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ME 351 Syllabus Spring 2020

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ME 351: ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS
SPRING 2020
SCHEDULE NUMBER 22182
COURSE INFORMATION
Instructor: Joaquin Camacho
Class Days: MW
Class Times: 3:30 – 4:45 PM
Class Location: WC - 201
Office Hours Times: Mon & Wed 2:00 – 3pm
or by appointment
Office Hours Location: E-323H
***SCHEDULE NOTE (GM ON SCHEDULE OF CLASSES WEBSITE)***
EXAM 1 FEB 22
10:00 AM – 11:15 AM AT HT-140
EXAM 1 APR 11
10:00 AM – 11:15 AM AT HT-140
ALL ME351 SECTIONS WILL HAVE EXAMS TOGETHER ON SATURDAY
COURSE OVERVIEW
Catalog entry: Analysis and design of gas and vapor power cycles, and refrigeration systems.
Generalized property relations for gases and gas-vapor. Air-conditioning. Combustion and
chemical equilibrium. Design of engineering systems and processes.
Course objectives:
1. To provide a thorough understanding of the application of classical thermodynamics to
practical problems. Applications include gas turbine engines (power generation and
aircraft), vapor power and refrigeration/heat pump systems, and air conditioning
systems.
2. To provide an introductory treatment of thermodynamics for an expanded range of
materials including ideal gas mixtures, real fluids, and reacting systems.
3. To provide limited design experience for systems requiring significant consideration of
thermodynamics.
COURSE PREREQUISITES
Mechanical Engineering 350
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STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, students will be able to:
1. Represent the power generation process in common mobile and stationary power
plants, and refrigeration systems and heat pumps, as a thermodynamic cycle.
2. Conduct first and second law analysis of the thermodynamic cycles to determine
system performance and suggest improvements.
3. Apply thermodynamic relations and physical property relations, tables and charts for
the analysis of gas and vapor mixtures, phase transformations, and chemically
reacting systems.
4. Conduct first law analysis of chemically reacting systems to determine product
temperature and composition.
5. Determine the thermodynamic state of a reacting mixture in chemical equilibrium.
6. Apply first and second law principles to design basic energy conversion systems, select
working fluids, and estimate the effects of pressure, temperature, and flow rate on
the system performance.
7. Communicate effectively the knowledge of thermodynamic principles, energy balance
equations, and the use of physical property relations, tables, and charts for the
analysis of energy conversion and air-conditioning systems.
ABET STUDENT OUTCOMES
1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying
principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with
consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social,
environmental, and economic factors
3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations
and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions
in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership,
create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet
objectives
6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret
data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning
strategies.
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8. An ability to apply principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics (including
multivariate calculus and differential equations); to model, analyze, design, and realize
physical systems, components or processes.
9. An ability to work professionally in either thermal or mechanical systems areas.
MAPPING OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLO) TO ABET STUDENT OUTCOMES
ME 351 SLO
ABET Student
Outcome
Represent the power generation process in common mobile and 1, 8, 9
stationary power plants, and refrigeration systems and heat pumps, as
a thermodynamic cycle.
Conduct first and second law analysis of the thermodynamic cycles to 1, 8, 9
determine system performance and suggest improvements.
Apply thermodynamic relations and physical property relations, tables 1, 8, 9
and charts for the analysis of gas and vapor mixtures, phase
transformations, and chemically reacting systems.
Conduct first law analysis of chemically reacting systems to determine 1, 8
product temperature and composition.
*Determine the thermodynamic state of a reacting mixture in chemical 1, 8
equilibrium.
Apply first and second law principles to design basic energy conversion 1, 8, 9
systems, select working fluids, and estimate the effects of pressure,
temperature, and flow rate on the system performance.
Communicate effectively the knowledge of thermodynamic principles, 1, 8, 9
energy balance equations, and the use of physical property relations,
tables, and charts for the analysis of energy conversion and airconditioning systems.
COURSE MATERIALS
The following materials are required.
Textbook: Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 9th edition, M.J. Moran, H.N. Shapiro, D.B.
Boettner, M.B. Bailey, John Wiley & Sons, 2018.
COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONDUCT
There will be two lectures per week, two mid-terms, and a comprehensive final exam. The lecture
schedule for Fall 2019 is shown below:
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Week
1
2
3
4
Date
1/22
Topic
Review – Work, Heat Transfer,
Properties
Samples
Reading
2.17,
2.24, 2.33,
Chapters 2,
2.36, 2.43, 3.25,
3
1/27
Review – First Law
Chapter 4
1/29
Review – Second Law, Entropy
Balance, Exergy
Chapters 5,
6, 7
2/3
2/5
2/10
Ideal Gas Mixtures and processes
Psychrometry
Psychrometry
12.1 – 12.3
12.4
12.5-12.9
2/12
2/17
2/19
2/24
2/26
10.1 – 10.3
10.1 – 10.3
10.6
8.1, 8.2
10.29, 10.32
8.4, 8.9, 8.14
8.3, 8.4
8.18, 8.19, 8.27
13.1, 13.2
13.2, 13.9, 13.20,
13.26
13.2, 13.3
13.31, 13.34, 13.42,
13.49
3/11
3/16
3/18
Vapor Compression Cycles
Vapor Compression Cycles
EXAM 1 on Saturday
Heat Pumps
Vapor Power Systems, Ideal Rankine
Cycle
Rankine Cycles with Superheat,
Reheat, and Regeneration
Stoichiometry of Reactions, Energy
Analysis
Energy Analysis of Reactions, Flame
Temperature
Entropy Analysis of Reactions
Chemical Equilibrium Criteria
Equilibrium Composition
3.41, 3.79
4.14, 4.20, 4.34,
4.47, 4.78
5.40, 5.44, 5.54,
6.14, 6.58, 6.68,
6.107
12.7, 12.15, 12.17
12.19, 12.24
12.30, 12.33, 12.36,
12.37, 12.54, 12.60,
12.62
10.6, 10.14, 10.20
10.6, 10.14, 10.20
13.53, 13.56
14.2, 14.7
14.18, 14.22
3/23
3/25
Equilibrium Flame Temperature
van’t Hoff Equation, Ionization
3/30
4/1
4/6
4/8
4/13
4/15
4/20
SPRING BREAK
SPRING BREAK
Simultaneous Reactions
EXAM 2: Saturday, April 11
Generalized Equations of State
Property Relationships for Real Fluids
Reciprocating Cycles, Air Standard
Assumptions
Air Standard Otto Diesel Cycle
Air Standard Otto Diesel Cycle
Air Standard Brayton Cycle
Air Standard Brayton Cycle
Other Cycles
FINAL EXAM 3:30 – 5:30 PM
13.5
14.1
14.2
14.3.2
14.4.1
14.4.2,
14.4.3
3/2
3/4
3/9
EXAM
4/22
4/27
4/29
5/4
5/6
5/13
4
–
14.28, 14.33
14.35, 14.37, 14.40
14.4.4
14.41, 14.42
11.1
11.2, 11.3
9.1 – 9.3
11.4, 11.8
11.20, 11.22
9.9, 9.14, 9.18
9.6
9.6
9.7, 9.8
9.7, 9.8
9.30, 9.40
9.30, 9.40
9.42, 9.57
9.42, 9.57
IN CLASS
Homework Problem Sets:
Problem sets will be assigned every 2-3 weeks. Two types of homework assignments will
be assigned at the same time: (1) shorter problems taken from the textbook and completed
online using Blackboard (2) longer problems requiring written responses with partial credit
given along the way. The homework assignments will include detailed instructions that need
to be followed to receive full credit.
1. Late homework will not be accepted. Exceptions will only be made following the
Medical Excuse Policy stated in the SDSU General Catalog.
2. The following rules will determine the homework problem set grade:
a. The instructions and requested steps must be followed. For example,
assumptions, equations, sketches, control volumes, diagrams, etc. will often be
requested.
b. The intermediate steps must be written down so that the grader can follow the
logic of the problem solver.
c. For the written problem sets, a correct solution is required for full credit but
accuracy will be weighted less than rules 2a. and 2b.
Please use the following format in solving problems:
Given: State in your own words what is given in the problem statement. Example
“Initial temperature T1 = 30°C.”
Given information serves two purposes. First, it helps you determine which terms in your
basic equations you can calculate directly. Second, it helps you determine how many
equations you need - the number of equations must equal the number of unknowns.
Find: List what the problem wants you to find. Example “Pressure P2 = ?”
You use this information to guide you in your choice of basic equation(s); obviously, the
basic equation(s) you choose should include the quantity (quantities) of interest.
A sketch of system and selected control volume.
Your sketch/control volume will help you identify where energy and mass flow into/out
of your system or control volume.
Assumptions: Examples: “Steady state” “Uniform flow” “Ideal gas” etc.
Assumptions are listed to help you eliminate terms in your basic equations.
Basic Equations: Your basic equation(s) must be one (those) listed on the attached ME
350 basic equation sheet.
Solution: This includes correct units.
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EXAMINATIONS: There are two one-hour examinations and one two-hour comprehensive final
examination. Make-up hourly examinations are not given. If you are ill (with acceptable
medical proof from a physician), have an emergency (with proof), or have prior approval of
your instructor to miss an examination on account of some university business, your grade for
the missed examination is the weighted average of the remaining one-hour examination and
final examination. In all other cases you receive a grade of zero for that examination.
All examinations, including the final, are closed book and closed notes. A list of basic equations
will be distributed.
You should bring to each examination a calculator that works and one in which the batteries will
not go dead during the examination (the instructors do not bring extra calculators to the
examinations), pencil(s), eraser, and a straight edge for help when drawing control volumes or
diagrams.
Exam Calculator Policy
A basic scientific calculator like the TI-30XIIs should be used during the examinations. Your
calculator should have only basic functionality (no added bells or whistles). Students retain the
freedom to use their calculator of choice on homework, labs, and projects; however, students
are encouraged to practice using their exam calculator to make sure they fully understand its
functionality. The reason for this policy is to address growing inequity and academic dishonesty
issues due to different calculators used by students during exams.
The use of PDAs, smartphones/iPhones, Blackberry-type devices, cell phones, tablet/laptop
computers, or any other sources of communication (wireless or otherwise) are strictly
prohibited during examinations. Doing so is cheating. If you bring a cell phone or other
communication device to the examination, it must be turned off prior to the start of the exam,
stored below your seat, and only picked up as you leave the examination room for the final
time. It cannot to be turned on again until after you have exited the examination room,
otherwise it will be considered a form of cheating and treated as such.
EXAMINATION GRADING: On the examinations, points are deducted if you do not follow the
problem solution format as outlined earlier. The problems will be usually set up so that the
Given and Find are provided. Points are deducted if you do not list your assumptions, indicate
what the system looks like, and what basic equations you have used. In addition, you will lose
points if you do not provide sufficient detail during your analysis so that the instructor can
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understand what you have done and why you have done it (i.e., which terms have been
dropped from any and all basic equations, as well as your justification for dropping those
terms). Finally, you must carry units through during your analysis, and must avoid sign errors
in all energy quantities, plus correctly identify the direction of work and heat transfer terms.
Problem solutions that cannot be followed because of illegibility will also lose points.
Any form of dishonesty (including cheating) on an examination, as defined by results in at least a
grade of zero for that examination and you will be reported to the University. After more than
one instance of dishonesty of any kind within ME 351, you will receive a failing grade for ME 351.
Any dishonesty on the final examination will result in a zero on the final examination.
SEE THE ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY BELOW FOR MORE DETAILS
COURSE ASSESSMENT AND GRADING
Final score out of 100 points calculated and a letter grade will be assigned as follows:
Mid-Term Exam 1
Mid-Term Exam 2
Final Exam
Homework
20%
20%
40%
20%
The grades will be allocated in the class according to the following ranges. The Instructor reserves
the right to change the range, but it will not be stricter than indicated below.
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
93+
90 to 9388+ to 9082 to 8880 to 8278 to 8072 to 7870 to 7268 to 707
D
DF
62 to 6860 to 6260-
ACADEMIC HONESTY
1.
Homework Cheating and Plagiarism Policy: Collaboration with classmates is encouraged
but each student must submit individual homework problem sets with original work. The
Disciplinary Action section of the Cheating and Plagiarism Policy listed in the SDSU General
Catalog will be referred to when cheating is suspected.
2.
Midterm Examination Cheating Policy: Collaboration and Copying from classmates is NOT
ALLOWED during the midterms exams and this will be considered to be cheating. The Disciplinary
Action section of the Cheating and Plagiarism Policy listed in the SDSU General Catalog will be
referred to when cheating is suspected.
3.
Final Examination Cheating Policy: Collaboration and/or Copying from classmates is NOT
ALLOWED during the final exam and this will be considered to be cheating. The Disciplinary Action
section of the Cheating and Plagiarism Policy listed in the SDSU General Catalog will be referred
to when cheating is suspected.
The University adheres to a strict policy regarding cheating and plagiarism. These activities will
not be tolerated in this class. Become familiar with the policy and what constitutes plagiarism
(http://studentaffairs.sdsu.edu/srr/cheating-plagiarism.html). Any cheating or plagiarism will
result in failing this class and a disciplinary review by the University. These actions may lead to
probation, suspension, or expulsion.
Examples of plagiarism include but are not limited to:
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•
•
•
•
•
Using sources verbatim or paraphrasing without giving proper attribution (this can
include phrases, sentences, paragraphs and/or pages of work)
Copying and pasting work from an online or offline source directly and calling it your
own
Using information you find from an online or offline source without giving the author
credit
Replacing words or phrases from another source and inserting your own words or
phrases
Submitting a piece of work you did for one class to another class
TURNITIN
Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for
textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers will
be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose
of detecting plagiarism of such papers. You may submit your papers in such a way that no
identifying information about you is included. Another option is that you may request, in writing,
that your papers not be submitted to www.turnitin.com. However, if you choose this option you
will be required to provide documentation to substantiate that the papers are your original work
and do not include any plagiarized material.
TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR BLACKBOARD
Student support for Blackboard is provided by the Library Computing Hub, located on the 2nd
floor of Love Library. They can be reached at 619-594-3189 or [email protected]
INTERACTING WITH INSTRUCTOR
The Instructor will assign two full hours of office hours per week. Please use this time to talk with
your instructor in person regarding any questions, concerns and suggestions you might have. If
you really need to talk, but cannot make it to office hours, please email your instructor to
schedule a meeting time. Queries submitted via email may or may not receive a timely response
based on the severity of the issue, the brevity of the response required and the ease of finding
the answer elsewhere (such as by consulting the course syllabus). Please make sure your emails
to the instructor follow the proper protocol of formal communication to elicit a response. The
instructor will go over this protocol (format) in class on the first day.
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STUDENT ABILITY SUCCESS CENTER
If you are a student with a disability and believe you will need accommodations for this class, it
is your responsibility to contact Student Disability Services at (619) 594-6473. You can also learn
more about the services provided by visiting the Student Ability Success Center website.
To avoid any delay in the receipt of your accommodations, you should contact Student Disability
Services as soon as possible. Please note that accommodations are not retroactive, and that
accommodations based upon disability cannot be provided until you have presented your
instructor with an accommodation letter from Student Disability Services. Your cooperation is
appreciated.
STUDENT SERVICES:
A complete list of all academic support services is available on the Academic Success section of
the SDSU Student Affairs website.
For help with improving your writing ability, the staff at the SDSU Writing Center is available in
person and online.
Counseling and Psychological Services offers confidential counseling services by licensed
psychologists, counselors, and social workers. More info can be found at their website or by
contacting (619) 594-5220. You can also Live Chat with a counselor
http://go.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/cps/therapist-consultation.aspx between 4:00pm and
10:00pm, or call San Diego Access and Crisis 24-hour Hotline at (888) 724-7240.
COPYRIGHT POLICY
SDSU respects the intellectual property of others and we ask our faculty & students to do the
same.
It is best to assume that any material (e.g., graphic, html coding, text, video, or sound) on the
Web is copyrighted unless specific permission is given to copy it under a Creative Commons
License. More information about the use of copy written material in education as part of the
TEACH Act and Copyright Fair Use Guidelines. Whenever possible, you should attribute the
original author of any work used under these provisions.
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