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1201 FINE 130

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Winter 2020
FINE 130 Online
University of Waterloo
Course Schedule
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/course-schedule.aspx
Week
Module
Week introduction:
1
getting
started: first
things first
Week module 04:
5
the power of
type
Weight
(%)
Activities and Assignments
Due Date
1. login to LinkedIn Learning
and make sure you have
access to the FINE 130
Introduction to Digital
Imaging playlist of tutorials.
2. subscribe to Photoshop CC
software.
3. submit screenshots of your
LinkedIn Learning playlist
and your Photoshop CC
receipt to the introduction
assignment:
screenshots dropbox.
Friday,
January 10,
2020 at
11:55 PM
Ungraded
introduce yourself
Monday,
January 13,
2020 at
11:55 PM
Ungraded
Groups for ad-ding critique will
be created
Check
after
Friday,
February
7, 2020 at
4:30 PM
text as message
Monday,
February
10, 2020 at
11:55 PM
10%
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Week module 05:
6
culture
jamming
FINE 130 Online
ad-ding
University of Waterloo
Monday,
February
24, 2020 at
11:55 PM
10%
Reading Week (Saturday, February 15, 2020 to Sunday, February 23, 2020)
Week module 05:
culture
7
jamming
ad-ding critique
Monday,
March 2,
2020 at
11:55 PM
5%
Week module 06:
8
the art and
act of social
Week and political
9
engagement
protest poster
Monday,
March 16,
2020 at
11:55 PM
15%
Week
12
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Contact Information
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/contact-information.aspx
Announcements
Your instructor uses the Announcements widget on the Course Home page during the
term to communicate new or changing information regarding due dates, instructor absence,
etc., as needed.
You are expected to read the announcements on a regular basis.
To ensure you are viewing the complete list of announcements, you may need to click Show
All Announcements.
Discussions
This course is designed to provide students with extensive information and resources so
that assignments can be completed independently, without in-class instruction. This being
said, questions do arise. In order to streamline the communication process between
instructor and student, there are several discussion topics* available for your use:
General Discussion is for student to student communication. Your instructor may drop in
at this discussion topic but will not participate in the discussions.
Ask the Instructor is for questions relating to academic issues (e.g., course content,
deadlines, etc.) This allows other students to benefit from your question. This topic will be
monitored once every weekday and your instructor will make every effort to reply to
questions within 24–48 hours. Questions received during weekends will be replied to on the
following Monday. Please note that academic questions sent via email will be answered on
the Ask the Instructor discussion topic.
Photoshop Software Related Questions is for technical questions related to Adobe
Photoshop CC. When posting to this board, please specify the version that you are using so
that you receive the appropriate answer. Turnaround is the same as above (24-48 hours,
weekend questions will be answered Monday).
Contact Us
Who and Why
Contact Details
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Instructor
Courserelated
questions
(e.g., course
content,
deadlines,
assignments,
etc.)
Questions of
a personal
nature
Questions
about
Tumblr or
SmugMug
FINE 130 Online
University of Waterloo
Questions of apersonal nature can be directed to your
instructor.
Instructor: Adam Glover
[email protected]
Your instructor checks email frequently and will make every
effort to reply to your questions within 24–48 hours. Questions
received during weekends will be replied to on the following
Monday. When emailing your instructor, please include the
following:
Include your course number in the subject line, and
include your full name and student number in your
signature.
Clearly describe your reason for emailing and include any
relevant background information that your instructor
may need to help you.
Let your instructor know what you have already done,
and if appropriate propose a solution. For example, if
you are requesting an extension due to a family
emergency, please indicate that you have reviewed the
deadline and grading policies, provide documentation,
and let your instructor know how and when he or she
could expect to receive your assignment.
Regardless of your reason for emailing, never email your
instructor at his or her personal email address unless you
are given explicit permission to do so.
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Information
Systems &
Technology
Problems
accessing
LinkedIn
Learning
using your
WatIAM
credentials
LinkedIn
Learning
FINE 130 Online
University of Waterloo
Information Systems & Technology or email the IST Service
Desk at [email protected]
Include your full name, WatIAM user ID, student number, and
course name and number.
LinkedIn Learning Help
Technical
problems
with
LinkedIn
Learning
(e.g., playing
videos)
Technical
Support,
Centre for
Extended
Learning
Technical
problems
with
Waterloo
LEARN
[email protected]
Include your full name, WatIAM user ID, student number, and
course name and number.
Technical support is available during regular business hours,
Monday to Friday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM (Eastern Time).
LEARN Help Student Documentation
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Learner Support
Services,
Centre for
Extended
Learning
General
inquiries
WatCards
(Student ID
Cards)
Examination
information
FINE 130 Online
University of Waterloo
Student Resources
[email protected]
+1 519-888-4002
Include your full name, WatIAM user ID, student number, and
course name and number.
*Discussions can be accessed from the Course Home page by clicking Connect and
then Discussions on the course navigation bar.
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Course Overview and Structure
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/course-structure.aspx
Overview
This online digital course is designed to introduce students to current digital imaging
software that students will use to create assignments. This course is taught from a Fine Arts
perspective.
Course Objectives
This course gives students introductory instruction/experience in creating art using digital
imaging tools. While students will attain a degree of familiarity and comfort with the tools
and techniques used to create digital artwork, there is a strong emphasis on content,
conceptualization, and originality. This will be considered in the evaluation of student
projects.
Through online lectures, tutorials and discussions, students will gain an understanding of
the language used to discuss digital technologies and a critical context for the politics,
power, and history of digital technologies and image making and the impact of technologies
on contemporary art practices.
Learning Outcomes
Through hands-on experience, students will gain an understanding of the software
and a level of comfort with the tools and will learn how to apply this knowledge
formally, aesthetically, and conceptually.
The course will equip students with the tools and knowledge to complete the work
that is asked of them with increasing confidence and skill level.
The course will teach students to develop a critical eye in relation to digital imaging.
Students will gain an understanding of how contemporary artists are using digital
processes and methodologies in their art practice.
Students will understand the historical precedents and artistic movements that led up
to the explosion and ubiquity of digital culture.
Modules
This course is broken up into a series of Modules. Each Module has a slide lecture, textbook
chapters, an assignment, and resources and examples. The lecture is made up of a
presentation that functions as a slideshow with audio augmentation. The slideshows are
meant to provide background information and context for the assignment and to give
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students an understanding of how digital image making can be contextualized through the
work of both historical and contemporary artists. In some of the Modules, you will find a
presentation of student work of students who have done a similar assignment in the past.
These examples are not necessarily “the best of”: they provide a cross-section of approaches
to the assignment.
Assignments
On the assignment page, there will be a explanation of the project. Be sure to read the
details carefully. Along with a description of the project, there will be information about the
format and the resolution that you need to use to build your Photoshop file, information
about how to save and what to name your file(s), as well as a breakdown of the grading
criteria for the assignment. Assignment due dates will be posted in the Course Schedule. Be
sure to hand in your work on time. Late work will be penalized (see Course Policies). In some
modules, a workflow for the assignments has been prepared as a separate document.
The instructor will make every effort to mark student projects in a timely manner. Students
can expect to receive a mark on work within a couple of weeks of the assignment’s due
date, provided it has been submitted on time.
The instructor may also create private online galleries from the work created for the
assignments in this class to allow students in the class to view the work of their peers. These
galleries will not be made available to the public outside of the class and will be taken down
promptly at the end of the term.
Tutorials
This course relies on a selection of tutorials from LinkedIn Learning titled FINE 130
Introduction to Digital Imaging, curated by Adam Glover. These tutorials are a key
component of the course and are available to you for free through your University tuition.
The full, free versions of the LinkedIn Learning tutorials will only be available to you when
you have logged into the playlist using your WatIAM userid and password.
These core tutorials will be used throughout the course in each of your Modules. Specific
chapters from a selection of these tutorials have been carefully curated for each Module
and Assignment. Students are expected to review the appropriate chapters before
beginning each assignment and access them when needed for technical information. This is
your primary resource for technical instruction in this course. Your instructor will expect you
to have consulted the material in the tutorials before asking technical questions on the
Photoshop Software Related Questions discussion. This discussion topic can be
accessed from the Course Home page by clicking Connect and then Discussions on the
course navigation bar.
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Resources
There will also be a resource section with relevant links to artists and websites that may not
be covered in the lecture due to copyright issues. This research material is important as it
serves to build your knowledge base and introduces you to a vocabulary that can be used to
talk about the digital image. When we built this course, we were respectful of copyright law.
We have been given permission to use all of the images you will find in the lectures. The
copyright permission does not extend beyond their use in the online presentation, so
please do not copy or use these images for any other purpose.
Using Found Material
Students should also have an understanding of copyright issues for images that they use in
their own work. For most of your assignments, you will be encouraged to take your own
images. In cases where you use an image taken by someone else, you will need to submit
the source image along with an MLA citation and URL of where you found it.
Day-to-Day Habits You Need to Follow
Get into the habit of backing up your work on an ongoing basis. Technology fails
unexpectedly, and you need to store your projects in folders besides locations on your
computer. A USB storage/memory key makes the most sense. I would recommend a 4-8 GB
storage device. Other possibilities include an external storage drive. There are a wide variety
of both available in different models.
Remember to save on an ongoing basis. If the computer crashes and you have not saved
your work, it is gone, and starting over REALLY HURTS. This is an online course, so the
instructor cannot see what you are building or how hard you have been working. It is also a
good idea to save versions of your files in case one gets corrupted. Use the convention of
v1, v2, etc., at the end of the filename. As you develop your project, you may want to go
back to an earlier version that you like better.
This online course was developed by Lois Andison, with instructional design and multimedia
development support provided by the Centre for Extended Learning. Further media production
was provided by Instructional Technologies and Multimedia Services.
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About the Course Author, Contributor, Editors, and
Instructor
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/about-the-course-author.aspx
Lois Andison — Course Author
© University of Waterloo
Educational Background
This course was authored by Fine Arts Assistant Professor Lois Andison. Lois has taught at
the University of Waterloo since 2007. She has instructed students in Digital Imaging,
Sculpture, and a TechArt course which brings artist and engineering students together to
collaborate on projects. Lois developed this course paying attention to the fact that
although this is a course that deals with software, it is taught from a Fine Arts perspective.
The projects are developed with the mandate that content matters and ideas and concept
are valued along with originality and experimentation.
With a background in both Fine Arts and Design, Lois brings lots of experience with her to
the online environment. She is a practicing artist with a gallery exhibition history of over 20
years, and she has worked professionally as both a print and web designer.
Current Research
Driven by her interests in kinetic sculpture and studies in motion, Lois’s research moves
through both the high- and low-tech mechanical worlds as well as video and photography.
Philosophy of Teaching
“As an educator, I am concerned with developing a student’s conceptual and practical skills
in tandem, while instilling a passion for art and artmaking. To make the most of the
educational experience, I believe that students need to move beyond preconceived notions
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and what they already know to open themselves to creative possibilities that could change
their ways of working and seeing. It is important for me that during their stay in the
program, students not only discover a personal artistic vocabulary, but also a means to talk
about their work critically while relating it contextually to the past as well as the present.” ~
Lois
Natalie Hunter — Course Contributor and Editor
© University of Waterloo
Educational Background
Natalie Hunter graduated with an MFA from the University of Waterloo and received her
Bachelor of Art in Visual Art with a Concentration in Curatorial Studies with a First Class
Standing from Brock University. She has educated art students since 2009, teaching
Introduction to Digital Imaging, Contemporary Art, and Digital Photography. She has also
aided in teaching courses such as Introduction to Visual Culture, Introduction to Western Art
History, Introduction to Sculpture, Expressive Drawing, Digital Imaging, and co-teaching
Introduction to Methods, & Practices of Drawing/Experimental Drawing. She is the recipient
of several awards including an Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Creation Project Grant, the
Keith and Winifred Shantz Internship Grant, Sylvia Knight Award in Fine Arts (co-recipient),
Ontario Graduate Scholarship, and a President’s Graduate Scholarship from the University
of Waterloo. She has shown her work in Canada and in the United States in numerous
exhibitions, including: the Hamilton Supercrawl, the Art Gallery of Hamilton, University of
Waterloo Art Gallery, Thames Art Gallery, Rodman Hall Arts Centre, Mississauga Living Arts
Centre, Hopkins Centre For the Arts at Dartmouth College (U.S.A), the Art Gallery of
Windsor, Centre 3 for Print and Media Arts, Ryerson Image Centre, and Museum London. In
2017 she completed a permanent public art installation commissioned by the City of
Kitchener for the Bridgeport Community Centre titled Pieces of Light.
Current Research
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Natalie Hunter is a contemporary artist situating herself between the disciplines of
photography, installation, sculpture, and video. Her work attempts to reconstruct
experiences from memory, and questions notions of nostalgia; forming connections
between past and present, facts and fiction. Drawing upon personal narratives and cultural
history she investigates the relationships between photographic, cinematic, cultural, and
personal memory. Often poetic, introspective, and emotional, her sensorial and spatial
installations investigate the materiality of photographic image making while exploring
notions of self, memory, the archive, space, and time. Through poetic inquiries into
perception, light, space, mind, matter, and lived experience, her work considers the material
and experimental possibilities of hybrid image and object making in a digitally saturated
culture.
Philosophy of Teaching
"As an artist and instructor I hope to engage students in a positive and creative
environment where a combination of technical skill, material exploration, and conceptual
ideas may be shared and challenged. I encourage my students to develop their own skill
sets and consider creative problems through a multimedia approach. Students are
motivated to think critically of their personal histories and daily experiences as catalysts for
material exploration and the development of original ideas. Through this, it is my hope that
students develop their own understanding of the world they inhabit while developing a
personal language that nurtures an enthusiasm for making. I believe that the skills,
methods, and concepts that students learn in post secondary arts education produce
engaged individuals that apply their knowledge within the communities they inhabit later in
life. It is the sharing of knowledge, ideas, and skills with others willing to learn that inspires a
passion for art making."
Adam Glover — Course Instructor, Contibutor, and Editor
© University of Waterloo
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Educational Background
Adam is a contemporary visual artist and digital media instructor and has worked as a
graphic designer for both print and the web in the past. At the University of Waterloo Adam
teaches workshops and courses in digital media, sculpture and drawing. Adam received his
Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto and his Master of Fine Arts specializing in
digital media and installation art from the University of Windsor. In addition to teaching
Adam also works for the Fine Arts department as the digital, multimedia and studio
technician.
Current Research
Adam is a practicing visual artist whose research focuses on the philosophical field of
emergence and its relationship to and representation by digital display technologies. "My
artistic practice typically takes the form of sculptural and architectural art installations
utilizing video, audio and a wide variety of display technologies, including Christie Digital's
MicroTiles, projectors, televisions and other digital signage display equipment."
Philosophy of Teaching
“I endeavor to foster a creative environment for the students to give them the tools
necessary to become critically-minded individuals. I hope to provide them with the ability to
contextualize their artistic projects and to foster new connections in their knowledge of the
world. I try to offer up information and make it understandable and relevant. Ultimately, I
wish to impart to my students the realization that the educational journey never really ends
and that there are always new things to learn and new ways to develop oneself.”
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Materials and Resources
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/materials-and-resources.aspx
system requirements
Internet connection: Students will need to have a Broadband (high-speed) Internet
connection to take this course.
Computer requirements: The main concern about computer system requirements is
that your computer needs to have the processing power and the RAM to run
Photoshop. Please check the Adobe Photoshop System Requirements (CC) to review
those requirements.
Software: This course requires access to Adobe Photoshop CC. Adobe Creative Cloud
is a subscription-based delivery system for Adobe Creative Suite. Educational
subscriptions are available directly from Adobe with your student ID for $15.99/month
US, and include other programs, such as InDesign, Illustrator, After Effects, Premiere,
etc. For more information visit Adobe. There is also the option to purchase the
Photoshop Photography Bundle for $9.99 per month US which includes Photoshop CC
and Lightroom CC
Students will need to purchase software and have it installed to proceed with the first
assignment. As Adobe Photoshop CC is available in both Mac and PC versions, the
student needs to be aware of what computer platform (Mac or PC) they will be using
before purchasing the software.
technical training
This course relies on a selection of tutorials from LinkedIn Learning titled FINE 130
Introduction to Digital Imaging, curated by Adam Glover. These tutorials are a key
component of the course and are available to you for free through your University tuition.
The full, free versions of the LinkedIn Learning tutorials will only be available to you when
you have logged into the playlist using your WatIAM userid and password.
These core tutorials will be used throughout the course in each of your Modules. Note that
you are not required to learn EVERYTHING in ALL of the tutorials. Specific chapters from a
selection of these tutorials have been carefully curated for each Module and Assignment.
Follow the list provided under technical training in each of your Modules. Each technical
training list will guide you through tutorials directly related to each Module and Assignment.
Make sure to follow the list carefully in order to stay on track.
Photoshop CC 2019 One-on-One: Fundamentals
Photoshop CC 2019 Essential Training: The Basics
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Photoshop CC 2019 Essential Training: The Basics
Photoshop CC 2019 Essential Training: Design
Photoshop CC 2019 Essential Training: Photography
Photoshop CC: Mastering Selections
Adobe Pen Tool: Mastery
Photoshop Selections: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques
Photoshop CC for Photographers: The Basics
Drawing and Painting in Photoshop: The Great Training
Photoshop Masking and Compositing: Fundamentals
If you encounter problems accessing LinkedIn Learning using your WatIAM credentials,
please visit Information Systems & Technology or email the IST Service Desk
at [email protected]
For technical problems with LinkedIn Learning (e.g., playing the video tutorials) please visit
LinkedIn Learning Help.
additional requirements
Digital Camera: Students will need to take photos in this course. For the photos to be
of a high enough quality, you will need to have a digital camera with a minimum of 8
megapixels. Cell phone cameras are not ideal but some models are acceptable. Please
ask your instructor for details.
Scanner: Students will need to scan images from time to time. If you do not have a
scanner, please try to find some place near you where you can scan an image
(perhaps a library).
Course Reserves
Course Reserves can be accessed using the Library Resources widget on the Course
Home page.
other resources
optional textbook
Optional:
1. Andrew Faulkner and Conrad Chevez. Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a Book (2017
release) textbook + Web Edition. Adobe Systems. 2017.
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The standalone ebook + Web Edition (without print book) must be ordered directly
from AdobePress. Students who purchase the ebook will be emailed an access code that
can be used to activate their ebook + Web Edition on AdobePress/Peachpit.
Once you have your own copy of the optional textbook you can proceed to sign up for
access to the Web Edition thorough AdobePress. Instructions for accessing the Web Edition
can be found in the introduction of the optional textbook.
For textbook ordering information, please contact the W Store | Course Materials +
Supplies.
For your convenience, you can compile a list of required and optional course materials
through BookLook using your Quest userID and password. If you are having difficulties
ordering online and wish to call the Waterloo Bookstore, their phone number is +1 519-8884673 or toll-free at +1 866-330-7933. Please be aware that textbook orders CANNOT be
taken over the phone.
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Grade Breakdown
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/grade-breakdown.aspx
Each assignment contains a Marking Rubric outlining the parameters by which the
assignment will be marked. The example grading rubric below outlines the mark breakdown
with an explanation of how it applies.
Assessment Rubric for Assignment #1: collage reveal and conceal
5% of final grade
80%100%
Exceptional work. Thorough understanding of the technical skills presented
in the module. A sophisticated and critical concept that addresses either the
“reveal” or “conceal” strategies through collage. The work demonstrates
deep involvement technically and conceptually. The work could stand on its
own in aesthetic terms outside of the context of a school assignment.
70%
- 79%
Good work that demonstrates an understanding of the technical skills
presented in the module and a strong concept. The student clearly
understands collage and communicates an original concept through
“revealing” or “concealing”.
60%
- 69%
Satisfactory work. The work may be successful technically but lacks
conceptual thought, or presents a strong concept but fails on a technical
level. A good deal of effort reflected, but it does not address the topic of
collage through either “revealing” or “concealing”. Superficial concept
communicated. More work necessary.
50%
- 59%
Barely adequate work. Minimal effort and commitment in terms of technical
proficiency of the tools presented in the module and the lack a well
developed concept. The student does not convey a sufficient understanding
of the assignment guidelines and goals. Very little effort. Poor work.
33%
- 49%
Insufficient or incomplete work. Little to no effort demonstrated. Failure.
0%
No submission.
Your assignment grade will contain a percentage number grade. Please refer to each
individual assignment rubric for a breakdown of your grade.
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Course Policies
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/course-and-department-policies.aspx
Project Delivery: Always follow the specifications listed in the project. You will be asked to
use specific filenames for each project. Make sure that you follow the instructions written
on the assignment page. All of the assignments will require a written statement as to the
intent of your project. This will be listed on the assignment page. Make sure you do it, as
failing to will affect your overall mark. It needs to be submitted at the same time as the
project is due and will not be accepted if submitted later.
The instructor will make every effort to mark student projects in a timely manner. Students
can expect to receive a mark on work within a couple of weeks of the assignment’s due
date, provided it has been submitted on time.
Time Management: You should expect to spend an average of 10 hours per week viewing
the presentations and resources, going through the tutorials, and completing course
assignments. Assignments in this course are progressive and cumulative. That means each
activity is built on the activity that came before it.
Deadlines: Assignments are due by the date given in the Course Schedule. Extensions to
assignment deadlines will be granted only in case of illness or emergency. Please contact
the instructor to make your request and provide credible documentation (such as a doctor’s
note). Assignments submitted late without approved extensions will be subject to late
penalties of 10% per week to a maximum of 50% of the assignment grade. Students may
not hand in late assignments past 5 weeks. Late penalties are not recoverable.
LEARN Outages: In event of service interruptions, deadlines will be adjusted in accordance
with the Service Interruption Guidelines
How the Grading Structure Works
Grades are assigned according to the following parameters:
80-100: This grade indicates exceptional work that, to varying degrees, demonstrates a
thorough understanding of the issues presented in class. The work demonstrates a deep
involvement on the part of the student and could stand on its own aesthetic terms outside
of the context of a school assignment. Excellent work.
70-79: This grade indicates notable work that, to varying degrees, shows that the student
has understood the topic and has made every effort to fulfill the requirements of the
assignment to the best of his or her ability. Good work.
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60- 69: This grade indicates, to varying degrees, satisfactory work. The work may be
successful on one level, but it fails on another. Furthermore, the work may reflect a good
deal of effort, but it does not adequately address the topic at hand. Acceptable work.
50-59: This grade indicates, to varying degrees, barely adequate work. The work displays
minimal effort and commitment on the part of the student and does not convey a sufficient
understanding of the topic at hand. Poor work.
33-49: This grade indicates, to varying degrees, totally insufficient or incomplete work.
Failure.
Fine Arts and Plagiarism and Copyright
The offense of plagiarism as defined by Policy 71 - Student Discipline includes visual and
aural plagiarism of works of art (drawings, photographs, graphics, video, sound, ideas, etc.
conceived/made by other artists). The rules of conduct that apply to text-based work at the
University of Waterloo also apply to work completed for studio-based assignments and
research. There are two issues to consider with visual and aural plagiarism: ethics, i.e.,
expectations related to academic integrity as outlined in Policy 71; and copyright
infringement, for which you could also be legally liable. Plagiarism and copyright
infringement occur when you create an artwork that is substantially similar to the original
source. For example, making a drawing in pencil based on a photograph that you find in a
magazine may constitute plagiarism and be an infringement of copyright.
Please take note of the following five points:
1. All work submitted for evaluation must be your own. If the submitted work is
determined not to be your own, the Academic Discipline Procedure of Policy 71 will be
invoked.
2. If you use any visual or aural material, such as images from the internet, magazines,
books, websites of other artists, or from any source that can be cited, you must
acknowledge/cite those references. Failure to do so will be deemed a violation of
academic integrity and possibly an infringement of copyright and the Academic
Discipline Procedure of Policy 71 will be invoked.
3. If you are using visual or aural material that you have not made yourself, you must
make an appointment with your instructor/s to discuss the ramifications of using
‘found’ or ‘appropriated’ material.
4. Any original images used as the basis for any work you create – whether manipulated
digitally or manually, or otherwise incorporated or appropriated for your work – must
be properly cited, and must accompany your final work at the time of submission or
evaluation.
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5. When using found material for assignments, you must provide a jpg copy of the
original source file, with a proper MLA style citation which includes a link directing to
the found source material. If you are unsure of how to properly cite image material,
take a look at How-To Guide: Image Citation (PDF). If you are unsure if you are allowed
to use a found image, take a look at this info-graphic to help you assess if an image
under copyright can be used in your creative assignments: Can I use this picture?
A note on copyright free, and Creative Commons:
Resources are available in the public domain that are identified as copyright free or that fall
under licenses from Creative Commons. Public domain is a term used for works that are not
protected by copyright law. If an image is in the public domain then you are allowed to use
it—to copy it, to manipulate it and to distribute it. Works identified as Creative Commons
allow varying degrees of use. In this case, the authors decide how you can use their images.
Helpful Links:
CARFAC (Canadian Artists Representation / Le Front Des Artists Canadiens)
Wikimedia Commons and flickr have databases of digital files that are available for
use. However, you need to check the conditions of use as they vary.
The Copyright Act in Canada was recently amended to reflect the current digital
landscape. Bill C-11: The Copyright Modernization Act.
A conversation that occurred on the US-based site, Copyright Advisory Network
answers some of the basics related to US Copyright, images and fair use.
Copyright Basics | Copyright at Ryerson
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University Policies
contensis.uwaterloo.ca/sites/courses/1201/FINE-130/toc/syllabus/university-policies.aspx
Submission Times
Please be aware that the University of Waterloo is located in the Eastern Time Zone (GMT
or UTC-5 during standard time and UTC-4 during daylight saving time) and, as such, the time
that your activities and/or assignments are due is based on this zone. If you are outside the
Eastern Time Zone and require assistance with converting your time, please try the Ontario,
Canada Time Converter.
Accommodation Due to Illness
If your instructor has provided specific procedures for you to follow if you miss
assignment due dates, term tests, or a final examination, adhere to those
instructions. Otherwise:
Missed Assignments/Tests/Quizzes
Contact the instructor as soon as you realize there will be a problem, and preferably within
48 hours, but no more than 72 hours, have a medical practitioner complete a Verification of
Illness Form.
Email a scanned copy of the Verification of Illness Form to your instructor. In your email to
the instructor, provide your name, student ID number, and exactly what course activity you
missed.
Further information regarding Management of Requests for Accommodation Due to Illness
can be found on the Accommodation due to illness page.
Missed Final Examinations
If this course has a final exam and if you are unable to write a final examination due to
illness, seek medical treatment and have a medical practitioner complete a Verification of
Illness Form. Email a scanned copy to the Centre for Extended Learning (CEL) at
[email protected] within 48 hours of your missed exam. Make sure you
include your name, student ID number, and the exam(s) missed. You will be REQUIRED to
hand in the original completed form before you write the make-up examination.
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After your completed Verification of Illness Form has been received and processed, you will
be emailed your alternate exam date and time. This can take up to 2 business days. If you
are within 150 km of Waterloo you should be prepared to write in Waterloo on the
additional CEL exam dates. If you live outside the 150 km radius, CEL will work with you to
make suitable arrangements.
Further information about Examination Accommodation Due to Illness regulations is
available in the Undergraduate Calendar.
Academic Integrity
In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo
community are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. If
you have not already completed the online tutorial regarding academic integrity you
should do so as soon as possible. Undergraduate students should see the Academic
Integrity Tutorial and graduate students should see the Graduate Students and Academic
Integrity website.
Proper citations are part of academic integrity. Citations in CEL course materials usually
follow CEL style, which is based on APA style. Your course may follow a different style. If you
are uncertain which style to use for an assignment, please confirm with your instructor or
TA.
For further information on academic integrity, please visit the Office of Academic Integrity.
Turnitin
Turnitin.com: Text matching software (Turnitin®) may be used to screen assignments in
this course. Turnitin® is used to verify that all materials and sources in assignments are
documented. Students’ submissions are stored on a U.S. server, therefore students must be
given an alternative (e.g., scaffolded assignment or annotated bibliography), if they are
concerned about their privacy and/or security. Students will be given due notice, in the first
week of the term and/or at the time assignment details are provided, about arrangements
and alternatives for the use of Turnitin® in this course.
It is the responsibility of the student to notify the instructor if they, in the first week of term
or at the time assignment details are provided, wish to submit the alternate assignment.
Turnitin® at Waterloo
Discipline
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A student is expected to know what constitutes academic integrity to avoid committing an
academic offence, and to take responsibility for his/her actions. A student who is unsure
whether an action constitutes an offence, or who needs help in learning how to avoid
offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration, should
seek guidance from the course instructor, academic advisor, or the undergraduate
Associate Dean. For information on categories of offences and types of penalties, students
should refer to Policy 71 - Student Discipline. For typical penalties, check Guidelines for the
Assessment of Penalties.
Appeals
A decision made or penalty imposed under Policy 70 - Student Petitions and Grievances,
(other than a petition) or Policy 71 - Student Discipline, may be appealed if there is a ground.
A student who believes he/she has a ground for an appeal should refer to Policy 72 Student Appeals.
Grievance
A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has
been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. Read Policy 70 Student Petitions and Grievances, Section 4. When in doubt please be certain to contact the
department’s administrative assistant who will provide further assistance.
Final Grades
In accordance with Policy 46 - Information Management, Appendix A - Access to and Release
of Student Information, the Centre for Extended Learning does not release final
examination grades or final course grades to students. Students must go to Quest to see all
final grades. Any grades posted in Waterloo LEARN are unofficial.
AccessAbility Services
AccessAbility Services, located in Needles Hall, collaborates with all academic departments
to arrange appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without
compromising the academic integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic
accommodation to lessen the impact of your disability, please register with AccessAbility
Services at the beginning of each academic term and for each course.
Accessibility Statement
The Centre for Extended Learning strives to meet the needs of all our online learners. Our
ongoing efforts to become aligned with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act
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(AODA) are guided by University of Waterloo accessibility Legislation and policy and the
World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 . The
majority of our online courses are currently delivered via the Desire2Learn Learning
Environment. Learn more about Desire2Learn’s Accessibility Standards Compliance.
Use of Computing and Network Resources
Please see the Guidelines on Use of Waterloo Computing and Network Resources.
Copyright Information
UWaterloo’s Web Pages
All rights, including copyright, images, slides, audio, and video components, of the content of
this course are owned by the course author and the University of Waterloo, unless
otherwise stated. By accessing this course, you agree that you may only download the
content for your own personal, non-commercial use. You are not permitted to copy,
broadcast, download, store (in any medium), transmit, show or play in public, adapt, or
change in any way the content of these web pages for any other purpose whatsoever
without the prior written permission of the course author and the University of Waterloo,
Centre for Extended Learning.
Other Sources
Respect the copyright of others and abide by all copyright notices and regulations when
using the computing facilities provided for your course of study by the University of
Waterloo. No material on the Internet or World Wide Web may be reproduced or distributed
in any material form or in any medium, without permission from copyright holders or their
assignees. To support your course of study, the University of Waterloo has provided
hypertext links to relevant websites, resources, and services on the web. These resources
must be used in accordance with any registration requirements or conditions which may be
specified. You must be aware that in providing such hypertext links, the University of
Waterloo has not authorized any acts (including reproduction or distribution) which, if
undertaken without permission of copyright owners or their assignees, may be infringement
of copyright. Permission for such acts can only be granted by copyright owners or their
assignees.
If there are any questions about this notice, please contact the University of Waterloo,
Centre for Extended Learning, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1 or
[email protected]
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