Uploaded by egwemau

NURI M&E Manual Version 1 (07.12.18) (2)

advertisement
UPSIDE
Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative
2019 - 2022
NURI
M&E Manual
Version no.
Government of Uganda
Danida
1
1/12/2018
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page i
Table of Contents
List of Acronyms............................................................................................................. iii
1. INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................1
1.1 Purpose and Scope of the Manual .............................................................................. 1
1.2 Distribution and Maintenance of the Manual ................................................................ 1
2. OVERVIEW OF NURI ...............................................................................................2
2.1 Interventions in NURI................................................................................................ 2
2.2 Implementing Partners .............................................................................................. 3
3. OVERVIEW OF M&E SYSTEM ...................................................................................5
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
M&E Concepts .......................................................................................................... 5
Levels of M&E .......................................................................................................... 6
Theory of Change/Results Framework ........................................................................ 6
M&E System Components .......................................................................................... 7
4. STAKEHOLDERS, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................8
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
NURI IMC................................................................................................................. 8
NURI Coordination Function ....................................................................................... 8
District Local Governments (DLGs) ............................................................................. 9
Implementing Partners .............................................................................................10
Farmer Groups, Local Communities and Refugees ......................................................10
5. INDICATORS ........................................................................................................ 11
5.1 Indicators and Targets .............................................................................................11
5.2 Indicator Definitions and Data Requirement ...............................................................16
6. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS ..................................................................... 24
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
Baseline Studies.......................................................................................................24
Monitoring Surveys ..................................................................................................26
Special surveys ........................................................................................................27
Data Collection Methods and Tools ............................................................................28
Databases ...............................................................................................................31
Data Analysis...........................................................................................................33
Units of Measurement for strategic and other common crops.......................................33
7. REPORTING ......................................................................................................... 35
8. M&E EVENTS ........................................................................................................ 36
9. TENTATIVE M&E ACTIVITY PLAN ......................................................................... 37
10. MAINTAINING AND SUSTAINING THE M&E SYSTEM......................................... 38
11. M&E STAFFING AND CAPACITY BUILDING PLAN FOR NURI ............................. 39
ANNEXES .................................................................................................................. 41
Annex
Annex
Annex
Annex
Annex
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Log-frame .......................................................................................................41
Agricultural Production Assets ...........................................................................48
Good Agricultural Practices ...............................................................................49
Agricultural Use of VSLA Loans .........................................................................50
Theory of Change ............................................................................................51
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page ii
Annex 6. Measurement and conversion rates for crops .....................................................52
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
List of Acronyms
Abb.
AFARD
CAO
CF
CSA
Danida
DCB
DEC
DED
DFA
DKK
DLG
DRC
DSA
DTPC
FPO
GoU
IMC
IP
MAAIF
M&E
MOLG
MOFPED
MoWT
NURI
OPM
PRDP
RDE
RDNUC
RI
ToR
UGX
VAT
WRM
Full text
Agency for Accelerated Regional Development
Chief Administrative Officer
NURI Coordination Function
Climate Smart Agriculture (strategic intervention 1 for NURI)
Danish International Development Assistance
Strategic Intervention for DLG Capacity Building
District Executive Committee
Development Engagement Document
District Farmers Association
Danish Kroner
District Local Government
Danish Refugee Council
Daily Subsistence Allowance
District Technical Planning Committee
Focal Point Officer
Government of Uganda
RDNUC Implementation Monitoring Committee
Implementing Partner
Ministry of Agriculture, Agriculture Industries and Fisheries
Monitoring and Evaluation
Ministry of Local Government
Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development
Ministry of Works and Transport
Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative
Office of the Prime minister
Peace, Recovery and Development Plan for Northern Uganda
Royal Danish Embassy
Recovery and Development in Northern Uganda Component
Rural Infrastructure (strategic intervention 2 for NURI)
Terms of Reference
Ugandan Shillings
Value Added Tax
Water Resource Management (strategic intervention 3 for NURI)
Page iii
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 1
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Purpose and Scope of the Manual
The purpose of this manual is to describe the M&E System for the Northern Uganda Resilience
Initiative (NURI) of the UPSIDE Programme and to provide guidelines for those involved in
M&E.
The manual is aimed at the participants in the NURI Implementation Monitoring Committee,
IMC, the District Local Governments, DLGs, the Implementing Partners, IPs, and staff at the
NURI Coordination Function.
The NURI M&E Manual is based on the following key documents:
1. Development Engagement Document for the Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative
2019-2022
2. Danida’s guidelines for programme management
3. NURI Management Manual
1.2 Distribution and Maintenance of the Manual
This manual is distributed to the stakeholders mentioned above. A complete distribution list is
maintained by CF.
CF is responsible for updating the manual, which is approved by the Royal Danish Embassy
(RDE).
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 2
2. OVERVIEW OF NURI
The Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative (NURI) is one of three engagements under the
Uganda Programme on Sustainable and Inclusive Development of the Economy (UPSIDE),
which is one of the two thematic programmes of the Danish Country Programme for Uganda
2018-2022, for which a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) has been signed between the
Government of Denmark and the Government of Uganda.
NURI will pursue enhanced resilience and equitable economic development in Northern Uganda,
including for refugees and host communities, by supporting 1) Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA),
2) Rural Infrastructure (RI), and 3) Water Resources Management (WRM). Refugees and host
communities will be among the beneficiaries as NURI is designed to support Uganda’s
progressive refugee policy and the nexus between development and humanitarian action.
Geographically NURI covers 9 districts in the West Nile and Acholi Sub Regions of Northern
Uganda. The districts are Agago, Kitgum and Lamwo in Acholi sub region and Arua, Pakwach,
Nebbi, Zombo, Moyo and Adjumani in West Nile sub region. Besides targeting nationals in these
districts, NURI will work with refugee settlements within some of the selected districts. Selected
settlements are Rhino Camp Refugee Settlement in Arua District, Palorinya Refugee Settlement
in Moyo District, 3 selected refugee settlements in Adjumani District and Palabek Ogili Refugee
Settlement in Lamwo District.
The refugee situation is dynamic, and the situation in Northern Uganda may change during the
project period, therefore a certain flexibility is built into the implementation plan, allowing for
adjustments if the environment changes significantly.
In-depth background analysis, lessons learnt from earlier interventions rationale for the
support, guiding principles and risk analysis and response, amongst other things are included in
the NURI DED, with further details in the DEDs developed for implementing partners.
NURI will be implemented in districts in West-Nile and in Acholi Sub-region from 1/1/2019 to
31/12/2022.
2.1 Interventions in NURI
NURI consists of three interventions:



Climate Smart Agriculture - Training of small-scale farmers in climate smart agriculture
and marketing;
Rural Infrastructure – Renovation and construction of agriculturally-related rural
infrastructure;
Water Resources Management – Improved climate change resilience in Northern Uganda
through WRM, including for refugees and host communities.
In addition to that there will be some training in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights, SRHR
through the WAY programme that will be handled by CARE in close collaboration with NURI
implementing partners in the field.
Please note that in the NURI DED for CF interventions are called outputs. For ease of
communication with the implementing partners it has been decided to keep the terminology
from RDNUC where main engagement consists of interventions that again are divided into
outputs.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 3
2.2 Implementing Partners
CSA
In selecting implementing partners, priority was given to DFAs and local NGOs capable of
meeting required minimum level in terms of implementation and management capacity. Where
there is a lack of local organisational capacity NURI Regional Agricultural Units will be set up, in
some places building on the RDNUC Agricultural Units (RAUs). In Adjumani and Moyo where
there have been no RDNUC activities, and no local NGOs are found to have the required
capacity, new units will be established. The table below gives a summary of IPs for
implementation of CSA activities:
Partner
A. Arua DFA
B. AFARD
C. RAU Moyo
D. RAU Adjumani
E. RAU Kitgum/Lamwo
F. RAU Agago
Coverage
National and refugee farmer groups in
Arua District
National farmer groups in Nebbi,
Pakwach and Zombo Districts
National and refugee farmers in Moyo
District.
National and refugee farmer groups in
Adjumani District
National and farmer groups in Kitgum
and Lamwo District
National farmer groups in Agago
District.
Comment
Selected based on DED
criteria 1.
Selected based on DED
criteria 2.
To be established by CF
To be established by CF
A continuation of RAU
Kitgum/Lamwo
A continuation of RAU
Agago.
RI and WRM
The Ministry of Water and Environment has been preselected as the implementing partner for
preparation of micro catchments plans under WRM.
With regard to implementation there will be one implementing partner for both RI and WRM,
which will be an international NGO or a company with experience from implementing similar
interventions preferably in Northern Uganda. The partner will be selected through an
international tender. The reason for having the same partner for RI and WRM is that there are
considerable savings in terms of management, office space and transport.
SRHR
The SRHR training, which is implemented under the WAY Programme, is done by CARE
International under supervision of UNFPA. The participating households for NURI will be part of
the target group for training activities and awareness raising.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 4
Overview of Benefitting Households
The number of households that will benefit from the different interventions and how many are
refugees is shown in the table below:
Table 2.1 Households benefitting from NURI
Intervention
Climate Smart Agriculture
Rural Infrastructure
Water Resource Management
Total
Groups
Households
4,000
1,800
120,000
54,000
Hereof refugees
Number
%
33,500
28%
16,200
30%
For CSA there is 1,250 groups in the refugee settlements, which is 31% of the 4,000 groups,
but since some of the groups are mixed refugees and nationals, the refugee households
constitute 28% of the total number of households.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 5
3. OVERVIEW OF M&E SYSTEM
The M&E system is based on NURI theory of change and log-frame which are explained and
shown in Annex 1 and 5. They are in line with the UPSIDE results framework as stipulated in
the DED.
The objectives of the system are:
I.
II.
III.
Measure progress towards achievement of component objectives and outcomes
Enhance learning, information sharing and give feedback
Provide a basis for improving delivery and decision making by facilitating the
identification of potential problems at an early stage and possible solutions
3.1 M&E Concepts
Some key concepts that will be commonly used in executing the M&E activities are defined
below:
Monitoring:
NURI adopts the definition from OECD (2002a) which says monitoring is a continuous function
that uses the systematic collection of data on specified indicators to provide management and
the main stakeholders of an ongoing development intervention with indications of the extent of
progress and achievement of objectives and progress in the use of allocated funds. Monitoring
gives information on where a policy, program, or project is at any given time (and over time)
relative to respective targets and outcomes.
Evaluation:
Is the systematic and objective assessment of the design, implementation and results of an
ongoing or completed project, program or policy. The aim is to determine relevance of
objectives, the effectiveness of the design and implementation, the efficiency of resource use,
the impact on beneficiaries and the sustainability of results (OECD 2002). Evaluation gives
evidence of why targets and outcomes are or are not being achieved. It seeks to address issues
of causality.
Outputs:
These are the products, capital goods and services which result from development
interventions.
Outcomes:
This refers to the likely or achieved short-term and medium-term effects of an interventions
output.
Impacts:
These are the positive and negative, primary and secondary long-term effects produced by a
development intervention, directly or indirectly, intended or unintended.
Indicator:
This is the quantitative or qualitative factor or variable that provides a simple and reliable
means to measure achievement, to reflect the changes connected to an intervention or to help
assess the performance of an actor.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 6
Target:
This is a value that an indicator is expected to reach by a particular date. Targets provide
benchmarks against which performance can be judged.
Theory of Change (TOC):
Theory of change refers to pathway mapping of how a development intervention will bring
changes (especially positive) about a condition it is meant to address. It is based on
assumptions about what is required to make these changes. This is done by articulating and
visually illustrating the assumptions, actions and strategies for change.
3.2 Levels of M&E
NURI will carry out M&E activities at four different levels; these are defined as:
I.
Activity Monitoring:
The day to day monitoring of activities, implementation processes and transformation of inputs
into program outputs will be done by implementing partners in line with approved work plans
and implementation processes and procedures.
II.
Output and Outcome Monitoring
The output and outcome level monitoring will be done by the Coordination Function with
support from implementing partners and consultants. The output and outcome results will be
measured in monitoring surveys and mini surveys.
III.
Impact Monitoring
The indicators for the immediate objective or goal define the impact of the component. It is
vital to note that the NURI is not solely responsible for attainment of the immediate objective
but rather contributes to it. Impacts are long term effects of a development program and
usually seen after several years. This program has not planned for any summative evaluation
and the M&E system will therefore track some of the indicators towards the end of the
programme.
IV.
Program Reviews and Evaluation
Reviews will be conducted twice; at inception and mid-term. The RDE will take lead in
conducting these reviews with close collaboration with the Coordination Function.
As mentioned under impact monitoring an evaluation is not planned. It should, however, be
considered to undertake one as it would provide useful information and lessons for future
programmes of a similar nature. An evaluation would be done by an independent team and
after the programme has ended. It would therefore be RDE to take the initiative.
3.3 Theory of Change/Results Framework
As earlier mentioned, the system is based on the Log-frame and theory of change/results
framework as indicated in the DED. As a tool, the TOC will help link activities to the results that
NURI is expected to contribute in the intervention areas.
The TOC is attached in Annex 5
NURI M&E Manual
3.4 M&E System Components
The main components in the M&E System are:
1. Stakeholders (section 4)
2. M&E Organisation (section 4)
3. Log-frame (Annex 1)
4. Theory of Change (Annex 5)
5. Indicators and targets (section 5)
6. Baseline studies (section 6.1)
7. Monitoring surveys (section 6.2)
8. Mini surveys (section 6.3)
9. Data collection methods and tools (section 6.4)
10. Databases (section 6.5)
11. Data analysis (section 6.6)
12. Reporting (section 7)
13. M&E Events (section 8)
14. M&E Plan (section 9)
15. M&E System Maintenance (section 10)
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 7
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 8
4. STAKEHOLDERS, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
A clear mapping of NURI stakeholders must be done which is a prerequisite for successful
monitoring and evaluation of the programme. A strong stakeholder platform will serve a great
purpose for auditing and follow of the implementation process. The stakeholders have been
identified as:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
RDE and Line Ministries (IMC participants)
Coordination Function
District local governments
Implementing partners
Farmer groups, community members and refugees
4.1 NURI IMC
A NURI Implementation Monitoring Committee (IMC) will be established. The IMC will be
chaired by a representative from the RDE and will meet once a year. CF on behalf of the RDE
will ensure that the committee is set up and launched in the first quarter of 2019. The
committee will comprise of the following members:









Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development
Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries
Ministry of Works and Transport
Ministry of Local Government
Ministry of Water and Environment
Office of the Prime Minister
Representatives of involved District Local Governments
Representatives from different implementing partners
Royal Danish Embassy
The IMC will perform the following M&E roles:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Carry out monitoring of the implementation process
Provide feedback to RDE and CF about the implementation process
Participate in the IMC meetings
Participate in on-spot joint field monitoring exercises
4.2 NURI Coordination Function
The NURI Coordination Function (CF) has been established as a decentralised unit under RDE
to ensure coordination between the implementing partners and other stakeholders and to
oversee and support implementation. The M&E functions for NURI will be managed by CF under
the leadership of the Monitoring and Evaluation Coordinator. CF will perform the following M&E
responsibilities:
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 9
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Establish, manage, coordinate, maintain and sustain NURI M&E system
Establish and manage the NURI Farmer Group and community members database
Build the capacity of implementing partners in M&E
Review and aggregate work plans of the implementing partners
Prepare NURI progress and annual reports
Prepare program reviews in cooperation with RDE
Prepare program evaluation/impact studies
Plan, supervise and implement M&E data collection activities (baseline studies, monitoring
surveys and mini surveys)
9. Assist the implementing partners in conducting mini surveys to provide quick feedback on
implementation process
10. Plan and conduct M&E events (Learning and Reflection workshops, NURI IMC meetings)
4.3 District Local Governments (DLGs)
The District Council and the District Executive Committee of the respective districts will have
the overall responsibility for supervising activities under NURI. The District Technical Planning
Committees (DTPC) will function as a District Steering Committee and will as such review
progress reports.
In each district, the CAO shall appoint a Focal Point Officer (FPO) for NURI. The appointed
person shall be a Senior Officer (e.g. Assistant Chief Administrative Officer, Clerk to Council,
District Planner). The role of the FPO shall be to:
 Mobilize the political representatives to carry out monitoring every quarter
 Participate in the monitoring by the political representatives and prepare their report.
 Prepare district monitoring report and compile district supervision reports and submit
them to CAO, DEC, IP and CF
The District Production Unit (DPU) will:
1. Monitor agricultural training and demo plot set-up
2. Monitor and provide feedback on production data (yields, adoption, marketing)
3. Assist in the preparation of DLG progress/monitoring reports
4. Participate in monitoring and mini surveys, impact studies, program reviews
5. Participate in M&E events organised by the CF
6. Monitor the use of equipment provided for DCB in the production unit
7. Report on the training and study programmes undertaken under DCB
The District Engineering Departments will:
1. Monitor infrastructure projects and verify whether they have been implemented
according to agreed standards
2. Provide resource persons for training on infrastructure projects
3. Assist in preparation of DLG progress/monitoring reports
4. Ascertain impact of infrastructure projects on agricultural production
5. Participate in monitoring, mini surveys, impact studies and program reviews
6. Participate in M&E events organised by the CF
7. Monitor the use of equipment provided for DCB in the engineering unit
8. Report on the training and study programmes undertaken under DCB
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 10
The Focal Point Officers will:
1. Mobilise political and technical DLG team for DEC monitoring of NURI activities
2. Compile DEC monitoring reports for NURI activities
3. Participate in IP coordination meetings
4. Account for fuel and allowances for DEC monitoring
5. Promote NURI programme activities within the DLG and LLG
The programme will not only work with the leadership of the DLGs, but also with the SubCounty Local Governments. Both the political and technical leaders of the sub-counties in the
programme area will be key actors in supervision and monitoring of the programme activities.
The LLGs (political and technical leaders) will:
1. Support in the selection of NURI beneficiaries and RI project selection/screening
2. Participate in monitoring NURI activities ie demo fields, infrastructure projects
3. Provide feedback on implementation process
4. Participate in M&E events
5. Make recommendations for improvement
6. Participate in IMC joint field visits
4.4 Implementing Partners
Implementation of NURI has been delegated to implementing partners. Their roles in M&E are:
1. Monitor implementation of planned activities and outputs
2. Prepare quarterly and annual progress reports
3. Collect farmer group and community members bio-data
4. Provide demo field data and completed projects status updates
5. Participate in surveys/assessments to provide status of achievement of performance
targets
6. Document best practices and lessons learnt during monitoring visits
7. Provide recommendations for program improvement
8. Participate in M&E events
4.5 Farmer Groups, Local Communities and Refugees
The farmer groups, local communities and refugees are the primary stakeholders of the NURI
program and have the following roles in M&E:
1. Provide data on activities, implementation process and the outputs of the program
2. Keep group production and marketing records
3. Provide suggestions on how program implementation can be improved to ensure their
increased benefit
4. Mobilise community members for NURI activities including surveys, reviews and
evaluations
5. Participate in M&E events (sharing success stories)
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 11
5. INDICATORS
The indicators were defined in the DED and will be reviewed and refined during the inception
phase. Some changes were made based on the re-appraisal of NURI in 2018. Key indicators
have been aligned with and included in the UPSIDE Results Framework. Defining indicators and
setting targets has been through an informed process based on experiences of the
DAR3/RALNUC3 and the development context of Northern Uganda and West-Nile.
5.1 Indicators and Targets
Essentially, a target is a number that is set (specified level of performance) for a given indicator
by a certain period of time. There is an overall target and annual targets to sort of break down
the goal into manageable tasks and make tracking the indicators easy;
1. An overall target: this measures the expected performance for the life of the program. It
defines what you want to accomplish by the end of the program by a given indicator.
2. Annual target: this measures expected performance for each year of the program.
Setting annual targets help to break down the overall target which is linked to the
achievement of the goal of the program.
The performance targets for NURI are set based on the number of participants the programme
is expected to serve. The numbers/percentages will depend on agency, personnel, and resource
constraints. Reference was also made to other national surveys and programmes which in a
way led to the application of the rule of the thumb.
The overall target was dependent on the success of the previous programme especially at goal
and outcome level.
The annual targets were set in consideration of the increase the programme will try to achieve
and the number of years of implementation. At output level, the implementing partners may
consider breaking down the annual targets into bi-annual or quarterly depending on the
activities.
Steps in setting annual targets:
 Determine the increase your program needs to gain to reach your overall target
 Divide that number by the number of years in which you would like to achieve the
target
 Add the number to your baseline indicator for each year
 Ensure you have an agreed-upon and realistic definition of target population
 Set a realistic target to achieve in the long term and short term
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 12
Indicators at Impact/Outcome level
As the implementation is phased (e.g. the first lot of farmer groups start in 2019 and the
second lot in 2020) the targets have been set for “Year 1”, “Year 2” and “Year 3”, where “Year
1” represents the first year of implementation for lot 1 and lot 2 combined (2019/2020). “Year
2” represents the second year of implementation (2020/2021) and “Year 3” the third year of
implementation (2021/2022). When these targets are converted into what should be achieved
per calendar year some of them will change.
Indicators
Baseline
Year 1
Targets
Year 2 Year 3
Immediate Objective: To enhance resilience and equitable economic development in
Year 4
supported areas of Northern Uganda, including for refugees and host communities.
% increase in average annual HH
income
(in fixed prices)
% Reduction in period that HHs
report food insecurity (availability
and access)
Total number of people benefiting
from supported WRM interventions
Objective for strategic Intervention 1:
TBD
N/A
5%
15%
25%
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
To increase the agricultural production, productivity
and marketing of produce for small scale farmers
% of participating HHs adopting CSA
practices
% of participating HHs reporting
higher prices for strategic crops
compared to average price in the
local area
% increase in average yields per
acre for strategic crops for
participating HHs compared to
baseline
% increase in value of total crop
production per HH compared to
baseline (fixed prices)
Objective for strategic intervention 2:
using labour intensive approach
% of HHs reporting satisfaction with
completed infrastructure projects
% of participants reporting reduced
travel time to the markets
% of community members living
close to the completed infrastructure
who are using it
Objective for strategic intervention 3:
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
15%
20%
25%
TBD
N/A
5%
10%
15%
TBD
N/A
10%
15%
20%
To improve agriculturally related rural infrastructure
N/A
N/A
70%
80%
90%
N/A
N/A
50%
50%
50%
N/A
N/A
90%
90%
90%
To improve climate change resilience in target areas
through water resource management (WRM)
Area of micro-catchments with
improved water management
% reduction of duration of periods
of water shortage in target areas
TBD
N/A
10%
15%
15%
TBD
N/A
5%
10%
15%
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 13
Indicators and Targets at Output Level
Indicators
Baseline
Year 1
Targets
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Strategic Intervention 1 Outputs
Output 1: Old national FGs supported
No. of FGs trained in collective
marketing
N/A
No. of FGs supported to construct
TBD
produce stores
% of strategic crops produced by
participating farmers collectively
N/A
marketed
Output 2: New national FGs trained in CSA
No. of FGS trained in CSA practices
N/A
700
0
N/A
N/A
TBD
TBD
N/A
N/A
15%
30%
N/A
N/A
825
1,170
0
N/A
TBD
N/A
60%
N/A
25%
N/A
% of FG members reporting having
learnt at least XX new CSA
N/A
TBD
TBD
practices
% of strategic crops dried and
cleaned on tarpaulins by
N/A
40%
50%
participating farmer HHs
% of strategic crops produced by
participating HHs that are marketed
N/A
15%
20%
collectively
Output 3: Mixed FGs trained in CSA (refugees and nationals)
No. of mixed FGs trained in CSA
practices
N/A
% of HHs reporting having learnt
N/A
XX new CSA practices
% of refugee HHs reporting having
access to production land through
TBD
mixed groups
Output 4: Refugee women FGs trained in CSA
No. of refugee women groups
trained in CSA
N/A
% of refugee women HHs reporting
N/A
having learnt XX new CSA practices
% of refugee women HHs reporting
having grown at least 6 types of
N/A
food and vegetables on their
residential plots
Output 5: Farmer groups supported in VSLA
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
N/A
N/A
TBD
TBD
N/A
N/A
80%
80%
N/A
N/A
NURI M&E Manual
No. of FGs supported in VSLA
% of VSLA loans used for
agricultural purpose
% of FGs participating in VSLA that
report increased savings by at least
20% compared to the previous
year
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 14
N/A
420
790
1,190
475
N/A
N/A
50
60
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
Output 6: Farmer groups supported in animal traction
No. of FGs supported in animal
N/A
TBD
traction through cost-sharing model
No. of acres ploughed per group
N/A
TBD
per year using oxen
% acreage of land for participating
TBD
TBD
AT farmers ploughed using oxen
Output 7: Capacity of implementing partners built
No. of male and female staff
trained
N/A
TBD
% of staff reporting increased
N/A
TBD
ability to meet performance targets
Output 8: Capacity of DLG production department built
No. of districts with approved
capacity building plans
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
Output 9: SRHR
No. of extension staff trained and
sensitized on SRHR
No. of farmer groups trained and
sensitized on SRHR
Strategic Intervention 2 Outputs
N/A
3
N/A
2
3
2
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
Output 1: Prioritized infrastructure investment plans approved
No. of parishes with updated
N/A
TBD
development plans
No. of districts with approved
N/A
TBD
infrastructure investment plans
Output 2: Approved infrastructure projects implemented
No. of work days paid for in
implementation of infrastructure
projects
% of infrastructure projects in
approved investment plans that
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
100%
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
have been completed
% of completed infrastructure
projects constructed in accordance
N/A
N/A
with agreed standards
% of participants for infrastructure
N/A
N/A
works who are youth (18-30 years)
Output 3: Capacity of DLG engineering department built
No. of districts with developed and
approved capacity building plans
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
N/A
3
N/A
Page 15
95%
95%
95%
50%
50%
50%
2
N/A
N/A
3
2
N/A
Strategic Intervention 3 Outputs
Output 1: DWRM/UNWMZ effective in planning, engaging stakeholders, monitoring
and supervising IWRM activities
No. of catchment plans developed
& agreed among stakeholders
No. of bylaws for micro-catchment
natural resources management
implemented
N/A
4
4
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
Output 2: Agriculturally related physical and natural water infrastructure in
the micro-catchment plans constructed and renovated
No. of micro-catchment
management plans implemented
No. of agriculturally related physical
and natural water infrastructure
constructed or made resilient to
climate change
No. of community/user
management agreements
implemented
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 16
5.2 Indicator Definitions and Data Requirement
In this section the indicators have been defined in terms of data required and in special cases
how they are calculated. Other information provided is the source of information, when the
data will be collected and who is responsible.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 17
Definitions of Indicators at impact/outcome level and information sources
Indicator
Data required/calculation
Data Source
Frequency
Responsible unit
GOAL: To Enhance resilience and equitable economic development in supported areas of Northern Uganda, including for refugees and
host communities
% Increase in average annual HH cash
income
% Reduction in period that HHs report
food insecurity (availability and access)
Total number of people benefitting from
supported WRM interventions
HH cash income per year
(consider all income sources per
household)
Food availability and
accessibility
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
WRM participants including
communities living around
completed projects
IP reports
Annually
IP
CSA OUTCOME OBJECTIVE: To increase agricultural production, productivity and marketing of small-scale farmers
% of participating HHs adopting
additional CSA practices
Farmers applying different CSA
practices (based on predetermined CSA practices)
Special survey (farmer
field observation)
Every second
year
CF
% of participating HHs reporting higher
prices for strategic crops compared to
average price in the local area
% increase in average yields per acre for
strategic crops for participating HHs
compared to baseline
Farm gate price reported by
participants
Local market price in the area
Total HH acreage under
production, Total production in
Kgs per crop compared to
baseline
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF, IPs
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
NURI M&E Manual
% increase in value of total crop
production per HH compared to baseline
Date: 1/12/2018
HH production of different crops
per year in Kgs, price of the
different crops
Page 18
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE OUTCOME OBJECTIVE: To improve agriculturally related rural infrastructure using labour intensive approach
% of participants reporting satisfaction
with quality of completed projects
Participants reporting
satisfaction with
quality/maintenance of projects,
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
% of participants reporting reduced
travel time to the markets
Participants reporting time
before and after construction of
the project
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
% of community members living close to
the completed projects who are using it
regularly
No. of participants using the
projects, uses of the different
projects
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OUTCOME OBJECTIVE: To improve climate change resilience in target areas through WRM
Area of micro-catchments with improved
water management
to be defined after consulting
with WRM
To be decided later
To be decided
later
CF, IPs
% reduction of duration of periods of
water shortage in target areas
Availability and accessibility to
water in target areas
HH survey of
community members
Every second
year
CF, IPs
CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE OUTPUTS
Output 1: Support to old farmer groups
NURI M&E Manual
No. of FGs trained in collective marketing
Date: 1/12/2018
Farmer groups trained
Page 19
Progress report
Annually
Ips
No. of stores that have been
constructed with support from
NURI
% of strategic crops produced by
Quantity of strategic crops
participating farmers collectively
produced, quantity of strategic
marketed
crops that are marketed
collectively
Output 2: New national FGs trained in CSA
Progress report
Annually
Ips
Monitoring surveys
Every second
year
CF
No. of FGs trained in CSA practices for
one year
FGs trained, No. of demos
established
Progress report
Annually
Ips
% of farmer group members reporting
having learnt at least xx new CSA
practices
Farmer group members
reporting learning new CSA
Special survey (farmer
field observation)
Every second
year
CF
% of strategic crops dried and cleaned
on tarpaulins by participating farmer HHs
No. of HHs drying and cleaning
produce using tarpaulins
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
% of strategic crops produced by
Quantity of strategic crops
produced, quantity of strategic
crops that are marketed
collectively
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
No. of FGs supported to construct
produce stores
participating HHs that are marketed
collectively
Output 3: Mixed FGs trained in CSA (refugees & national)
No. of mixed groups trained in CSA
practices
Mixed groups trained, No. of
demos established
Progress report
Annually
Ips
% of HHs reporting having learnt xx new
CSA practices
HHs reporting learning xx new
CSA practices
Special survey (farmer
field observation)
Every second
year
CF
NURI M&E Manual
% of refugee HHs participating in mixed
groups reporting having access to
production land
Date: 1/12/2018
No. of refugees HHs reporting
access to land for production
other than residential plots
Page 20
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF
Output 4: Refugee women FGs trained in CSA
No. of refugee women groups trained in
CSA
Refugee women groups trained
Progress report
Annually
Ips
% of refugee women HHs reporting
having learnt xx new CSA practices
Reporting having learnt new
CSA practices
Special survey (farmer
field observation)
Annually
CF
% of refugee women HHs reporting
having grown at least 6 types of food
and vegetables on their residential plots
No. of different food and
vegetable crops grown in a year
per refugee HH
Special survey (on site
visits)
Every second
year
CF
No. of FGs supported in VSLA
FGs supported
Progress report
Annually
% of VSLA loans used for agricultural
purpose
No. of loans taken, loans used
for agricultural purpose
SAVIX
Annually
% of farmer groups that report increased Total amount saved per group
savings by at least 20% compared to the
previous year
Output 6: FGs supported in animal traction
SAVIX
Every second
year
To be formulated after a decision is
made
To be decided
To be decided
To be decided
To be decided
To be formulated after a decision is
made
To be decided
To be decided
To be decided
To be decided
Output 5 FGs supported in VSLA
Ips
Ips
Ips
NURI M&E Manual
To be formulated after a decision is
made
Date: 1/12/2018
To be decided
Page 21
To be decided
To be decided
To be decided
Total no of staff trained in job
related fields
% of staff that report increased ability to Staff performance targets, no of
meet their targets
staff that report increased
ability, no of management that
report increased staff ability to
perform
Output 8: DLG Capacity Building for production department
Progress report
Annually
Ips
Special-survey
Appraisal forms
Annually
CF, Ips
No. of districts with developed and
approved investment plans
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
District plans developed and
approved, Assessment forms
DLG plans implemented, Types
of inputs provided DLG, DLG
production staff supported
Progress reports
Annually
CF, DLG
Progress reports
Annually
CF, DLG
No. of staff trained
Progress reports
Annually
IP
No. of FGs trained
Progress reports
Annually
IP
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
Output 7: IP Capacity building
No. of staff trained (to be further
discussed)
Output 9: SRHR
No. of extension staff trained and
sensitized on SRHR
No. of farmer groups trained and
sensitized on SRHR
RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE OUTPUTS
Output 1: Preparation of Investment Plans
No. of parishes with updated
development plans
Total no. of parishes with
updated plans
NURI M&E Manual
No. of districts with approved
infrastructure investment plans
Date: 1/12/2018
Total no. of districts with
approved plans
Page 22
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
Total no. of work days paid for
to participating community
members
% of infrastructure projects in approved
Total number of projects in the
investment plans that have been
investment plans, no. of
completed
projects completed
% of completed infrastructure projects
No. of projects completed, No.
constructed in accordance to agreed
of projects completed according
standards
to agreed standard
% of infrastructure participants who are
Total no. of infrastructure
youth
participants (by age, gender,
refugees) total no. of
participants who are from 18 to
30 years (youth)
Output 3: DLG capacity building for engineering department
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
Progress/project
commissioning reports
Annually
IPs, DLGs
Monitoring surveys
List of completed
projects
Progress reports
Monitoring survey
Every second
year
CF, Ips
No. of districts with developed and
approved investment plans
Progress reports
Annually
CF
Progress reports
Annually
CF
Output 2: Implementation of infrastructure plans
No. of work days paid for in construction
of infrastructure projects
District plans developed and
approved, Assessment forms
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
DLG plans implemented, Types
of inputs provided DLG, DLG
engineering staff supported
WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OUTPUTS
Every second
year
IPs, DLGs
Output 1: DWRM/UNWMZ effective in planning, engaging stakeholders, monitoring and supervising IWRM activities
No. of catchment plans developed &
agreed among stakeholders
No. of plans agreed by
stakeholders
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 23
No. of bylaws for micro-catchment
No. of bylaws enacted
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
natural resources management agreed
and implemented
Output 2: Agriculturally related physical and natural water infrastructure in the micro-catchment plans constructed and renovated
No. of micro-catchment management
plans implemented
No. of agriculturally-related physical &
natural water infrastructure constructed
or made resilient to climate change (to
be further discussed)
No. of community/user management
agreements development & implemented
No. of plans implemented
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
No. of infrastructure projects
constructed
No. of infrastructure projects
made more climate resilient
No. of user agreements
developed
No. of user agreements
implemented
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
Progress reports
Annually
Ips
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 24
6. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS
Data and information form a crucial part of the M&E system. Data collection is therefore a
critical step in establishing a strong M&E system. Determining how the data will be collected
and information organised is important and requires that primary stake holders establish a clear
roadmap to achieving this. Depending on the different indicators being tracked, data collection
requires different methodologies, methods and tools.
NURI will collect both primary and secondary data. The primary data will be gathered from the
actual site of implementation of activities while the secondary data will be obtained from
existing sources. The program will employ both quantitative and qualitative methodologies for
data collection. In some instances, mixed methods will be adopted.
The following data collection studies and surveys will be undertaken:
1. Baseline studies
2. Annual monitoring surveys
3. Mini and special surveys
6.1 Baseline Studies
These are studies that are carried out to establish a starting point for a program, making it
possible to see if anything has changed as a result of the program intervention. It is a known
state by which something is measured or compared.
In NURI, the baseline study will inform the key indicators defined. It will further provide a basis
for assessing progress and making comparisons. In short, the study will provide a basis for
setting performance targets and their measurement plans. Looking at the indicators defined in
the M&E system, some require baseline data while others do not. For the intervention about
Rural Infrastructure baseline data is not needed.
Baseline data is required for the refugees and new national groups. In the case of the refugees,
it is difficult to rely on the pilot report, a comprehensive study of household characteristics is
necessary to set the starting point for the production activities. Also relying on studies by other
development agencies operating in the refugee areas is difficult.
The studies in both cases should be conducted by CF with support from a consultant in 2019.
The details can be elaborated in the terms of reference for the study.
The data will be collected using the methods highlighted below:
1. Household interviews (organised by CF)
2. Interviews with other stakeholders
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 25
Baseline Survey Plan:
Old National farmer groups
The results from the latest RDNUC monitoring survey will be used as baseline upon which
improvement can be compared.
New National farmer groups
Baseline study will not be conducted in all the districts when it comes to the new national
farmer groups. It is planned for Kitgum in the Acholi sub-region, and Nebbi, Arua and Adjumani
in West Nile.
Refugee groups (mixed and women refugee groups)
All the districts that are hosting refugees will be included in the baseline except for Lamwo.
Sample size for household interviews
In all the districts, sampling procedures will be employed. It will be simple random techniques
where selected sub-counties, parishes, villages and farmer groups will be chosen in the
sampling frame. This process should involve the implementing partner staff working with the
communities in the target areas.
At least 5 sub-counties from each district and 2 parishes from each sub-county should be
selected for the studies. The lists of which can be obtained from the sub-county authority or the
existing implementing partner.
In each parish two farmer groups that participate in APM will be randomly selected. The list of
participating farmer groups in a parish can be obtained from the implementing partner.
In each farmer group 5 members will be selected randomly from the list of members, which can
be obtained from the farmer group chairperson or the implementing partner.
Definite numbers will be developed when the selection of farmer groups and communities for
implementation is completed.
Table 6.1 Summary of the sample size for the baseline study
Sampling level
Sub-counties
Parishes
Farmer groups
Farmers / Households
Number per district
5
10
20
100
Notes
5 per district
2 per sub-county
2 per parish
5 per farmer group
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 26
Table 6.2 No. of HH to be interviewed for CSA Baseline in NURI
District
Adjumani
Moyo
Arua
Pakwach
Nebbi
Zombo
Kitgum
Lamwo
Agago
Total
New
HH
2019
FG Mixed
Gps HH
100
100
100
Women
Ref HH
100
100
100
2020
New FG Mixed
HH
Gps HH
100
Women
Ref HH
Total
HH
300
200
200
100
100
100
100
300
200
300
100
900
RI Baseline:
No baseline study will be done for RI as the indicators do not required that the studies are
done.
6.2 Monitoring Surveys
Monitoring surveys are in-depth assessments of the output and outcome indicators for NURI.
This will not be done in the first year or the beginning of the programme. It is expected to
commence in the second year when some results will start to trickle in. The surveys will assess
the achievement of performance indicators for all the interventions. The performance and
capacities of the implementing institutions will also be included. The information collected will
further provide early pointers to ultimate impacts and the contribution of NURI to increasing
resilience and equitable economic development in supported areas of Northern Uganda,
including for refugees and host communities.
The following data collection methods will be used:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Household interviews (organised by CF)
Focus groups discussions (organised by CF)
Key informant interviews (organised by CF)
Data collected during implementation by the IPs’
The Monitoring Survey Plan
The first monitoring survey will be conducted in 2020 and 2021 with the refugee groups and old
national farmer groups. The new national groups will be assessed in the following year.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 27
6.3 No. of HH for NURI CSA monitoring survey
District
Adjumani
Moyo
Arua
Pakwach
Nebbi
Zombo
Kitgum
Lamwo
Agago
Total
Old
FGs
New
FG HH
2020
Mixed
Gps
HH
100
100
Women New
Ref HH FG HH
100
100
100
100
100
50
100
50
100
50
50
200
200
300
400
2021
Mixed
Gps HH
Women
Ref HH
Total
HH
300
200
200
50
100
50
100
50
50
1,100
Sample size for household interviews
For all the farmer group types participating in CSA, it is decided that the survey will target 100
households per district except for the old national groups in the selected districts where only 50
HHs will be interviewed. The distribution will be as done in the baseline plan.
RI survey:
The monitoring survey for RI participants will be done in 2021 and 100 HHs will be interviewed
per district. It is planned that 6 out of the 11 districts will be selected for the survey. Note that
out of the 6 districts, 3 will be the refugee hosting districts.
6.3 Special surveys
These will be short and quick assessments on special issues from the framework. This will be
organised in the second year of implementation. They include adoption of and learning new
CSA practices. They will be organised for a few farmer groups on their individual farms
complimented with the demo performance reports. The number of groups will depend on the
number of groups selected per district and sub county.
The studies will be organised by CF in close collaboration with the extension team in the
respective locations. The special areas for surveys in NURI could be:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Poultry with refugee HHs
Adoption of CSA practices
Radio sensitisation programme
Use of community stores from cost-sharing model
Survival rates of tree seedlings
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 28
A mini survey will focus on a single issue, have a small sample size e.g. 50 farmer groups, and
be conducted in 1-2 weeks. Mini surveys will play an important role in 2019 and 2020 where
there are no Monitoring Surveys.
6.4 Data Collection Methods and Tools
Data/information gathering is a key component of the monitoring and evaluation system. It
involves establishing how the data will be collected and organized to provide useful information
for program implementation. The participation of stakeholders at this level is critical and the
application of different tools/methods depending on the performance indicators being tracked.
The data collection methods encompass the design and approach to overall monitoring and
evaluation of program activities. In NURI, data will be collected using both quantitative and
qualitative methods and, in some cases, triangulation. The qualitative methods will rely on a
variety of semi-structured or open-ended methods to produce in-depth, descriptive information.
The quantitative methods will depend on structured or standardized approaches to collect and
analyze numerical data.
The application of both methods will have implications in terms of cost, data reliability, skills
required, the ability to quantify results and richness of information generated.
Qualitative data collection methods
The qualitative method in NURI will provide an understanding of underlying reasons, opinions
and motivations. It will further provide insights in to problems and develop ideas/hypothesis for
quantitative methods. The methods will be Focus Group Discussions, Key Informant Interviews
and Observations.
Focus group discussions:
This is one of the principle means of collecting qualitative data; it is a form of interviewing in
which a small group usually 8-52 is led by a moderator in a loosely structured discussion of
various topics of interest. The course of the discussion is usually planned in advance and the
moderator relies on a guide to ensure all the areas of interest is covered. Focus group
discussions present the opportunity to collect data on a large range of behaviors, encourage a
variety of interaction with participants and enable more open discussions however the
moderator plays a crucial role of leading the discussions on pertinent issues rather than letting
the discussions go off track.
Focus Group Discussions will be used to:
 Verify and make notes on quantitative data
 Understand community views or perceptions about programme implementation process
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 29
Figure 6.1 focused group discussion session
Key informant interviews:
This is a qualitative in-depth interview with people who know what is going on in the
community. Such people are community leaders, professionals, farmer group focal persons or
residents who can provide first-hand information about what is going on in the communities.
These people are considered community experts with particular knowledge and understanding
who can provide insights on the nature of problems and give recommendations for solutions.
The target group for NURI will be the DLG political and technical staff attached to the
prorgamme (LC5 Chairpersons, DPOs, DE and FPOs), LLG leaders (Sub-County Chiefs, LC3
chairpersons, CDOs), PUCs, PMCs, FG leaders and CBTs.
Observation:
This is a data collection method that enables learning the activities of the people under study in
the natural setting through observing and participating in their day-to-day routine activities. It
provides the context for development of sampling guidelines and interview guides.
In NURI, this will be helpful in studying group dynamics issues, time spent on some key
production activities. It is more recommended for the refugee population. It should be
participatory however with some questions and answers that are recorded to guide reporting.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 30
Quantitative data collection methods
This will be used to quantity surveys/studies by way of generating numerical data that can be
transformed in to useable statistics. It will quantify data on the defined indicators and variables
where the measurable data will be translated in to facts. The main method will be face-to-face
interviews of respondents (farmer group members, community members participating in
infrastructure projects, community members participating in WRM). In some instances,
systematic observations will be done.
Household interviews:
This is the most common method in quantitative research, it is based on the assumption that
the participants knowledge is meaningful, knowable and can be made explicit. The perspective
of the respondent is also assumed to affect success of the program. The program will use both
structures in which a questionnaire is administered and in-depth interviews in which the
interviewer is not very rigid.
Figure 6.1 A household interview process
Systematic Observation:
This involves making observation quantifiable by and its application is as described under
qualitative research.
Data collection tools
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 31
These are instruments designed to aid data collection. The types of tools depend on the type of
data required to be collected. The program will use both qualitative and quantitative tools. The
key tools include:




Interview Questionnaires for baseline studies, monitoring survey and special assessments
Farmer group registers and attendance forms
Farmer group production and marketing plans and sales records
Infrastructure projects attendance and payment templates
The qualitative tools include:
 FGD guides
 Recorders
 KII guide
6.5 Databases
It is in plan for NURI M&E system to establish two databases; one for CSA and the other for RI.
The databases should be able to generate reports on some of the indicators.
CSA Database
The farmer group database is needed to provide a system for tracking agricultural production
and provide easily accessible data repository that is readily accessible by all program stake
holders. The system is also needed to provide a central location for tools, software and other
monitoring and evaluation accessories. It should be a simple, flexible retrieval system with a
choice of standard outputs and reports.
The database will be centrally located but the different stakeholders will have access from their
respective locations. The Coordination Function will be in charge of the database however each
implementing partner will identify one staff who will have access to the database and also enter
data into the system.
The database should built based on experiences with the RDNUC APM database. It should be
able to generate reports about the production indicators plus key activities implemented under
the strategic intervention on CSA. The content will include but not restricted to the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Basic farmer group data (group membership, sex, location, group type)
Total acreage of land under production (including means for opening)
Total production of the different strategic crops
Adoption of CSA in the demo plots (use of improved seeds, planting types)
Marketing of produce
PHH practices i.e. use of tarpaulins
Refugee HHs
Support from other agricultural livelihoods partners
Typical CSA farmers
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 32
The CSA database should include data about typical farmers who will be monitored through out
the implementation period. Their report will be useful for comparison after monitoring surveys
have been conducted.
6.5.1
No. of typical farmers to be captured in the CSA database
2020
District
Old FGs
Adjumani
Moyo
Arua
Pakwach
Nebbi
Zombo
Kitgum
Lamwo
Agago
Total
New FG HH
50
50
50
50
50
250
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
900
Mixed
HH
Gps Women
HH
50
50
50
50
50
50
150
150
Ref
Total
200
200
150
100
150
150
150
200
150
1,450
RI Database
The rural infrastructure database should be established in close collaboration with the
implementing partner. It should also generate reports that are in line with the performance
indicators.
The content should include but not restricted to the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Basic data for community groups and project types
Refugee participants
Youth participation
PUCs and PMCs trained and are working
Completed projects in accordance to standards
Data collection equipment
NURI should procure some equipment to support data collection and verification of outputs in
the field.
The following equipment will be required:
1. GPS for demo plot mapping
2. Weighing scales and harvest bags for field assessment
3. Calculators and assorted tools for research
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 33
4. Laptops for data entry when surveys and special assessments are done
6.6 Data Analysis
The data in the databases and the data collected in the monitoring surveys and mini surveys
should be analysed. The first purpose of data analysis is to calculate the results for the
indicators to see whether we are achieving our objectives and planned outcomes.
In order to explain the results further data analysis can be relevant as illustrated in the table
below:
NURI will use computer softwares such as SPSS, EXCEL and EpiDATA for analysis. Data
presentation will be done using tables, graphs, charts, diagrams, pictorials and narrative.
Focus of Analysis
Analysis Technique
Questions to be answered
Description
of
 Compare actual performance
 Is the program on
program performance
against targets
track?
 Compare current performance
 Did we meet our
to prior year
targets? Why or not?
 Analyze trends in performance
 How does this period’s
performance compare
to last period? Are
new targets needed?
Diversity of target
 Comparison between sites or
 Are
we
adequately
groups/sites
groups
reaching
all
the
required
target
groups/sites?
Conformity
of
 Component Analysis: training,
 Is
the
program
program to its design
referral system, services
performing functions
as it was expected to
or not performing
functions as well as it
is supposed to?
Summary of Steps in data analysis
 Describe the sample population
 Order, reduce and/or code the data
 Summarize the data in such a way that interpretation becomes easy
 Draw conclusions
 Develop strategies for confirming findings to prove validity
 Make the necessary recommendations
6.7 Units of Measurement for strategic and other common crops
The total production of strategic and other crops needs to be capture in the database. This
means that standard units need to be set and agreed upon. This should be done before data
entry starts.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 34
In the previous programme, cassava, bananas, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and vegetables
has been difficult to address. A quick assessment of what happens in the life of a typical farmer
growing these types of crops should be done before the units are harmonised.
NURI should be able to follow up with the zonal agricultural research and development
institutes (NARO- ABI-ZARDI, NGETTA-ZARDI) to share experiences and harmonise units for
measurement of crop production.
A simple conversion template is attached in Annex 6.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 35
7. REPORTING
Regular progress reporting from DLGs, IPs and CF is described in NURI Programme
Management Manual. This includes quarterly progress and annual reports. The format should
be revised at the start of the implementation process.
Special reports will be prepared from the:
1. Baseline studies
2. Monitoring surveys
3. Mini surveys and special assessments
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 36
8. M&E EVENTS
The monitoring and evaluation events are key activities that strengthen and consolidate the
whole M&E system. The rationale for conducting these events is to influence decision making
for management of programme implementation. The following events will be conducted for
NURI:
1. NURI Implementation Monitoring Committee (IMC) Meetings: This is a
committee that will be formed to participate in program M&E at a higher level. For further
details see section 4.1. The IMC will meet annually and carry out joint field monitoring
visits in the regional areas.
2. LLG survey feedback workshops: These will be conducted after every two years when
monitoring surveys have been conducted. The objective is to give feedback to the LLG on
level of achievement of targets. This could be combined with the DEC monitoring visits
and the implementing partners can be supported to hold these seminars.
3. Implementing partners’ take-off workshop: The purpose of the take-off workshop is
to orient the stakeholders in the program monitoring and evaluation system, the
performance indicators & targets and the partner roles and responsibilities. The workshop
will be held in the second quarter of the implementation process when all the indicators
and targets have been clearly defined.
4. Implementing partners M&E training: The training is meant to build the capacity of
the partners in monitoring and evaluation. One of the key roles of the partners is reporting
and data collection, it is therefore prudent that the partners are trained on report writing,
data collection methods and tools to enhance quality of data entered in the M&E system.
During the first year of implementation, it will be called M&E training however in the
preceding years, they will become M&E refresher trainings.
5.
Program Reviews (mid-term): The reviews are conducted by the governments of
Uganda and Denmark and are used as a management tool that allows national partners and
the Danish authorities to assess progress and adjust their support in light of changes in the
program context, sector development. The terms of reference of the review is prepared by
the RDE and led by a representative from DANIDA.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 37
9. TENTATIVE M&E ACTIVITY PLAN
Key M&E activities
Baseline studies (refugee hosting districts & partly old
continuing districts)
M&E tools harmonisation/development (PMPs, reporting
formats and other tools for surveys)
CSA production measurement and unit harmonisation
Timeframe
2019
+
2020
+
Responsible
person
2021
2022
+
CF
M&E
consultant
CF M&E
+
CF M&E and IPs
M&E training (Ips for CSA and later RI)
+
Database establishment (CSA and RI)
+
Reporting (progress, semi-annual and annual)
Data entry (CSA and RI)
Remarks
plus
+
+
+
+
+
+
CF M&E
+
+
+
+
CF M&E and Data
officers
Database maintenance (CSA and RI)
+
+
+
Monitoring surveys (CSA and RI)
+
+
+
Special surveys (CSA)
+
IMC workshops
+
+
CF
M&E
plus
consultant
CF plus consultant
+
+
+
CF
M&E
consultant
CF
M&E
consultant
CF
plus
plus
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 38
10. MAINTAINING AND SUSTAINING THE M&E SYSTEM
Maintenance and Support
The responsibility of maintenance and management of the M&E system rests on the
Coordination Function. The CF will contract consultants to support in building the data base and
to support the monitoring surveys.
Sustaining the system
The program M&E system is regarded as a long-term effort to measure achievement of the
planned objectives throughout the program duration. The most important issue in sustaining
the system is enhancing complete utilization. Some critical dimensions of sustainability that the
CF will follow up include;
1. Defining clear M&E roles & responsibilities: The responsibilities of all stakeholders must
be clear and understandable to all.
2. Putting trustworthy and credible information: The information put in the M&E system
should be reliable, clear, accurate and up to date.
3. Ensuring accountability: The system should demonstrate results, enhance transparency
and accountability to all stakeholders.
4. Building capacities: Sound technical skills in data collection and analysis are essential
for sustaining the system. Data collection systems and retrieval must be up and running
at all times, therefore financial resources must be committed to support the process.
5. Providing incentives to stimulate M&E activities: The incentives will help the
stakeholders not to take M&E as a bureaucratic task but as an opportunity to reflect
critically and criticize constructively in order to learn what changes are needed to
enhance impact.
6. Validating and continuous up grading of the M&E system: the system should respond
and adapt to changes in program priorities. Continuous upgrade is necessary and this
means attempt should always be made to evaluate completed processes and necessary
recommendations adopted.
In short, the responsibility for sustaining the system rests in the hands of the Coordination
Function with support from the implementing partners.
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 39
11. M&E STAFFING AND CAPACITY BUILDING PLAN FOR NURI
M&E Staff
Coordination Function will employ two professional fulltime staff; one as M&E Coordinator and
the other M&E officer. It is planned the M&E officer will focus more on rural infrastructure and
water resource management. On top of NURI M&E coordination role, the M&E Coordinator will
attend to CSA data demands. In either case, the two professional staff will work in close
collaboration.
NURI will support the recruitment of Data Officers who will be attached to the APM
implementing partners/units in the field. Three Data Officers will be recruited, one attached to
AFARD but over seeing Nebbi, Zombo and Arua, another attached to RAU-Kitgum/Lamwo over
seeing Kitgum, Lamwo and Agago, lastly one attached to RAU-Moyo over seeing Moyo and
Adjumani.
The staff will be supported by an external consultant when surveys and special studies are
organised to be conducted.
The roles and responsibilities of the staff will be specified in their terms of employment
(contract).
M&E Capacity building
To establish a system that is robust and functioning well, there is need for capacity building of
the staff at the Coordination Function and implementing partners in various aspects. The staff
at CF need to be trained on:
1. Data analysis using recommended software packages (SPSS, Epi-data, MS Access and
Advanced Excel)
2. GPS use (mapping/verification of demo plot fur yield assessment)
3. Data collection and management
4. Report writing
The implementing partners require training on:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
NURI M&E system (indicators & targets)
Their roles and responsibilities in M&E
Data collection and management
Report writing
Simple data analysis using MS Access and Excel
GPS mapping for demo plot mapping
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 40
Consultancy services for M&E in NURI
NURI will require consultancy services in the following areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Baseline study, monitoring and special surveys in data collection tools design and analysis
Establishment of the CSA and RI database
Training of IPs in M&E (data collection and management)
Training of IPs on the CSA and RI database
Data analysis and application of the different software
Maintenance of CSA and RI databases
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 41
ANNEXES
Annex 1. Log-frame
In NURI the logical framework is used as the program planning matrix and presenting the
logical sequence of the program activities. It identified the various elements of the component,
specified how they relate to the achievement of purpose and made explicit assumptions and
external conditions crucial for success. The logframe will be enhance transparency and
communication of achievement of objectives. It is a four by four matrix which describes both
the vertical and horizontal logic of the program. The key elements are highlighted as:
 Defines inputs, activities, outputs, purposes and higher goals in measurable or
objectively verifiable terms;
 Hypothesizes the causative (means-ends) linkage between inputs and outputs;
 Articulates the assumptions (external influences) which affect the causative linkages;
 Establishes the indicators which will permit subsequent measurement or verification of
achievement of the defined outputs, purpose and goal.
The Vertical Logic of the Logframe
 Activities/inputs - with appropriate external circumstances, lead to outputs;
 Outputs/Results - with appropriate external circumstances lead to achieving the
purpose;
 Purpose - with appropriate external circumstances leads to achieving the goal;
 Higher Goal of Sectoral Objectives
Inputs: Physical and non-physical assets that are used as a basis for adding value to a given
project. They could include land, labour (skilled and unskilled), and finance (equity, loan, grant,
government budget).
Activities: These are tasks carried out by the project in order to achieve the desired outputs or
results. Activities could include design, tender, recruit, procure, clear, delivering training
programs.
Outputs: The outputs or results describe the assets, goods and services which are created by
the inputs and activities of a project.
Purpose or Immediate Objective: The project activities and outputs must lead to achieving
this immediate objective; for instance increased food production, increased household income.
There must be cause-effect relationship and the external factors must be clearly defined. Likely
changes in factors and the magnitude of impact must also be identified (risk analysis).
Goal: The goal may be a broader sectoral or societal goal, however a project alone cannot
achieve a broader goal but may contribute towards achieving the broad goal – provided other
external factors also work.
The Horizontal Logic:
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 42
 At each stage, objectively verifiable indicators (OVIs) of achievement are identified and
clearly stated;
 At each stage the means of verifying the OVIs is clearly stated;
 At each stage the important assumptions for achieving the next stage are stated.
Objectively verifiable indicators: Means of measurement which permits judgement about a
situation. It is a criteria for assessing project progress at the different levels shown in the
narrative summary and specified in precise and concrete terms. The indicators must be
measurable or verifiable (SMART: S = Specific, M = Measurable, A = Achievable, R = Realistic,
T = Time bound). The selection of indicators took the following issues into consideration:




Who is going to use them
How they are going to use them (calculations and measurements)
Who is going to collect the information & how (sharing of responsibilities in M&E)
Any potential problems with the indicator.
Means of Verification: Instruments by which the OVIs can be measured; Project monitoring,
periodic reports, surveys, evaluation studies; Completing this sections helps to ensure that OVIs
are realistic since they specify how they are to be measured; Important role in facilitating
evaluation.
External Assumptions
 Assumptions or External factors are identified at three levels:
 Inputs to outputs
 Outputs to purpose
 Purpose to Goal
These need to be worded as positive conditions. The detailed logframe matrix for is shown
below.
NURI M&E Manual
COMPONENT LOGIC
Date: 1/12/2018
OBJECTIVELY VERIFIABLE
INDICATORS (OVIs)
Page 43
MEANS OF VERIFICATION
(MoVs)
ASSUMPTIONS/EX
TERNAL FACTORS
DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE (GOAL)
Resilience and equitable economic
development in supported areas of
Northern Uganda, including for refugees
and host communities enhanced
% increase in average annual HH
income
Baseline survey
Monitoring survey
% Reduction in period that HHs
report food insecurity
Total no. of people benefiting from
supported WRM interventions
OUTCOME (PURPOSE)
1. Agricultural production,
productivity and marketing of
small-scale farmers increased
2. Rural agriculture-related
infrastructure rehabilitated using
a labour intensive approach
% of participating HHs adopting
CSA practices including refugees
% of participating HHs reporting
higher prices for strategic crops
compared to average prices in the
local area
% increase in average yields per
acre for strategic crops for
participating HHs compared to
baseline
% increase in value of total crop
production per HH compared to
baseline
% of HH reporting satisfaction with
quality of completed projects
% of participants reporting reduced
travel time to the markets
% of community members living
close to the completed projects who
Special survey
Monitoring surveys
Monitoring survey
Climatic conditions
remain conducive for
production & market
conditions are
favorable, farmers
willing to participate
and cost share,
refugees have
sufficient access to
land
Monitoring survey
Monitoring surveys
Monitoring surveys
Monitoring surveys
DLG & LLG enforce
maintenance of
projects,
communities willingly
participate and
enhance
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 44
are using it regularly
3. Climate change resilience in
target areas improved through
WRM
sustainability
Area of micro-catchments with
improved water management
% reduction of duration of periods
of water shortage in target areas
To be defined later
No. of FGs trained in collective
marketing
Progress reports
No. of FGs supported to construct
produce stores
% of strategic crops produced by
participating farmers collectively
marketed
No. of FGs trained in CSA practices
for one year
% of FG members reporting having
learnt at least XX new CSA practices
% of strategic crops dried and
cleaned on tarpaulins by
participating farmer HHs
% of strategic crops produced by
participating HHs that are marketed
collectively
No. of mixed FGs trained in CSA
practices
% of HHs reporting having learnt
XX new CSA practices
Progress reports
Monitoring surveys
Community
participation
encourages
adherence to by-laws
OUTPUT
Strategic Intervention 1
Output 1: Old farmer groups
supported
Output 2: New National FGs trained in
CSA
Output 3: Mixed FGs trained in CSA
(refugees and nationals)
Monitoring surveys
Progress reports
Special survey
Monitoring surveys
Climate remains
favorable and
farmers are able to
produce more for
marketing
Climate remains
favorable, farmers
willing to learn, land
available for demo
and individual
production
Monitoring surveys
Progress reports
Special surveys
Peaceful co-existence
between refugees
and nationals, access
to land and
willingness to
participate
NURI M&E Manual
Output 4: Refugee women FGs trained
in CSA
Output 5: FGs supported in VSLA
Output 6: FGs supported in animal
traction
Output 7: Capacity of implementing
partners and their staff built.
Output 8: Capacity of DLG production
department built
Output 9: SRHR
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 45
% of refugee HHs participating in
mixed groups reporting having
access to production land
No. of refugee women groups
trained in CSA
% of refugee women HHs reporting
having learnt XX new CSA practices
% of refugee women HHs reporting
having grown at least 6 types of
food and vegetables on their
residential plots
No. of FGs supported in VSLA
Monitoring surveys
% of VSLA loans used for
agricultural purpose
% of FGs that report increased
savings by at least 20% compared
to the previous year
To be decided
SAVIX
To be decided
To be decided
No. of male and female staff trained
Progress reports
% of staff reporting increased ability
to meet their performance targets
No. of districts with approved
capacity building plans
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
No. of staff trained and sensitized
on SRHR
No. of FGs trained and sensitized on
SRHR
Special survey and appraisals
Progress reports
Special survey
Monitoring surveys
Progress reports
Peaceful co-existence
between nationals &
refugees, refugee
women have access
to sufficient land,
willingness to
participate
Farmers willing to
save money through
VSLA
SAVIX
To be decided
Progress reports
Progress reports
Progress reports
Progress reports
To be decided
Staff will be
motivated to stay on
job
DLG leadership
remains committed
and supportive of
NURI activities
FGs and community
members willing to
learn SRHR
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 46
Strategic Intervention 2
Output 1: Prioritized infrastructure
investment plans approved
Output 2: Approved infrastructure
projects implemented
Output 3: Capacity of DLG engineering
department built
No. of parishes with updated
development plans
No. of districts with approved
infrastructure investment plans
Progress reports
No. of work days paid for in
implementation of infrastructure
projects
% of infrastructure projects in
approved investment plans that
have been completed
% of completed infrastructure
projects constructed in accordance
to agreed standards
% of infrastructure participants who
are youth (18-30 years)
No. of districts with developed and
approved capacity building plans
No. of DLG capacity building plans
implemented
Progress reports
No. of catchment plans developed &
agreed among stakeholders
Progress reports
No. of bylaws for micro-catchment
natural resources management
agreed and implemented
No. of micro-catchment
management plans implemented
No. of agriculturally-related physical
& natural water infrastructure
constructed or made resilient to
climate change
Progress reports
LLG structures have
development plans
Progress reports
Monitoring surveys & List of
completed projects
Monitoring survey
Climatic conditions
will favor
construction works,
proper selection of
contractors,
community members
willing to participate
Monitoring survey
Progress reports
Progress reports
DLG leadership
remains committed
and supportive of
NURI activities
Strategic Intervention 3
Output 1: DWRM/UNWMZ effective in
planning, engaging stakeholders,
monitoring & supervising IWRM
activities
Output 2: Agriculturally related
physical and natural water
infrastructure in the micro-catchment
plans constructed and renovated
Progress reports
Progress reports
Communities will
participate willingly
and adhere to the
bylaws
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
No. of community/user
management agreements developed
and implemented
Page 47
Progress reports
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 48
Annex 2. Agricultural Production Assets
The following assets are important for agricultural production and will be considered when it is
measured if the households have increased the value of their assets:












Hoes
Pangas
Ox-ploughs
Spray pumps
Bicycle
Radio
Telephone
Poultry
Goats
Pigs
Cattle
Oxen for ploughing
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 49
Annex 3. Good Agricultural Practices
The following agricultural practices are important for improving the production and quality and
are the ones that should will be considered when it is measured if the farmers have learned
about or are adopting good agricultural practices:










Proper land/seed bed preparation
Use of improved seeds
Timely planting
Proper plant spacing
Mulching
Timely and proper weed control
Timely pests and disease control
Timely harvesting
Drying of produce on tarpaulins or similar
Not burning crop residues
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 50
Annex 4. Agricultural Use of VSLA Loans
The following agricultural uses practices are important for improving the production and quality
and are the ones that should be considered when it is measured if the farmers have used their
VSLA loans for agricultural production:





Procurement of seeds
Procurement of tools
Hiring labour for field work
Hiring animal traction or tractor services
Buying animals
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 51
Annex 5. Theory of Change
Activities
NURI will support farmers and
refugees with CSA Training and
VSLA
NURI will support farmers and
refugees with improved inputs
and cost-sharing of equipments
(including tarpaulins and animal
traction)
Outputs
Farmers and refugees will learn
CSA practices and financial
literacy
Farmers will have better
access to improved inputs and
PHH facilities
Short- term outcomes
Long-term Outcomes
Farmers & refugees will
increasingly adopt CSA
Practices & use improved
inputs
Farmers will have
increase in yields and
productivity
Farmers have better
quality of produce
Farmers will increase the
value of production
Farmers have increased
savings in VSLA
Impact
Enhanced resilience and
equitable economic
development in suported areas
of Northern Uganda
1. Increased Annual HH income
2. Increased Food Security
3. Increased value of
production assets
Farmers will invest in
production assets
Farmers will learn animal
traction technology
Farmers will increase
acreage of land cultivated
NURI will improve the rural
infrastructure using labour
intensive approach
Community members construct
roads, markets and other
infrastructure
Farmers will have better
physical access to produce
markets and inputs
Farmers get higher prices
for their crop produce
Farmers will reduce
travel time to the main
produce markets
NURI will develop and implement
community driven water resource
management plans
WRM micro-catchment plans
approved by stakeholders
Communities will follow
the by-laws
Community members will
use the
renovated/constructed
infrastructure
Enhanced resilience and equitable
economic development in suported
areas of Northern Uganda
to be discussed with WRM IP
Communities benefiting from
Climate Change resilience
interventions
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
Page 52
Annex 6. Measurement and conversion rates for crops
Units commonly used and standardization (Approximation)
SESAME
MAIZE
SUNFLOWER
1 bag full
= 120 kg
½ bag
= 60 Kg
1 basin full
= 20 Kg
1 cup (mug)
= 0.5 Kg
1 cup (min mug) = 0.33 Kg
1 bag full
½ bag
1 basin full
1 cup
1 cup (min mug)
1 acre maize
RICE (unmilled)
BEANS
1 bag full
½ bag
1 basin full
1 cup
1 cup (min mug)
= 100 kg
= 50 Kg
= 17 Kg
= 0.5 Kg
= 0.33 Kg
RICE (milled)
1 bag full
= 120 kg
½ bag
= 60 Kg
1 basin full
= 20 Kg
1 cup
= 0.5 Kg
1 cup (min mug) = 0.33 Kg
Cassava
1 bag full (fresh) = 120 kg
1 basin full (fresh) = 22 kg
1 acre cassava
= 3,600kg
1 acre stems = 4 bags plant
1 bag cuttings = 50 Kg
Cassava (Flour)
1 bag full (flour) = 100 kg
1 basin full (flour) = 17 kg
1 cup
= 0.4 kg
1 cup (mini mug) = 0.3 kg
1 bag full
½ bag
1 basin full
1 cup
1 cup (min mug)
Kg
= 120 kg
= 60 kg
= 20 Kg
= 0.5 Kg
= 0.33 Kg
=400 Kg
1 bag full
½ bag
1 basin full
5 cups
= 70 kg
= 35 Kg
= 12 Kg
= 1 Kg
SOYA BEANS
= 120 kg
= 60 Kg
= 20 Kg
= 0.5 Kg
= 0.33
Groundnuts (Unshelled)
1 bag full
= 45 kg
1 basin full
= 7.5 kg
1 cup
= 0.2 kg
1 cup (mini mug) =0.15 kg
Groundnut (Shelled)
1 bag full
= 120 kg
1 basin
= 17 kg
1 cup
= 0.4 kg
1 cup (mini mug) = 0.3 kg
Millet (Threshed)
1 bag full
= 130 kg
1 basin full
= 22 kg
1 cup
= 0.5 kg
1 cup (mini mug) = 0.4 kg
Pigeon pea (Threshed)
1 bag full
= 130 kg
1 basin full
= 20 kg
1 cup
= 0.5 kg
1 cup (mini mug) = 0.4 kg
Tomatoes & cabbage
Sugar cane
1 bag full
½ bag
1 basin full
1 cup
1 cup (min mug)
= 120 kg
= 60 Kg
= 20 Kg
= 0.5 Kg
= 0.33 Kg
Sorghum (threshed)
1 bag full
= 130 kg
1 basin full
= 22 kg
1 cup
= 0.5 kg
1 cup (mini mug) = 0.35 kg
Bananas
Small bunch = 5 Kg
Medium bunch = 10 Kg
Big bunch
= 20 Kg
Very big bunch = 30 Kg
Sweet potato (Fresh)
1 bag full
= 120 kg
1 basin full
= 22 kg
1 acre s/pota vines = 5 bags
1 bundle vines = 18 Kg
1 acre yield = 2000 kg
1 basin of sliced s/p = 6.5Kg
1 bag of sliced s/p = 40 Kg
Irish potato
1 bag full
= 120 kg
1 basin full
= 15 kg
Onions
NURI M&E Manual
1
1
1
1
1
1
Date: 1/12/2018
basin tomatoes = 20 Kg
acre of tomatoes =1500 Kg
bag cabbage = 70 kg
big head cabbage = 2.5 kg
medium head =1.5kg
small head = 0.5 kg
Okra
1 acre = 1000 Kg green pods
1 basin = 10 kg
1 bag = 50 Kg
1 bundle = 20 stems (sticks)
1 lorry carries 500 bundles
(estimate)
Page 53
1 basin = 15 Kg
1 bag = 90 kg or 6 basins
1 acre = 1000 kg or 11 bags
Pumpkin
1 Small
= 2 Kg
1 Medium = 5 Kg
1 Big
= 10 Kg
1 Very big = 20 Kg
1 acre
= 120 fruits ( 6 10 plants)
1 jug small (all grains except sunflower)
1 jug medium (all grains except sunflower)
1 jug big (all grains except sunflower)
1 Katasa (dish)
4 Nice cups (Plastic, short and thick)
Calabash (medium size for sowing seeds)
Ogatia unit is west Nile
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
1
2
3
5
1
2
?
Kg
Kg
Kg
Kg
Kg
Kg
Conversion Rates
Ground nuts
Shelled groundnuts weigh 60% of the unshelled.
Rice
Hulled rice weighs X% of unhulled rice
Cassava
Dry/Milled cassava weighs 37% of fresh cassava (Assumption based on dry matter of cassava)
Sliced sweet potatoes units e.g. Kg per bag ?? – Seems none was sampled
Standardizing Area measurements
1 Hectare
1 Hectare
1 acre
0.5 acres
1 acre
1 Katala
1 Large garden
1 medium garden
= 10,000M2
= 2.5 acres
= 4000 M2
= 2000 M2
= 20 Katalas
= 20 X 10 M2
= 1.5 acres (Acholi)
= 1 acre (Acholi)
NURI M&E Manual
Date: 1/12/2018
1 small garden or 1/2 garden
= 0.5 acres (Acholi)
1 Kenya
= 1/3 acre
Lasanduku
= 1 Katala
Page 54
Download
Random flashcards
Arab people

15 Cards

Radioactivity

30 Cards

Nomads

17 Cards

Ethnology

14 Cards

Create flashcards