Uploaded by Terrance Lindall

JOHN MILTON'S PARADISE LOST, illustrated by Terrance Lindall

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Contents Copyright
Yuko Nii Foundation 2014
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ABOUT THE ELEPHANT FOLIO
In 2011 and 2012 Terrance Lindall completed work on production of "The
Paradise Lost Elephant Folio," a large 13 x 19 inch book. With 24 k gold
illumination containing 14 full-page Giclee print illustrations, with handpainted borders, using Museo II paper manufactured by Crane’s, which
company makes the paper for our national currency.
The borders of the elephant folio are complete original paintings in
themselves. The original hand-painted borders and historiated initials are
also tributes to humanity’s great achievements, such as music, dance and
architecture, as well as tributes to those individuals and institutions and
friends who have had important influences on Lindall’s ideas or who have
shown substantial support or affinity for his (Lindall’s) artistic work.
There are only two copies in existence. One is in the collection of the
Yuko Nii Foundation and the other is in the world’s most comprehensive
Milton collection, the Robert J. Wickenheiser John Milton Collection in
the Thomas Cooper Library now at the University of South Carlolina.
These two folios are perhaps the most lavish illustrated productions ever
done for Milton’s great epic.
Lindall's art appears on the 2008 cover of the Modern Library’s college
text book The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton,
Edited by William Kerrigan, John Rumrich and Stephen M. Fallon.
Holt Rinehart & Winston used another Lindall image in a 2009 high
school textbook, with a first run of 370,000.
Cambridge University Press uses another Lindall illustration on the
cover of the 2014 Cambridge Companion to Paradise Lost.
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NOTE TO THIS EDITION
After the printing of the first signed and numbered ten all of which have
already been sold, my dear friend and colleague Dr, Robert J.
Wickenheiser suggested a better presentation of the book. Since he is a
major scholar and expert on publication of scholarly material, I felt I
needed to take his suggestions very seriously. Robert said:
“You know you love your cover of your Elephant Folio, as do I, but there's
much to be said for the importance of changing that photo to your
illustrated title page of your Elephant Folio. That shows the style and
design of the illustrated epic by the artist (you); it also underscores that
this is, in fact, an illustrated edition of Paradise Lost.”
Robert also suggested other changes “in the manner of all great
publications,” and I thus have therefore followed his suggestions
scrupulously in this printing of the fourth version of this book.
Also, I have begun numbering this final version from No.1 and will
produce 100 copies. The earlier version will no longer be printed after the
first ten copies.
Terrance Lindall
December 2013
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INTRODUCTION TO LINDALL’S PARADISE LOST
by Yuko Nii
“The written word skims in through the eye and by means of the utterly
delicate retina hurls shadows like insect legs inward for translation. An
immense space opens up in silence and privacy, a space where literally,
anything is possible” John Updike
Updike’s is a wonderful description of why the written word cannot be
superseded and why the written word will endure. Written words in a master’s
hand can conjure landscapes, colors, sensations, music, philosophy and artistic
visions without confining them. And as the words are scanned, the receptive
and imaginative reader, a "sine qua non" part of this formula or process, brings
them to life. As John Milton said: “Books are not absolutely dead things!”
With Paradise Lost, the written word in it’s greatest form, Milton was able to
evoke Updike’s “immense space” and project spectacular landscapes of both
heaven and hell, and create also the monumentally tragic character of Satan,
courageous yet debased, blinded by jealousy and ambition, heroic nonetheless.
The blind poet brings powerful visionary life to one of the world's greatest
stories, id est, the Western legend of man’s creation and fall, a story
encompassing philosophical concepts of free will, good and evil, justice and
mercy, all presented with the greatest artistry to which the written word can
aspire.
The artist Terrance Lindall came to Milton while pursuing a double major in
Western Philosophy and English Literature, graduating Magna Cum Laude
from Hunter College New York City. Paradise Lost, this “greatest work in the
English language," enraptured Lindall because it encapsulates Lindall’s
metaphysical, epistemological and axiological philosophies. Today Terrance
Lindall’s paintings for John Milton's Paradise Lost are perhaps the best-known
illustrations for this epic outside of those by William Blake and Gustave Doré.
Thus the power of Milton today is reflected in how it continues to inspire
artists, writers and intelligent persons at all levels, creating a ripple effect into
society.
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This is a signed and numbered edition commemorating the
30th anniversary of the first illustrated edition of Terrance
Lindall’s Paradise Lost. This volume contains prints of
the pages of the 2012 gold folio,
This is number
of 100 copies
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The Visionary Foal represents
God’s Omniscience
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JOHN MILTON’S PARADISE LOST
ILLUSTRATED AND SYNOPSIZED
By
TERRANCE LINDALL
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“Esse est percipi!”
George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne
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S
ing Heavenly Muse!
Say first, for Heaven hides nothing
from thy view – nor the deep tract of
Hell – say first what caused out
parents in that happy state of Eden to
fall off from their creator. Who first
seduced them to that foul revolt?
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T
he Infernal Serpent, he it was
whose guile stirred up by envy and
revenge deceived the mother of
mankind. What time he trusted to
have equaled the Most High if he
opposed, and with ambitious aim,
against the throne and monarchy of
God, raised impious war in Heaven
and battle proud with vain attempt.
The Infernal Serpent, he it was whose
guile stirred up by envy and revenge
deceived the mother of mankind.
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W
hat time he trusted to have
equaled the Most High if he opposed,
and with ambitious aim, against the
throne and monarchy of God, raised
impious war in Heaven and battle
proud with vain attempt.
Him the Almighty Power hurled
headlong flaming from the ethereal
sky with hideous ruin and
combustion, down to bottomless
perdition, there to dwell in penal fire
who durst defy The Omnipotent to
arms.
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HIDEOUS RUIN & COMBUSTION
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N
ow the thought of both lost
happiness and lasting pain torments
him. Round he throws his baleful
eyes that witnessed huge affliction
and dismay. A dungeon horrible on
all sides round as one great furnace
flamed, yet from those flames no
light, but rather darkness visible
served only to discover sights of woe
where peace and rest can never dwell.
Hope never comes that comes to all,
but torture without end still urges.
Said then the Lost Archangel: “Hail
horrors! Hail infernal world! Meet
thy new possessor: A mind not to be
changed. The mind is its own place
and in itself can make a Heaven of
Hell, a Hell of Heaven. To reign is
worth ambition though in Hell. Better
to reign in Hell than serve in
Heaven!”
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A DUNGEON HORRIBLE
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SATAN BUILDS A CITY IN HELL
N
igh
on
the
plain
with
wondrous art a fabric huge rose like
an exultation, with the sound of
dulcet symphonies and voices sweet,
built like a temple. Meanwhile, the
heralds by command of sovereign
power, with awful ceremony and
trumpet sound, throughout the host
proclaim a solemn council to be held
in Pandemonium, the high capital of
Satan and his peers.
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PANDEMONIUM
S
atan exalted thus displayed:
“Powers and Dominions! I give not
Heaven for lost. Whether for open
war or covert guile we now debate.
Who can advise may speak.”
Moloch, the strongest and fiercest
spirit that fought in Heaven, these
words thereafter spake: “My sentence
is for open war.
“Turning our tortures into horrid
arms, He shall see black fire and
horror shot among His angels, which
if not victory is yet revenge.”
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NONE BUT ME!
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M
oloch, the strongest and
fiercest spirit that fought in Heaven,
these words thereafter spake: “My
sentence is for open war.
“Turning our tortures into horrid
arms, He shall see black fire and
horror shot among His angels, which
if not victory is yet revenge.”
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MOLOCH
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O
n the other side rose up Belial.
Though his tongue dropped manna,
to nobler deeds timorous and slothful:
“What if from above should
intermitted vengeance arm again His
red right hand to plague us, and Hell
should spout her cataracts of fire
threatening hideous fall upon our
heads? This would be worse. War
therefore dissuades.”
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BELIAL
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B
eelzebub, than whom, Satan
except, none higher sat, seemed a
pillar of state. On his front engraven
deliberation sat while thus he spake:
“Thrones and Imperial Powers! War
hath determined us and foiled with
loss irreparable. What if we find
some easier enterprise? There is a
place, the happy seat of some new
race called ‘man’ to be created.
Thither let us bend our thoughts and
where their weakness seduce them to
our party that their God may prove
their foe. This would surpass
common revenge.” The bold design
pleased highly. With full assent they
vote.
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BEELZEBUB
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S
atan, whom now transcendent
glory raised above his fellows thus
spake: “Long is the way and hard that
out of Hell leads up to light. But I
should ill become this throne if aught
of difficulty or danger could deter me
from attempting. Wherefore mighty
powers, intend at home against a
wakeful foe while I abroad through
all the coasts of dark destruction seek
deliverance for us all. This enterprise
none shall partake but me!”
And Satan, with thoughts inflamed of
highest design, puts on swift wing
and toward the gates of Hell explores
his solitary flight. At last appear Hellbounds and the gates impaled with
circling fire yet unconsumed. Before
the gates there sat on either side a
formidable shape!
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ON SWIFT WING
T
he one seemed woman to the
waist and fair. The other shape, black
as night it stood, terrible as Hell. The
monster came fast with horrid strides.
Hell trembled as he strode.
Satan undaunted thus began: “What
art thou that dare’st athwart my way
to yonder gate? Retire or taste thy
folly!”
The goblin replied, “Art thou that
traitor angel? Reckonest thyself with
spirits of Heaven where I reign king –
thy king and lord?!” So spake the
grisly terror. So matched they stood,
for never but once more was either
like to meet so great a foe.
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THE GRISLY TERROR
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A
nd now the Snakey Sorceress
with hideous outcry rushed between:
“O father, what intends thy hand
against thy only son? What fury, O
son, possesses thee to bend that
mortal dart against thy father’s
head?”
To her Satan returned: “Why thou
call’st me father and that phantasm
my son? I know thee not, nor ever
saw sight more detestable than him
and thee.”
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THE SNAKEY SORCERESS
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T
he portress of Hell-gate replied:
“Hast thou forgot me then, once
deemed so fair in Heaven when in
sight of all the seraphim with thee
combined in bold conspiracy against
Heaven’s King? All of a sudden
miserable pain surprised thee, while
thy head fast thick flames threw forth
till out of thy head I sprung.
“All the host of Heaven recoiled and
called me ‘Sin.’ But I with attractive
graces won the most adverse, thee
chiefly, who becam’st enamored.
And such joy thou took’st with me
that my womb conceived a growing
burden. At last this odious offspring
whom thou see’st, thine own
begotten, tore though my entrails,
that all my nether end thus grew
transformed. I fled and cried out
‘Death!’ Hell trembled at that
hideous name and sighed from all her
caves. I fled, but he pursued, and in
embraces forcible and foul begot
these yelling monsters.”
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S
atan, now milder, thus answered
smooth: “Dear daughter, since thou
claim’st me and my fair son here
show’st me, know I come no enemy
but to set free from this dark home of
pain both he and thee, and myself
expose to tread the unfounded deep
to search and bring ye to the place
where thou and Death shall dwell at
ease.”
Both seemed highly pleased. Thus
from her side the fatal key she took.
On a sudden open fly the infernal
doors, redounding smoke and ruddy
flame before a vast illimitable ocean.
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T
he wary fiend at last his sail-
broad vans he spread for flight. Into
the expanse and through the shock of
fighting elements he wins his way.
Now at last the sacred influence of
light appears that Satan now with
ease wafts on the calmer wave and
weighs gladly to behold far off the
emphereal Heaven with opal towers,
once his native seat, and, fast by,
hanging in a golden chain, this
pendant world. Thither he hies.
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THIS PENDANT WORLD
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S
o on he fares and to the border
comes of Eden where nature crowns
with her enclosure green. Blossoms
and fruits at once appeared with gay
enameled colors mixed. Nature boon
poured forth profuse on hill and dale
and plain, where the Fiend saw all
kind of living creature, new to sight
and strange. Two of far nobler shape,
erect and tall, clad in naked majesty,
seemed lords of all, for in their look
the image of their Glorious Maker
shown. Satan, still in gaze where first
he stood, recovered sad: “O Hell!
What do mine eyes with grief
behold? Ah gentle pair, ye little know
how nigh your change approaches,
when all these delights will vanish
and deliver ye to woe. Hell shall
unfold to entertain you two. And
should I at your harmless innocence
melt, as I do, yet reason, honor and
empire with revenge compels me
now to do what I should abhor.”
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This page is also the cover for the
The Cambridge Companion to Paradise Lost.,2013
HARMLESS INNOCENCE
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A
seraph winged now is come
into the blissful field. Adam called
hither Eve and Raphael thus began:
“Son of Heaven and Earth attend!
That thou art happy owe to God.
That thou continuest such, owe to
thyself. Freely we serve, in this we
stand or fall. And some are fallen
from Heaven to deepest Hell. How
shall I relate the ruin of so many,
glorious once and perfect while they
stood? “As Heaven’s great year
brings forth, the host of angels
before the Almighty’s throne
appeared. Thus while they stood, the
Father
Infinite,
by
whom
embosomed sat the Son, thus spake:
‘Hear Progeny of Light, hear My
Decree! My only Son, whom ye
now behold, your head I him
appoint. To him shall bow all knees
in Heaven and confess him Lord.
Him who disobeys Me disobeys and
that day, cast out from God, falls
into
utter
darkness
without
redemption.’
So
spake
the
Omnipotent.
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RAPHAEL
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“S
atan, with envy against the
Son of God, could not bear through
pride that sight and thought himself
impaired. Deep malice thence
conceiving, he resolved with all his
legions to dislodge the Throne
Supreme.
Now storming fury rose and clamor
such as heard in Heaven till now was
never. And now all Heaven had gone
to wrack had not the Almighty Father
to honor his anointed Son all power
on him transferred. Forth rushed with
whirlwind sound the chariot of the
Paternal Deity, flashing thick flames.
The Son into terror changed his
countenance and under his burning
wheels the Empyrean shook while as
a herd he drove his impious foes
down from the verge of Heaven.
Eternal wrath burned after them to
the Bottomless Pit.
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STORMING FURY
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“T
hus to thee I have revealed
that thou may’st beware by what is
past. Satan, who envies now thy state,
is plotting how he may seduce thee
from obedience. Remember and fear
to transgress!” So saying Raphael
arose.
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SATAN RETURNS TO EDEN
AT MIDNIGHT
S
atan, in mediated fraud and
malice, fearless returned at midnight.
With inspection deep he considered
every creature which of all most
opportune might serve his wiles and
found the serpent subtlest beast of all
the field. So, like a black mist low
creeping, the serpent soon he found
fast sleeping. In at the mouth the
Devil entered. . Now and since the
break of dawn, the Fiend, mere
serpent in appearance, forth was
come and on his quest. Eve separate
he spies. He bowed his turret crest
and sleek enameled neck fawning.
His gentle dumb expression turned at
length the eye of Eve.
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FRAUDULENT TEMPTATION
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H
e,
glad
of
her
attention
gained, his fraudulent temptation thus
began: “Wonder not sovereign
mistress that I approach thee thus and
gaze on thee who should’st be seen a
Goddess among Gods, adored and
served.” So glozed the Tempter.
Not unamazed, she thus in answer
spake: “What may this mean?
Language of man pronounced by
tongue of brute and human sense
expressed!” The Guileful Tempter
thus replied: “I chanced a goodly tree
loaden with fruit of fairest colors.
From the boughs a savory odor
blown. Hunger and thirst at once
quickened at the scent of that alluring
fruit urged me so keen that to pluck
and eat my fill I spared not.
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S
ated at length, ere long I might
perceive great alteration in me, of
reason in my inward powers, and
speech wanted not long.” So glistered
the Dire Snake and into fraud led
Eve.
Fixed upon the fruit she gazed. She
plucked! She eat! Earth felt the
wound and nature sighing through all
her works gave signs of woe.
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A
dam, to him she hasted. He
scrupled not to eat, not deceived, but
fondly overcome by female charm,
took no thought eating his fill. Earth
trembled from her entrails as again in
pangs. Meanwhile, the heinous and
despiteful act of Satan was known in
Heaven. The voice of God Adam and
Eve heard now in the garden. They
heard and hid themselves till God
thus to Adam called aloud: “Where
art thou Adam? I miss thee here, not
pleased thus entertained with
solitude. Come forth!” He came with
Eve, discountenanced both and
discomposed. Love was not in their
looks, but apparent guilt, and shame,
and perturbation, and despair.
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THE EXPULSION
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A
dam thus answered brief: “I
heard Thee in the garden, and, being
naked, hid myself.” The Gracious
Judge replied; “That thou art naked,
who hath told thee? Hast thou eaten
of the tree whereof I gave thee charge
thou should’st not eat?” Adam sore
beset replied: ”This woman, whom
thou mad’st to be my help, she gave
me of the tree and I did eat.”
The Sovereign Presence thus replied”
“Was she thy god that her thou did’st
obey before His Voice? Say, woman,
what is this that thou hast done?” Eve
with shame nigh overwhelmed, thus
abashed replied: “The serpent me
beguiled and I did eat.” Which when
the Lord God heard, without delay to
judgment he proceeded.
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GOD SENDS THE
ARCHANGEL MICHAEL
TO REMOVE ADAM AND EVE
FROM THE GARDEN
M
ichael, the Archangel, soon
drew nigh, not in his celestial shape,
but as a man clad. Over his lucid
arms a military vest of purple flowed.
“Adam, to remove thee I am come
and send thee from the garden forth”
In either hand the hastening angel
caught our lingering parents, and to
the eastern gate led them direct.
They, looking back, all the eastern
side beheld of Paradise, so late their
happy seat. Some natural tears they
dropped, but wiped them soon. The
world was all before them. They,
hand in hand, with wandering steps
and slow, through Eden took their
solitary way.
THE END
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