Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative

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ENERGIZING Our Communities
Exploring the Counties We Serve – MECKLENBURG
This is the first article in a series highlighting the counties and areas served by
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative. Abbreviated historical facts about the county will be
spotlighted followed by mention of some of the community’s businesses and establishments
served by Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative.
M
ecklenburg County came into
legal existence in 1765 as the
result of the Virginia General
Assembly dividing Lunenburg into three
smaller, localized counties: Lunenburg,
Charlotte, and Mecklenburg. Mecklenburg
was named for the wife of King George III,
Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz,
queen of Great Britain and Ireland.
History buffs can experience the earlier
lifestyle of Southern Virginia by visiting
Prestwould, a beautiful plantation home
built in 1794 near Clarksville, MacCallum
More Museum and Gardens in Chase City,
the Boyd Tavern built in 1790 in Boydton,
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mecklenburg
637
47
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• CLARKSVILLE
Virginia Avenue Mall
49
Meherrin River
Open 7 days
Open Wed-Sat
360
and South Hill’s Colonial Center and
Tobacco Farm Life Museum of Virginia.
Of particular interest to historians,
Mecklenburg County is the site of the
original Randolph-Macon College campus.
The college’s official seal depicts the fourstory brick structure built in 1832 in
Boydton. A historical marker is located on
Route 58, within view of the original
building’s fallen remains.
Continuing with educational history,
we must remember the Thyne Institute,
established in Chase City in 1876 by the
Rev. J.Y. Ashenhurst, United Presbyterian
Church, and a group of local citizens to
VISITOR INFORMATION LOCATIONS i
• BOYDTON
Boyd Tavern
provide an opportunity for AfricanAmericans to obtain an education. John
Thyne donated five acres of land and built
the first school building, thus the church
named the school in his honor. In 1914
Thyne Institute gained high school
accreditation by the Virginia Department
of Education with enrollment peaking at
650 by 1951.
Mecklenburg County is probably best
known for Buggs Island Lake, which
affords camping, boating, swimming and
fishing to locals and tourists alike. With
50,000 acres of fresh water and over 850
miles of beautiful shoreline, it also holds
the world record for the largest blue catfish
(caught in 2011) weighing a whopping
143 pounds.
Anglers, hoping to surpass this record,
stop by Bobcat’s Bait and Tackle on
V I R G I N I A
• KERR LAKE
• BRACEY
Visitor Assistance Center at North Bend
I-85 Virginia Welcome Center
Open Mon-Fri
Open 7 Days
Open 7 days
Open Mon-Sat
LEGEND
i
i
• SOUTH HILL
Visitor Center & Museum
• CHASE CITY
MacCallum More
Whittle’s Mill
Chase City
92
660
636
Staunton River
WAY
AMERICAN
RUDDS CREEK
WINERY
PARK
Campground
Boat Ramp
Wildlife Management Area (WMA)
Parking
Canoe/Kayakk Launch
Information Center
Park
Golf Course
Airport
Winery
Civil War
Marina
47
654
92
660
47
South Hill
HOGAN CREEK
WMA
STAUNTON RIVER
STATE PARK
La Crosse
Lake Gordon
58
Tobacco
Heritage Trail
15
BUFFALO
WMA
694
722
BLUESTONE
WMA
762
688
WALL BRANCH
WMA
PRESTWOULD
PLANTATION
58
705
RUDDS CREEK
WMA
Tobacco
Heritage Trail
i
58
637
Boydton
RUDDS CREEK
PARK
848
BUFFALO
PARK
MAP COURTESY OF VISITMECKVA.COM
Brodnax
58
STAUNTON VIEW
PARK
49
22
i
1
344
85
1
707
4
58
Clarksville i
Clarksville
722
772
703
823
OAKLEAF
WMA
705
GREENWOOD
WMA
707
835
MERIFIELD
WMA
LONGWOOD
PARK
DICK CROSS
WMA
707
EAGLE POINT
WMA
824
723
678
i
637
JOHN H. KERR
RESERVOIR DAM
710
Kerr Lake
IVY HILL
WMA
903
615
615
OCCONEECHEE
STATE PARK
15
626
LOWER BUTCHER CREEK
WMA
OCCONEECHEE
WMA
LIBERTY HILL
WMA
ROSEMONT
WINERY
Bracey
Bracey
903
711
NORTH BEND
PARK
BEAVER POND
CREEK WMA
85
CEDAR GROVE
WMA
OLD SOUDAN
WMA
THREE
RUDDSSISTERS
CREEK
OF PARK
SHINEY
ROCK WINERY
VIRGINIA
NORTH CAROLINA
819
825 IVY HILL
1
PARK
836
PALMER POINT
PARK
719
822
Lake Gaston
Americamps
(Campground)
i
ISLAND CREEK
DAM
820
ISLAND CREEK
PARK
ISLAND CREEK
WMA
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Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative
Highway 15 just south of Clarksville to
gear up for their fishing adventures.
There’s no better way to start a great tale.
Another popular recreational site in the
county is Occoneechee State Park located
just outside of Virginia’s only lakeside
town, Clarksville. Facilities there include
cabins, campsites, an equestrian
campground, picnic shelters, an
amphitheater, a playground, boat ramps,
and a private concession offering boat
rentals and snacks. The park has more
than 18 miles of trails that meander
through the forest and along the lake’s
shore. Hikers, bicyclists and horseback
riders enjoy the trails and the beauty of
Virginia’s Piedmont. The visitor center and
museum introduce visitors to Native
American history and the indigenous
Occoneechee people.
Established businesses outside of
Clarksville, such as Clarksville
Community Pharmacy and Arrington’s
Home Furnishings, have welcomed a new
business to the area. Free Spirit Café is
operating in the former Wayside
Restaurant building and offers full-course
breakfasts and pastries as well as deli-style
subs and sandwiches for lunch. These
businesses are neighbors to the Lake
Country Regional Airport, which provides
an air-transportation facility responsive to
airport-user and community needs.
MECKLENBURG ELECTRIC
COOPERATIVE QUICK FACTS
FOR MECKLENBURG COUNTY, VA.
MEC Miles of Line
1,207
Number of Active MEC Services
9,911
MEC Substations
Beechwood • Black Branch • Boydton
Clarksville • D C Jackson
Island Creek • Jones Store
Northview • Omega • EDS
Your electric cooperative originated in
Mecklenburg County in 1938, and it was
thus named Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative.
The headquarters office is located in Chase
City along with one of its three district offices.
January 2015
A popular spot for pontoon and boat
enthusiasts is Buggs Island Boat Company
on Route 4. It boasts being the hub for
information in the area while offering
pontoon sales, service, and rental as well as
storage for boats and campers.
In addition to fishing, hunting is an
especially popular sport in this county;
and Twin Lakes Outfitters in South Hill
offers both live bait and a great selection of
fishing and hunting supplies. The Gordons
are local sportsmen who know the area,
and they give great advice and tips for
productive outings.
Archery enthusiasts can stop by and see
Noel and Marian Corpus at Clarksville’s
Buggs Island Archery for professional sales
and service for all their sportsmen’s needs.
In addition to tourism, a major source
of income for Mecklenburg County
residents comes from farming. For many
years, and continuing today, a major crop
grown in the county is tobacco; and
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative still
serves many tobacco-farming operations,
such as those run by the Hudson,
Wilkinson and Jones families in western
Mecklenburg County. Today’s farming
families continue to expand as offspring
grow up and join the business, sometimes
From top: Buggs Island Lake is home to
many boating and fishing enthusiasts.
• Occoneechee Marina offers a fuel dock
and boat slips with water and electric
service at annual rentals. Six slips are
available for rent to overnight camping
and cabin guests. The most recently opened
marina is Rudd’s Creek Marina in Boydton
and is located at Rochichi Peninsula.
planting and harvesting additional crops,
such as soybeans, wheat and a new
commodity for this area, cotton.
Another innovative venture for rural
areas of Southern Virginia is the planting
of grape vineyards and production/bottling
of award-winning wines. Rosemont
Vineyard and Winery in LaCrosse began in
2003 with the planting of 15,000 grape
vines. In addition to its wine production,
the site offers a beautiful rural setting
suitable for weddings, receptions, birthday
parties, corporate events and other
gatherings.
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative also
serves River Ridge Golf and Camping Club
in Bracey where there are 1,500
individually owned camper and mobile
home lots. For families looking for more
camping and hiking opportunities, a stay
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Above: As a project-based learning
assignment, second-graders at Clarksville
Elementary School tend chickens that they
have raised from an incubator. • Right:
NIPRO brand medical devices and glass
products produced in Chase City’s
Industrial Park are used on a global scale.
• Far right: Big Fork Chainsaw Art offers
unique wood carvings by Tommy Winn.
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Regarding medical and health-related
concerns, MEC powers facilities such as
Tanglewood Family Medicine in Bracey
and the Chase City Health and Rehab
Center that offers services to people in
Mecklenburg County and surrounding
areas. Residents are proud of Chase City’s
120-bed facility that provides short-term
rehab and nursing care programs to help
patients get back to their own lifestyles. It
also provides a safe, secure long-term
living environment for those in need.
Families with members who need
assistance can also count on Mecklenburg
House, an assisted living facility near
South Hill that offers residents
independent living options and daily
support services.
Realizing the worth of skilled and
capable health care and emergency
services in a community, Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative makes annual
monetary contributions to the rescue
squad organizations and fire departments
in each of the counties it serves. In
Mecklenburg County, MEC provides
electric service to the Buckhorn and
Palmer Springs volunteer fire departments.
Good education is also important to the
backbone of a strong community, and
MEC is proud to provide electric service to
Clarksville Elementary School, Bluestone
Middle School in Skipwith, to
homeschoolers, such as Kimberly and
Don Bright of Clarksville, and The Lake
Country Education and Enrichment
Center, which provides classes in
Clarksville from Southside Virginia
Community College. The Center also
encompasses the Mecklenburg County
YMCA with its commitment to serve the
communities within Mecklenburg and the
neighboring counties. Its mission is to put
Christian principles into practice through
programs that build a healthy spirit, mind
and body for all. A variety of programs,
services and initiatives are offered to
ensure that investment is made in our
kids, our health and our neighbors; and
each year the Soccer Splash is held as a
fundraiser at the Y’s soccer field.
Celebrating its 250th anniversary this
year, Mecklenburg County has a lot to
offer residents of Southern Virginia as
well as visitors to the area. The rich
history, the splendor of beautiful sunsets
over the pristine waters of the lake, and
the Southern hospitality of its residents
make Mecklenburg County a great place
to live or visit; and Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative is proud to serve
and support the counties and communities
and those who live, work and raise their
families there.
COURTESY OF NIPRO
at North Bend Park near John H. Kerr
Dam offers lakeside camping that can be
topped off with a visit to the Joseph S.J.
Tanner Environmental Education Center
to learn about area wildlife. Adventurous
visitors have an opportunity to meet one of
the resident black snakes up close.
While camping at North Bend, many
people patronize Lucky’s Dairy Bar and
Pino’s Pizza for sweet treats and tasty
Italian meals. Both are located on Buggs
Island Road close to another focal point
that attracts sightseers, the John H. Kerr
Dam. It is operated by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers and was built primarily
to provide flood control and hydropower
generation. Your electric cooperative
receives a portion of its power from John
H. Kerr Dam.
For many years, in addition to
providing electric power, Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative (MEC) has played a
major role in economic development in all
the communities it serves. In fact, it was
instrumental in the establishment of a
glass tubing factory in Chase City in 1990.
Today NIPRO manufactures products for
dialysis, transfusion, diagnostics,
cardiopulmonary, and pharmaceutical
needs; and the NIPRO brand is highly
regarded worldwide for its technological
superiority and high quality.
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative
Renee Gorby
Shares Meatloaf
Recipe
Renee Gorby of Clarksville says,
“This recipe makes two meatloaves.
We eat the first one fresh-baked,
then I like to slice the second meatloaf
into thick slices and wrap them
individually in wax paper and freeze
for later.”
Bacon Cheeseburger
Meatloaf
2 lbs. ground beef (85% lean)
1 lb. ground pork
1 lb. bacon, cooked and crumbled
(except for 6 slices, which are
left raw)
12 oz. onion dip (like French’s — found
in the dairy case)
1 cup mini-cubed cheese (we like
Colby Jack)
1
⁄3 cup Parmesan cheese (we like the
shredded kind)
1 package mushrooms, sliced and
sautéed in the bacon fat, then
cooled
1 onion, diced and also sautéed in the
bacon fat, then cooled
1 cup Panko bread crumbs
Salt and pepper to taste
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
After cooking bacon, drain off all
but a little of the fat to cook your onions
and mushrooms for about 7 minutes.
Mix all ingredients together thoroughly
but gently. Divide into two round
meatloaves. Drape three pieces of
bacon over each loaf. I like to place
each meatloaf slightly raised on a cake
rack positioned over a jelly roll pan or
on a broiler pan to allow the drippings
to drain. Cover with foil and bake at
350 degrees for 1 hour. Remove foil
and bake for an additional 10 minutes
so bacon can brown.
January 2015
Meet Your Cooperative Employee
W
anda Bardenheier serves
MEC members as district
services representative in
the Emporia office. She greets and
assists members who come in to inquire
about service or pay their electric bills.
When helping a member, she takes time
to listen to his or her request, look up
needed information on the computer,
and fully understand the situation to
help meet that person’s need. Most often
there is a steady flow of members
coming into the office along with a
ringing telephone on her desk
beckoning to be answered and cars
pulling up to the drive-thru window for
assistance. “It’s a job that requires multitasking, and there are times that it can
be very stressful,” she admits.
In addition to assisting our
consumers, she aids field personnel
over the two-way radio, monitors
outages on MEC’s reporting system,
prepares service orders and performs
clerical duties. “Customer service
representatives wear many hats,” she
comments with a smile.
“My fellow employees and I work
together as a team, and we treat each
other like family,” she says. “Office staff
and guys out in the field alike, we’re all
here for the members; and we strive to
give the best service possible. When
storms cause outages, members can be
assured we’re going to be working until
every service is restored.”
Wanda is a lifelong resident of the
Emporia area, and being of assistance to
residents in the communities where she
grew up is a very special opportunity. “I
love seeing and talking to people,” she
says. “It makes me feel good when I can
help someone.”
She attends Main Street Baptist
Church in Emporia, where she became a
member at a young age. She serves as
church librarian and on several
committees. It’s encouraging that her
family attends church by her side, and
she is also proud of their other life
accomplishments.
Her first-born, Courtney Lynch, is a
nurse with Southern Virginia Medical
Group; and her younger daughter, Tori
Wanda Bardenheier
District Services Representative
Emporia District
26 Years of Service
Wills, is attending SVCC with plans to
major in elementary education. Her
grandchildren, Olivia Dru and Gracie,
attend school in Greensville County;
and the most recent addition to the
family, Asher Cole, was born in October.
Wanda’s husband, Daryl, is field
manager for Advanced Flooring and
Design, and he has a son, Nicholas.
Wanda comments, “Daryl and I have
been married six years and met through
E-Harmony.”
In her spare time she loves
photographing her family, her dog
Dakota, holiday celebrations and
beautiful scenery. “I take my camera
everywhere I go,” she mentions, “and
my favorite hobby is making
scrapbooks.” Her passion is quite
evident as she has dedicated an entire
room of her home for work tables,
supplies, tools, paper, and binders.
“Scrapbooking is like preserving that
moment in time,” she says. “It’s a great
way to record special occasions and
everyday life.”
If a scrapbook was made of Wanda’s
26 years of experience at Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative, it would highlight
her excellent service to the members
and exhibit her dedication to MEC.
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Mecklenburg Electric Cooper a
Recognized for Years o
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
John Waller (left), who has served on the board of
directors for 15 years, is recognized by Chairman of
the Board David Jones.
GRETNA DISTRICT
L-R: Calvin Younger (equipment operator) - 25 years
Mark Tucker (district manager) - 25 years
Wayne Shrader (line foreman) - 10 years
Jamie Walden (lineman/serviceman) - 15 years
Blake Hutcherson (manager of district operations) - 20 years
ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS
L-R: Guy Desantis (senior r/w coordinator) - 25 years
Wayne Sheffield (app. tech SCADA/LM) - 25 years
Gary Klein (field engineering supervisor) - 35 years
Gary Burns (field engineering technician) - 40 years
Not pictured:
Warren Rutledge (draftsman) - 40 years
Thanks for your dedication and
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Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative
ative Director and Employees
of Outstanding Service
EMPORIA DISTRICT
L-R: Craig Phelps (line foreman) - 15 years
David Holloway (lineman/serviceman) - 15 years
Al Lassiter (district manager) - 10 years
Phnon Ramsey (dist. services representative)
- 10 years
Bobbie Rose, Jr. (service technician) - 15 years
David Rawlings (field eng. technician) - 25 years
Not pictured:
Andy Epperson (lineman/serviceman) - 10 years
CHASE CITY DISTRICT
HEADQUARTERS
L-R: Jeff Irby (field engineering technician) - 25 years
Brad Clark (equipment operator) - 5 years
Ronnie Long (lineman/serviceman) - 25 years
Clint Card (manager of district operations) - 25 years
L-R: Chris Shearin (fleet supervisor) - 10 years
David Lipscomb (v.p. member & energy services) - 25 years
Priscilla Lawson (communications specialist) - 15 years
Gwendolyn Harris (accounting & d.p. assistant) - 25 years
Brian Morris (member srv./energy efficiency adv.) - 25 years
commitment to those we serve !
January 2015
27
MEC Recognized for Employees’ Commitment to Safety
M
ecklenburg Electric
Cooperative (MEC)
was recently
recognized by the National
Rural Electric Cooperative
Association (NRECA) for its
ongoing commitment to safety
in the workplace and in
providing electric service to its
member-owners. MEC board
member Fletcher B. Jones
accepted the Rural Electric
Safety Achievement Program
(RESAP) certificate at a
meeting of the Virginia,
Maryland & Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives
(VMDAEC). Myron Rummel, the Shenandoah Valley Electric
Cooperative CEO and chairman of the regional electric
cooperative association’s safety committee, presented the
certificate to Jones.
VMDAEC Executive Vice President Richard Johnstone notes,
“Everyone is aware how dangerous electric utility line work can
be, and that a rock-solid commitment to safety is essential every
second these dedicated individuals are working to build or
maintain electric lines.” He continues, “This certificate doesn’t
just recognize a commitment to safety by lineworkers; it
recognizes the fact that everyone at MEC, from board members
and senior managers to every office worker and of course every
lineman, is committed to carrying out their work safely. We
applaud MEC for this commitment.”
Fletcher B. Jones (right),
a board member for
Mecklenburg Electric
Cooperative, accepts the
RESAP national safety
award from Myron
Rummel, CEO of
Shenandoah Valley
Electric Cooperative and
chair of the Virginia,
Maryland & Delaware
Association of Electric
Cooperatives’ safety
committee.
John Lee, president and CEO of Mecklenburg Electric
Cooperative, who also serves on the regional electric cooperative
association’s safety committee, explains, “Here at Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative safety is, far and away, our highest priority.
Everyone here has worked hard to successfully ingrain safety into
our culture and into the fabric of everything we do. For example,
we have now worked over 700,000 hours without a lost-time
accident, and in our industry that is a remarkable feat.”
Lee adds, “I congratulate all of the employees for working
safely and earning this achievement. As they construct and
maintain our electric facilities, the safety of our members and the
public is paramount; and the RESAP achievement recognizes our
strong, aggressive work in that area.”
MEC Facebook page offers
real-time information:
$34 Million
• Restoration progress during stormrelated and other outages
• Energy-saving tips
ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK
That’s the amount of money your
Cooperative has returned to date to
member-owners — the people
whose homes and businesses are
served by MEC.
• Notifications of planned service
interruptions for maintenance work
This figure includes $946,307 approved by the board of
directors in 2014 for return to those who received electric
service from MEC during 1997. Refunds were credited on
the November bills.
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• Safety information
• Public service announcements
• Annual Meeting, auction sales,
other miscellaneous info
• How to apply for scholarships
• Office closings
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative
Wholesale Power Cost Adjustment to Increase In 2015
M
ecklenburg Electric Cooperative’s
top priorities are to provide safe,
reliable, and affordable electricity
to its members and to do so offering the
very best in customer service. Your
Cooperative works diligently to achieve
these objectives while keeping a keen focus
on delivering energy at the lowest possible
cost. Those efforts include meeting the very
serious responsibility to communicate to
our members when external factors such as
weather, government-imposed regulations
or actions by the Regional Transmission
Organization (RTO) impact the cost to
provide you with electric service.
During 2013, the power we purchased
for your use from Old Dominion Electric
Cooperative (ODEC), our wholesale power
supplier, represented 64 percent of every
dollar we collected from you, and these
costs have been under constant and extreme
pressure throughout 2014. Unfortunately,
we have been informed these rates will
increase the average residential bill by
3.46 percent in 2015 due to three factors.
First, transmission system investments
are on the rise to pay for federally mandated
reliability projects, as well as construction
efforts designed to harden transmission
facilities against both cyber and physical
attacks. These upgrades will ensure the
availability and delivery of power to your
homes and businesses; however, they create
expenses that the state’s transmission
system owners, including Dominion
Virginia Power and American Electric
Power, have been authorized to pass on to
all who utilize those facilities ... which
includes the Commonwealth’s electric
cooperatives.
Secondly, generation costs have increased
to accommodate the Environmental
Protection Agency’s Cross State Air
Pollution Rule which will be enacted
Jan. 1, 2015, and requires coal-fired power
plants to meet more stringent emissions
regulations. Ultimately, some plants will
require capital-intensive upgrades while
others will be prematurely shut down or
decommissioned; the cost of both of these
options will ultimately be borne by those at
the end of the line. Your Cooperative and its
power provider, ODEC, work diligently to
provide environmentally friendly energy;
however, these mandated regulations come
with a price tag, and at a time when most
Safety Director Warns of
Power Line Hazards
Having had over 40 years of experience in the electric utility industry,
I have seen many instances when harsh winter weather has brought
power lines to the ground. Ice-coated electric wires lying on the ground
appear to be harmless; but, in fact, are many times still energized, with
enough electricity to cause serious injury or death. Earlier predictions
have indicated a rough winter for Virginia this year, so please keep the
following warnings from the Electrical Safety Foundation International in
mind and share them with your family:
Ron Campbell
Safety Director
• ALWAYS assume that a downed power line is energized.
• If you see a downed power line, don’t touch it or anything within 35 feet. Move away from
it by shuffling away with small steps, keeping your feet together and on the ground at all
times. This will minimize the potential for a strong electric shock.
• If you see someone who is in direct or indirect contact with the downed line, do not touch
the person. You could become the next victim. Call 911 for help.
• Do not drive over downed power lines. If your car comes in contact with a downed power
line while you are inside, stay in the car. Honk your horn to summon help, but direct others
to stay away from your car. If you must leave your car because it is on fire, jump out of the
vehicle with both feet together and shuffle away from the car. Avoid contact with both the
car and the ground at the same time.
are struggling through difficult economic
times.
Lastly, the extreme temperatures of this
past January, during the polar vortex,
caused heating systems to run longer, and
more often, to keep families comfortable
and warm as homes and businesses served
by the state’s cooperatives used recordbreaking amounts of electricity. As a result,
ODEC experienced an all-time record peak
for electricity, and MEC’s share of that peak
rose dramatically increasing our wholesale
power costs.
Please note this increase is a direct pass
through from ODEC to Mecklenburg
Electric Cooperative and will show up on
your bill as a Wholesale Power Cost
Adjustment (WPCA). Your Cooperative
adds no additional charges to this cost.
Additionally, it should be noted that any
changes, including increases or decreases,
to the WPCA are not permanent and the
charge is reviewed and adjusted, if needed,
on an annual basis.
Please know that we do not take this
development lightly, or without great
concern given these difficult times. For
assistance, please refer to our website
(www.meckelec.org) and click on the “Save
Energy” tab to access energy efficiency ideas
that will help you receive the most value for
your energy dollar and for information on
other options that can help relieve the
burden of high winter and summer electric
bills. For additional information or
assistance of any type, please contact David
Lipscomb, vice president of member and
energy services, at 434-372-6153 or by
email at [email protected]
MECKLENBURG ELECTRIC
COOPERATIVE
P.O. Box 2451
Chase City, VA 23924-2451
Chase City District
(434) 372-6200
Emporia District
(434) 634-6168
Gretna District
(434) 656-1288
Power Failure & Emergencies
(877) 632-5688
Office Hours: M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Website: www.meckelec.org
• Stay away from trees that have downed power lines lying in them.
Like us on Facebook
• Be aware of fences that can become energized by downed power lines.
Electricity is our beneficial companion for power at home, at work and play; but it can be
hazardous if not handled properly. Please keep safety in mind.
January 2015
Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative is an
equal opportunity provider and employer.
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