
Title
Credits
Period
Type
6MA011
ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
20
YEAR
Core
6MA021
Signal Processing II
20
YEAR
Core
6MA022
Electronic System Design
20
YEAR
Core
6MA023
Telecommunications System Design
20
YEAR
Core
6MA017
Individual Research Project
40
YEAR
Core
September (Full-Time)
Year 4
Module
Title
Credits
Period
Type
7MA011
Robotics: Sensors and Control
20
YEAR
Core
7MA015
Speech and Audio Signal Processing
20
YEAR
Core
7MA016
Control Engineering II
20
YEAR
Core
7MA017
Business Management and Advanced Analytical Methods
20
YEAR
Core
7MA012
Group Research Project
40
YEAR
Core
Course Learning Outcomes
Learning Outcome
CertHE Course Learning Outcome 1 (CHECLO1)
Demonstrate knowledge of the underlying
concepts and principles associated with your
area(s) of study, and an ability to evaluate and
interpret these within the context of that area of
study
CertHE Course Learning Outcome 2 (CHECLO2)
Demonstrate an ability to present, evaluate and
interpret qualitative and quantitative data, in
order to develop lines of argument and make
sound judgements in accordance with basic
theories and concepts of your subject(s) of study.
CertHE Course Learning Outcome 3 (CHECLO3)
Evaluate the appropriateness of different
approaches to solving problems related to your
area(s) of study and/or work
CertHE Course Learning Outcome 4 (CHECLO4)
Communicate the results of your study/work
accurately and reliably, and with structured and
coherent arguments
CertHE Course Learning Outcome 5 (CHECLO5)
Demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills
necessary for employment requiring the exercise
of some personal responsibility
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 1 (DHECLO1)
Demonstrate knowledge and critical
understanding of the well-established principles
of your area(s) of study, and of the way in which
those principles have developed with an
understanding of the limits of your knowledge,
and how this influences analyses and
interpretations based on that knowledge.
Contributing Modules
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 2 (DHECLO2)
Demonstrate the ability to apply underlying
concepts and principles outside the context in
which they were first studied, including, where
appropriate, the application of those principles in
an employment context
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 3 (DHECLO3)
Demonstrate knowledge of the main methods of
enquiry in the subject(s) relevant to the named
award, and ability to evaluate critically the
appropriateness of different approaches to
solving problems in the field of study
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 4 (DHECLO4)
Use a range of established techniques to initiate
and undertake critical analysis of information,
and to propose solutions to problems arising from
that analysis
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 5 (DHECLO5)
Effectively communicate information, arguments
and analysis in a variety of forms to specialist and
non-specialist audiences, and deploy key
techniques of the discipline effectively
DipHE Course Learning Outcome 6 (DHECLO6)
Demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills
necessary for employment, requiring the exercise
of personal responsibility and decision-making
and undertake further training, developing
existing skills and acquire new competences that
will enable them to assume significant
responsibility within organisations
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 1
(ORDCLO1)
Design and demonstrate creativity in the design
and synthesis of electronic and
telecommunications products, systems, and
processes and apply an innovative approach to
their physical realisation
6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 2 6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
(ORDCLO2)
6MA017 Individual Research Project
6MA022 Electronic System Design
Effectively research unfamiliar subject areas in
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
electronics, telecommunications and cognate
disciplines, and thereby propose and evaluate a
broad range of solutions to engineering problems
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 3 6MA021 Signal Processing II
(ORDCLO3)
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
Select and apply appropriate mathematical
methods to solve problems in the analysis and
synthesis of electronic and telecommunications
engineering systems
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 4
(ORDCLO4)
Lead teams of engineers effectively and ethically,
addressing the prominent engineering, social,
environmental, and commercial issues
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 5 6MA021 Signal Processing II
(ORDCLO5)
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
Select and apply appropriate software packages
for design, analysis, and synthesis applications
and critically evaluate the results
Ordinary Degree Course Learning Outcome 6 6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
(ORDCLO6)
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
Relate theory and practice, thereby facilitating
the efficient realisation of viable electronic and
telecommunication engineering products and
systems
Honours Degree Course Learning Outcome 1
(DEGCLO1)
Design and demonstrate creativity in the design
and synthesis of electronic and
telecommunications products, systems, and
processes and apply an innovative approach to
their physical realisation
Honours Degree Course Learning Outcome 2
(DEGCLO2)
Effectively research unfamiliar subject areas in
electronics, telecommunications and cognate
disciplines, and thereby propose and evaluate a
broad range of solutions to engineering problems
Honours Degree Course Learning Outcome 3
(DEGCLO3)
Select and apply appropriate mathematical
methods to solve problems in the analysis and
synthesis of electronic and telecommunications
engineering systems
Honours Degree Course Learning Outcome 5
(DEGCLO5)
Select and apply appropriate software packages
for design, analysis, and synthesis applications
and critically evaluate the results
Honours Degree Course Learning Outcome 6
(DEGCLO6)
Relate theory and practice, thereby facilitating
the efficient realisation of viable electronic and
telecommunication engineering products and
systems
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 1 (IMACLO1)
6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
6MA017 Individual Research Project
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
6MA021 Signal Processing II
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
6MA021 Signal Processing II
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
6MA011 ESEE: Economic, Social, Ethical and Environmental
6MA022 Electronic System Design
6MA023 Telecommunications System Design
7MA012 Group Research Project
Design and demonstrate creativity in the design
and synthesis of electronic and
telecommunications products, systems, and
processes and apply an innovative approach to
their physical realisation
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 2 (IMACLO2)
Effectively research unfamiliar subject areas in
electronics, telecommunications and cognate
disciplines, and thereby propose and evaluate a
7MA012 Group Research Project
7MA016 Control Engineering II
7MA017 Business Management and Advanced Analytical Methods
broad range of solutions to engineering problems
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 3 (IMACLO3)
Select and apply appropriate mathematical
methods to solve problems in the analysis and
synthesis of electronic and telecommunications
engineering systems
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 4 (IMACLO4)
7MA011 Robotics: Sensors and Control
7MA015 Speech and Audio Signal Processing
7MA016 Control Engineering II
7MA012 Group Research Project
Lead teams of engineers effectively and ethically,
addressing the prominent engineering, social,
environmental, and commercial issues
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 5 (IMACLO5)
Select and apply appropriate software packages
for design, analysis, and synthesis applications
and critically evaluate the results
Integrated Masters Course Learning
Outcome 6 (IMACLO6)
7MA011 Robotics: Sensors and Control
7MA015 Speech and Audio Signal Processing
7MA016 Control Engineering II
7MA012 Group Research Project
Relate theory and practice, thereby facilitating
the efficient realisation of viable electronic and
telecommunication engineering products and
systems
PSRB
None
Employability in the Curriculum
The field of information systems, supported by electronics and communications, is extensive and services a
rapidly expanding market. Graduates from this course will find many opportunities for well-paid jobs such as
designing communication networks, managing networks, or developing novel electronic systems. The
multidisciplinary nature of the electronics and telecommunications engineering subject area provides career
opportunities in a broad spectrum of industries, from consumer goods design and manufacture to large
process control plants, and of course the telecommunications sector. The course enables graduates to attain
management positions, with significant levels of responsibility within a relatively short time. Graduates may
also study for a taught postgraduate degree, MSc, or a research degree, MPhil/PhD, within the Department.
The transferable skills gained during the course, including: project management, group working, and
analytical thinking, also enable a graduate to pursue careers in nontechnical fields such as: law, accountancy,
authoring, and computing.
Teaching, Learning and Assessment
The following learning activities support the achievement of the course learning outcomes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Reading – core and supplementary texts, journals and electronic sources
Group activities aimed at developing team-working skills in a multi-disciplinary environment
Preparing written presentations; both analytically and textually based
Oral presentations; both group and individual
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Lectures and laboratory sessions
Group and individual tutorials
Engaging in informed discussion with fellow students and academic staff in tutorials and seminars
Information retrieval from articles, journals and books for assessments
Problem-based learning techniques, e.g. design projects, case studies
Providing solutions to meet real world problems/requirements
Solving closed and open ended problems
Using computer software and hardware to model and simulate products and engineering systems
Engaging in informed discussion with fellow students and academic staff in tutorials
Student led presentations
Researching articles, journals and books for assessments
Applying systematic methods to develop (novel) solutions
Coursework reports (technical and discursive)
Preparing for unseen examinations
Writing Project dissertation
Critical examination of data
Working within accepted guidelines
Simulation and problem solving exercises.
Reference Points
The following PSRB and QAA subject benchmarks have been consulted in the development of learning
outcomes of this course, thereby ensuring that the academic requirements of the appropriate PSRBs
(Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)) are addressed:
Engineering Council UK-SPEC 2015
Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) - descriptors for a qualification at Honours (H)
level and at Masters (M) level:
The School of Engineering and the Built Environment publication “Equality and Diversity in the Curriculum”
has been used to inform the design of the teaching and learning materials and the assessment regime.
Academic Regulations Exemptions
In situations where Professional Body and University regulations differ, the respective Professional Body (IET)
regulation will have precedent over the exempted University regulation;
Section 4.5.1 - Exemption for the use of 40 credit modules (one each at Level 4, Level 5, Level 6 and Level 7)
which cannot be compensated in order to enable students to progress with a minimum of 100 credits at each
level of study. All other undergraduate modules can be compensated only if students achieve a marginal fail
(between 30% and 39%) and for no more than 20 credits at each level of study (a maximum of 40 credits in
total). There is no compensation for independent study or postgraduate modules. Deferment of a project
submission date at Level 6 or Level 7 is allowed only for exceptional reasons and for a maximum of three
months.
Section 4.5.8 - Exemption permitting MEng students to progress from Level 6 to Level 7 of their integrated
masters qualifications with a minimum lower second class degree classification.
Section 5.4.1 - Exemption to use all Level 5, Level 6 and Level 7 module grades excluding placement modules
(assessed using a Pass/Fail marking scheme) to contribute towards overall MEng classifications with
aggregated weightings at each level of study as follows;
Level
4
5
6
7
Weighting
20%
30%
50%
Students who fail the MEng qualification at Level 7 will be eligible to receive the BEng qualification achieved
at Level 6. For students being admitted directly at Level 6, on degrees which do not have professional
accreditation, student degree classifications are based upon the average of all Level 6 and Level 7 modules
according to weightings listed below as follows;
Level
4
5
6
7
Weighting
50%
50%
For accredited programmes, the PSRB will assess the educational qualifications of an applicant for either IEng
or CEng status based upon the receipt of a certified transcript from the University Registry (and with the
applicant’s authorisation).
APPROVED on 17/5/2018.
Support with your studies
University Learning Centres are the key source of academic information for students providing access to:
Physical library resources (books, journal, DVDs etc.)
Study areas to allow students to study in the environment that suits them best: Social areas, quiet and
silent areas.
A wide range of online information sources, including eBooks, e-journals and subject databases
Academic skills support via the Skills for Learning programme
Students on campus can attend workshops or ask for one-to-one help on a range of skills such as
academic writing and referencing.
Dedicated Subject Pages to enable you to explore key online information sources that are recommended
for their studies.
Physical access to local libraries both in UK and overseas via SCONUL and WorldCat agreements
We also strongly advise you to download to “MyWLV” student app. MyWLV is a single point of personalised
access to the variety of systems the University offers. This includes pulling through relevant information (e.g.
deadlines, timetables) and linking to underlying systems.
Leave of Absence:
The University allows breaks in learning of up to two years and there is a process for applying for a leave of
absence, which can be accessed through your e:Vision account. Initially you will need to apply for the leave of
absence, which could be for medical, parental or personal reasons. A short-term absence, such as annual leave,
must not be recorded as a break. The course leader will consider, and where appropriate agree, the leave of
absence application. A return date will be identified and agreed for a suitable point in the programme.
Additional course fees may be incurred as a result of a leave of absence and you are advised to discuss this
with the Faculty Student Services team prior to application.
Course Specific Support
Enhanced learning support is provided in the following areas:
1. Support for mathematics and analytic-based modules via the Mathletics software package
2. Face-to-face tutorial sessions in mathematics
3. Report writing and oral/presentation communications skills
4. Learning centre – literature searches and information searches
5. Practical/lab/experimental activities and reporting
6. Research for project work (major individual, group at M-level, plus group assignments at L5/6)
7. Promotion of independent learning during tutorials, face-to-face sessions.
University provided support:
As well as providing general counselling support the University Counselling Service provides short courses
on topics such as "Self Confidence", "Stress Management and Relaxation" and "Life Skills". They also provide
study skills and academic support, providing short courses such as provide help in areas such as "Writing and
Assignment Skills", "Exam Techniques", "Enhancing Professional Skills", "Personal Development Planning"
and "Making Choices for the Future."
In addition to the subject knowledge that you will gain from studying on your course, there are opportunities
available to develop a range of skills that will help with your academic work; such academic skills include
giving presentations, group work, academic writing, referencing and time management.
The Learning and Skills Team in Learning and Information Services (LIS) offer year-round academic skills
support and guidance to all students. Students who are new to academic study and unsure of how to get
started, or any student who wants to improve on their academic performance can attend drop-in sessions and
workshops, or obtain advice via email or Skype. More details about how the Learning and Skills Team can
help you are available at; http://www.wlv.ac.uk/skills
Contact Hours
In higher education, the term ‘contact hours’ is used very broadly, to refer to the amount of time that you
spend learning in contact with teaching or associated staff, when studying for a particular course.
This time provides you with the support in developing your subject knowledge and skills, and opportunities
to develop and reflect on your own, independent learning. Contact time can take a wide variety of forms
depending on your subject, as well as where and how you are studying. Some of the most common examples
are:
lectures
seminars
tutorials
project supervisions
demonstrations
practical classes and workshops
supervised time in a studio/workshop
fieldwork
external visits
work-based learning (including placements)
scheduled virtual interaction with tutor such as on line, skype, telephone
In UK higher education, you as the student take primary responsibility for your own learning. In this context,
contact time with teaching and associated staff is there to help shape and guide your studies. It may be used
to introduce new ideas and equip you with certain knowledge or skills, demonstrate practical skills for you to
practise independently, offer guidance on project work, or to provide personalised feedback.
Alongside contact time, private or independent study is therefore very significant. This is the time that you
spend learning without direct supervision from, or contact with, a member of staff. It might include
background reading, preparation for seminars or tutorials, follow-up work, wider practice, the completion of
assignments, revision, and so on.
50 Day Engagement:
You will be withdrawn from the University if you fail to engage with the academic requirements of your
course of study, within 50 days of the course start date, following repeated and reasonable attempts by the
University to contact you.
Course Specific Health and Safety Issues
All students in the faculty of Science and Engineering are required to take and pass their
Schools/Departments Health and Safety Assessment. All assessments are available via the Faculty of Science
and Engineering Student Information topic in Canvas and you will only be allowed to carry out any practical
work once you have passed the relevant assessments. https://canvas.wlv.ac.uk/courses/9679
It is essential that you read and understand the relevant codes covering the work within your specialist area
and that you check them regularly for updates. All assessments should be completed before teaching
commences.
Any student who currently has access to a restricted area, such as the Rosalind Franklin Building, via their ID
card will have their access revoked at the start of the academic year unless they have passed their
Schools/Departments Health and Safety Assessment. Students should be aware that any attempt to bypass
the security systems can lead to disciplinary action.
Course Fact File
Hierarchy of Awards:
Master in Engineering with Honours Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering with Honours Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering
Diploma of Higher Education Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering
Certificate of Higher Education Engineering
University Statement of Credit University Statement of Credit
Course Codes:
MA006Q01UV
MA006Q31UV
Awarding Body / Institution:
University of Wolverhampton
School / Institute:
School of Engineering
Category of Partnership:
Not delivered in partnership
Location of Delivery:
University of Wolverhampton
Teaching Institution:
University of Wolverhampton
Full-time
Part-time
4 Years
8 Years
Published: 06-Jul-2018 by Alexandra Hitch
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