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GRADE 11 JUNE History QP EXAMINATIONS 2017 (1)

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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE
MID-YEAR EXAMINATIONS
HISTORY
GRADE 11
JUNE 2017
TIME: 3hrs
MARKS: 150
This paper consists of 17 pages including the cover page
INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION
1.
This question paper consists of SECTION A and SECTION B based on the prescribed
content framework as contained in the CAPS document.
2.
SECTION A consists of THREE source-based questions. Source material that is
required to answer questions will be found in the ADDENDUM.
3.
SECTION B consists of THREE essay questions.
4.
Candidates are required to answer THREE (3) questions. ONE source-based question,
ONE essay and ONE either source-based question and any other question essay
5.
When answering questions, learners should apply their knowledge, skills and insight.
6.
A mere rewriting of the sources as answers will disadvantage learners.
7.
Number the answers correctly according to the numbering system used in this
question paper.
8.
Answer according to the marks allocated i.e 2x2 means 2 facts at 2 marks each
9.
Write neatly and legibly.
2
QUESTION 1:
HOW DID THE FIRST WORLD WAR CONTRIBUTE TO THE
OUTBREAK OF THE FEBRUARY 1917 REVOLUTION IN
RUSSIA?
Study Sources 1A, 1B, 1C and 1D to answer questions that follow.
1.1 Study Source 1A
1.1.1 Name the country that Russia was fighting against during the First
World War.
(1x1) (1)
1.1.2 Quote evidence from the source that indicates that the Russian soldiers
were suffering in the battlefield during the war.
(3x1) (3)
1.1.3 What, according to the source, were the strengths of the enemy army
that resulted to the overwhelming of the Russian troops?
(3x1) (3)
1.1.4 Use the source and your own knowledge to explain the contribution
of the Russian authorities in the disillusion (dissatisfaction)of the troops. (2x2) (4)
1.2 Use Source 1B
1.2.1
1.2.2
1.2.3
1.2.4
Use the source and your own knowledge and explain why the Tsarina
ruled Russia for 17 months during the war?
(2x2) (4)
What was her role in the worsening of chaotic situation in the Russian
government?
(2x2) (4)
Why, do you think that the calls for the removal of the Tsarina from the
throne failed?
(2x2) (4)
Define the following concepts in the context of the pre-revolution Russian
History:
(a) Duma
(b) Dynasty
(2x2) (4)
1.3 Refer to Source 1C
1.3.1 What, according to the Tsarina,was the cause of the disturbances in Russia? (1x2)(2)
1.3.2
Explain whether the statement … “they do this just to create excitement”
was valid.
(2x2) (4)
3
1.3.3
1.4
Select evidence from the source that indicates that the grievances of the
people were not taken seriously?
(3x1) (3)
Read Source 1D
1.4.1 Using the source and your own knowledge, explain why the soldiers
marched against the government in February 1917.
(2X2) (4)
1.4.2 Comment on the usefulness of this source regarding the behaviour of
the Russian soldiers during the First World War.
1.5
(2x2) (4)
Using the information from the relevant sources and your own knowledge, write a
paragraph of about six lines (60 words) to explain how Russia’s participation in the
First World War contributed to the outbreak of the revolution in February 1917 in
Russia.
(6)
4
QUESTION 2:
HOW DID THE USA EXPERIENCE ECONOMIC BOOM IN
THE 1920S?
2.1
Study Source 2A
2.1.1
Which war boosted the economy of the USA in the 1920s?
(1x2) (2)
2.1.2
Mention the two European countries that ordered military weapons from
the USA during war.
(2x1) (2)
2.1.3
Quote evidence from the source, which suggests that American industries
benefitted from the war.
(2x2) (4)
2.1.4
How do you think ‘millions of dollars in war debts’ helped the economy
of the USA in the 1920s?
(1x2) (2)
2.1.5
Use the source and your own knowledge to explain why the USA
(2x2) (4)
was untouched by war damage.
2.2
Refer to Source 2B
2.2.1
How many cars were produced between 1920 and 1929?
(1x2) (2
2.2.2
Why was there such a high production of goods in 1929 as compared to
1920?
(2x2) (4)
(
2.2.3
Use the source and your own knowledge to explain why the new roads
had to be constructed during the period of the boom.
5
(1x2) (2)
2.3
Use Source 2C
2.3.1
Between which pair of dates did workers’ hourly rates increase the most?
(1x2) (2)
2.3.2
Why do you think worker’s hourly rates only increased by two cents for
the period 1923-1926?
(2x2) (4)
2.3.3
Use Source 2C to determine whether a factory worker was able to buy a
Model T Ford. Support your answer.
(1x2) (2)
2.3.4.
Why were these American cars known as Ford cars?
(1X2) (2)
2.3.5
Comment on the usefulness of this source with regards to the boom in the
American economy in the 1920s.
(2x2) (4)
2.4
Read Source 2D
2.4.1
Define the phrase “Stock Exchange” in the context of economic boom in
the USA in the 1920s.
(1x2) (2)
2.4.2
What evidence in the source could have encouraged people to speculate
recklessly in the Stock Market?
(2x1) (2)
2.4.3
Explain why you think these people ended up losing the money they had
invested in the stock market.
(2x2) (4)
2.5
Using the information from the relevant sources and your own knowledge
write a paragraph of about six lines (60 words) explaining the factors that
caused the economic boom in America in the 1920s.
(6)
6
QUESTION 3: HOW WERE THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF MINORITIES VIOLATED
IN NAZI GERMANY FROM 1933 TO 1945?
Study Source 3A, 3B, 3C and 3 D in order to answer the following questions.
3.1
Refer to Source 3A.
3.1.1 Using the source and your own knowledge define the following historical
concepts:
(a) Anti-Semitism
(1 × 2) (2)
(b) Democracy
(1 × 2) (2)
3.1.2 What, according to the source, was President Hindenburg’s
aspiration about what the new chancellor could do?
(1 × 2) (2)
3.1.3 How, according to the source, did Hitler end democracy in
(1 × 2) (2)
Germany?
3.1.4 Why, in your opinion, did Hitler want to end democratic practices
(2 × 2) (4)
in Germany?
3.1.5 Why, in your view, were the Germans prepared to sacrifice their
own freedom in order to grant Hitler powers of a dictator?
(2 × 2) (4)
3.1.6 Using the information from the source, give reasons why the Jews
became the prime target of the Nazi hatred?
7
(2 ×1) (2)
3.2
Study Source 3B.
3.2.2 Using Extract 1, name the newspaper in which the anti-Jewish laws were
(1 × 2) (2)
published.
3.2.2 Extract evidence from the source that suggests that Rudy Barnes was not
(1 × 2) (2)
a supporter of the Nuremberg Laws.
3.2.3 Compare Extract 1 and Extract 2. Explain in what ways are these extracts
similar regarding the manner in which the Nazis treated the Jews and Gypsies.
(2 × 2) (4)
3.2.4 Why would you consider Extract 1 of Source 3B to be useful in
understanding the race policies of Germany during World War II?
3.3
(2 × 2) (4)
Refer to Source 3C.
3.3.1 How, according to the source, did Heydrich understand the instruction
from Goering regarding the ‘Jewish problem’?
(1 × 2) (2)
3.3.2 Using the source and your own knowledge, explain why the Nazi
government under Hitler committed itself to find a final solution to
the ‘Jewish Question’.
(2 × 2) (4)
8
3.4
Study Source 3D.
3.4.1 What are the limitations of this visual source as a piece of historical
(2 × 2) (4)
evidence?
3.4.2 How does Source 3D support the evidence contained in Source 3B, Extract 2,
with regard to the treatment of minorities in the concentration camps?
3.5
(2 × 2) (4)
Using the information from the relevant sources and your own knowledge, write a
paragraph of about SIX lines (60 words) explaining how the human rights of
minorities were violated in Nazi Germany.
(6)
[50]
SECTION B : ESSAY QUESTIONS
Answer at least ONE question from this section.
QUESTION 4 : COMMUNISM IN RUSSIA 1900 to 1940
“Stalin was both a blessing and a curse for Russia.”
Do you agree with this statement? Support your answer with specific reference to the Five
Year Plans in Russia under Stalin and his repressive reign.
[50]
QUESTION 5 : CAPITALISM IN USA 1900-1940
To what extent did the New Deal address the challenges resulting from the effects of the
Great Depression.
[50]
QUESTION 6 : IDEAS OF RACE IN THE LATE 19th and 20th CENTURIES
An Australian Anthropologist argued that the Australia’s assimilation policy during the 1930s
was brutal and inhumane.
Critically discuss the above statement in the context of how Australia implemented its policy
of ‘ assimilation’.
[50]
9
ADDENDUM
QUESTION 1:
HOW DID THE FIRST WORLD WAR CONTRIBUTE TO THE
OUTBREAK OF THE FEBRUARY 1917 REVOLUTION IN
RUSSIA?
SOURCE 1A
An extract adapted from a letter sent to Tsar Nicholas II by the head of the
Duma’s War Committee. This letter was written on 4 September 1915.
Sire,
We have learnt that our valiant army, after losing four million men, killed, wounded or taken
prisoner by the enemy (Germany), is not only retreating but will have to withdraw still further.
We have also learnt that our army, in its fight with the enemy, does not possess armaments of
equal effectiveness, and that, while the enemy ceaselessly showers upon us a hail of lead and
steel, we are unable to send him in reply more than a much smaller quantity of bullets and
shells. While the enemy possesses plenty of artillery, both heavy and light, we are completely
lacking in these weapons.
We have learnt, furthermore, that, although the enemy has plenty of rifles, and each soldier is
equipped with one, hundreds of thousands of our men are without weapons, and have to wait
until they can pick up the rifles dropped by their fellow comrades.
The negligence, carelessness and lack of organization that prevail have resulted in the troops
losing confidence in their leaders …
SOURCE 1B
This source highlights the effects of chopping and changing ministers in Russia
during the war years of the war.
‘’In the seventeen months of the ‘Tsarina’s rule’, from September 1915 to February 1917,
Russia had four Prime Ministers, five Ministers of Interior, three Foreign Ministers, three
War Ministers, three Ministers of Transport and four Ministers of Agriculture. This
“ministerial leapfrog”, as it came to be known not only removed competent men from power,
but also disorganized the work of government since no one remained long enough in office
to master their responsibilities.” [There were] calls for Alexandra to be removed from
influence, but Nicholas still refused to take their advice.
10
SOURCE 1C
Alexandra Fyodorovna, the Tsarina, letter to Tsar Nicholas II on 26th February, 1917.
The strikers and rioters in the city are now in a more defiant mood than ever. The
disturbances are created by hoodlums (criminals). Youngsters and girls are running around
shouting they have no bread; they do this just to create some excitement. If the weather were
cold they would all probably be staying at home. But the thing will pass and quite down,
providing the Duma behaves. The worst of the speeches are not reported in the papers, but I
think that for speaking against the dynasty there should be immediate and severe punishment.
SOURCE 1D
Russian soldiers marching in Petrograd in February 1917
11
QUESTION 2:
HOW DID THE USA EXPERIENCE ECONOMIC BOOM IN
THE 1920S?
SOURCE 2A
The following source outlines the factors that boosted the economy of the USA in the
1020s.
The first World War had acted as a great boost for the economy. Countries like Britain and
France placed huge orders for weapons with US businesses. This demand helped the growth
of industries such as iron and steel engineering. Also by 1918 the USA had emerged from
the war as the world’s largest economy. Millions of British and French men had been killed
or wounded and both their countries owed the USA millions of dollars in war debts. By
comparison the USA had lost only 60 000 men and was untouched by war damage.
-The USA 1918 to 1941, Derrick Murphy, Collins, 20013, Hammersmith
SOURCE 2B
Industries which boomed in the 1920s
1920
1929
Cars produced
9 million
26 million
Kilometres of roads
620 000
1 million
Radios
60 000
10 million
Telephones
13 million
20 million
12
SOURCE 2C
Average hourly wage of factory workers and a cost of a Model T Ford between 109 and
1926.
YEAR
AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE OF
FACTORY WORKERS
COST OF A MODEL
T FORD
1909
19 cents
$950
1917
32 cents
$440
1920
55 cents
$360
1923
57 cents
$295
1926
59 cents
$290
SOURCE 2D
This source explains speculation in the stock market
The Wall Street Stock Exchange had become for many a great national gambling casino
where everyone won almost all the time. Many of the most frequently quoted financial
experts predicted that this would go on almost endlessly. In August 1929 one expert wrote
in the Ladies Home Journal: “I am firm in my belief that anyone can not only be rich but
ought to be rich.”
-America in the Twentieth Century, Frank Freidel, Knopf, 1970, New York
13
QUESTION 3: HOW WERE THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF MINORITIES VIOLATED
IN NAZI GERMANY FROM 1933 TO 1945?
SOURCE 3A
This source explains the early stages of coming to power of Hitler in Germany and it also
gives insight into the exclusion of certain races from the so-called German master race.
On January 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler was named chancellor, the most powerful position in the
German government, by the aged President Hindenburg, who hoped Hitler could lead the
nation out of its grave political and economic crisis. Hitler was the leader of the rightwing
Nationalist Socialist German Workers Party (called “the Nazi Party” for short). The Nazi
Party was extremely anti-Semitist. It was, by 1933, one of the strongest parties in Germany,
even though… the Nazis had won only a plurality of 33 percent of the votes in the 1932
elections to the German parliament (Reichstag).
Once in power, Hitler moved quickly to end German democracy. He convinced his cabinet
to invoke emergency clauses of the constitution that permitted the suspension of individual
freedoms of the press, speech and assembly... The Enabling Act of March 23, 1933…gave
Hitler dictatorial powers. Also in 1933, the Nazis began to put into practice their racial
ideology. The Nazis believed that the Germans were “racially superior” and that there was a
struggle between them and inferior races. They saw the Jews, Roma (Gypsies) and the
handicapped as a serious biological threat to the purity of the “German (Aryan) Race,” what
they called the master race.
Jews , who numbered about 525 000 in Germany were the principal target of Nazi hatred.
Nazis identified the Jews as a race and defined this race as ‘’inferior”. They also spewed
(advocated) hate-mongering propaganda that unfairly blamed the Jews for Germany’s
economic depression and the country’s defeat in World War 1 (1914-1918)
14
SOURCE 3B
The source below consists of two extracts on the impact of Nuremberg Laws on the Jews
and the Gypsies.
Extract 1: This newspaper article focuses on how the Nuremberg Laws started the process
of discrimination against German Jews.
NEWS FROM GERMANY 1935
New York Herald Tribune, 16 September 1935
“The Shame of Nuremberg” by Rudy Barnes
NUREMBERG, Germany, 15 September 1935. Strict new laws depriving German Jews of all the
rights of German citizens were decreed by a cheering Reichstag (Germany parliament) here
tonight after an address by Chancellor Adolf Hitler. Tonight’s decrees are among the most
sweeping measures taken since the Nazis came into power two and a half years ago. The new
laws, which go into effect on 1 January, will help to realise the anti-Jewish part of the Nazi
programme. They are described as ‘laws for the protection of German blood and honour.’ As read
before the Reichstag by the president of the legislative body, they are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Marriages between Jews and German citizens are forbidden.
Physical contact between Jews and Germans is forbidden.
Jews are not permitted to employ in their household German servants under the age of 45.
Jews are forbidden to raise the swastika emblem (now the national flag).
Violation of any of the first three laws is punishable by imprisonment and hard labour.
Violation of the fourth law is punishable by imprisonment. Tonight’s session of the Reichstag
was called unexpectedly by Hitler. The Reichstag, which is now nothing more than a rubber
stamp, was called to order by the President of the Reichstag at 09:00pm. After speaking of the
three laws, the President asked the Reichstag for unanimous approval. Six hundred men, most of
them in brown uniforms leaped to their feet…
Extract 2: Vera Laska, an eyewitness, gives an account on the impact of the Nuremberg laws
on Gypsies.
Gypsies were officially defined as non-Aryan by the Nuremberg Laws of 1935, which also first
defined Jews; both groups were forbidden to marry Germans. Gypsies were later labelled as
asocials in 1937… Two hundred Gypsy men were then selected by quota and incarcerated (held
under severe prison conditions) in the Buchenwald concentration camp. Gypsies were forbidden
to move freely and were concentrated in encampments within Germany in 1939, later (1941)
transformed into fenced ghettos, from which they would be seized for transport by criminal police
(aided by dogs) and dispatched to Auschwitz (infamous concentration camp) in February 1943.
15
SOURCE 3C
This Source focuses on Herman Goering’s (Hitler’s deputy) attempts to solve what he
referred to as the ‘Jewish Question.’
Through his interests in the economics of Aryanisation (Jewish property and businesses
placed under German control), and the use of the Jewish concentration camp labour,
Goering was inextricably (completely) caught up in the effort to find a solution to the
‘Jewish Question’. In the winter of 1938-9 he had acquired powers to organise the economic
exploitation of the Jewish population. The wider question of what to do with the Jews thus
excluded from public life he delegated Heydrich and the SS (Nazi Party military police),
under his loose supervision. Goering was attracted at first to the idea of expelling all
German Jews, either to Madagascar or to Western powers… After the outbreak of the war
the seizure of Jewish assets increased in scale, as did the exploitation of Jewish labour. It
was during the ‘cleansing’ of the European economy that the Nazi leadership moved
towards a final solution to the Jewish question.
In the summer of 1941 Goering ordered Heydrich to provide a plan for resolving the Jewish
problem using any means available. Heydrich announced this at the Wannsee conference on
29 January 1942, using it a carte blanche (complete freedom) from the movement’s leaders
to proceed to annihilation (total destruction).
16
SOURCE 3D
This source shows survivors at Buchenwald concentration camp remaining in their barracks
after liberation by Allied forces on April 16, 1945.
17
18
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