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Boy Biography Autobiography

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Biography and Autobiography
Non-fiction Reading and Writing
Teacher-of-English.Com
Biography and Autobiography
What is the difference?
Biography
and
Autobiography
Objectives:
• To learn the difference between biography and
autobiography
• To explore a multi-modal example of a biography
What is the difference?
What is the difference between a
biography and an autobiography?
A biography is written by a person about
someone else.
An autobiography is written by a person
about themselves.
William
Shakespeare
was born
in…
I was eight
when I broke
my arm…
Biography
Biography means writing about another person’s life:
“bio” comes from the Greek word for “life”
“graphy” comes from the Greek word for “I write”.
Therefore a biography is the story of the
another person’s life.
Biographies of famous people
are very popular and sell
millions of copies every year.
Biography:
Charles Dickens
We are going to read extracts
from different biographies of
Charles Dickens. The first one
can be found on the following
slide. Read the text and
discuss it with your teacher.
Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, on February 7, 1812.
His father John worked as a clerk in the Navy Payroll Office but
was constantly in debt, and in 1824 he was imprisoned in a
debtor's prison. Charles was forced to leave school at the age of
12 and go to work in a factory to help support the Dickens
family. He was released from the misery of factory work when
his father received a legacy from a relative, and could finally
pay his debts and be set free from prison. Charles went to
school for two years, then took work as a clerk in London.
In 1835 Dickens married Catherine Hogarth and together they
had 10 children before they separated in 1858.
In 1837 Dickens had his first book, The Pickwick Papers,
published and success was almost instant. For the next 30 years
Dickens was incredibly famous, wrote dozens of hugely
successful books and travelled around the world reading his
stories to massive audiences. He died on June 9, 1870 and was
buried at Westminster Abbey.
The Information Superhighway
The internet contains lots of biographical
information about Charles Dickens.
However be aware that information found on
the internet is not always as reliable as that
found in traditionally published media such
as books, DVDs or CD ROMs. (Why would that
be?)
Use reputable websites to find reliable
information you can trust. For example:
www.charlesdickenspage.com
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/victoria
n_britain/?site=history_victorianlj_sour
Charles Dickens’ Animated Life
Click on the link below to watch an animated
version of Charles Dickens’ life from the BBC
website.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/bleakhouse/anima
tion.shtml
Click below for more pages from the BBC
website about life in Dickens’ World.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/deary_gall
ery_05.shtml
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/victorians/index.
shtml
Biography
A biography gives the reader lots of information
about a person’s life.
Talk to a partner about Charles Dickens. Try to
include the following points in your talk.
•Where did Charles Dickens spend his early
childhood?
•What happened to the Dickens family when Charles
was 12?
•Name three of his famous novels.
•Tell your partner three unusual facts about Charles
Dickens.
•When did he die and how old was he?
Plenary
Feedback to the rest of the
group. Discuss what you have
discovered about Charles
Dickens.
How did the different text
types provide different
information?
Teacher-of-English.com
Conventions of biography
Biography
Writing
Objectives:
• To learn the main features of biographical
writing
• To explore a biography of Roald Dahl
The Third Person
A biography is always written in
the third person.
‘Kate’s first acting role was in the school nativity. When she
was only eight years old Kate wowed audiences with her
portrayal of Mary.’
The third person means writing about another person from
your own point of view. You describe what happens to them
and refer to their thoughts and feelings.
When using the third person you will use pronouns such as:
He, she, they, (the person’s name), and them.
A Brief Roald Dahl Biography
Roald Dahl is one of the world’s most
popular and most famous children’s
writers.
Have you read any of Roald Dahl’s
books?
In pairs complete a spider diagram
showing everything you know about
Roald Dahl.
Roald Dahl
What do you know about Roald Dahl? Write down as
much as you can on the spider diagram below.
Roald Dahl
Over the coming lessons
we will be studying Roald
Dahl’s autobiography ‘Boy’
but before we begin the
book we are going to look
at a brief biography of
the author.
Click the picture above to
watch a short film about
Roald Dahl.
By the end of today’s
lesson you should be a
Roald Dahl expert!
Roald Dahl
Roald Dahl was born on 13 September 1916 and died on 23
November 1990. He was a novelist, short story writer, fighter
pilot and screenwriter.
Born in Llandaff, Cardiff, to Norwegian parents, he served in
the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, in which he
became a flying ace and intelligence agent, rising to the rank
of Wing Commander. Dahl became famous in the 1940s writing
for both children and adults, and became one of the world's
bestselling authors. He has been referred to as “one of the
greatest storytellers for children of the 20th century” and his
books are well loved for their fantastic characters and often
very dark humour.
Some of his most popular works include James and the Giant
Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr Fox,
Matilda, The Witches, and The Big Friendly Giant.
Check your understanding
1.When was Roald Dahl born and
when did he die?
2.List three of Roald’s jobs.
3.When did Roald’s stories first
gain popularity?
4.Name three of Roald Dahl’s
books.
5.Where did Roald write his
stories?
6.Describe a typical day’s writing
routine.
Plenary
Create a Roald Dahl fact
file using your own
knowledge and research,
information from this
PowerPoint presentation
and the BBC video clip.
Teacher-of-English.com
Biography and Autobiography
Boy – Roald Dahl’s Family Tree
Roald Dahl
Objectives:
• To understand the meaning of
autobiography
• To create a family tree for Roald Dahl
using events from Chapter One of
Boy
• To create your own family tree
What is an Autobiogrphy?
What is the difference between a
biography and an autobiography?
A biography is a text written by a person
about someone else.
An autobiography is a text written by a
person about themselves.
William
Shakespeare
was born
in…
I was eight
when I broke
my arm…
Autobiography
Autobiography means writing about your self:
“auto” comes from the Greek word for “self”
“bio” comes from the Greek word for “life”
“graphy” comes from the Greek word for “I write”.
Therefore an autobiography is the story of
the author’s life.
Boy is autobiographical.
It is the story of Roald’s
childhood, full of exciting and
unusual events!
Facebook, blogs and websites
If you have a Facebook page, a blog or a website then you
have probably written some kind of autobiographical text.
Why are these texts examples of autobiography? What
information do people put on them?
What is a Family Tree?
On this and the next slide are two examples of a family tree.
Study them then explain what a family tree is.
Family Tree
Read Chapter
One of Boy.
Create a family
tree for Roald
Dahl based on
the information
provided in
Chapter One.
Plenary
Homework
Create your own family tree.
Ask your relatives to help you
with the information you
need.
Teacher-of-English.com
Biography and Autobiography
Writing about people
Writing about people in
autobiography
Objective:
• To understand how Dahl
presents Mrs Pratchett in Boy
Mrs Pratchett
What have you discovered about Mrs Pratchett? Read up
to the end of ‘The bicycle and the sweet shop’ then jot down
everything you can remember about her.
Mrs Pratchett
Mrs Pratchett is a person from Roald’s early childhood. Write a paragraph
about her. Below are a few sentence starters to help you:
12th June 11
Mrs Pratchett
Mrs Pratchett is introduced to the reader in Chapter Three where she…
Roald describes her as…
She speaks to the children like…
The young Roald Dahl and his friends feel…
Plenary
Volunteers read out their work to the
class. The rest of the class will provide
constructive criticism based around the
following questions:
What is good about it?
How could it be improved?
Teacher-of-English.com
Biography and Autobiography
Holiday in Norway
Going to Norway
Objective:
• To talk about your favourite holiday
• To study Roald Dahl’s childhood
memories of Norway
• To create an advertisement for
Norway as a tourist destination
Welcome to Norway
Read the chapters ‘Going to Norway’ and ‘The magic island’. In these
chapters Roald writes about his boyhood holidays in Norway. What do we find
out about Norway from reading them? Answer the questions below.
1. What is the capital of Norway? What do we learn about it?
2. What is the journey from Oslo to Tjome like?
3. What can tourists do on the islands of Norway?
4. What dangers are there about holidaying in Norway?
5. What fish can be caught in the early evening?
6. What is so good about Norwegian fish?
7. What do you know about ice cream in Norway?
8. What is ‘skaaling’?
9. What is gjetost?
Holiday in Norway
Using the information you have gathered about Norway, create a magazine
advertisement designed to persuade people to visit Norway for a holiday.
Things to
include
•What is the scenery like?
•What are the people like?
•What food and drink is
available?
•What activities could holiday
makers enjoy?
•Describe the capital city of
Oslo.
Teacher-of-English.com
Biography and Autobiography
My First Day at School
My First Day at School
Objective:
• To understand the key features of
autobiographical writing
• To read Chapter Ten and Chapter
Eleven of Boy
• To write a letter home in the style
of Roald Dahl in Boy
First Day at School
Do you remember your first day at school?
What was it like? How did you feel? Was
it different to what you expected?
The First Person
Autobiography is written in the
first person. The narrator always
tells the story from their own
point of view:
“My earliest memory is when I fell down the stairs aged
three and a half. My mum had left me playing…”
The first person means writing from your own point of
view. You describe what happened from your perspective
and include your personal thoughts and feelings.
When using the first person you will use personal pronouns
such as: I, me, my, myself, we and us.
The text below is an extract from an
autobiography, part of which is set in
Glasgow. It describes a boy's first day at
secondary school.
A lank young teacher led us into the classroom. The girls sat
in desks to his right, the boys to the left, and he faced them
with hands on hips leaning forward from the waist. He said,
"My name is Maxwell. I'm your form teacher. You come to me
first period each day to have the class register called and to
bring reasons for having been absent or late. They'd better
be good reasons. I'm also your Latin teacher." He stared at us
a while, then said, "I'm new to teaching. Just as I'm your first
senior secondary school teacher, you are my first senior
secondary school class. We're starting together, you see, and
I think we’d better decide here and now to start well. You
do right by me and I'll do right by you. But if we quarrel
about anything you're going to suffer. Not me." He stared at
us brightly and the frightened class stared back. He had a
craggy face with a rugged nose, trimmed red moustache and
broad lips.
First Day at school
Here's a closer look at some of the features you may be able to spot.
Notice that characters are introduced. Mr Maxwell is a "lank young
teacher".
The writer provides description of characters: " he faced them with
hands on hips leaning forward from the waist.”
The story is told in the 1st person: "A lank young teacher led us into
the classroom".
Language in both extracts is used imaginatively. Look for the vivid
description in "He had a craggy face with a rugged nose, trimmed
red moustache and broad lips." This example shows words being
used to create strong impressions of the people or places in the
story.
Boy’s letter
Read up to the end of ‘Letters home’.
Imagine you are Roald Dahl. Think about what has
happened during the first few days at your new school.
What would Roald think and feel about life at St Peter’s so
far?
Imagine that you are writing a letter home about your new
school.
Remember to use the key features of autobiographical
writing:
•First person perspective
•Personal pronouns
•Introduce new characters (the Headmaster)
•Use imaginative and vivid description
•Include the main events of Chapters 10 and 11
Plenary
Read out your letter to the rest
of the group.
If you have not finished,
complete your letter for
homework.
Teacher-of-English.com
Boy
Captain Hardcastle
Captain Hardcastle
Objective:
• To know the difference between
description, dialogue and action
• To read to the end of the chapter
‘Captain Hardcastle’
• To explore how Roald Dahl presents the
character of Captain Hardcastle to the
reader
Captain Hardcastle
What are your first impressions of Captain Hardcastle? What
words or phrases does Roald Dahl use to describe him.
First impressions last…
Do you think that
Captain Hardcastle is a
hero or villain in this
book? What evidence is
there for this?
Authors create
characters through
description, dialogue
and action but do you
remember exactly what
those things are?
12th July 11
Captain Hardcastle
Captain Hardcastle is a…
Description, Dialogue, Action!
Can you match up the word with its correct definition?
Description
What the character
says
Dialogue
What the character
does
Action
How the character
looks, feels and behaves
Description, Dialogue, Action!
Can you match up the word with its correct definition?
Description
What the character
says
Dialogue
What the character
does
Action
How the character
looks, feels and behaves
Captain Hardcastle
Look at the words and phrases used by Roald Dahl to present
the character of Captain Hardcastle. What do these tell us
about him?
Quotation
His legs were as hard
and thin as ram’s legs.
Description,
dialogue or
action?
description
“You, what’s-your-name,
get on with your work!”
His small milky-blue
eyes would rove the Hall
for the full sixty
minutes, searching for
trouble, and heaven help
the boy who caused it.
action
What it suggests about him
Captain Hardcastle
Write a paragraph explaining
how Roald Dahl uses
description, dialogue and
action to present the
character of Captain
Hardcastle to the reader.
You could use some of the
sentence starters on the
next slide to get you up and
running.
12th May 11
Captain Hardcastle
My first impression of Captain
Hardcastle is that he is a…
Captain Hardcastle
What are your first impressions of Captain Hardcastle? Below are a few
sentence starters to help with your paragraph:
12th May 11
Captain Hardcastle
Captain Hardcastle is introduced to the reader in chapter 15 where he…
Hardcastle is described as …
When he speaks to Roald Dahl he says…
The author’s use of description, dialogue and action gives the reader an
insight into Captain Hardcastle’s character…
Plenary
Read your paragraph about
Captain Hardcastle to the rest
of the group.
Do they agree or disagree with
your description of him?
Teacher-of-English.com
Personal Pronouns
Me, myself and I
Personal Pronouns
In this lesson we are going to:
• Learn about personal pronouns
• Learn how to use personal
pronouns in autobiographical
writing
Personal Pronouns
A noun is a word that is a person, place or thing.
A pronoun can be used in place of a noun
A personal pronoun is used in place of a noun
that is a person or thing.
Emma loves chocolate. She
could eat it all day.
Personal pronouns are used so that
you don’t have to repeat the same
words in your writing.
Personal pronouns for people include…
I
they
him
she
her
he
us
you
me
them
we
Personal pronouns for things include…
it
they
them
The following sentences do not use personal
pronouns. Rewrite each sentence using a personal
pronoun.
1.Mike turned the fire on because Mike was
cold.
2.Jane loves football, Jane plays football
after school.
3.The rain poured down, the rain made a
tremendous noise.
4.The car broke down because the car ran out
of petrol.
5.Amir loves Saira, Amir bought Saira a ring.
Check your answers
1.Mike turned the fire on because he was
cold.
2.Jane loves football, she plays it after
school.
3.The rain poured down, it made a
tremendous noise.
4.The car broke down because it ran out of
petrol.
5.Amir loves Saira, he bought her a ring.
Check your sentences with your
teacher
Did you remember to change the noun for a
personal pronoun?
Personal Pronouns
In autobiographical writing personal
pronouns are used all the time as the
author is writing about themselves.
‘I remember when I
was seven, scoring a
last minute goal…’
Biography and Autobiography
Describing a place from the past
Describing a place from
the past
Objective:
• To understand how to use adjectives to
create effective description
• To explore examples of descriptive
writing
• To learn how to use the senses when
creating description
Adjectives
Adjectives describe a noun. They are used to add
description and mood to a piece of writing.
E.G: I fell into the river
becomes
I fell into the raging river.
•
The adjective ‘raging’ adds description to the sentence.
It helps the reader get a clear picture of what is being
described. The reader can now imagine the scene
vividly: a rapidly flowing river.
•
The adjective also adds tension to the sentence. The
word ‘raging’ makes the river sound fast flowing and
dangerous. This makes the sentence more exciting for
the reader.
Spot the Adjective
Underline, circle or highlight the
adjectives in the following sentences:
1.The vicious dog ran straight for me.
2.The angry sea crashed against the black rocks.
3.The fragile, old lady peered through the
smashed window.
4.My new bike landed in the muddy pond.
5.A lonely star shone in the purple sky.
Using Adjectives
Place adjectives into the following sentences:
1. The _____ wind blasted the _____ castle
walls.
2. The _____ child threw its _____ toy onto the
floor.
3. A _____ woman crept out of the back door of
the _____ house.
4. I sat there _____ in the _____ examination
hall.
5. The _____ striker smashed the ball past the
_____ goal keeper.
Effective Descriptive Writing
Descriptive Writing puts into words what
a person, thing or place is like. Good
descriptive writing should make the
object, place or person being described
come alive in the reader’s imagination.
It’s just like
being there!
For the purpose of this task you will describe a
place that is important to you.
Planning Your Writing
Look at the question :
Describe a place that is
important to you.
What is the secret of writing a
successful description?
Planning!
How do I plan my writing?
Once you have chosen your place you need to begin a plan.
When you are planning try to use the senses. Add as much
information as you can to the spider diagram below.
touch
smell
taste
Holiday in Majorca
see
hear
Plan your Writing
Now plan your description, try to use the senses. Add as
much information as you can to your spider diagram.
Sand between my toes
touch
smell
taste
Holiday in Majorca
Waves
crashing
on the
rocks
Children
paddling in
the sea
see
hear
Writing to describe - Example
Read the example below. How has the author made the
place being described come alive in the reader’s
imagination?
Strolling along the promenade was always a special
thrill. I loved the familiar sights - the white houses and
hotels along the front, the shelters occupied by little
old ladies, the beach and the ravenous pleading gulls
that circled above it. My mother would stand by the
seafront railings and inhale great lungs full of sea air
and cry "Oh, smell that sea air - the sea never smells
as good anywhere else as it does here.”
The sticks of rock that we all sucked, were like barbers’
poles made of sugar...
Did you spot these techniques?
Use of effective verbs
Use of
adjectives
Strolling along the promenade was always a special
thrill. I loved the familiar sights - the white houses and
hotels along the front, the shelters occupied by little
old ladies, the beach and the ravenous pleading gulls
that circled above like vultures. My mother would stand
satisfied by the seafront railings and inhale great lungs
full of sea air and cry "Oh, smell that sea air - the sea
never smells as good anywhere else as it does here.”
The sticks of rock that we all sucked, were like barbers’
poles made of sugar...
Use of similes
Use of past tense
Did you spot these techniques?
Use of effective verbs
Use of
adjectives
Strolling along the promenade was always a special
thrill. I loved the familiar sights - the white houses and
hotels along the front, the shelters occupied by little
old ladies, the beach and the ravenous pleading gulls
that circled above like vultures. My mother would stand
satisfied by the seafront railings and inhale great lungs
full of sea air and cry "Oh, smell that sea air - the sea
never smells as good anywhere else as it does here.”
The sticks of rock that we all sucked, were like barbers’
poles made of sugar...
Use of similes
Use of past tense
Developing and Improving
Which description is more effective?
Holiday in Majorca
Holiday in Majorca
The sun shone in the sky. I
could see children
paddling in the sea and I
could hear waves crashing
on the rocks in the
distance. I could feel the
sand between my toes. I
decided to go for a swim.
The sun blazed down upon
the white Spanish sands of
Puerto Pollensa.
Everywhere you looked
people were enjoying the
sunshine. Children
splashed and squealed
with delight as waves
crashed against…
What differences can you spot between the two
descriptions?
Effective Description
Why is this description more effective?
Holiday in Majorca
The sun blazed down upon the white Spanish sands of
Puerto Pollensa. Everywhere you looked people were
enjoying the sunshine. Children splashed and squealed
with delight in the waves, which crashed against…
Remember to use effective adjectives and verbs. Don’t
forget to use the senses and if you can try to use other
descriptive techniques such as similes.
Now use your notes to begin a first draft. Don’t worry
about it being perfect just yet, just have a go at writing
a descriptive paragraph of your special place.
From First to Second Draft
How has this student improved her second draft?
Holiday in Majorca
Holiday in Majorca
The sun shone in the sky. I
could see children
paddling in the sea and I
could hear waves crashing
on the rocks in the
distance. I could feel the
sand between my toes. I
decided to go for a swim.
The August sun blazed
down upon the white
Spanish sands of Puerto
Pollensa. At the water’s
edge children splashed
and squealed with delight
as waves crashed against
the shore like a giant’s
hands splashing around in
a gigantic bathtub.
Teacher-of-English.com
Biography and Autobiography
My Story
My story
Objectives:
• To produce a piece of writing, using the
conventions and key features of
autobiography, about an event from your
life which would interest others.
My Story
Read up to the end of the book then discuss your favourite
story from Roald Dahl’s childhood. What makes it such a
good story? How does Roald Dahl capture and keep your
attention?
Assessment Task
Choose an event from your life that you think would
interest others.
You are going to write about this event just as Roald Dahl
writes about moments from his childhood in ‘Boy’.
You will need to:
•Select an unusual, amusing or entertaining event
•Use the first person perspective
•Use personal pronouns
•Include imaginative and vivid description
My Story
You have 40 minutes to write
your autobiographical story.
Spend five minutes planning, 30
minutes writing, then the final
five minutes checking.
Good luck!
Teacher-of-English.com
Boy
Links
Boy and Roald Dahl Links
The Roald Dahl official website
Roald Dahl fan’s website
The Roald Dahl Museum
An episode from ‘Reading Aloud’
with Michael Rosen about Roald
Dahl and ‘Boy’
Free Roald Dahl resources
(stickers, posters and quizzes)
Planning
Documents
Assessment:
AFL, APP and Assessment Outcomes
This unit has been designed to be used with both APP and AFL.
KS3 Nonfiction unit – Biography and Autobiography
Prior Learning
Prior learning evident in lessons one and two where pupils discuss their knowledge of
biography, autobiography and Roald Dahl.
Assessment for Learning (AFL)
Opportunities for AFL appear throughout this unit and are evident in activities through
PowerPoint slides and worksheets.
Assessing Pupil Progress (APP)
Opportunities for APP can be found in lessons 4,5,6,7 and 10
Assessment outcomes
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
4: (Reading) Writing about how the author presents a character
5: (Writing) Norway holiday brochure
6: (Writing) Letter writing
7: (Reading) Writing about character
10: (Writing) Unit main assessment task – write an autobiographical story
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