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Entrepreneurship Education
Grade 12 | Term 1–3
LEARNER’S book
Authors:
Ria de Villiers
Juliet Williamson
Robert Eric Nelson
Jens Dyring Christensen
International Labour Office, Geneva
International Training Centre of the ILO, Turin
Copyright © International Labour Organization 2015
First published 2015
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rights’ organization in your country.
978-92-2-129415-3 (print)
978-92-2-129416-0 (web pdf)
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Cover Photo: Stephen Collet
Design: Elizabeth Fincham
Printed in South Africa
Foreword
Dear Grade 12 Learner,
Welcome to the startUP&go programme!
The startUP&go will take you on a journey over the next year through the world of entrepreneurship.
During this journey we hope to build your entrepreneurial skills and competencies and make you better
prepared to become an entrepreneur in the future, should you wish to be one!
If you are reading this, then you are part of a special group of Business Studies learners in a Free State
school, who have been selected to test the startUP&go programme during Grade 10,11 and 12.
During the next year you will learn about characteristics of enterprising people and you will learn that
entrepreneurship is an attitude towards life that you can use in many ways to identify opportunities in
your personal life, in your family and in your community.
You will practise entrepreneurship through games and creative exercises with your teachers and fellow
students in class and we hope you will have fun! Practising and learning about entrepreneurship must
be inspiring!
This is what the startUP&go package is about. The book you hold in your hand will assist you in nurturing
your entrepreneurial talent.
If you think you can, you can!
startUP&go | LEARNER’S book
Table of contents
TERM 1
General objectives/link to the CAPS
Entrepreneurship focus
12
12
1 Session
(Week 1–3) I mpact of recent legislation on business –
response to demands for redress and equity
13
Viewing 1.1
Legislation
13
Activity 1.1
Applying legislation to real-life scenarios
Case study 1–7
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
14
Activity 1.2
Reflecting on legislation as an entrepreneur
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
15
Activity 1.3
Analysing the importance of legislation
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
15
Activity 1.4
Understanding and explaining legislation
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
15
Activity 1.5
Applying learning to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
16
Activity 1.6
Mini debate: Problems facing SMMEs
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
16
Reading 1.6
New Minister of Small Business Development, Ms Lindiwe Zulu
17
Journal Entry
Session
17
2 (Week 4–5) Human resources function
18
Activity 2.1
View the video: HR functions
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
18
Viewing 2.1
HR functions
18
Activity 2.2 (Part 1)
Reflecting on the video of HR Functions
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
19
Activity 2.2 (Part 2)
Sipho gets a job
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
19
Reading 2.2 (1)
Sipho needs a job …
19
Reading 2.2 (2)
He applies and they phoned him back!
20
Reading 2.2 (3)
He’s been invited for an interview!
20
Activity 2.3
Analysing Absa’s HR functions
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
21
Activity 2.4
Explain induction and recruitment
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
21
Viewing 2.5
Meet Mamoabi, HR specialist
21
Activity 2.5
View the video: Meet Mamoabi, HR specialist
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
21
Activity 2.6
Apply HR to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
23
23
Journal Entry
Session
3 (Week 8–10) Devise
strategies for business to use in its response to the
challenges of the macro business environment
24
The Business Strategy Game
24
Activity 3.1
Play the Business Strategy Game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
27
Activity 3.2
Reflect on the Business Strategy Game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
27
Activity 3.3
Analyse the Business Strategy Game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
28
Activity 3.4
Discuss business strategies
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
29
Activity 3.5
Apply business strategies to the real world
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
29
Activity 3.6
Case study: Strategies
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
29
Reading 3.6
Strategies
30
Activity 3.7
Meet Thato Kgatlhanye
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
30
Reading 3.7
Solving problems in Africa – The lack of opportunity
31
Game
startUP&go | LEARNER’S book
Table of contents
TERM 2
General objectives/link to the CAPS
Entrepreneurship focus
33
33
1 (Week 1–2) C
oncept of corporate social responsibility
34
Nedbank CSR and CSI
34
Session
Viewing 1.1
Activity 1.1Nedbank: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate social Investment (CSI)
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
35
Activity 1.2
Reflect on CSR and CSI video
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
35
Activity 1.3
Analyse CSI projects
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
36
Activity 1.4
Understand CSR and CSI and social responsibility
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
36
Activity 1.5
Apply CSR to real world
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
37
Reading 1.5
Social or Business entrepreneur?
37
Journal Entry
Session
37
2 Activity 2.1
Game
(Week 5) Management and leadership
38
The leadership game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
38
The Leadership Game
38
Reading 2.1
Team Instruction Sheet
40
Reading 2.2
Leadership Styles
42
Reflect on the leadership game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
43
Activity 2.2
Activity 2.3
Analyse the leadership game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
44
Activity 2.4
Differentiate between leaders and managers
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
44
Activity 2.5
Applying leadership to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
45
45
Journal Entry
Session
3 (Week 6) Q
uality of performance with business functions
46
Activity 3.1
Quality control and the eight business functions
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
46
Viewing 3.1
Sedibeng Water, Quality Control
46
Activity 3.2
Reflect on Quality Control video
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
47
Activity 3.3
Analyse the eight business functions and quality control
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
47
Activity 3.4
Implementing quality control and continuous improvement cycle
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
48
Activity 3.5
Apply quality control to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
48
(Week 7–8) Revision
49
Revision: Business Strategies
Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Social Investment
Leadership
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
49
Session
4 Activity 4.1
startUP&go | LEARNER’S book
Table of contents
TERM 3
General objectives/link to the CAPS
Entrepreneurship focus
51
51
1 (Week 3) Forms of ownership and their impact on business operations
52
Forms of ownership
52
Activity 1.1
Business scenarios 1-6
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
52
Activity 1.2
Reflect on forms of ownership
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
53
Activity 1.3
Analyse the forms of ownership
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
54
Activity 1.4
Understand forms of ownership
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
54
Activity 1.5
Apply forms of ownership to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
54
(Week 4–5) Presentation of information and data response
55
Meet Tumi, presenter
55
Activity 2.1
View video: Meet Tumi, presenter
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
55
Activity 2.2
The use of audio-visual aids in presentations
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
56
Activity 2.3
Help Lebo present her business plan
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
57
Activity 2.4
Differentiate between types of presentation documents
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
57
Activity 2.5
Applying presentation skills to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
57
Session
Viewing 1.1
Session
Viewing 2.1
2 Session
3 (Week 6–7) Revision
58
The Envelope Factory Game
58
Activity 3.1
Play the envelope factory game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
58
Activity 3.2
Reflect on the envelope factory game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
61
Activity 3.3
Analyse the envelope factory game
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
61
Activity 3.4
Understand economic sectors
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
62
Activity 3.5
Apply the envelope factory game to business
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
62
Viewing 3.6
Quiz
62
Revision: Whole year’s work
Quiz Term 1
Quiz Term 2
Quiz Term 3
(Informal Assessment Portfolio)
62
Game
Activity 3.6
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
General objectives/link to the CAPS
The objectives for the startUP&go material for term 1 are to:
•Consider the macro environment with a particular focus on the recent
legislation, which was developed in response to demands for redress and
equity, on small and large business operations
•Understand and know how to apply the relevant legislation and the
following aspects of the Human Resources function: recruitment
and selection; employee contracts; induction and placement; salary
administration; employee benefits; skills development
•Devise and formulate strategies a business could use in response to the
challenges of the macro business environment; critically evaluate such
strategies and make recommendations as required.
Entrepreneurship focus
Session 1–3: Week 1–10
TERM 1
For Term 1 in Grade 12, the main focus of the startUP&go package is on key
entrepreneurial activities relating to the operations of a business. Entrepreneurs
are often faced with basic business problems regarding legal concerns as well as
human resource issues. It’s not always clear how to solve these pressing problems
with the limited resources available to most entrepreneurs.
12
Entrepreneurship education isn’t just about learning the basics of law and
human relations. It’s about encouraging ethical behaviour and creativity in
resolving problems related to law and human relations; this is the hallmark of
entrepreneurial thinking. When you begin finding new ways to solve problems,
some solutions may fail. But this isn’t failure in the traditional sense. It’s simply
trial and error. It teaches new entrepreneurs to be resilient and persevere, and in
doing so, won’t block the creative process just because some potential solutions
don’t work.
Entrepreneurs bring new products and services to the world that never existed
before. They see a need that others have missed. It is important that they not
only have a vision of how their product will meet the need, but also use various
business strategies to promote the new products and services, as well as how to
react to problems.
They need to formulate strategies which could respond to the challenges of the
macro business environment and to critically evaluate such strategies and make
recommendations. A defining trait of entrepreneurship is the ability to spot an
opportunity and create a strategy that takes into account the most favourable
macro business environment to bring that opportunity to the market place.
Entrepreneurs have a curiosity that identifies overlooked business opportunities
and puts them at the forefront of innovation and emerging fields. They have
the ability to communicate that strategy effectively to investors, staff and other
stakeholders.
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 1: Week 1–3
SESSION 1
Week 1–3
Impact of recent legislation on business – response to demands for redress
and equity
3–4 hours
Session focus:
Through the knowledge you gained in Grades 10 and 11 you learned that there are a number
of factors in the Macro environment – of which the business has no control – which affect
businesses. The legal environment is one of the environments that a business has no control of
and has to comply with.
Since 1994, a number of Acts have been introduced in South Africa which businesses have to
adhere to. These Acts were brought in to redress the inequalities of the past. The responsibility
lies with management to ensure these Acts are adhered to and implemented in the businesses
because non-compliance with these Acts is punishable by law.
You will view a documentary video which sums up the legislation on businesses in South Africa
today and, by doing various related activities, you will grow in your understanding of the
legislation as response to demands for redress and inequity.
STAGE 1: DOING
Viewing 1.1: Legislation
View the video, make notes and then complete the following questions in writing in your Informal
Assessment Portfolio.
13
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 1: Week 1–3
ACTIVITY 1.1
Applying legislation to real-life scenarios
Case study 1–7
Case study 1:
a)
Which Act is applicable in the above scenario?
b)How would Vincent go about claiming damages from the
business for the incident that took place?
Case study 2:
c)
Which Act is applicable in the above scenario?
d)What are the consequences of non-compliance to this Act for
businesses?
Case study 3:
e)
Which Act is applicable in the above scenario?
f)Mention two errors this micro lender has made.
Case study 4:
g)
Which Act is applicable in the above scenario?
h)Name two rights for employees in this Act.
Case study 5:
i)Which Act stipulates that the business would receive a better rating if Jabulani gets the job?
j)Name the seven elements included in a scorecard associated with this Act.
Case study 6:
k)
Which act is applicable in the above scenario?
l)What is an advantage of this Act?
14
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 1: Week 1–3
Case study 7:
m)Which two Acts are most applicable in the above scenario?
n)When is it illegal to strike?
o)How much should they be paid for overtime or work on Sundays/Public holidays?
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 1.2
Reflecting on legislation as an entrepreneur
You have almost finished with school and may soon start working, or starting a small business.
a)
How do you feel about the Acts as an entrepreneur, or as a worker?
b)
How did the video make things clearer?
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 1.3
Analysing the importance of legislation
a)Describe whether you feel the Acts have been successful in their implementation and whether
they have achieved their initial purpose.
b)
Name one advantage and one disadvantage of the new Acts for start-up businesses
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 1.4
Understanding and explaining legislation
a) The Labour Relations Act, 1995 (Act 66 of 1995) provides for the establishment of trade unions
and employer organisations. Distinguish between these two types of organisations. 15
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 1: Week 1–3
b) Evaluate the impact of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997 (Act 75 of 1997) on business
operations. c) The Labour Relations Act (LRA), Act no. 66 of 1995, prescribes procedures for the different types
of labour actions. Name and discuss any THREE types of labour procedures that workers can
participate in. d) According to the Employment Equity Act no. 55 of 1998, it is expected of all employers to take
steps in ending all unreasonable discrimination and to prevent it. Discuss any steps that an
employer could incorporate to prevent unreasonable discrimination. e) Name and explain any two elements of a BBBEE scorecard.
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 1.5
Applying learning to business
a) Why do you think it is necessary for businesses to adhere to all these Acts?
b) Do you think BBBEE is “reverse Apartheid?” Explain why/why not.
ACTIVITY 1.6
Apply HR to business
Ms Lindiwe Zulu was recently appointed as the Minister of Small Business Development. Do you think
this is the answer to the problems facing SMMEs (Small and Medium Enterprises)?
The class will be divided into two halves:
Team A: This is definitely the answer to the problems, particularly of too much admin, facing small
businesses
Team B: It’s just another government department – nothing’s going to change.
a)Individually read the excerpt from a newspaper article (Reading 1.6) quoting the new minister and
make notes to support your argument.
b)
16
Regroup yourselves into teams (A and B). You now have 20 minutes to prepare for the debate by
- selecting your 2 best speakers to present your team’s point of view
- organising all the information you wrote down in a) into an argument.
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 1: Week 1–3
c)
Your teacher will organise the mini-debate as follows:
- Speaker 1 (Team A)
- Speaker 1 (Team B)
- Speaker 2 (Team A)
- Speaker 2 (Team B)
- A vote by a show of hands to see which side was the more convincing.
Reading 1.6: New Minister of Small Business Development, Ms Lindiwe Zulu
“We will focus on providing effective support for
small businesses to ease the regulatory and
compliance burden on small businesses.
“That does not mean that people must no longer
comply.
“We need people to understand that compliance
is important for stability.
“But we are saying we must not make it difficult
for small businesses to comply.
“We must make it easy for them and understand
the circumstances under which they operate.
Sunday Independent, 22 June 2014
(Photo: Mogomotsi Magome)
“We must understand the constraints they deal with on a daily basis. The ultimate goal is to reduce the
difficulty in doing business, and this includes improving access to finance and the markets,” she said.
Having crisscrossed the world travelling with Zuma as his international relations adviser, Zulu this week
warned about the change of mindset necessary if small businesses in the country were to grow and
compete on the continent and across the world.
Learner’s Journal:
A blogger wrote this after reading the above article:
“Red tape and over-regulating, even though well-intentioned, add stupid admin
burdens to small businesses! However, the access to finance must be on merit
and not colour otherwise it will fall short.”
In your journal react to the blogger stating whether red tape and affirmative
action with respect to finance will hamper your entrepreneurial dream.
17
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
SESSION 2
Week 4–5
Human resources function
2–3 hours
Session focus:
The most important resource in a business is their human resources – the employees. In South
Africa there is a shortage of skilled workers, and the human resource function, if correctly
managed, can assist in this problem.
In Grades 10 and 11 you gained valuable information regarding various aspects of the human
resource function and the legalities involved. In Grade 12, this information will be refreshed,
as well as learning about key activities that the human resource function of a business must
perform, such as recruitment, selection, induction, placement, skills development, salary
administration and employee benefits.
You will view a video in which you take a journey with a young person who experiences all these
functions so that you can truly understand the value of each step in a “real-life situation”.
STAGE 1: DOING
ACTIVITY 2.1
View the video: HR functions
View the video: HR functions
View the video which shows the various roles and responsibilities of the human resource function. Take
short notes and try to create a rough mind-map of these roles and responsibilities.
18
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 2.2 (PART 1)
Reflecting on the video of HR Functions
Discuss in pairs:
a) Why do you think the human resource function is important to the overall success of a business?
b) What do you think prospective employees can do to make themselves more appealing to
business?
ACTIVITY 2.2 (PART 2)
Sipho gets a job
Reading 2.2 (1): Sipho needs a job …
Sipho Tshabalala would like to study, but he has no funds. He got a distinction for Accounting in Matric,
and spent a lot of time coaching his friends before tests and exams. He even became the accounting
teacher for the Matric class for two terms when the school’s accounting teacher was taken ill and they
could not find a replacement. He lives, eats and breathes accounting, so he decides to look for work
in the field of accounting so that he can learn and earn. Perhaps one day, he can become a teacher or
maybe even a professor in Accounting!
He goes into town one morning and at the taxi rank, he buys a newspaper. He goes to a coffee shop,
orders a cool drink and starts paging through the Jobs Vacant section. He cannot believe his luck.
The first advertisement that catches his eye is the vacancy for a training facilitator in the new basic
accounting course for Qualitas Career Academy. The application form can be downloaded from a given
website address. He knows he has no formal qualifications but perhaps his teaching and mentoring
experiences and his high accounting marks will pull him through!
a)
What is the first thing Sipho has to do?
b)
What documents should he attach to the application?
c)
What should he do while waiting for a response from Qualitas Career Academy?
19
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
Reading 2.2 (2): He applies and they phoned him back!
A week later, the phone rings. Sipho answers and a professional-sounding lady introduces herself as
Mary, from Qualitas Career Academy. Sipho responds politely, but he is very nervous. Mary asks him a
few questions about his experience as an Accounting teacher and says, that although they were hoping
for a qualified person, they are struggling to find one. Would Sipho be prepared to visit them for an
interview? The course will be presented to Grade 10 level students so Sipho could manage the job if he
is selected. Of course he’ll go for an interview … He puts the phone down and takes a deep breath!
d)
What should Sipho do now?
e)
How else should he prepare himself?
Reading 2.2 (3): He’s been invited for an interview!
The first interview is in two days’ time. He wears his smart trousers, a collar and tie and goes to the first
interview, dressed to impress! He has a good conversation with Mary and a day later Mary phones him
again to say he is on “the short list” – he is one of two applicants who are being considered!
The final interview goes very well – by now his confidence has grown, although he feels very young.
Mary, however, reassures him that his has “an old soul” – his experience teaching his fellow students and
his responsible way of dealing with the school’s crisis when the accounting teacher was on sick leave, are
all evidence that he will be fine. She tells him that she has phoned the principal and the other referees
and that they all say the same thing: Sipho worked hard, he is responsible, give him a chance!
And Qualitas Career Academy decided to do just that. They are even prepared to support his further
studies in Accounting!
20
f)
Sipho has got the job. What is the next discussion about?
g)
He arrives at work on the first day of the next month. What will happen today?
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 2.3
Analysing Absa’s HR functions
“A post for the regional manager at ABSA Bank in Bloemfontein has opened up.”
a)Differentiate between internal and external sources of recruitment that ABSA could use to recruit
people to fill this vacancy.
b)
What would the role of ABSA be as the interviewer?
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 2.4
Explain induction and recruitment
a) ABC Limited has employed a new sales person. The human resources manager has decided to
draw up an induction programme for the new employees. Indicate the benefits ABC Limited could
gain from an induction programme.
b) Provide three advantages and three disadvantages of the internal recruitment of prospective
candidates.
Viewing: 2.5 Meet Mamoabi, HR specialist
View the video in which Mamoabi Matsie, HR consultant is interviewed. Try to answer these questions
based on her interview and on knowledge you have already acquired in Session 1.
ACTIVITY 2.5
View the video: Meet Mamoabi HR specialist
a)How does big business recruit potential employees?
Name the methods Mamoabi has listed.
b)How are employees screened?
21
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
c)How are applicants selected for the initial list and then the short
list?
d)What is an employee contract? Describe in your own words.
e)Apart from personal details, list another 5 items that would appear
on most employee contracts.
f)What is the difference between a salary and wages?
g)What typical fringe benefits offered by the corporate sector does
Mamoabi mention?
h)Mamoabi mentions the induction programme at her last corporate
job. Describe what new employees do in week 1 of their new job
after they have been placed in the advertised position.
i)Should an employee wish to end her employment at a company:
-Which Act would help the employee in following the right
procedures?
-What would the notice period be if the employee has worked
for 6 months?
-What would the notice period be if the employee has worked
for a year or more?
j)Should an employee be dissatisfied with the employer who has, in
her opinion, acted unfairly:
-What is her first step?
-Which Act would help the employee in following the right
procedures?
-Where does she go if she feels that her dispute is not being
solved at work?
Recruit: a strategy for
looking for the right person
for a job
Screen: a way of evaluating
job applicants to create a
short list
Select: choose the best
applicant for the vacancy
advertised
Salary: fixed payment
usually paid once a month
Wages: daily, weekly
or monthly payment
to employees usually
calculated per hour
Remuneration: any money
paid to workers (salary or
wages)
Fringe Benefits/Perks:
extra benefits employees
enjoy in addition to their
salary
Induction: introduction of
employee to people s/he
will be working with. Also
a site visit
Placement: successful
applicants are placed into
the vacancy or job they
applied for
k)Describe/define each of the following terms to show that you understand the meaning of each:
-Termination of an employee
-Retrenchment
-Retirement
l)Why is some knowledge of HR valuable for you
-as a person?
-as an employee?
-as an entrepreneur?
22
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 2: Week 4–5
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 2.6
Apply HR to business
a)
What have you learned about the importance of the human resource function in a business?
b)How would you apply the human resource function in starting a business of your own? Make
short notes that you could use in an essay if necessary.
Learner’s Journal:
What have you learned about yourself in this session? Would you prefer to
work for somebody else? Or are you ready to start up a small business?
In your journal write a 250-word essay about how ready you are to start a
business.
23
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
SESSION 3
Week 8–10
Devise strategies for business to use in its response to the challenges of
the macro business environment
3–4 hours
Session focus:
In Grades 10 and 11 you learned about the various elements in the micro, market and macro
environments, and the interrelationships of these elements as well as the challenges faced by
businesses in this environment.
In Grade 12, we will turn our attention to developing strategies that businesses can use to deal
with the challenges in these environments. The strategy a business develops should be in line
with its mission and vision, and the strategy must be measurable in order to ascertain whether
the strategy was successful or not.
You will play a game to explore these strategies and to decide in teams which strategies to use to
deal with the business problems presented in the game.
Play the Business Strategy Game
Purpose:
In this game learners will test their understanding of problems and
relevant solutions in a business scenario by matching or aligning 3
cards for each of 12 given business scenarios: the scenario card
(card 1) must be matched to the best strategy or solution (card 2)
and the best opportunity card (card 3) must be aligned to the
scenario. The purpose of the game is to see whether learners
can not only solve business problems, but also recognise that the
solution may present a business opportunity.
Objectives:
1. You will be able to identify the twelve strategies that
entrepreneurs use in response to a variety of business
scenarios.
2. You will identify opportunities that will probably result when
using a particular business strategy for a given scenario.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
Procedure
1.Divide into teams of 5 – 7. Each group chooses a team name.
2.Your teacher will appoint an Observer for each group and explain their role which will be to:
a)Record the interaction amongst the team members when playing the game using the Observer
Feedback form (see Activity 3.3)
b)Report to the teacher the minute the team has finished so that she can note the team’s
position in terms of speed.
c)Score the team as your teacher gives the correct answers.
d)Give feedback using the Observer’s Feedback form.
3.Your teacher will give each group the following sets (on colour cardboard printing cards). Each set
is on a different colour cardboard:
- A set of 12 business scenarios (name them from 1 – 12 to avoid confusion)
- A set of business strategy cards comprising the 12 strategies and a short description of each
- A set of short descriptions on the SWOT opportunity presented by each strategy
- A sheet of flipchart paper, a koki pen and presstick.
4.
Your teacher will demonstrate a sample grid she has drawn up on a sheet of flipchart paper.
5.
Groups now draw the following grid (which your teacher has just demonstrated).
Business Scenario
Business Strategy
Opportunity
Score
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
How to play the game:
1.Use the presstick to stick the scenario cards, in correct
numerical order, in column 1 of the flipchart grid under the
heading “scenario”.
2.Underline the key words in the scenario descriptions to help
you focus.
3.Then find a business strategy card to solve the problem
described in the scenario card in column 1. Stick it in column 2
next to the relevant scenario.
4.Finally, find a relevant opportunity to align with the scenario
and strategy and stick the opportunity card in column 3. There
is only one possible way to align all 36 cards correctly.
5.The observer makes notes according to the criteria given on
the observer sheet.
6.The groups gather around a table where they can work without
having their completed answers and table seen by the other
groups.
7.As soon as the group is satisfied that they have aligned all 36
cards correctly, the observer reports to the teacher who makes
a note of how long the team took to finish the game.
8.Groups keep their finished grids on their tables until all the
groups have finished.
9.The observer checks that no more shifting of cards is done while the group waits for all the groups
to finish.
10.When all the groups have finished, they put their flipchart posters on the wall. The group
observer stands at his/her group’s poster.
11.The teacher now reads out the correct alignment and the observer scores the group’s answers.
Scoring:
1.The teacher gives the correct answers for all 12 scenarios. The teacher has a table with the correct
alignment.
2.The observer allocates 1 point for each correct answer in Column 4 (the score column). All three
cards must be correctly aligned for 1 point.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
3.Should it happen that more than one team gets the same top
score, the teacher will make the final decision by checking on
his/her notes to see how long each team took to complete
the game.
4.The team with the highest score (or if there are more than
one top score, the team with the best score and who finished
first) wins the game.
Feedback and debriefing:
1.The observer gives feedback on the team activity using the
notes recorded on the Observer Feedback form.
2.
Your teacher leads the discussion and encourages contributions from both the observer and the class.
3.Your teacher ties up the lesson by reinforcing the importance
of problem-solving skills in business and in life generally.
STAGE 1: DOING
ACTIVITY 3.1
Play the Business Strategy Game
Play the game. While you are playing:
-the Observer will take notes using the Observer Feedback form (see Activity 3.3)
-glance at the Observer Feedback form and make notes as ideas about your team’s performance
occur to you.
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 3.2
Reflect on the Business Strategy Game
After you have finished playing the game, in groups discuss the following orally and then complete the
activity in writing in your Informal Assessment Portfolio:
a)
How did your group perform during the game?
- What went well?
- What obstacles did you encounter?
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
b)
What did you learn from this game
- about yourself?
- about business?
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 3.3
Analyse the Business Strategy Game
a)Why is it important to know what strategies are available for businesses to pursue?
b)Using the Observer Feedback form below, and the notes you pencilled in while playing the game,
think about your team’s performance and pencil in your view of the team’s performance. Tick
your decision in the correct block. Give a reason for your decision in each case.
c)Listen to the observer analyse your team’s performance by reading the table below as feedback is
given.
d)Your teacher will lead a class discussion:
-Why did the winning team do well? What was the reason for their success?
-Why did the other teams not perform as well? What could they improve on?
-What skills does a successful business need in times of crisis?
-What behaviour could be considered negative in times of crisis?
Observer Feedback Form
Excellent
Team performance quality
Identifying correct strategies
Teamwork and cohesion
(“tightness”)
Leadership skills
Effective use of time
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Fair
Under-performed
Reason/s – identify areas for
improvement if any
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 3.4
Discuss business strategies
a)Differentiate between following types of strategies and make use of examples to explain the
strategy.
-Backward integration
-Market development
-Concentric diversification
-Liquidation
b)
Link a description from COLUMN B that matches an item in COLUMN A:
Column A
Column B
1. Micro environment
A. PESTLE
2. Market environment
B. SWOT
3. Macro environment
C. Porter’s Five Forces
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 3.5
Apply business strategies to the real world
a)How does what happened in the Business Strategy Game mirror what happens in the business
world?
b)What did you learn in the game that will help you be a better entrepreneur or an enterprising
employee once you are operating in the “real world”?
ACTIVITY 3.6
Case Studies: Strategies
In pairs, read the text in Reading 3.6, discuss the questions orally and then complete the activity in
writing in your Informal Assessment Portfolio for homework.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
Reading 3.6: Strategies
The word “strategy” may be interpreted in various ways. In Business Studies textbooks and the
curriculum, when you see the word “strategy” you will immediately think of using the word academically
to describe the strategic management process to solve business-related problems in the macro
environment. In other words, Business Studies in term 2 focuses on how businesses can respond
to challenges, in other words, to react to problems in a manner that will be best for the business
(Reactive). See Activity 3.4 above.
However, strategies can also be proactive, i.e. they can be used to generate business ideas for
services and products which address community needs. They can be used to solve problems. How do
dictionaries define strategy?
The online Business Dictionary defines a strategy a little less formally as:
1.A method or plan chosen to bring about a desired future, such as achievement of a goal or
solution to a problem.
2.The art and science of planning and marshalling resources for their most efficient and effective
use. The term is derived from the Greek word for generalship or leading an army.
(Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/strategy.html#ixzz3JynqdIyR)
On your own:
a)
What is a strategy? Define the term in your own words.
b)
What is the difference between reactive and proactive strategies?
c)
Why is it interesting that the word originated from the Greek word for “Military General”?
ACTIVITY 3.7
Meet Thato Kgatlhanye
Now read the story of Thato Kgatlhanye in groups and answer the questions by preparing a poster on
flipchart paper to present in the feedback session.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
Reading 3.7: Solving problems in Africa – The lack of opportunity
Meet Thato Kgatlhanye, a 21-year-old entrepreneur with a purpose
Thato Kgatlhanye is a 21 year-old South African, co-founder of Repurpose Schoolbags, an innovative
company which designs school bags made from up-cycled plastic that integrate solar technology,
charging up during the day and transforming into a table lamp at night. The bags enable pupils living in
poorer neighbourhoods, where electricity is scarce, to study at night time at no cost to their households.
They also help prevent traffic injuries which take place when car drivers run over school children crossing
poorly lit streets. South African roadside fatality rates are estimated to be double the world average…
Thato’s bags are eco-friendly. They are made of recycled materials and produce solar energy and
they are life-saving as they help prevent roadside fatalities. They are also “empowering”. They help
unprivileged children living in households without electricity to read, write, and study for up to 12 hours.
The need for such a product is real and huge in many developing and emerging countries, and Thato is
confident that her project will raise interest outside South Africa in the future.
“I am a struggling billionaire. I’m rich, but my bank just doesn’t know it yet,” she said.
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY MIORA RAJAONARY
(EDITED AND SUMMARISED VERSION)
The original article and pictures were written and taken by Miora Rajaonary for Emerging Innovation, a new magazine of
creative ideas and management practices in the Global South.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 1 - Session 3: Week 8–10
a)Which definition of “strategy” does Thato illustrate?
b)Clearly, Thato is a problem solver. What four problems in her community does she solve?
c)Thato is confident that her project will raise interest outside South Africa in the future. “I am a
struggling billionaire. I’m rich, but my bank account just doesn’t know it yet,” she said.
- What entrepreneurial attitudes does Thato reveal in the quote?
- Why do you think Thato’s attitude is part of her success story?
32
General objectives/link to the CAPS
The objectives for the startUP&go material for term 2 are to:
•Understand the concept of Social Responsibility and Corporate Social
Responsibility and implications for both business and communities
•Explore and assess the extent to which a business venture addresses issues
such as human rights, inclusivity and environmental issues
•Differentiate between management and leadership styles and approaches
and appreciate the role of personal attitude in success and leadership
•Understand the concept of quality and explore the relation between quality
and the various business functions and the impact of quality on different
business structures (e.g. sole traders versus large businesses), using the
elements of Total Quality Management (TQM).
Entrepreneurship focus
Session 1–4: Week 1–8
TERM 2
For Term 2 in Grade 12, the main focus of the startUP&go package is also on
key factors that affect the day-to-day operations of a business. Due to limited
resources available to small business entrepreneurs, they encounter difficulties in
responding to general environmental and social issues that affect their businesses.
On the other hand, large corporations are expected to have a more socially
responsible role in their communities and take the lead in resolving local and
regional environmental issues.
Entrepreneurs often encounter problems regarding their leadership and
management styles. Entrepreneurs need to be team leaders and ready to resolve
conflicts, both internally and externally when they occur. Being creative as a leader
is key to resolving such problems. Entrepreneurship is a key factor in obtaining
quality results by personnel within the firm. An entrepreneur has to be both a
great leader as well as a great manager.
A great manager maintains quality performance within the following eight
functional areas of a business: a) Human Resources, b) Sales and Marketing,
c) Public Relations, d) Purchasing, e) Finance and Accounts,
f) Production/Operations, g) Administration and IT and h) General Management.
As a leader, the entrepreneur is able to delegate responsibility for achieving
outstanding performance in these eight business functions to managers and
subordinates within the business.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 1: Week 1–2
SESSION 1
Week 1–2
Concept of corporate social responsibility
2–3 hours
Session focus:
Henry Ford once said that, “A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business.” The
concept of corporate social responsibility encompasses this view.
In Grade 11 you learned about the concept of social responsibility – a responsibility of every
individual to take care of the community and environment in which they live. In Grade 12 the
focus will be on the concept of corporate social responsibility as well as what are then benefits
and drawbacks of corporate social responsibility for a business and a community.
You will view a video interview with the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) representative of a
large commercial bank so that you are clear about CSR and Corporate Social Investment (CSI) and
why CSR and CSI are important to the business and the community.
STAGE 1: DOING
Viewing 1.1: Nedbank CSR and CSI
View the video, make notes and then answer the questions in groups, first orally, and then for
homework in writing in your Informal Assessment Portfolio.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 1: Week 1–2
ACTIVITY 1.1
Nedbank: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate social Investment (CSI)
a) How are CSR and CSI implemented at Nedbank?
b) Why is Nedbank involved in CSI?
c) Discuss education as a strategic focus area in Nedbank’s CSI programme.
d) Discuss health as a strategic focus area in Nedbank’s CSI programme.
e) Discuss skills development as a strategic focus area in Nedbank’s CSI programme.
f) Discuss community development as a strategic focus area in Nedbank’s CSI programme.
g) Discuss staff voluntarism as a strategic focus area in Nedbank’s CSI programme.
h) How does Nedbank decide on which projects or cause-worthy organisations to support as part of
their CSI programme?
i) What is the difference between Marketing and CSI?
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 1.2
Reflect on CSR and CSI video
a)In pairs name three companies that you associate with very good Corporate Social Responsibility
and state why.
b)Mention four Corporate Social Investment projects in South Africa that you think are very worthy
projects. Explain why.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 1: Week 1–2
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 1.3
Analyse CSI projects
In groups, discuss CSI projects that you know about. Redraw the table below onto flipchart paper and
prepare to give feedback after you have completed it.
a)Name four types of socio-economic issues that CSI projects can address.
b)Complete the following table by referring to CSI projects that are regularly advertised or which
you know about.
Company
CSI Project
Socio-economic
issue addressed
One benefit for the
community
One benefit for the
business
1.
2.
3.
4.
c)
Now discuss discuss a few of these well-known projects and how they are perceived by Grade 12
learners
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 1.4
Understand CSR and CSI and social responsibility
a)Distinguish between corporate social investment and corporate social responsibility.
b)Differentiate between benefits of CSR for businesses and for the community.
c)Why do you think it should be a strategic management decision that a business should contribute
to the community?
d)Name and explain 5 ways in which a business can act in a socially responsible way towards its
employees.
e)How can a business’s social responsibility have a positive impact on the triple bottom line?
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 1: Week 1–2
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 1.5
Apply CSR to real world
Reading 1.5: Social or Business Entrepreneur?
Social entrepreneurs create innovative solutions to social problems. More specifically, social
entrepreneurs create and try to sustain social value. They usually operate and think both like NGOs and
business and draw upon the experiences of both the business and non-profit worlds. To sum up, social
entrepreneurs run their social enterprises as sustainable businesses, in other words, making money is
also important because they know that without money, their social contribution may not last.
Business entrepreneurs typically measure performance in profit and return while social entrepreneurs
also take into account a positive return to society.
a)
Why do you think it is important for individuals and businesses to give back to the community?
b)
Can you make money as a “socially entrepreneurial” person? Explain how.
c)
What is the defining difference between a social entrepreneur and a business entrepreneur?
Learner’s Journal:
Write a short reflection of whether or not you feel you are a social entrepreneur.
Begin with the following words:
“I am/am not a social entrepreneur because …”
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
SESSION 2
Week 5
Management and leadership
3–4 hours
Session focus:
In Grades 10 and 11 management and leadership were explored in terms of challenges in the
micro environment. However, management and leadership are two unique concepts, and in
Grade 12 a distinction between these two concepts will be made.
Different circumstances sometimes demand leaders to use different approaches to succeed. It is
thus important to understand and distinguish between the various leadership theories and styles
at a leader’s disposal.
You will play a game in which two different leadership styles will be experienced first-hand.
STAGE 1: DOING
ACTIVITY 2.1
The leadership game
Play the Leadership Game
Make notes on how your leader performs.
Objective
The objective of the leadership game is to demonstrate:
•
the differences between leadership styles
•
the roles of leaders as opposed to followers and managers.
A description of the game
In this game, leaders will be selected by your teacher and each leader
will be given a card on which a leadership style is described. You will
then have to enact the leadership style given in your group which
has to solve a fairly complicated problem. An observer, who is also
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
nominated by your teacher, analyses the leader’s verbal and nonverbal communication as well as your group’s reactions according to a
prescribed set of criteria. After the game, a debriefing session is held
in which the answer to the problem is given. Each group explains how
they got to the answer. Finally, the observer gives feedback on the
leader and the group’s behaviour.
How to play the game
1.Divide into teams of 4 learners. Remember that observers and
leaders have already been selected by your teacher.
2.One observer and one leader are assigned to each team so that
there are now teams of 6 learners.
3.Each team will receive a Team Instruction Sheet (Reading
2.1) and five minutes to read the instructions and to ask any
questions regarding the problem.
4.While the teams are reading the instructions your teacher will make sure the Observers
understand that they will be expected to complete their feedback forms while the game is being
played.
5.To observe the interaction among the team members, the leader should ensure that the
Observer(s) stand behind each of the teams.
6.The team leader starts the problem-solving process – s/he enacts the role assigned throughout
the process. The role he/she is assigned is captured on the card handed out prior to the game.
7.The observer takes notes of the behaviours of the leader and the followers according to the
criteria on the Observer Feedback Sheet below the reading.
8.Once your team has completed the task, put up your hands, so that your teacher can jot down
your time and the sequence of team completion. If you have finished ahead of time, start
answering the questions below the activity in your Informal Assessment Portfolios.
9.A class discussion follows:
•The team that finished the game first and had the correct answer give the strategy they used
and the specific steps to solve the problem.
•Other teams, who solved the problem in a different way, are also given the chance to share
their strategy.
10.Observers come to the front of the class and stand in front of the blackboard or a flipchart.
•They have to say what type of leadership style they observed.
•If correct, they give the features of the leadership style while the leadership traits are summed
on the board by the teacher as the observers give feedback.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
Reading 2.1: Team Instruction Sheet
The ancient city of Mapungubwe is located in South Africa. In the main square of
the city, there is a monument in the form of a rectangular obelisk. The people
started to build the monument on the first day of January to honour the founding
of the city. The actual structure was built in less than two weeks.
Obelisk: a tall,
four-sided narrow
monument which
becomes narrower at
the top.
Your team wants to determine on which day of the week the monument was completed so that
the dedication of the monument can be celebrated each year in the future. Information has been
discovered that the building of the monument actually began on 1 January. To help solve this problem,
the team will be given information that is related to the building of the monument. This information
should be shared among the team members.
The first task is to choose a member of your team to serve as a “team leader.” The leader will then
receive instructions from the teacher.
Information Regarding the Task
TIP: Separate each piece of the following information so that the information can be categorised.
1.Day four in the week is called Thursday.
2.Day five in the week is called Friday.
3.
Day six in the week is called Saturday.
4.
There are six days in the Mapungubwe week.
5.
The total working day has nine periods.
6.
The team rests for two periods during the working day.
7.
The team works for seven periods during the working day.
8.
Workers each lay 150 blocks per period.
9.When work is taking place on building the monument, there is only one team of ten workers on
site.
10. One member of each team is a supervisor and does not lay blocks.
11. The basic measurement of time in Mapungubwe is a day.
12. A work day in Mapungubwe is divided into work periods and rest periods.
13. The height of the monument is one hundred meters.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
14.The length of the monument is fifty meters.
15. The width of the monument is ten meters.
16. The monument is built of stone blocks.
17. Each block is one cubic meter.
18. Day one in the week is Monday.
19. Day two in the week is called Tuesday.
20. Day three in the week is called Wednesday.
21. One member of each team makes sure the bricks are the right size and does not lay blocks.
22. The government decreed that no work takes place on Friday.
23. Because of the religion no work takes place by the teams on Saturday.
24. The height of the monument is greater than its length or its width.
25. Only one team of workers at a time can work on the construction of the monument.
26. Length X width X height = area.
Observer Feedback Report
Criteria
1
(Not at all)
2
(Fair)
3
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
Additional notes
1
(Not at all)
2
(Fair)
3
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
Additional notes
The Team …
…thought creatively to solve
the problem
…members were all involved
in solving the problem
…members influenced each
other in the team work
Criteria
The Leader …
...categorised the information
to solve the problem
…used a definite strategy to
solve the problem
…inspired and motivated
others on the team
…was willing to give orders
and direction to the team
What strategy did s/he use?
How?
What was the effect? Good?
Bad?
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
…communicated effectively
…encouraged teamwork
…took responsibility for the
result of the task
…was task-oriented as
opposed to people-oriented
Explain
How did time affect the
leadership style?
…was influenced by time
a)
Who made the final decision as to the day the final brick was laid? What does this tell you about
the person?
b)
What leadership style was shown in your group? Explain how you know this, using Reading 2.2
below to help you.
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
Read through these styles of leadership before moving to Activity 2.2.
Reading 2.2: Leadership styles
Democratic leadership style
Autocratic/Authoritarian leadership style
This leader will use language like this in leading
the group:
This leader will use language like this in leading
the group:
“Everybody must say how they feel – we are all
equal.”
“There is only one person who will be making
the final decision – and that’s me”
“Let me quickly sum up so that we all
understand…”
“If you have anything to say, ask for my
permission by putting your hand up”
“Hmm… I hear what you say – that’s a great
idea!”
“Stop right there…I am in charge and I will not
allow you to continue on that topic – it’s wasting
our time”
“We seem to be disagreeing … let’s get back to
that point later and discuss it as a group…”
“Let’s vote – all our opinions are important!”
Body language: friendly, generous, eye contact
with group, leaning forward to explain, open
palms to strengthen what you say, etc.
42
“Let’s go back to the point I was making…”
“We will solve the problem in this way….we are
wasting time by thinking of other ways”
Body language: assertive hand movements
(no! be careful = finger pointing), lack of real
eye contact, pen in hand, unfriendly or at least
neutral.
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
Laissez-faire/Delegated/Free Rein leadership
style
Bureaucratic leadership style
This leader will use language like this in leading
the group:
This leader will use language like this in leading
the group:
“Thabo, will you take charge? I am going away
for the week. Sort it out! You don’t need my
help!”
“Here are the rules. Let’s move around the
group… Does anyone have anything to add?
Dikonelo? Sechaba?...”
“No, Thabo. I think Mpho should be in charge
now!” (goes back to texting)
“Please do not interrupt, Peter! It’s not your
turn yet! Rules are rules…”
“Go well, guys! Make a good decision. Bye!”
“No speaking out of turn!”
Body language: clearly not interested in the
process of solving the problem, e.g.
texts on his/her phone while meeting is
continuing or has a whispered cell phone
conversation while the meeting is on, keeps
looking at his watch.
“Let’s keep to the agenda!”
Body language: often looks at watch and
agenda, irritated if someone speaks out of turn,
points at the agenda, points to each person to
give them a turn to speak.
ACTIVITY 2.2
Reflect on the leadership game
After the game, teams of six break up into pairs and read the above text to discuss orally. They then
answer the following questions in writing in the Informal Assessment Portfolios.
a)
Did you feel the role you played (as leader, observer, or team member) suited you? Explain why.
b)
If you would have preferred another role, explain which role and why.
c)
If you were a team member, how did you react to the leader’s approach?
d)
Do you think your leader was a good manager?
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 2.3
Analyse the leadership game
In pairs, discuss the following orally and then complete in your Informal Assessment Portfolio.
a)
List three things that the leader did well.
b)
What could the leader have done to improve the team’s performance?
c)
Which leadership style do you think would have solved the problem most efficiently? Explain why.
d)
Did other natural leaders emerge within the team while the game was being played?
e)
Did somebody in the team try to manage the process? Who? Was it successful?
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 2.4
Differentiate between leaders and managers
You now have a fair idea of what leadership is. Go back to Reading 2.2 to refresh your memory.
a)
Define leadership and discuss five differences between leaders and managers.
b)Read the descriptions below and then answer “true” or “false” next to each description in the
appropriate column.
If the answer is false, write the “true” answer in the last column
Description
44
1.
Some people can be leaders and managers.
2.
A manager is usually “born” but a leader is usually
“made”.
3.
A leader carries out decisions.
4.
Leaders are more important to the success of a
business than managers.
5.
People follow a leader out of their own choice.
6.
A leader sets the new vision, while a manager
carries it out.
T/F
Correct statement
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 2: Week 5
7.
A manager is a good administrator and managers
are usually people-oriented.
8.
Leaders control people by setting rules and
processes which staff has to follow to reach the
company's vision.
9.
There are probably more inspirational leaders than
inspirational managers.
10.
A manager’s role could change to a leadership role.
11.
Leaders are motivators, innovators and clear
communicators.
12.
Managers have the important task of obtaining
acceptance or getting “buy in” after a change has
been made.
13.
A manager is finally accountable for the success or
failure of the organisation.
14.
A manager focuses on systems and structures.
15.
Power in leadership refers to the leader’s ability to
hire and fire people.
c)Jerry is the owner of XYZ suppliers. He explains work procedures, rewards employees for
excellence and punishes them if targets are not met.
• Identify the leadership style describe above
• Evaluate the impact of this leadership style on business operations.
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 2.5
Applying leadership to business
Answer the following questions on your own:
a)What have you learned about yourself that is a positive entrepreneurial step?
I am _________, _________ and _________.
b)What do you still need to learn to be successful after school? Explain your answer.
Learner’s Journal:
Write a short reflection of your own talents by using the following opening
sentence:
“After this game I have discovered that I am more of a leader/follower than a
leader/follower, because…”
45
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 3: Week 6
SESSION 3
Week 6
Quality of performance with business functions
2–3 hours
Session focus:
The quality of a product or a service gives an indication of how effective the product or service
is in satisfying a specific want or need. Throughout this section, the concepts of quality, quality
control, quality assurance, quality performance and quality management will be refreshed and
discussed in more depth.
Total Quality Management (TQM) ensures that all eight business functions remain focused on
producing to the best of their abilities. This concept, and the impact it has on businesses, will be
discussed in depth.
STAGE 1: DOING
ACTIVITY 3.1
Quality control and the eight business functions
View the video: Sedibeng Water, Quality Control
In pairs, view the following documentary then draw a mind-map summing up the eight business
functions as well as mentioning ways customers perceive quality.
46
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 3: Week 6
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 3.2
Reflect on Quality Control video
After doing this, pairs form small groups to discuss orally, and then answer the following questions in
writing in their Informal Assessment Portfolios.
a)
Why is quality assurance and quality control important for a business?
b)
Why do businesses focus on total quality management?
c)
How does an organisational culture fit in with total quality management?
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 3.3
Analyse the eight business functions and quality control
In pairs, identify the eight business functions and give two examples of how a business can ensure
quality control of each function, by completing the following table:
Business function
Example 1
Example 2
47
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 3: Week 6
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 3.4
Implementing quality control and continuous improvement cycle
a)Explain the impact of a total quality management system on small and large businesses with
reference to continuous skills development.
ABC Stationery
ABC Stationery buys their stationery directly from John’s Factory. A day after delivery ABC Stationery
discovered that some of the stationery was faulty. ABC Stationery immediately informed John’s Factory
about the situation but nothing was done. John’s Factory lost many customers as a result of this
challenge.
b)Advise John’s Factory on how to implement a continuous improvement cycle to improve the
quality of their product.
c)
Briefly state the benefits of implementing a good quality control system in a business.
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 3.5
Apply quality control to business
If you open up your own business, mention three ways/policies (using total quality management) that
you would put into place to ensure your customers are always satisfied.
48
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 4: Week 7–8
SESSION 4
Week 7–8
Revision
1–2 hours
ACTIVITY 4.1
Revision: Business Strategies
Identify a specific business strategy to address the problem and describe the process in each of the
scenarios that follow:
a)The Anesti Group gains ownership of Anesti Sports Centre (sports industry), Anesti Independent
School (education industry) and Anesti Restaurant (food industry).
b)8ta, a South African cell-phone brand, has decided to enter the cell-phone market in Indonesia.
c)Giovanni’s Pizza has decided to purchase Cheddar Chaps, a well-established cheese factory.
d)TOPS suppliers are on the verge of bankruptcy and the owners, in an attempt to save the business,
have decided to sell shares in the business to a local investor.
e)Samsung embarks on a new promotional campaign using social media such as Facebook and
Twitter to market their products in order to increase their market presence dramatically.
f)Coffee King and a large hotel franchise come to an agreement that Coffee King will replace all the
coffee shops at the Hotel group sites.
g)Van Zyl’s Biltong is not showing growth by selling biltong alone, so they decide to start selling soft
drinks and pancakes as well.
h)In an effort to try and increase profit margins, a national bank has decided to let go of two
employees at each branch.
49
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 2 - Session 4: Week 7–8
Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Social Investment
Sharks Couriers is a courier company situated in Bothaville. Describe how Sharks Couriers can engage in
corporate social investment programmes to improve on the long-term challenges given below, which are
facing both the local community and the company. Use examples to motivate your answer.
i)
Education
j)
Crime
k)
Housing
Leadership
The following statements represent a certain leadership style. Identify the different leadership styles.
l)
This leader considers the needs and input of followers and encourages group involvement.
m)
This leadership style relies on organisational rules and policies.
n)This leader tells employees what to do, but isn’t prescriptive in how they should carry out these
tasks.
50
General objectives/link to the CAPS
The objectives for the startUP&go material for term 3 are to:
•Determine the extent to which a particular form of ownership can
contribute to the success or failure of a business
•Examine the accurate and concise verbal and non-verbal presentation
of a variety of business-related information (including graphs), respond
professionally to questions and feedback, and amend information as
necessary
•Describe the criteria for a logical and effective presentation of information,
know how to handle feedback and assess presentations in order to identify
areas for improvement.
Entrepreneurship focus
Session 1–3: Week 1–7
TERM 3
For Term 3 in Grade 12, a main focus of the startUP&go package is on starting a
business as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various forms of business
ownership and their impact on business operations. Practical examples of the
characteristics of entrepreneurs who use various forms of business ownership
will be highlighted. Examples of making presentations to obtain funding to start a
business will also be highlighted. Convincing others that the business will succeed
is a critical part of becoming a business owner.
A practical way for you to understand the opportunities as well as the
disadvantages of owning a business, is to practise business operations within
the safe environment of the classroom. Not all of us are capable of being an
entrepreneur, but we are all able to be entrepreneurial in the way which we
interact with others in various learning situations. A business simulation in
manufacturing will help you understand how employees interact to practise the
eight business functions to produce and sell envelopes. This is revision of work
done earlier in the year.
One of the most distinguishing characteristics of successful entrepreneurs is their
ability to present their dreams both verbally and audio-visually. In term 3 you will
explore ways in which you can improve your presentational skills and grow your
confidence and flair in presentations.
51
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 1: Week 3
SESSION 1
Week 3
Forms of ownership and their impact on business operations
2–3 hours
Session focus:
In Grades 10 and 11 the focus was on learning about the various forms of ownership. In Grade
12, a revision of these concepts – characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of forms of
ownership – will be done but the emphasis will now shift to a more in-depth comparison on the
various forms of ownership.
An analysis will also be done to ascertain how the selection of a form of ownership can contribute
to the success or failure of a business, and how this selection impacts business operations.
STAGE 1: DOING
Viewing: 1.1: Forms of ownership
a) View the video, make notes and then complete the following questions in writing in your Informal
Assessment Portfolio.
ACTIVITY 1.1
Business scenarios 1-6
Business scenario 1:
-
-
52
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
Name one advantage of this business.
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 1: Week 3
Business scenario 2:
-
-
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
What is implied by the business as “having no legal personality?”
Business scenario 3:
-
-
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
What is a disadvantage of this form of ownership?
Business scenario 4:
-
-
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
What is implied by the business having “unlimited continuity”?
Business scenario 5:
-
-
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
Name two requirements of this form of ownership.
Business scenario 6:
-
-
Identify the form of ownership applicable here.
Name three legal structures commonly used by these types of businesses.
b) After answering the questions, complete the following on a flipchart page:
- Draw a mind-map summing up the different forms of business ownership. Try to sort them
into a meaningful summary.
- Stick your poster onto a wall. One person in your group remains at the poster to answer
questions from other groups.
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 1.2
Reflect on forms of ownership
Groups now walk around from poster to poster and make comments in which they share ways of
improving posters and what was successful in each poster. Using a different coloured koki pen, they
“mark” the poster. The group representative is there to answer questions.
53
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 1: Week 3
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 1.3
Analyse the forms of ownership
a)
Which group presented the best summary of the information on the video?
b)
Why was it so clear and well-organised?
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 1.4
Understand forms of ownership
1. Distinguish between limited liability and unlimited liability.
2. Compare the success or failure of a personal-liability company and a partnership in terms of:
a) Capacity
b) Legislation
c) Management
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 1.5
Apply forms of ownership to business
Which form of ownership is the most attractive to you? If you were to open your own business, what
entity would you register it under, and why?
54
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 2: Week 4–5
SESSION 2
Week 4–5
Presentation of information and data response
2–3 hours
Session focus:
Communication is one of the key elements of a business’ success. How the business presents
information – whether internal or external – to its stakeholders is critical to the success of the
business.
The emphasis in Grades 10 and 11 was to introduce verbal and non-verbal ways to present
information, as well as responding professionally to feedback. In Grade 12 the focus shifts to
mastering the art of presenting by using accurate information and linking it up with appropriate
supporting materials to ensure professionalism.
STAGE 1: DOING
Viewing 2.1 Meet Tumi, presenter
In pairs, view the video in which Tumi, an enterPrize Challenge winner, shares her trade secrets about
successful presentations. Discuss the questions orally and then complete the questions in writing in your
Informal Assessment Portfolio.
ACTIVITY 2.1
View video: Meet Tumi, presenter
a) What was the occasion of Tumi’s best
business presentation?
b) Is it difficult to make a good presentation?
Explain Tumi’s viewpoint.
c) How important is analysing your audience
(age, educational level, language usage, etc.)
when you prepare a presentation?
d) How did Tumi structure the information in the presentation of her business plan?
55
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 2: Week 4–5
e) Did Tumi use any support materials? Explain which and why they were appropriate.
f) How important is body language when you make a presentation?
g) How should a presenter dress for the occasion?
h) How should one deal with questions asked at the end of your presentation?
i) What should you do if you are not able to answer a question?
j) How do you handle a hostile audience?
k) What tips does Tumi have for Grade 12 learners who would like to improve their business
presentation skills?
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 2.2
The use of audio-visual aids in presentations
Tumi uses audio-visual aids in her presentations. How do you know when to use which aid? Complete
the table by suggesting whether a specific graph or whether a table or diagram should be used for each
scenario. Why is your choice appropriate?
Scenario
56
a)
You want to group information so
that the audience gets a better
picture.
b)
You need to explain how a certain
new product looks.
c)
You wish to compare, year by year,
the performance of two products
over a period of 12 months clearly
showing peaks.
d)
You want to see the whole as the
proportions of its components, or
wedges.
e)
You want to add reality and provide
a visual record.
Audio-visual aid (if a graph, specify
the type)
Why is this choice appropriate?
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 2: Week 4–5
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 2.3
Help Lebo present her business plan
Your cousin, Lebo, has to prepare and present her business plan to a group of stakeholders and potential
investors in two days’ time.
Send her an e-mail and advise her on her presentation of the business plan so that it is of high quality
and a successful presentation which meets its objectives.
You must include the following aspects in your e-mail:
•
How should Lebo prepare for the presentation?
•
Evaluate any FOUR methods that she can use to present the information.
•
Propose ways to handle hostile feedback in a professional manner.
•
Recommend possible focus areas that will improve the quality of Lebo’s presentation.
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 2.4
Differentiate between types of presentation documents
Name the type of presentation document described in each statement below:
a) Printed copies of financial statements to support an electronic presentation on this year’s financial
results.
b) Production figures for 2013 and 2014 on a histogram.
c) A short video explaining the steps to complete an application form.
d) Drawings and pictures in the user manual of a fax machine.
e) A flow chart explaining the steps in the production process.
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 2.5
Applying presentation skills to business
Name situations you may need to use your presentation skills in your life. Why do you think it is
important to have good presentation skills?
57
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
SESSION 3
Week 6–7
Revision
3–4 hours
Session focus:
Entrepreneurs face many challenges in the micro and market environments. In the micro
environment this may be poor workmanship skills and low productivity of employees as well
a lack of management and leadership skills of business owners themselves. In the market
environment, challenges include shortages of supplies and raw materials for production,
competition from other firms and changes in consumer buying behaviour. In this final session
of startUP&go, you will play the Envelope Factory Game to revise production issues, conflict
management, leadership styles and the three economic sectors.
STAGE 1: DOING
ACTIVITY 3.1
Play the envelope factory game
Play the Envelope Factory Game
Objective
The objective of the envelope factory game is to expose you as factory owners and employees to
some of the challenges of production, conflict management and leadership styles. You will have to buy
production equipment and raw materials from suppliers, produce high quality envelopes and sell these
to buyers. In the process you must demonstrate workmanship skills, leadership and management skills,
as well as an understanding of the challenges and control factors in each business environment.
Methodology of the game
The following business scenario is simulated in this game:
•Divide yourselves into groups according to your teacher’s instructions.
•Each group of learners represents a newly established envelope factory. Currently a serious
shortage in the supply of envelopes is being experienced in the market environment.
58
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
•As a result, each new envelope factory wants to use this
opportunity to establish their business as quickly as possible
in the market. Therefore they have to buy the necessary
material and produce as many envelopes as possible in a
short space of time to meet market demand. Then they must
sell their stock at the best prices possible to office supplies
companies in need of envelopes.
The methodology followed in the envelope factory game is as
follows:
•Each group starts with R300 in their bank account.
•Teams must then decide how much production equipment
they will buy such as the number of scissors and glue. A pair
of scissors costs R30 and a Pritt glue stick costs R50.
•Each team then buys raw materials to start the production
process. Each sheet of A4 paper costs R40.
•The teams must produce envelopes as quickly as possible
with the material they have bought.
•The teams have the option to produce two sizes of
envelopes (see instruction on the video on how to fold an
A4 sheet to get a large square piece of paper or two smaller
square pieces of paper).
•During the production process, the groups also start selling
the manufactured envelopes to either of the two buyers.
•Depending on the quality, selling prices can range from R60
to R80 for a large well-manufactured envelope as compared to R30 - R50 for a smaller specialty
envelope. Each team must decide how many large envelopes and small envelopes to manufacture
during the game to achieve the most profit by the end of the game.
•Money received from the envelopes sold is used to buy more raw materials to manufacture more
envelopes.
How to play the game
•Divide yourselves into groups of 5 to 7 members each.
•Go through the above instructions to understand the game and clarify any questions.
•Your teacher will appoint 2 learners as buyers of two different office supplies companies. The
buyers’ place of business should be at a desk in the front of the room (on either side of the
supplier’s place of business).
•Another 2 learners will be chosen as observers of all the groups. The observers will make
comments at the end of the game on how the different teams managed the production and selling
process.
•You will be given a few sheets of A4 paper and practise making large and small envelopes for
about 10 minutes.
•While the groups are practising making envelopes, the buyers of envelopes will be told about the
range of prices at which they must be prepared to buy envelopes. They must be objective and
focus solely on the quality of the envelopes in determining a buying price. (TIP: Make sure the
envelopes made in the practice round are taken in before the game begins.)
59
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
•The two observers will study the Observer Feedback Form below to observe the groups during the
game with these questions in mind.
•The supplier receives the necessary stock of scissors, glue and raw materials and the buyers
enough money to purchase envelopes from the groups.
•Each group is given the opportunity to select a learner who will act as a Sales Representative
responsible for selling the envelopes to the buyers.
•Each group receives the indicated amount of money and all groups buy the necessary materials
from the supplier of raw materials.
•Groups have only 30 minutes to produce and sell their envelopes.
•During the game, record your purchases on the record form below.
Start the game
•Groups start manufacturing envelopes, selling their stock, buying more raw materials, etc.
•At any point in time, the sales representatives of the various groups can approach the 2 buyers
and negotiate the best selling price possible.
•Income generated from the sale of the manufactured envelopes is then used to buy more material
for the production of more envelopes.
•When the 30 minutes are up, the game is over. The observers should check how much profit each
team has generated from their original investment of R300. The team with the most money is
declared the winner.
•The observers then give feedback using the following Observer Feedback Form which then leads
to a class discussion in preparation for the revision exercises in Activities 3.2 – 3.5
Observer Feedback Form
Criteria
1
2
3
Any leadership style observed?
4
Other comments:
Describe…
Ability to work in a team as a business?
8 business functions displayed with
division of labour?
Quality control measures were in place
Special negotiating techniques used by
to convince the buyers to pay a higher
price for the envelopes?
Entrepreneurial characteristics of the
business were obvious
Total
4 = yes, very definitely
60
3 = yes
2 = on and off/inconsistent
1 = not at all
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
STAGE 2: SHARING – HOW DID IT GO?
ACTIVITY 3.2
Reflect on the envelope factory game
a)
Mention three typical types of conflict that did arise/could have arisen in your envelope business.
b)
How could difficult people in the group be dealt with in the game?
c) Describe the leadership style which was apparent in your envelope business.
Was this effective? If not, which style would have been more effective?
STAGE 3: ANALYSING/PROCESSING
ACTIVITY 3.3
Analyse the envelope factory game
a) Apply the three economic sectors to your envelope business. Give an example of each economic
sector as it was experienced in the game:
Economic Sector
How the game showed this
Primary Sector
Secondary Sector
Tertiary Sector
b) Which business environment will be affected by an increase in inflation?
c) Describe the impact of an increase of inflation on your envelope business.
d) Conduct a SWOT analysis of your envelope business (mention two examples of each component).
61
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
STAGE 4: LINKING THE THEORY TO THE CAPS
ACTIVITY 3.4
Understand economic sectors
1. In which sector of the economy would you categorise the following businesses?
a) A dry cleaning business
b) Cherry’s Wine Farm
c) Goldfield’s Mine
d) Free State Manufacturers
e) Standard Bank
2. Briefly state the benefits of implementing a good quality control system in a business.
STAGE 5: APPLYING LEARNING TO THE REAL WORLD
ACTIVITY 3.5
Apply the envelope factory game to business
What has the envelope game taught you about how businesses operate in the real world, paying special
attention to the three economic sectors?
Viewing 3.6: Quiz
ACTIVITY 3.6
Revision: Whole year’s work
Quiz Term 1
62
1. The ____________ ensures that the relationship between employees and their union and
employers and their organisations is regulated.
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
2. A board of representatives comprising both employers’ and employees’ organisations is known
as a ____________.
3. Businesses who use BEE suppliers when buying goods or services instead of Non-BEE suppliers
engage in ____________. 4. The ability to think creatively is also known as ____________ thinking.
5. The ____________ regulates the South African credit industry.
6. When a business looks for suitable candidates within the organisation this is known as
____________ sources of recruitment.
7. The problem-solving technique which makes use of experts is known as the ____________
technique.
8. Threat of new entrants is one of ____________ Five competitor’s forces model
9. The framework used to analyse opportunities and threats in the Macro/External
environment is known as ____________.
10. If BMW decides to buy over Mercedes, they are making use of ___________integration.
11. The letter W in the acronym SWOT stands for internal ____________ in the business.
12. ____________ is one of the reasons an employment contract can be terminated.
13. When employees are paid based on the amount of work they produce they are paid
____________ rate.
14. Tax evasion is an example of ____________ behaviour.
15. The Act that ensures workers who are injured during the course of their employment are
compensated is known as the ____________.
16. A ____________ benefit is a form of compensation over and above the regular salary or wage.
17. The ____________ assures employees, students and employers that learning outcomes are
relevant.
18. The first step of the problem-solving process is to ____________.
19. The problem-solving technique whereby pros and cons are compared is known as
____________.
20. An increase in the tax rate is an example of a fluctuation in this category of the PESTLE
framework.
63
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
Quiz Term 2
1. ____________ is when a business improves the quality of lives of key stakeholders in the way
that they conduct their business. 2. CSI stands for ____________.
3. An area that a business can focus on in their CSI programme is ____________. 4. The right to vote is an example of our basic ____________.
5. The organisation formed to promote the protection of human rights for all individuals is known
as the ____________.
6. ____________ is working together to achieve a common purpose.
7. The final stage of team development is ____________.
8. Extracting raw materials for further development forms part of the ____________ sector.
9. A hotel forms part of the ____________ sector.
10. A business has limited control of its ____________ environment.
11. The purchasing function is associated with the ____________ environment
12. A ____________ tends to motivate and inspire others.
13. The leadership style where the individual in charge does not listen to any suggestions from his/
her employees ____________.
14. ____________ leadership style encourages participation and empowers employees.
15. The process of ensuring products/services meet specific standards is known as ____________.
16. ____________ provide the business with resources to produce products and services.
17. The business function responsible for recruitment, selection and induction is ____________.
18.TQM stands for ____________.
19. The ____________ leadership approach allows workers to make and be responsible for their
own decisions.
20. ____________ refers to the inclusion of a diverse group of people and ensuring that no one is
discriminated against in the workplace.
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LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
TERM 3 - Session 3: Week 6–7
Quiz Term 3
1. ____________ is an example of compulsory insurance.
2. The ____________ is a formal market in South Africa where public companies are listed.
3. The formula used to calculate Simple Interest is: ____________. 4. The form of ownership which no longer exists in South Africa is a ____________.
5. ____________ shares are standard shares with no restrictions.
6. ____________ shares are shares in a company that is performing very well.
7. The amount a company pays out to its shareholders is known as ____________.
8. If Jerry invests R10 000 at an interest rate of 10% compounded annually for five years, then the
amount Jerry will receive at the end is ____________.
9. When the debts are not only limited to the business, but also to the owner and his/her
possessions, the form of ownership is said to have ____________ liability.
10. Which form of ownership is categorised by the letters ‘Pty (Ltd)’ as part of its name?
11. The form of ownership which is ended when one of the partners passes away is known as
____________.
12. The form of ownership which is the easiest and cheapest to start and end is ____________.
13. The audio-visual aid which reflects an image onto a whiteboard is known as a ____________.
14. Insurance products that pay back money used for retirement are known as ____________.
15.____________ is a payment for an event which is guaranteed to happen.
16. The ____________ is the percentage that will be earned in an investment or that will have to be
paid back on a loan.
17. The initial amount which was invested is known as the ____________.
18. An example of a non-insurable risk is ____________.
19.The program used to present a slideshow as an audio-visual aid is ____________.
20. The people responsible for managing a public company are known as ____________.
65
LEARNER’S book
Entrepreneurship Education - Grade 12 | Term 1–3
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Dear Grade 12 Learner,
Welcome to the startUP&go programme!
The startUP&go will take you on a journey over the next year through the world of entrepreneurship.
During this journey we hope to build your entrepreneurial skills and competencies and make you better
prepared to become an entrepreneur in the future, should you wish to be one!
If you read this, then you are part of a special group of Business Studies learners in a Free State school,
who have been selected to test the startUP&go programme over the next year, in Grade 10, 11 and 12, in
the Business Studies course.
During the next year you will learn about characteristics of enterprising people and you will learn that
entrepreneurship is an attitude towards life that you can use in many ways to identify opportunities in
your personal life, in your family and in your community.
You will practise entrepreneurship through games and fun exercises with your teachers and fellow
students in class and we hope you will have fun! Practising and learning about entrepreneurship must
be fun!
This is what the startUP&go package is about. The book you hold in your hand will assist you in nurturing
your entrepreneurial talent.
If you think you can, you can!
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