Syllabus - Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

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Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto
MIE1224H - Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
Winter 2016
Babak Samareh. Ph.D., CFD Consultant and Analyst, Simulent Inc.
[email protected]
Course Description: Residential and industrial buildings require heating, ventilating, and air conditioning
systems in order to provide a comfortable living and working environment. This course is designed to
explore the fundamentals of HVAC systems. The first step to achieve this goal is to understand the
Psychrometrics which deals with the properties of moist air and how it responds to different air
conditioning processes. In the next step, some of the common elements of HVAC systems are studied,
followed by air quality requirements including thermal comfort, physiological considerations and
environmental indices. The last step is the estimation of a building’s heat gain and loss through heat
transmission in building structure as well as solar radiation, and overall heat transfer coefficient. Having
access to this data, space heat loads, cooling loads, and energy cost calculations can be conducted.
Course Objectives: At the end of the course student will be familiar with the following concepts
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Applying the concepts of thermodynamics and psychrometrics to heating and cooling analysis
Using basic heat transfer laws and solar calculations to estimate heat gain and loss of a building
Employing fluid dynamics concepts in order to design or select air handling devices and ducts
Evaluating indoor air quality and designing thermal comfort conditions
Calculating energy and estimating seasonal energy cost
HVAC control systems
Lectures: Mondays, 6:00pm – 9:00pm, GB-221
Office Hours: After the lecture or by appointment
Teaching Assistant: Nazli Saranjam ([email protected]), BA-8143
Course Evaluation: (May change during the semester)
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Design project
Problem sets
Midterm
45%
20%
35%
(March 7)
Course Project: Students will cooperate in teams of 3 to 4 to calculate the heating and cooling load of a
building they choose. The project includes calculations of solar radiation, heat gains and loss, energy
cost for different seasonal operating conditions, and commenting on the efficiency of the system
currently installed.
Course Material: Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Design for Efficiency, Revised Second Edition, by Jan
F. Kreider, Peter S. Curtiss, and Ari Rabl, CRC Press, 2008
http://www.amazon.com/Heating-Cooling-Buildings-Efficiency-Engineering/dp/1439811512
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Course Schedule
Week
Lecture
Date
1
Jan 11
Introduction to Air Conditioning Systems, Heat Transfer,
Thermodynamics, and Fluid Systems
2-3
2
Jan 18
Introduction to Air Conditioning Systems, Heat Transfer,
Thermodynamics, and Fluid Systems
3-5
3
Jan 25
Psychrometrics, Conditioning Processes, and Thermal Comfort
4
4
Feb 1
Solar Radiation
6
5
Feb 8
Heating and Cooling Loads
7
6
Feb 15
No Lecture (Family Day and Reading Week)
7
Feb 22
Heating and Cooling Loads
7
8
Feb 29
Heat Generation and Transfer Equipment
9
9
Mar 7
No Lecture (Midterm Exam)
10
Mar 14
Cooling equipment
10
11
Mar 21
Secondary Systems for Heating and Cooling
11
12
Mar 28
HVAC Control Systems
12
Lecture Topic
Chapters
Final Project Assignment
and Setup
13
Apr 4
Design for Efficiency
14
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Course Outline
Introduction to Air Conditioning Systems, Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics, and Fluid Systems
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Fundamental physical concepts
HVAC components and distribution systems
HVAC systems overview
Elements of heat transfer for buildings
Thermodynamic processes in buildings
Flow in pipes, pumps and fans, and pressure drop
Psychrometrics, Conditioning Processes, and Thermal Comfort
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Moist air and standard atmosphere
Fundamental thermodynamic parameters
Adiabatic saturation and wet bulb temperature
Psychrometrics chart
Classic moist air processes
Thermal Comfort
Solar Radiation
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Solar geometry
Extraterrestrial solar gain
Solar gain data and models
Sol-Air temperature
Windows
Heating and Cooling Loads
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Principle of load calculation
Storage effects
Zones
Heating loads
Cooling loads
Dynamic load calculation
Heat Generation and Transfer Equipment
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Furnaces
Boilers
Heat pumps
Coils and heat exchangers
Cooling equipment
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Rankin refrigeration cycles
Absorption cycle
Chillers
Tooling towers and evaporative coolers
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Secondary HVAC Systems
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Air distribution systems
Ducts and duct design
Piping systems and design
HVAC system design sizing and energy calculation
HVAC Control Systems
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Introduction
Control hardware
Control system design considerations
Design for Efficiency
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Design elements and recommendations
Performance indices for heating and cooling
Residential buildings
Commercial building
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