Uploaded by Stewart Oser

The Importance of Georgia's Waterways

advertisement
THE IMPORTANCE OF
GEORGIA’S
WATERWAYS
BY STEWART OSER
FAST FACTS
• Georgia has 14 rivers, including the Savannah,
Chattahoochee, Coosa, Flint, St. Mary’s, Tennessee, and
Oconee Rivers.
• “Georgia has 4.8 million acres of wetlands, 425,382 acres
of public lakes and reservoirs, 854 square miles of
estuaries, and 100 miles of coastline.”
• The Environmental Protection Agency says that Georgia
has 44,056 miles of perennial streams, 23,906 miles of
intermittent streams, and 603 miles of ditches and canals.
HISTORICAL FACTS
• The Savannah River was discovered by De
Soto in 1540. At the time, it was 314 miles
long and well traveled.
• Natives used this river for settlement, food,
drinking water, and transportation and they
called it Isondega, meaning “blue waters.”
• The Chattahoochee River’s name means
“river of painted rocks”, and the Natives
used this river for transportation.
GEORGIA’S WATERWAYS
• Georgia has several different types of waterways.
• These include:
• Rivers
• There are many different rivers in Georgia, and they all
mainly serve for drinking water, transportation, and hydroelectric power.
• The Atlantic Ocean
• Georgia has 100 miles of Atlantic coastline. This is used for
international trade.
• and Coastal Waterways.
• One such waterway is the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway,
which is used for transportation.
THE INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY
• The Atlantic Intracoastal waterway is a partially
man-made waterway that allows safe travel through
the entire U.S. east coast.
• It is mainly man-dug canals, however it does utilize
some natural lakes and rivers.
• The lowest controlling depth of the Atlantic
Intracoastal Waterway is 6.1 feet.
VIDEO SUMMARY: DEVELOPMENT OF
GEORGIA
Once upon a time, Georgia ran on water. People used mills and waterwheels on farms to grind corn and other products,
but this could take hours. Some of these mills still exist and are still in use. There were many kinds, including waterwheelpowered mills, river water-powered mills, and waterfall powered mills. These are all wonderful sites around Georgia.
“When Georgia’s settlers learned to control water, it changed everything.” Different kinds of mills, such as paper and
textiles, were created as a result of this wet epidemic. Most Georgia mills were burned down by Union soldiers. They got
to Georgia by traveling the Chattahoochee. Mills were very common wherever water had a steep drop against rocks,
because they produced better power. Georgia made sure that they controlled the waters, even giving up Alabama and
Mississippi to the federal government, drawing the boundary.
Water and mills helped shape our country, and they continue to play a role in the state. They were simple machines that
served a huge purpose: to provide a method of grinding food and rock and they also provided power. These mills were
very important to Georgia. They provided food and power to us, and put people into jobs. Without the mills, there would
have been a lot less socializing in Georgia. Without mills, Georgia would not be the same today.
EQ: HOW DID WATER AFFECT GEORGIA’S
DEVELOPMENT
Water affected Georgia’s development
because without water, Georgia would have
never created the many mills that it did
which led to an increase in food, power, and
more. Water served as a great source of
transportation, and it still does. In summary,
without water, Georgia would not be at the
same place that it is today.
WHAT I TAKE FROM THIS:
While creating this PowerPoint, I learned many things
about Georgia’s water, waterways, and how and why we
use them. For example, I learned about the many different
Georgian mills and how they benefited our early society.
They provided power, food, and more for all of us. I
learned that some of these mills still exist today. Another
thing that I learned was that our rivers have many
historical backgrounds to them. For example, the Savannah
river was used for food, water, and transportation even by
Native Americans.
RESOURCES
•
Administrator. “Georgia Rivers.” Ocmulgee River Water Trail, www.garivers.org/news/470-georgia-rivers.html.
•
https://georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/images/uploads/gallery/garivers.jpg
•
https://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/article-top/public/chattooga%20river_002.jpg?itok=6coyN0Ah
•
http://northgeorgiaphotos.com/images/Chattooga_river_bulls_sluice.jpg
•
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5a/Chesapeake_and_Delaware_Canal_eastern_entrance.jpg/1200pxChesapeake_and_Delaware_Canal_eastern_entrance.jpg
•
Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. “Intracoastal Waterway.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 13 June 2016,
www.britannica.com/topic/Intracoastal-Waterway.
•
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5e/Water_drop_001.jpg
•
https://media1.tenor.com/images/1cf847ae1ccd4c7e4eecdc62879509b5/tenor.gif?itemid=9718895
•
Previous Knowledge and from notes and video and Mrs. Imbert and textbook, and the video.