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DescriptiveWritingPromptMyFavoriteRestaurant

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Descriptive Essay—My Favorite Restaurant
Getting Started: What should I print?
Student handouts: pages 8-15
Page 8: Descriptive Essay Prompt “My Favorite Restaurant”
Page 9: 5 Senses Planning Map
Page 10: Vivid Words
Page 11: Brainstorm Vivid Words
Page 12: Planning Map
Page 13: Descriptive Essay Tips
Page 14: Writing Introductions and Conclusions
Page 15: Revision Checklist
Assessment Materials: pages 16-17
Page 16: Grading Sheet
Page 17: 6+1 Writing Traits Rubric
Additional Materials (printing optional)
Page 3-6: Suggestions for Teaching the Descriptive Essay
Page 7: Why Plan Your Writing?
Page 18: Alternative Planning Map with hamburgers for younger writers
Page 19 Decorative paper for publishing or presentation (pencil border clip art)
Page 20: Decorative paper for publishing or presentation (marquee border clip art)
Page 21: Decorative paper for publishing or presentation (My Favorite Restaurant sign border clip art)
Page 22: Decorative paper for publishing or presentation (hamburger and hot dog border clip art)
Tips for Teaching:
How long should my students spend on this essay?
It depends on the grade level and experience level of your students. If your students are familiar with
the “basics”, i.e. following a writing prompt, using a planning map, writing paragraphs, etc., you can plan
for these activities to take about a week (spending 45 min-1 hour a day). If you are teaching 3rd graders
(or students that have little experience with essay writing), you may wish to extend the lessons for
several weeks.
How many paragraphs/sentences should I require of my students?
Again, this will depend on grade level and writing experience. For 5 th and 6th graders, I would expect
them to write at least a paragraph for each of the main categories. Depending on time and ability level,
some students can and should write more than a paragraph for each of the main categories.
For 3rd and 4th graders, special needs students, or students with little writing experience, you can easily
adapt the essay’s length. You might, for instance, require a shorter paragraph for each of the main
categories. I have had students that were only required to write a few sentences for each of the main
categories.
I feel strongly that ALL students, regardless of ability level, should include an introduction and conclusion in their writing. Knowing how to write an inviting introduction and a satisfying conclusion is a skill
that will benefit them in all areas of writing for years to come. I have included a reference sheet for
writing introductions and conclusions if you don’t already have a method you use with your students.
© R. Russell
Suggestions for Teaching the Descriptive Essay
These materials are flexible! You don’t need to use them in a specific order. You don’t even have
to use all of the pages. Just use what works best for your students and your teaching style. If you
need a little more guidance, here are some suggestions on how I have used the materials
successfully in my classroom:
Writing Prompt: Step One
Start with introducing the Writing Prompt. Should you start with the
writing prompt before explaining what a descriptive essay is? Yes! The
questions in the writing prompt will hook the students and provide
motivation for learning more about descriptive essays.
Each student will need a copy of the prompt. I suggest using an active
reading or text marking strategy to help students disaggregate important
information in the prompt. Use whatever strategies your students are
used to, or try MUTT.
MUTT stands for Mark Up The Text. My students know that “MUTT”
means they must read the text 3 times. As they read, they will use
“marks” to respond to the new information. (Circle any unknown words
or confusing information. Underline or highlight key or important words
and phrases. Jot down short notes or thoughts in the margins.)
After students finish MUTT, encourage them to share their “marks” with
the class. Show a copy of the prompt on the whiteboard or projector so you can “mark” as the students share. This
will help you to determine if students understand the prompt, as well as give you an opportunity to clear up any
confusion.
5 Senses Planning Map: Step Two
We all know that planning is essential for successful essay writing! If
you need help convincing your students, read the Why Plan Your
Writing page included with this packet.
Each student will need a 5 Senses Planning Map. Ask your
students to close their eyes and think about what their topic looks like.
After a few moments, instruct them to open their eyes and jot down
their ideas under the “What do I see?” column. Do the same for the
remaining categories. Notice that the third category has two pictures.
Tell the students that they can write down what they feel with their
hands (soft, bumpy, sticky, etc.). They can also record emotions—
what they feel with their heart (fear, happiness, embarrassment, etc.). After students fill out their maps independently,
have them share their ideas with a partner or on a big chart for the class to see. Say, “If someone else has an idea
that also applies to your topic, add it to your map.” I encourage my class to share and borrow writing ideas—especially
when learning a new type of writing.
© R. Russell
Suggestions for Teaching the Descriptive Essay (Continued)
Vivid Words: Step Three
Descriptive essays need to use vivid words!
This packet includes a Vivid Words sheet
and also a blank sheet for Brainstorming
Vivid Words.
Give students several minutes to brainstorm
their own words on the blank Brainstorming
Vivid Words sheet. Allow students to
discuss and share words with classmates.
Then pass out the Vivid Words sheet, and
ask students to compare it their list. Did
they have some of the same words? Did
they have vivid words that the sheet did
not? Are there words they didn’t have that
they can add to their list? You may prefer
to skip the brainstorming sheet, and just
have students circle words they like on the
Vivid Words sheet.
Main Ideas Planning Map: Step Four
Each student will need a copy of the Planning Map.
There are also alternative planning maps with cute
shapes. You can choose and copy the maps that work
best for your students. The main sections of the
Planning Map will eventually become the body paragraphs of the essay.
Now students can begin brainstorming and jotting down
ideas for their descriptive essays. They should have their
Five Senses Map nearby for reference. Students do not
need to use complete sentences on the planning map—
words and phrases are fine.
I like to give my students several minutes of “quiet
planning time” for independent writing, and then several
minutes of “discussion time” to share their ideas with
classmates. Again, it is important for your students to
discuss and share their ideas with each other. This can
be done with partners or as a whole class activity.
Allowing discussion will also give valuable insight as to
whether the students are on the right track with their ideas.
© R. Russell
Suggestions for Teaching the Descriptive Essay (Continued)
Body Paragraphs: Step Five
Now that we’ve read the prompt and filled out our
planning maps, it’s time to begin writing some
paragraphs! Each of the main topics on the Planning
Map is designed to become a body paragraph;
however, this is easily adjustable. Beginning writers or
special needs students might only be required to write a
few sentences for each main topic. Older students or
advanced writers may be able to write several
paragraphs for each main topic. You can determine
what length works best for your students. Depending on
your schedule and your students’ ability levels, writing
the body paragraphs can take several days or several
weeks.
The Descriptive Essay Tips sheet should be given to each student as you prepare to write paragraphs. Read the
Descriptive Essay Tips sheet with your students. Discuss what descriptive writing should contain. Read the
examples of descriptive writing. Keep this sheet handy as students draft their paragraphs. I have students keep the
Descriptive Essay Tips sheet in a writing folder so they can use it for this and future assignments.
Writing Introductions and Conclusions: Step Six
All students, regardless of ability level, can benefit from learning
how to write inviting introductions and satisfying conclusions. If
you don’t already have a method for teaching introductions and
conclusions, you can use the Writing Introductions and
Conclusions sheet. It contains student-friendly examples you
can discuss together. It is also an excellent reference for
students to keep in a writing folder. I like to have students write
their body paragraphs first, and then add the introduction and
conclusion at the end.
© R. Russell
Suggestions for Teaching the Descriptive Essay (Continued)
Editing and Revising: Step Seven
While teachers can and should help students revise and edit their writing, it is
important for students to practice assessing and correcting their own writing. The
Revision Checklist is a student-friendly sheet that can help students assess their
writing and make adjustments. Have your students fill out the checklist after writing
the first draft of the essay. They will use a checkmark on areas that are satisfactory
and an X on areas that they want to improve. Another tip is to have students read
the essay aloud to a classmate, parent, or teacher. Reading aloud allows them to
“hear” parts of the essay that need correction or revision.
Final Draft and Publishing: Step Eight
Knowing their work will be published and
displayed is a great motivator for students
to do their best work! Writing Paper with
decorative borders is included in this
packet.
Assessment: Step Nine
A Grading Sheet is included so you can provide feedback on the final essay. I
like to show the grading sheet to the students several times throughout the
writing process so they will know exactly how they will be graded. Also
included is the Rubric, which
can help you determine how
individual students are
progressing on writing goals.
You may also want to have
students try evaluating their
writing with the rubric.
© R. Russell
Why plan your writing?
A guide for helping students understand
why pre-writing is important
It never fails. After passing out that first writing prompt and planning sheet, at least
one student groans and asks, “Why do we have to do all of this planning? Why
can’t we just start writing?” This is a story I share with my students to help them
see the importance of pre-writing and planning. Maybe it will help you.
I ask my students to pretend they are going to take a trip to Florida and visit Disney
World. Then I ask, “Would you just get into your car, start driving, and hope you get to
Disney World someday?” After the laughter subsides, I engage the students in a
discussion about why planning is necessary to make their trip successful. I record
their answers on a chart to ensure that we have planned thoroughly.
Students usually begin by explaining that they would need a map to get to Florida.
(These days, however, my students call it a GPS app.) As the discussion continues,
students mention necessities such as gas, money, luggage, first aid kits, hotel
reservations, etc. (I should mention that I live and teach in Indiana, so a trip to Florida
is quite an undertaking. If you happen to live in Florida, pick another destination for
your students.)
After we “plan” our trip to Disney World, I explain that writing an essay is like taking a
trip. We don’t just start writing and hope we get there someday. To ensure that
we get to our destination, we have to plan. Of course, our destination is an essay that
fulfills the requirements of the prompt. More importantly, our destination is a
finished product that students are excited about and take pride in.
Tell your students that just as we needed a chart to plan our trip to Florida, we will
make a chart before we start writing. This way, we will stay on course and make
sure we get to our destination. This is where I integrate planning sheets, graphic
organizers, or thinking maps into the discussion.
Just a warning, I usually have to remind students of this story several times throughout
the year. I still get some groans when it’s time to fill out the planning sheets. When
that happens, I always ask, “Why do we have to plan first?” The students always
answer, “If you don’t plan first, you probably won’t get there.”
© R. Russell
Descriptive Writing Prompt
My Favorite Restaurant
What is your favorite restaurant? What do you see, hear,
and smell when you enter? What delicious foods do they
serve? Why is visiting this restaurant such a great
experience? Write a descriptive essay about your favorite
restaurant. Describe the atmosphere, your favorite foods,
and the experience of being there.
Think about these questions as you
fill out your Planning Map:

What kind of atmosphere does the restaurant have? Is it
fancy or casual? What are the decorations like? Is it loud
or quiet? Can you describe the atmosphere so the reader
can almost see it?

What are your three favorite dishes at the restaurant?
What makes them so delicious? Can you describe the
dishes so the reader can almost taste them?

Why is visiting the restaurant such a great experience? Do
they have music, games, funny waiters, etc.? Is the
service fast and friendly? Do you have a special memory
of being there with a friend or relative? Do you go there for
special occasions (like birthdays)? Can you describe the
experience so the reader can feel how great it is to be
there?
© R. Russell
My Favorite Restaurant 5 Senses Planning Map
Imagine you are visiting your favorite restaurant. What do you see, hear, feel, taste, and smell at your
favorite restaurant? Write what you sense in the appropriate boxes below.
OR
What do I
What do I
see?
hear?
What
feel?
do I
What do I
What do I
taste?
smell?
© R. Russell
VIVID Words to Describe Food
Circle the words you want to use for your essay.
delectable
saucy
garlicky
creamy
sweet
mashed
crunchy
hot
toasted
flaky
scrumptious
rich
© R. Russell
Brainstorm vivid words
you can use to describe food!
© R. Russell
My Favorite Restaurant Planning Map
Restaurant Atmosphere:
Three Favorite Dishes:
Restaurant Experience:
Vivid Food Words:
© R. Russell
Descriptive Essay Tips
Descriptive Writing Should:
Paint a picture in the reader’s mind.
You want to make your reader feel that they have met a particular person,
visited a specific place, or held a certain object in their hands.
Pretend that you have a photograph of a person, place, or object. You
aren’t allowed to show it to your friend, but you describe it so well that your
friend can imagine exactly what the picture looks like. That’s descriptive
writing!
Use vivid and creative words.
Pick words that will make your topic come alive! Stay away from vague
words, like, “nice, cute, bad, good.”
Are you writing about your favorite meal?
Don’t say, “The spaghetti and meatballs were good!”
Say, “The meatballs were juicy and tender. The tangy and garlicky sauce
danced on my tongue, and I sighed with pleasure.“
See the difference?
Use the five senses.
Describe what the reader should feel, see, hear, taste, and/or smell. Using
as many senses as possible will help your reader “see” your picture! Write
so your reader will see the sunrise, hear the music, taste the pumpkin pie,
smell the roses, or feel the kitten’s fur.
Limit use of characters, dialogue, and action.
Descriptive writing doesn’t usually have characters talking (dialogue).
Descriptive writing doesn’t have a plot with lots of action. If you have to
use a little dialogue or action in your description, make sure it adds to the
picture you are trying to get your reader to see in their mind.
Allow the reader to feel your emotions.
An important part of descriptive writing is making the reader feel what you
feel about a person, place, or object. If you feel love for the person you
are writing about, your reader should be able to feel it. If you are writing
about your grandfather, how could you describe him so the reader feels
that love? If you are writing about a place that scares you, what
descriptive words can you use so the reader feels your fear?
Examples of Descriptive Writing
Instead of: I was scared to jump off the diving board. It was
really high. I finally did it.
Try This: As I climbed higher and higher on the ladder, my body
started to shake. My throat was as dry as a desert. I could no longer
hear the other kids splashing and laughing. All I could hear was the
rapid beating of my heart. When I finally reached the diving platform,
the people below me looked like ants. It was now or never. I took a
deep breath, closed my eyes, and jumped!
Instead of: I had fun at the beach. It was a very nice day.
I went swimming.
Try This: The sand was scratchy and hot under my feet. I could
hear the sound of seagulls squawking as they flew through the blue
sky. Finally, I reached the water. It was cool and turquoise blue. I
felt like a dolphin as I played in the waves. I tasted salt from the
ocean on my lips. I turned onto my back and floated for a while,
admiring white puffy clouds in the sunny sky. Soon I smelled the
delicious aroma of hot dogs cooking. It was Mom, grilling dinner in a
fire pit on the beach. My mouth watered as I swam to shore.
Instead of: My dog is brown. She is a good dog.
She likes to play.
Try This: My dog is my best friend. She has brown fur, pointy
ears, and a curly tail. She always waits by the window for me to come
home from school. When I come in the door, she gives a little “yip” of
excitement, and her body wiggles all over. I put down my book bag to
pet her, and her fur is soft and silky. Soon she goes to the back door
and looks at me expectantly. I can almost hear her asking to go out
and play. We run and jump and explore together. Her legs are short,
but she can run like the wind!
Use these suggestions, and soon you’ll be describing like a pro!
© R. Russell
Writing Introductions and Conclusions
Writing Introductions
Writing Conclusions
Your introduction should contain two things:
Your conclusion should contain two things:
1. The Hook (H)
1. Restate the Topic (RT)
Your first sentence should “hook” the reader’s attention and make him or
her excited to read the rest of your essay. Here are some examples of
hooks for an essay about pizza:
In this section, you will restate your main idea(s). This could be one
sentence or several sentences, depending on how many main ideas your
essay has. Here are some examples from essays about pizza:
First a Fact: Use real facts to intrigue your reader.
 With the right ingredients, pizza can be healthy snack!
Did you know pizza took the United States by storm before it
became popular in its native Italy?
 As you can see, pizza has an interesting and confusing history.
It’s My Opinion: Express yourself! Use this for persuasive essays.
Many people consider pizza just another type of junk food, but with the
right ingredients, I think it can be quite healthy!
Jump into Action: Drop your reader into the middle of the action.
My party guests gasped in horror as the pizza slipped out of the box and
onto the floor.
Imagine This: Use adjectives to create a vivid picture in the reader ’s
mind.
Mmmm….do you smell that? Fresh from the oven, the scents of hot
bread, spicy pepperoni, and melted cheese make my mouth water.
2. The Topic (T)
After hooking your reader, you will need to tell them what the rest of your
essay will be about. Try not to say, “My topic is…”. Here are some
creative examples of telling the topic after the hooks:
(H)- Did you know pizza took the United States by storm before it
became popular in its native Italy? Here is how pizza became one of the
most popular foods in the United States. -(T)
(H)- Many people consider pizza just another type of junk food, but
with the right ingredients, I think it can be quite healthy! Read on to
discover recipes to make your pizza delicious and healthy! -(T)
(H)- My party guests gasped in horror as the pizza slipped out of the
box and onto the floor. Let me tell you about my worst birthday ever! -(T)
 Even though it was a bad birthday party, I learned an important lesson.
 In conclusion, pizza is not the same food all around the world.
Ingredients and preparation vary greatly depending on where you are.
2. Memorable Moment (MM)
You want your essay to end with something the reader will remember.
This will be the last line of your essay, so make it a memorable one! Here
are some examples of ways to make your final sentence memorable:
May I suggest? Suggest an action or give advice—great for persuasive
essays.
(RT)- With the right ingredients, pizza can be healthy snack! So, the
next time you want a delicious snack that’s also good for you, think
pizza, and try my recipes! -(MM)
Lesson Learned: Tell your reader what lesson you learned—great for
personal narratives.
(RT)- Even though it was a bad birthday party, I learned an important
lesson. Loyal friends are much more important than pizza, decorations,
and presents. -(MM)
Ponder This: Leave your reader with a thought-provoking question to
get them thinking.
(RT)- In conclusion, pizza is not the same food all around the world.
Ingredients and preparation vary greatly depending on where you are.
Which type of pizza do you think you would enjoy the most? -(MM)
© R. Russell
Revision Checklist for “My Favorite Restaurant”
Organization:
I have a great title that is interesting and clever.
I have a strong beginning (introduction) that states my topic and grabs the reader’s attention.
My essay is well-organized. I can read it without getting lost.
Every sentence relates in some way to my main point.
I have a strong ending (conclusion) that restates my topic and is memorable.
Ideas:
I gave examples of the restaurant’s atmosphere.
I described my three favorite dishes.
I described the experience of being at my restaurant.
Voice:
My writing shows that I like this topic.
My writing sounds like me.
My writing gives the reader a clear picture of who I am.
My writing is appropriate for the audience.
Sentence Fluency:
My sentences start in different ways.
I have both long and short sentences in my essay.
I have enough sentences to support my topic.
My essay sounds great when I read it aloud.
Word Choice:
My words make my essay come alive.
My writing isn’t vague. (“stuff, things”)
I used vivid food words.
Conventions:
My words are all spelled correctly.
I used correct capitalization and punctuation.
I indented all of my paragraphs.
I had at least one other student read my essay.
I had at least one adult read my essay. (parent, teacher, uncle, etc.)
© R. Russell
Descriptive Essay:
My Favorite Restaurant
by:________________________________________________
Section
Clever Title
Inviting Introduction
Restaurant Atmosphere
Three Favorite Dishes
Restaurant Experience
Vivid Food Words
Satisfying Conclusion
Correct Spelling
Correct Grammar
Neatness (Appearance and Presentation)
%
/05
/10
/15
/15
/15
/15
/10
/05
/05
/05
Total Score: _______/100
Comments:_____________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
© R. Russell
© R. Russell
Writing Rubric (grades 3-6)
4
3
2
1
Ideas
Organization
Sentence Fluency
Word Choice
Voice
Conventions
The writer’s ideas are clear
and focused. Relevant details
support and enhance the
main topic.
 The main topic is focused,
clearly stated, and strongly
maintained.
 Interesting and accurate
details support the main
topic.
 The reader’s questions are
anticipated and answered.
The writer has an excellent
understanding of
organization. The order and
structure of the writing
smoothly move the reader
through the text.
 Thoughtful use of transition
and signal words show how
ideas connect.
 There is a logical progression
of ideas from beginning to
end.
 There is an inviting
introduction and satisfying
conclusion.
The writer has a good
understanding of
organization. The order and
structure of the writing are
generally smooth.
 Adequate use of transition
and signal words show how
ideas connect.
 There is a mostly logical
progression of ideas from
beginning to end.
 There is an adequate
introduction and conclusion.
The writer’s sentences have
an easy flow and rhythm.
The writing is fluid and
pleasing to read.
 Sentences vary in length and
structure.
 Varied sentence beginnings
add interest and energy to
the writing.
 The flow of the writing is
ideal for expressive oral
reading.
The writer uses words in a
precise, dynamic, and natural
way.
 Words are specific and
accurate. It is easy to
understand just what the
writer means.
 Words add energy and depth
to the writing.
 Word choice is extremely
appropriate for purpose and
audience.
The writer speaks directly to
the reader in a way that is
compelling and engaging.
 The reader feels a strong
connection with the writer,
sensing the person behind
the words.
 The writing reflects a strong
commitment to the topic and
convinces the reader to care
about the topic.
The writer demonstrates an
excellent grasp of standard
conventions.
 Few, if any, errors are
present in spelling,
punctuation, and
capitalization.
 Grammar and usage are
correct and contribute to the
clarity and style of the
writing.
The writer’s sentences
mostly have an easy flow and
rhythm. The writing is
generally fluid and pleasing
to read.
 Most sentences vary in length
and structure.
 Sentence beginnings are not
all alike.
 The flow of the writing
allows for expressive oral
reading.
The writer generally uses
words in a precise, dynamic,
and natural way.
 Words are generally specific
and accurate. The writer's
meaning is understood.
 Words often add energy and
depth to the writing.
 Word choice is generally
appropriate for purpose and
audience.
The writer is mostly sincere
and generally speaks to the
reader in a way that is
compelling and engaging.
 The reader generally feels a
connection with the writer,
sensing the person behind
the words.
 The writing mostly reflects a
commitment to the topic.
Readers generally care about
the topic.
The writer demonstrates an
adequate grasp of standard
conventions.
 Writing contains some errors
in spelling, punctuation, and
capitalization.
 Grammar and usage are
mostly correct and generally
contribute to the clarity and
style of the writing.
The writer has an
inconsistent understanding
of organization. Writing
often lacks a sense of
direction.
 Inconsistent use of transition
and signal words make
following the writing
difficult.
 There is an uneven
progression of ideas from
beginning to end.
 The introduction and
conclusion, if present, are
weak.
The writer has a poor
understanding of
organization. Writing lacks a
sense of direction.
 Few or no transitional or
signal words are present.
 Ideas seem to wander. There
is no progression from
beginning to end.
 The introduction and/or
conclusion is not present.
Some of the writer’s
sentences have an easy flow
and rhythm. The writing can
be awkward or choppy.
 Many sentences are
incomplete or rambling.
 Many sentences follow the
same pattern (subject-verbobject).
 The flow of the writing is
mechanical or choppy and
makes expressive oral
reading difficult.
The writer sometimes uses
words in a precise, dynamic,
and natural way.
 Words are simplistic and do
not enhance meaning.
 Words are sometimes vague
or passive.
 Word choice may at times be
inappropriate for the
purpose and audience.
The writer seems somewhat
insincere and/or not fully
engaged in the topic.
 The tone of the writing may
not be appropriate for the
audience (too silly, sarcastic,
etc.).
 The writer sometimes seems
invested in the topic, but can
sometimes seem insincere or
uninterested.
The writer demonstrates a
partial grasp of standard
conventions.
 Writing contains frequent
errors in spelling,
punctuation, and
capitalization.
 Problems with grammar and
usage often distort meaning
of the writing.
The writer’s sentences lack
flow and rhythm. The
sentences make the writing
unclear and difficult to read.
 Most sentences are
incomplete or rambling.
 Most sentences follow the
same pattern (subject-verbobject).
 This writing does not invite
expressive oral reading.
The writer seldom uses
words in a precise, dynamic,
and natural way.
 Limited or nonspecific word
choice makes the writing lack
clarity or meaning.
 Words are often vague or
unimaginative.
 Word choice does not show
an understanding of purpose
or audience.
The writer seems indifferent
or uninterested in the topic.
 The writer is not concerned
with the audience. The
reader does not get a sense of
the person behind the
writing.
 The lack of interest in the
topic harms the writer’s
credibility. The writing is
lifeless and/or mechanical.
The writer demonstrates a
limited grasp of standard
conventions.
 Errors in spelling,
punctuation, and
capitalization repeatedly
distract the reader.
 Errors with grammar and
usage greatly distort
meaning of the writing.
The writer’s ideas are mostly
clear and focused. Relevant
details support the main
topic.
 The main topic is generally
focused and clear, but some
irrelevant details may be
present.
 Mostly interesting and
accurate details support the
main idea.
 The reader’s questions are
mostly anticipated and
answered.
The writer is beginning to
define the main topic, but
clarity and/or supporting
details may be missing.
 The main topic is not clear,
and many irrelevant details
are present.
 Supporting details are
attempted, but they lack
accuracy or depth.
 The reader is left with some
questions about the main
topic.
The writer’s ideas are
unclear and unfocused.
Supporting details are not
present.
 The writer is still in search of
a main topic.
 Supporting details are not
present.
 The reader is left with many
questions about the main
topic.
My Favorite Restaurant Planning Map
Put Your Ideas in the Hamburgers!
Restaurant Atmosphere:
Three Favorite Dishes:
Restaurant Experience:
Vivid Food Words:
© R. Russell
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© R. Russell
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© R. Russell
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© R. Russell
More coming
soon!
Please Follow Teacher Oasis, as we will be adding more writing lessons, paired texts
for guided reading, and readers’ theater for beginning and advanced readers!
Our goal is to create materials that are concise, relevant, and easy for you to print and
teach. We know you are busy, and we want to provide a place, an oasis, for materials
that are always professional looking, hassle-free, and of the utmost educational quality.
We will have the hammock and cold drinks ready, so stop by often and tell us how we
can help you.
If you downloaded our materials, please leave a rating and tell us what you think!
Feel free to reach out to us at [email protected]
Our store address at Teachers Pay Teachers is:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Teacher-Oasis
About us:
I am a veteran teacher with experience in upper elementary, high school, and special
education. I am passionate about language arts studies. My expertise is in 6 +1 Writing
and guided reading, and I have been developing and implementing curriculum for
these subjects for over 20 years.
My husband, who has been designing multimedia materials professionally for over 20
years, designs the materials. He works at an elementary school and is always looking
for ways to help teachers. His passion is developing multimedia materials and helping
teachers use technology effectively and efficiently.
Also, our materials have been reviewed by a group of educators in various grades
before being placed on TPT. This ensures our materials are mistake free, easy to use,
and teacher tested to give you exactly what you need.
© R. Russell
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