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CLD 103 - Human Development - Course Syllabus

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Course Syllabus
CLD 103 Human Development II (Section 021)
School of Early Childhood Studies
Ryerson University
Winter 2017
Course Number and Title: CLD 103 Human Development II (Section 021)
Semester/Year: Winter 2017
Year: 1
Class Time and Location: Fridays from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm in VIC608
Instructor:
Rachel Caplan, M.A. (Early Childhood Studies), Ph.D. Candidate (Community Psychology)
Office: KHS352
Email: [email protected] *Only emails from Ryerson email accounts will be opened*
Office hours: Fridays 12:00-1:00pm;
Please email me to let me know before visiting my office hours or if you would like to schedule an
alternate time to meet.
Course Process:
My goal is to facilitate a safe, respectful, and accepting environment to foster learning and encourage
active engagement. Class attendance and preparedness (having completed readings and assignments),
and active participation in class discussions and exercises are strongly encouraged, as they are
essential parts of the learning experience. I will present on a variety of topics, and a substantial
amount of class time will be spent engaged in discussions, exercises, and activities to explore
different areas of human development together.
Calendar Course Description:
This course builds on the students’ understanding of the major theories and contemporary research
findings on human development and the mutual influences of biological, psychological and social
factors within a given environment. Emphasis will be on the contexts of development and the focus
will be on children from preschool through adolescence.
1 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
A
Course Objectives (*from Dr. Sejal. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus, with slight adaptation)
This course will investigate theoretical and practical aspects of human development. Upon successful
completion, you will be able to better…
• understand, apply, and critique major theories of child development.
• understand the interdependency of various domains of development (physical, cognitive,
language, and social and emotional).
• explore ways that social and cultural values, and environmental conditions impact patterns of
growth and development.
• analyze common methods used to study child development and identify strengths and
limitations of each.
• reflect on your own development within ethno-cultural and socio-historical contexts.
• develop and refine your ability to read, write, and think critically.
Course Management Policies:
The information posted below is not exhaustive of the Course Management Policies to be used for
this course. Please ensure that you thoroughly read the ECS 2016-2017 Student Handbook and other
Ryerson University and ECS policies for additional policy details. These can be found on the ECS
website www.ryerson.ca/ecs/
o COMMUNICATION WITH INSTRUCTOR:
Please do not hesitate to contact me outside of class hours via email. Personal consultation can be
prearranged with me by appointment. Student emails must be sent through a Ryerson account.
Please include the following when sending an email: Course code and description of query. For
example: “CLD 103 – Question regarding poster presentation”
o D2L BRIGHTSPACE:
Please check D2L Brightspace frequently (e.g., daily) for course updates. I will use the D2L
system to send mass emails to our class, to post information, and class content. If you require
assistance with the D2L system, please notify me immediately.
o WRITING STYLE – APA:
All assignments must be submitted in scholarly form according to the most current American
Psychological Association (APA) format (6th edition). Appropriate in-text citations and
references are required.
2 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
Some helpful APA resources are:
APA website: http://www.apastyle.org/
Harvard website: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=apa_exposed
RU Library and Archives website: http://www.ryerson.ca/library/subjects/style/apa.html
Owl at Purdue website: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
Additionally, the following recommended writing guide contains information about APA
formatting: Lunsford, A. (2014). Easy Writer (5th Ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martins.
o GRADE POSTING:
All grades will be posted in D2L. If you have any questions about your grade for a particular
quiz/assignment/exam, please email me immediately.
o READINGS:
You are encouraged to come to class having prepared notes made on the course readings, ready to
discuss the readings, and take an active role in class discussions.
o ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION - TURNITIN:
All written assignments must be submitted via TURNITIN on D2L before the assignment
deadline (i.e., assignments submitted at 9:01am are considered late). Please check your originality
report BEFORE submitting any assignments to ensure your work is original.
Please do not submit assignments via email.
Be sure to keep electronic and hard copies of your work.
All written assignments must include a cover page. The cover page must include the following:
course code, section, and name; the instructor’s first and last names; student’s first and last names;
student number; title of assignment; and the due date. For example:
“CLD 103 Human Development II (Section 021); Rachel Caplan; First Last; #123456789;
Individual Critical Analysis, March 3, 2017”
All assignments must be submitted in scholarly form according to the most current American
Psychological Association (APA) format (6th edition). Appropriate in-text citations and
references are required.
Note about TURNITIN: While this tool is helpful in preventing and detecting plagiarism, the
TURNITIN system does not make decisions about whether or not work is plagiarized. It provides
3 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
A
an “originality” report, but the work is assessed for plagiarism by the instructor. If you do not
want to submit your work through TURNITIN, you must notify me by the end of the second
week of classes, so that we can make alternate arrangements.
o MISSED CLASS:
Responsibility for catching up on missed classes resides with you, the student. It is suggested
that you let a peer know if you will miss a class, and contact them to see what you missed.
o LATE PENALTY FOR ASSIGNMENTS:
The late penalty for assignments is 10% per working day, including weekends, up to 7 days.
After 7 days, assignments will no longer be accepted and a grade of “0” will be assigned
(with the exception that requests for accommodation through the Academic Accommodation
Support centre, and well-documented, serious circumstances will be considered).
o MISSED MINI-TESTS OR PRESENTATIONS:
Medical documentation must be submitted to the School of ECS (to Dr. Charlene Ryan, Director
of School of Early Childhood Studies or Ms. Maria Burgos, Student Affairs Coordinator of
School of Early Childhood Studies), and you must notify me directly within 3 working days of a
missed mini-test or presentation. I will only consider well-documented, serious circumstances for
accommodation. Vacations are not considered to be serious circumstances, so please schedule
vacation time around the course/exam schedule.
o RELIGIOUS OR SPIRITUAL ACCOMMODATION REQUESTS:
Requests for accommodation of specific religious or spiritual observance must be presented to the
Instructor no later than two weeks prior to the conflict in question (or within two weeks of the
release of the final examination schedule). Please see the ECS 2016-2017 Student Handbook for
detailed accommodation policies.
Note: If you miss an assignment/test for medical or other reasons, you must notify the School of ECS
and your Instructors immediately. Please thoroughly review the following documents and follow
their instructions in the case that you require any form of academic consideration. Although
documentation is to be submitted immediately to the School of ECS, keep in mind that academic
consideration is based on the Instructor’s decision.
!
!
Medical certificates: http://www.ryerson.ca/senate/forms/medical.pdf
Academic consideration document form:
www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/senate/forms/academic_consideration_document_submission.pdf
4 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
o ACADEMIC INTEGRITY & STUDENT CODE OF ACADEMIC CONDUCT:
Please familiarize yourself with the Academic Integrity Office and review their website at
http://www.ryerson.ca/academicintegrity/. Additionally, you are strongly encouraged to review
the terms and penalties outlined in Ryerson’s Student Code of Academic Conduct at
http://www.ryerson.ca/senate/policies/pol60.pdf. Violation of this code, including but not limited
to plagiarism and cheating in this course will not be tolerated.
As per Ryerson Policy 145, if the Instructor has reason to suspect plagiarism, the work will be
submitted in a non-identifying way to a plagiarism detection service.
Submitting the same work to more than one course is a form of plagiarism, often referred to as
self-plagiarism. Claiming an idea as one’s own or copying even one sentence of someone’s work
constitutes plagiarism. It is essential to appropriately cite and reference, in APA style, all sources.
It is important to review these forms of plagiarism as well as the other forms and consequences of
plagiarism extensively. Suspicions of academic misconduct may be referred to the Academic
Integrity Office. If charged with academic misconduct, a Disciplinary Notation is placed on
the student’s academic record. In addition, the following penalties (in addition to others) may
be assigned:
•
Grade reduction for plagiarized work
•
Grade of zero for plagiarized work
•
F in the course
•
Expulsion from the University
o CHANGES TO COURSE:
Changes in information that appear in this course syllabus will be discussed in class prior to being
implemented.
Important Student Resources:
o STUDENT DEVELOPMENT & COUNSELLING SERVICES:
The Centre for Student Development and Counselling is an excellent resource for students.
The centre provides some of the following services: academic and life skills seminars, individual
counselling sessions, workshops in stress and time management, taking and using lecture notes,
etc. The centre is in JOR-07C, Lower Ground Floor; 416-979-5195; [email protected];
http://www.ryerson.ca/counselling/
5 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
A
o ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
It is highly recommended that students go to the following Student Learning Support website to
preview some of the resources that are available to you on campus, which may assist you in
succeeding in this and other courses: http://www.ryerson.ca/studentlearningsupport/
• Academic Accommodation support
• English Language support
• Study Skills and transition support
• Writing support
• Test Centre
Required Texts:
Martorell, G., & Kruk, R. (2014). Child: From birth to adolescence (Canadian ed.). Toronto:
McGraw-Hill Ryerson.
Lunsford, A. (2014). Easy writer: A pocket reference (5th Ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martins.
Course Evaluation:
A considerable portion of your grade is comprised of written assignments, which will be graded
according to University-level standards (as per the Grading Guide for Papers in the Ryerson
University School of ECS Student Handbook 2016-2017). It is highly recommended that you access
Ryerson University (and/or other) resources to strengthen your writing skills. For example, the
Student Learning Support services and programs (i.e., Academic Accommodation Support,
English Language Support, Study Skills and Transition Support, and Writing Support) would be a
helpful resource to access and can be found online at: http://www.ryerson.ca/studentlearningsupport/
* The course weighting and all assignments described below have been prepared for the School of
Early Childhood Studies CLD103 course for the 2016-2017 academic year by Dr. Sejal Patel (some
minor adaptations have been made by R. Caplan for the Winter 2017 term) *
Assignment
Weight
Due Date
1. Mini-Tests (6 total; best 5 grades count)
2. Individual Critical Analysis
3. Group Poster & Presentation
Poster (worth 15%)
Presentation (worth 10%)
50%
25%
25%
Jan 27, Feb 3/10/17, Mar 3/10
March 3 before 9:00am
Mar 24 or Mar 31
TOTAL
100%
6 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
Brief Descriptions of Assignments (detailed guidelines will be posted on D2L):
1. Mini-Tests (50%)
Due Date: Jan 27, Feb 3/10/17, Mar 3/10
Submission Method: In class
Six classes will begin with a mini-test, consisting of 20 questions (M/C and T/F format) based on
assigned readings from the Martorell and Kruk (2014) text and class lecture from the previous week
(as indicated on the Course Schedule below). There will be a total of 6 mini-tests and your 5 best
tests will be used to calculate your final quiz grade – therefore, each mini-test will be worth 10% of
your course grade. If you miss a mini-test, you will acquire a grade of “0”, which can be dropped
as your lowest mini-test grade. Missed mini-tests cannot be written at a later date, except in
extenuating and well-documented circumstances (where the appropriate procedures described above
are followed). Latecomers to class may write the mini-test, but will not be given extra time.
2. Individual Critical Analysis (25%)
Due Date: March 3 before 9:00am
Submission Method: TURNITIN
You will have the opportunity to critically analyze a claim about child development. Your analysis
will be supported by scholarly literature through individual research. The claim you will analyze will
be taken from the Mercer (2013) text, and will be provided for you. In addition, guiding questions
will be provided for you to facilitate your analysis.
All written assignments must include a cover page. The cover page must include the following:
course code, section, and name; the instructor’s first and last names; student’s first and last names;
student number; title of assignment; and the due date. For example:
“CLD 103 Human Development II (Section 021); Rachel Caplan; First Last; #123456789;
Individual Critical Analysis, March 3, 2017”
3. Group Poster (15%) and Presentation (10%)
Due Date: March 24 or 31
Submission Method: In class
As a group of 4 (self-selected) members, you have the opportunity to create a poster and present
about adolescent development (refer to chapters 14, 15, 16 and at least one peer-reviewed article) in
classes 10 (March 24) and 11 (March 31). The poster must be presented in APA style. All group
members will sign a “contract” with each other, agreeing that the work will be shared equally.
All assignments must be submitted in scholarly form according to the most current American
Psychological Association (APA) format (6th edition). Appropriate in-text citations and
references are required.
7 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
A
Course Schedule:
* Please bring your textbook to every class *
Class
Class # 1:
Jan 13, 2017
Class # 2:
Jan 20, 2017
Lecture Topic
Text
Chapters
Assignment Due
Introduction to Human Development II
Physical Health & Development in Early Childhood
Chapter 8
Cognitive Development in Early Childhood (begin)
Chapter 9
Discuss Individual Critical Analysis Assignment
Class # 3:
Jan 27, 2017
TEST 1 (Chapter 8)
TEST 1 (Chapter 8)
Cognitive Development in Early Childhood (continued)
Class # 4:
Feb 3, 2017
Chapter 9
TEST 2 (Chapter 9)
TEST 2 (Chapter 9)
Psychosocial Development in Early Childhood
Chapter 10
Discussion of Group Posters & Presentations
Class # 5:
Feb 10, 2017
TEST 3 (Chapter 10)
TEST 3 (Chapter 10)
Physical Health & Development in Middle Childhood
Class # 6:
Feb 17, 2017
TEST 4 (Chapter 11)
TEST 4 (Chapter 11)
Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood
NO CLASS
Feb 24, 2017
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Winter Study Week (University Closed)
8 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
Class
Class # 7:
Mar 3, 2017
Lecture Topic
Text
Chapters
TEST 5 (Chapter 12)
Psychosocial Development in Middle Childhood
TEST 5 (Chapter 12)
Chapter 13 INDIVIDUAL
CRITICAL ANALYSIS
ASSIGNMENT DUE
BEFORE CLASS
Class # 8:
TEST 6 (Chapter 13)
Mar 10, 2017
Physical Health & Development in Adolescence
Chapter 14
Cognitive Development in Adolescence (begin)
Chapter 15
Class # 9:
Cognitive Development in Adolescence (continued)
Mar 17, 2017
Psychosocial Development in Adolescence
Assignment Due
TEST 6 (Chapter 13)
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Poster/Presentation & Peer Review Process Q&A
Class # 10:
POSTER PRESENTATIONS
Mar 24, 2017 (Development in Adolescence)
Group Posters and
Presentations
Class # 11:
POSTER PRESENTATIONS
Mar 31, 2017 (Development in Adolescence)
Group Posters and
Presentations
Class # 12:
Apr 7, 2017
Course Wrap-Up
9 - This course syllabus was developed by R. Caplan on January 11, 2017
(with the exception of Course Objectives, Texts, and Assignments, which were adapted from Dr.
S. Patel’s Winter 2016 syllabus)
A
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