Proceedings 會刊 - 2016 Los Angeles Environmental Forum

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Proceedings
Fifth Symposium on Global Emerging
Environmental Challenges and Government Responses
and Environmental Summit Forum
第五屆全球當前環境挑戰和政府應對措施研討會
暨環境高層論壇
會
刊
Los Angeles, USA
August 9 - 16, 2012
主辦單位: 南加州華人環保協會
Southern California Chinese American Environmental Protection Association (SCCAEPA)
Individual
Environment
Stability
Local
Inspiration
Present
Work
Team
Public Health
Change
National
Consensus
Future
Life
Something good for myself. Something good for the world around me. At the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), there are opportunities for everyone to participate in the important
work of safeguarding the environment. From the student intern to the senior executive — your
individual skills and knowledge can lead you in new career directions. And you’ll be rewarded
with solid benefits that equal the dedication you put into your work. Find your career balance
at www.epa.gov/careers. U.S. EPA is an equal opportunity employer.
U. S .
E N V I R O N M E N T A L
P R O T E C T I O N
A G E N C Y
Content
SCCAEPA
Symposium Program
Abstract and Biography
Workshop Program
Best Student Paper Award
Reference
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A non-profit charitable organization [501(c)(3)]
www.sccaepa.org
Mission Statement of SCCAEPA
To promote environmental awareness and
members communications, to participate in
and serve the environmental scientific
community and the Chinese American
community.
SCCAEPA Board of Directors (2012)
2012 年度理事会
Dr. Weixing Tong (1)
會長
童衛星
Dr. Rebecca Chou (2)
副會長
許仙育
Dr. Kun Liu (3)
財務長
劉坤
Dr. Wei Li (4)
秘书長
李偉
Dr. Hung-Li Chang (5)
理事
張鴻立
Ms. Donna Chen (5)
理事
徐月容
Dr. Charles Cheng (5)
理事
程群
Dr. Tianpeng Guo (5)
理事
郭天鵬
Ms. Iris Huang (5)
理事
黄虹
Dr. Jim Kang (5)
理事
康志晖
Dr. Jian Peng (5)
理事
彭艦
Dr. Guangyu Wang (5)
理事
王光宇
Dr. Eric Wu (5)
理事
吳基銜
Dr. Zhong Xiong (5)
理事
熊忠
Dr. Yue Rong (6)
上届會長
容躍
Mr.
Michael Shiang (7)
监督長
向文智
(1) president, (2) vice president, (3) treasurer,
(4)secretary, (5) board members, (6) preceding
president, (7) director at large
Highlights of SCCAEPA

Founded in 1991 as a non-profit
organization [501(c)(3)].

More than 350 members who are scientists,
engineers, professors, students, and
environmental professionals working in
sectors of government, municipalities, and
consultants.

More than 90% members have advanced
degrees (Masters or Doctorates).

15 board members elected every year and
the board meeting held quarterly.

Organized and/or sponsored more than 50
Technical Seminars/Workshops on various
environmental topics.

Hosted International Environmental
Symposium in L. A. in 1997, 2008, 2009,
2010, and 2011, and will host 5th
international symposium in August, 2012

Co-hosted 3 annual Asian American
Environmental Symposium since 2006 at
UCLA, Cal-poly Pomona, and USC.

Hosted and educated frequently Chinese
environmental delegations and visitors from
overseas.

Participated in regular local Chinese radio
TV shows for concerned environmental
issues.

Won a Grant from Santa Monica Bay
Restoration Commission for Chinese
Community Education on Recycling (2005).

Participated with SCE and MWD to grand
Student Scholarship since 2006


环保咨询网站 
Air Quality:
Water Info:
Conservation:
www.aqmd.gov
www.bewaterwise.com
www.consrv.ca.gov
www.cuwcc.org
Recycling and Solid Waste:
LA County:
www.lacsd.org
www.888cleanla.com
Orange County: www.ocsd.com
If you want to join the SCCAEPA and/or would like to
participate in SCCAEPA activities, please contact us by
sending an e-mail to [email protected]
e-mail: [email protected]
SCCAEPA, P.O. BOX 90783, City of Industry, CA 91715
Chinese-American Environmental Protection Association – Southern California
華人環保協會 (1991 –2011) - Celebrating SCCAEPA 20th Anniversary
President Obama Congratulated SCCAEPA on its 20th Anniversary
1
Recent Member Activities
Some Board members and invited guests in a recent board meeting
Up: Some members attended a recent Water
Special Project conference in China
Right: Some members attended the 2012
Cross-Straight Environmental Summit in
Taipei
Fifth Symposium on Global Emerging Environmental
Challenges and Government Responses
Site Visits
Symposium Program
Presented By
Southern California Chinese American Environmental Protection Association (SCCAEPA)
Global Chinese Scientists Environment Forum (GCSEF)
August 9 – 11, 2012
Hilton Los Angeles/San Gabriel
225 West Valley Boulevard,
San Gabriel, California 91776
Panelists: (Moderator: Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission)
Ms. La Ronda Bowen, Special Advisor, Office of the Ombudsman, Air Resources Board, Cal EPA, USA
Dr. Chung Liu, Deputy Executive Officer, South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD), CA, USA
Prof. Jiming Hao, Tsinghua University, member of Chinese Academy of Engineering, China
Dr. Mu-sheng Lee, Director-General of Kaohsiung City EPB, Taiwan
Prof. Daiqi Ye, Dean, Department of Environmental Engineering, South China University of Technology, China
Prof. Dave Shaw, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA
Platform Sessions
Environmental Summit Forum
PM 2.5 and Air Quality Management (9:30 am—12:00 pm, August 9, 2012)
LUNCHEON KEYNOTE PRESENTATION (12:40 — 1:10 PM)
Adventure in Building an Environmental Corporation — a Personal Story
Dr. Li-San Hwang., Founder and CEO/Chairman Emeritus, Tetra Tech, Inc.
Student Research Paper Competition Awards Presentation (1:10 — 1:20 PM)
Environmental Summit Forum
Soil and Groundwater Remediation (2:00 pm—5:30 pm, August 9, 2012)
Symposium Sponsors
Panelists: (Moderator: Weixing Tong, Ph.D., Unit Chief, Cal/EPA LARWQCB)
Dr. Rebecca Chou, Section Chief, Cal/EPA Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (LARWQCB)
Mr. Hung-Teh Tsai, Technical Superintendent and Executive Secretary, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Fund Management Board, Taiwan EPA
Prof. Youkuan Zhang, Director, Research Center of Water Science, Nanjing University
Dr. Jun Ma, P.E., Chief Technology Officer, BCEG Environmental Remediation Co., Ltd., China
Dr. Chin Man Mok, P.E., Principal Engineer, AMEC, USA
Prof. Jeff Kuo, California State University at Fullerton, USA
Friday, August 10, 2012
Site Visits
Friday 8:30 a.m.—4:30 p.m.
Trips Run Concurrently
Direction: Trips 1, 2, & 3 meet in hotel lobby
at 8:30 a.m.
(Long pants & walking shoes required!)
Trip 2 (Air Pollution Control)
Coordinator:
Hung-Li Chang, Ph.D., Air Resources En-
Trip 1 (Wastewater Treatment)
gineer, Cal/EPA ARB
Coordinator:
Jian Peng, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist
Orange County Watersheds Program
1. South Coast Air Quality Management
District (AQMD) air quality monitoring
station in Pico Rivera
 1. Orange County Sanitation Dis-
trict Wastewater Treatment Plant
http://www.ocsd.com/education/
tours.asp

Combined State and Local Air Monitoring Station (SLAMS) & Photochemical
Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS)

PM2.5 (FRM, BAM)

CO, O3, NO2
and Lead

VOCs and Carbonyls
2. Los Angeles
County Sanitary
District Puente Hills Landfill
2. Orange County Water District- The
Groundwater Replenishment System
http://www.gwrsystem.com

Co-gen units

Has production capacity of 70 million
gallons (265,000 m3) per day

PM traps demo
equipment

Takes highly treated wastewater and
purifies it to near-distilled quality water


Cost $481 million (US Dollars)
Resources recovery operations

Is one of the most celebrated civil engineering and water reuse projects in
the world.
3. AQMD Headquarters
2

Chemistry lab

Technology
advancement
program

Advanced clean
technologies
Friday, August 10, 2012
Site Visits
Trips Run Concurrently
Trip 3 (Site Remediation)
Coordinator:
Trip 4 (San Diego)
Direction:
Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E., Unit Chief, Cal/EPA
LARWQCB
Meet in hotel lobby at 7:30
a.m.
Coordinator:
Charles Cheng, Ph.D.
Engineering Geologist, San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board, Cal
EPA
1. Irvine Desalter Project at former El
Toro marine base (TCE plume).
The project is a joint cleanup project
of Irvine Ranch Water District, Orange
County Water District, and the US Navy. Beginning full operation in January
2007, the project includes multiple
pumps that extract water from the
plume that is treated to remove the
TCE. The cleaned water is used for non
-drinking
water
purposes
in IRWD’s extensive
recycled
water
system.
1. San Dieguito Lagoon Restoration
Project - this site
demonstrates wetland restoration
and environmental
mitigation projects .
2. San Diego Water Purification Demonstration Project - this site uses state-ofthe-art technologies to treat wastewater
to drinking water standard.
3. La Jolla ASBS (Areas of Special Biological Significance) - this site demonstrates BMPs for stormwater treatment, and have a chance to
visit the famous
SIO and La Jolla
Cove.
2. Site cleanup project at former Tustin
Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS). The
site has a famous blimp hanger (a National Civil Engineering Landmark)
which was decommissioned in 1999.
The site has been undergoing intensive
cleanup of its soil and groundwater due
to contamination of MTBE, TCE, and
other pollutants. Remediation technologies include air sparging, soil excavation, and
groundwater
pump & treat.
3
Site Visits
Friday 8:30 a.m.—4:30 p.m.
Saturday, August 11, 2012
Platform Sessions
Saturday, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sessions Run Concurrently
TECHNICAL SESSION 1:
Informal Break: (10:15-10:45 am)
Surface Water and Watershed Management I
1. Methods for Environmental Flow Assessments in the Yellow River Estuary (11:10
Moderators:
Jason Wen, Ph.D., P.E., Utility Superintendent
— 11:35 am)
Tao Sun, Associate Prof., School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
2. The Impact of the New National Pollutant
Discharge Elimination System Permit Requirements on Vector Control (11:35 am —
Platform Sessions
City of Downey
Storm Water Management Forum
(9:00 — 11:10 am)
This special forum will discuss the issues related
to recently released Tentative MS4 permit for LA
County. TMDLs incorporated in the new permit
will post a significant impact on local municipalities and communities. Panel who represents various stakeholders will give their perspectives and
try to answer some challenging questions: What
are the stormwater problems and challenges? How
do we effectively control the stormwater pollution?
Are residents ready to pay for the cost of program, especially in the current economic condition?
12:00 pm)
Renjie Hu, Ph.D.. Supervising Public Health
Biologist, California Department of Public
Health
TECHNICAL SESSION 2:
Air Quality Management
Moderators:
Daiqi Ye, Ph.D., Prof., Dean of Department of Environmental Engineering, South China University of Technology, China
Hung-Li Chang, Ph.D., Air Resources Engineer
LA County MS4 Permit and TMDL Implementation
Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E., Unit Chief, LARWQCB
Cal/EPA Air Resources Board (ARB)
US EPA Perspective on Stormwater Management
Cindy Lin, D. Env., US EPA Region 9
1. Air Quality Impacts of a Scheduled Closure of an Interstate Freeway: Local and
Regional Scales (9:00 — 9:25 am)
Yifang Zhu, Assistant Professor, University of
California, Los Angeles
2. Objective and Measures to Mitigate PM 2.5
Air Pollution in Guangzhou City during the
12th Five-year Plan (2012-2016) (9:25 —
NGO Perspective on Stormwater Pollution
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa
Monica Bay Restoration Commission
Overview of Los Angeles County and Los Angeles City Stormwater Monitoring Programs
Donna Chen, Assistant Division Manager,
Charlie Yu, Sr. Chemist
City of LA Watershed Protection Division
9:50 am)
Jingquan Liang, Former Chief Engineer, Guangzhou City EPA, China
3. Temporal Trend and Spatial Distribution
of Emission Inventory of Hazardous Heavy
Metals Pollutions in China (9:50 — 10:15
am)
Hezhong Tian, Associate Prof., School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
Implementation Experience of Orange County MS4 Permit
Jian Peng, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist, Orange
County Watersheds Program
Solution for Stormwater Control: BMPs, LID,
and Other Control Measures
Tianpeng Guo, Ph.D., P.E., Water Resource Engineer, CH2M Hill
Break: (10:15-10:45 am)
4
Saturday,
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Saturday,
4. The Development of Air Quality Monitoring Net work in Jiangsu, China (10:45 —
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm
5. Dynamic Duel-Phase-Extraction Treatment
of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contaminated
Soil and Groundwater at a Former Leaking
Underground Storage Tank Site (11:10 —
11:10 am)
Lili Tang, Ph.D., Jiangsu Environmental
Monitoring Center, China
5. Evaluation on the Performance of Air Pollution Control for Chinese Cities (11:10 am
11:35 am)
Rain Zeng, Ph.D., P.E., Accord Engineering Inc.
6. A Case Study of Site Investigation and Remediation at a Chemical Manufacturing Facility in the San Francisco Bay Area (11:35
— 12:00 pm)
Xinggang Tong, Ph.D., Principal Engineer, OTG
EnviroEngineering Solution, Inc.
TECHNICAL SESSION 4:
Surface Water and Watershed Management II
TECHNICAL SESSION 3:
Moderators:
Charles Cheng, Ph.D. Engineering Geologist, San
Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa
Monica Bay Restoration Commission
Soil and Groundwater Remediation
Moderators:
Rebecca Chou, Ph.D., P.E. Section Chief,
Cal/EPA LARWQCB
Jeff Kuo, Prof., California State University
at Fullerton
1. Risk Assessment of Water Environment
Based on the Respond Net Model (RNM) in
Haihe River Estuary of China (1:30 — 2:00
pm)
Jingling Liu, Prof., School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
2. Case Study—Use TMDL to Control and Restore Sediment Impairment in the Los
Penasquitos Lagoon (2:00 — 2:30 pm)
Charles Cheng, Ph.D. Engineering Geologist,
San Diego Regional Water Quality Control
Board, Cal EPA
3. The Occurrence of Controlled Substances
in Hospitals Effluents and Surface Waters
(2:30 — 3:00 pm)
Angela Yu-Chen Lin, Associated Professor, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
1. Current Status of China’s Remediation
Market and Case Studies (9:00 — 9:25 am)
Jun Ma, Ph.D. Principal Engineer, BCDG Environmental Remediation Co. Ltd., China
2. Consolidation of risk Assessment and Management of Contaminated Lands in Taiwan (9:25 — 9:50 am)
Wan-Ying Tsai, Engineer, Environmental Engineering Research Center, Sinotech, Taiwan
3. Application of Microwave Irradiation in
the Degradation of Persistent Organic Pollutants (9:50 — 10:15 am)
Xitao Liu, Associate Prof., School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
Break: 3:00-3:30 pm
Break: (10:15-10:45 am)
4. Nitrate Loss From Subsurface Drains in An
Agricultural Watershed Using SWAT (3:30
4. Regulatory Framework of Waste Discharge Requirements for Soil and Groundwater Remediation (10:45 — 11:10 am)
Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E. Unit Chief,
Cal/EPA LARWQCB
— 4:00 pm)
Yinghui Sui, Ph.D.
5
Platform Sessions
— 11:35 am)
Guojun Song, Prof., School of Environment,
Renming University of China
6. Comparison of Greenhouse Gas and Air
Pollutant Emissions in Kaohsiung City
(11:35 am — 12:00 pm)
Yusung Yeh, Ph.D., President, Envirmac Technology and Consultants Corp, Taiwan
Saturday, August 11, 2012
Saturday,
Platform Sessions
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Sessions Run Concurrently
5. Improvement of Nitrogen Removal
through Riverbank Restoration (4:00 —
6. Environmental Performance Evaluation of
Beijing Energy Use Planning (4:30 — 5:00
pm)
Linyu Xu, Associate Prof., School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
Platform Sessions
4:30 pm)
Yuansheng Pei, Prof. Deputy Dean of School of
Environment, Beijing Normal University, China
6. Development and Use of Biological Objectives for Protection and Ecological Restoration of Wadeable Streams in California
(4:30 — 5:00 pm)
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa
Monica Bay Restoration Commission
TECHNICAL SESSION 6A:
Waste Water and Solid Waste Management
Moderators:
Michael E. Shiang, RG., CHG, President, ADvTECH
TECHNICAL SESSION 5:
Environmental, Inc.
Low Carbon Economy and Sustainable Development
Tianpeng Guo, Ph.D., P.E., Water Resource
Moderators:
Chengwen Wang, Prof., School of Environment,
Tsinghua University , China
John Chien, P.E., City of San Jose, California
1. Dewatering of Sewage Sludge Conditioning with Skeleton Builders (1:30 — 2:00 pm)
Jiakuan Yang, Prof., School of Environmental
Science and Engineering, Huazhong University
of Science and Technology, China
2. An Innovative Adsorption/Nitrification/
Denitrification/Sludge-hydrolysis Wastewater Treatment Process (ANDH) for
Wastewater Treatment (2:00 — 2:30 am)
Xianghua Wen, Ph.D., Prof., School of Environment, Tsinghua University, China
3. Stabilization of fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators utilizing landfill
leachate (2:30 — 3:00 am)
Yanyu Wu, Ph.D. South China Institute of Environmental Science, China
Engineer, CH2M Hill
1. Studies on the Mechanochemically Modified Photocatalysts Applied in the Environmental Remediation and Green Energy
(1:30 — 2:00 pm)
Pengwan Chen, Prof. Beijing Institute of Technology, China
2. Costal Effects of Tsunamis at Pacific Coast
Harbors (2:00 — 2:30 pm)
Jiin-Jen Lee, Prof., University of Southern California
3. Estimation of Methane Emission from California Natural Gas Industry (2:30—3:00am)
Jeff Kuo, Prof., California State University
at Fullerton
Break: 3:00-3:30 pm
TECHNICAL SESSION 6B:
Break: 3:00-3:30 pm
Environmental Corporation Case Study
4. Development of Wastewater Treatment
Plants in China: With Special Focus on Energy Consumption and Sludge Disposal
(3:30 — 4:00 pm)
Chengwen Wang, Prof., School of Environment, Tsinghua University , China
5. Green Bioventing Study and Implementation Using Wind Power (4:00 — 4:30 pm)
Jim Leu, Ph.D., P.E.,Project Manager, Parson
4. CH2M Hill—Water Reuse and Desalination
(3:30 — 4:00 pm)
Qingshan Wang, Senior Design Manager and
Operational Lead, CH2M Hill
5. Air Quality, Climate, and Clean Transportation (4:00 — 4:30 pm)
Eddy Huang, Ph.D., Director, Tetra Tech, Inc.
6
Saturday,
Special Workshop (August 9, 1:30—2:30
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm
pm)
“Environmental Career in USEPA”
6. Groundwater Impacts and Fate Transport
Modeling of Perchlorate Stringfellow Superfund Site, Riverside County CA (4:30 —
Piyachat Terrell, USEPA National Program Manager
5:00 pm)
Jim Fingan, Ph.D. CHg, Principal Hydrogeologist, Kleinfelder
Special Conference (August 13—16, 2012)
“Site Remediation and Management”
Symposium Sponsors
Symposium Steering Committee
Committee Chair
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa Monica
Bay Restoration Commission,
Deputy Committee Chair
Michael E. Shiang, RG., CHG, President, ADvTECH
Environmental, Inc.
Members
 Rebecca Chou, Ph.D., P.E., Section Chief, Cal/EPA Los
Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board
(LARWQCB)
 Dan Q. Fang, President of American Green Environmental
Academy of Science
 Yu-Yang Gong, Ph.D., P.E., Managing Director, ESD China Limited
 Tianpeng Guo, Ph.D., P.E., Water Resource Engineer,
CH2M Hill
 Eddy Huang, Ph.D., Air Quality Director, Tetra Tech, Inc.
 Kun Liu, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Chambers Group
 Jian Peng, Ph.D. Environmental Scientist
Orange County Watersheds Program
 Yue Rong, Ph.D., Section Chief, Cal/EPA LARWQCB
 Weixing Tong, Ph.D., RG., CEG., CHG., Unit Chief, Cal/
EPA LARWQCB
 Jason Wen, Ph.D., P.E., Utility Superintendent
City of Downey, City of Downey
 Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E., Unit Chief, Cal/EPA LARWQCB
 Zhong Xiong, Ph.D., P.E., Project Engineer, AMEC
Support and Co-organizer Agencies: Chinese American Environmental Professional Association (San Francisco), Professional Association for China’s Environment (PACE), Overseas Chinese Environmental Engineers
and Scientists Association (OCEESC), China Environmental Remediation (www.hjxf.net), U.S. EPA Region
IX, Cal EPA-Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Diego Regional Water Quality Control
Board, and California State University at Long Beach
8
Abstract and Biography
Thursday, August 9, 2012 Environmental Summit Forum
Biography of Invited Forum Panelists
Morning Panel: PM 2.5 and Air Quality Management
 Ms. La Ronda Bowen, Special Advisor, Office of the Ombudsman, Air Resources
Board, Cal EPA, USA
As Ombudsman for the California Air Resources Board, pro-actively engages stakeholders
on issues of air quality, public health, and the economy especially as these topics relate to
the implementation of California’s Global Warming Solution Act commonly referred to as AB
32. Ms. Bowen has a long history in policy issues related to the intersection of environment
and the economy. Ms. Bowen’s history of work at the intersection of environmental policy
and a sustainable economy began 20 years ago when she built the first small business
assistance program in an environmental regulatory agency in the United States. The
program became an award winning national model. She has also served as an advisor to
the United States Environmental Protection Agency and as a consultant to other agencies
and businesses. Ms. Bowen received her Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts from Norwich
University and her Masters of Fine Arts from Goucher College.
 Dr. Chung Liu, Deputy Executive Officer, South Coast Air Quality Management District
(AQMD), CA, USA
Dr. Chung S. Liu is the Chief Scientist and Deputy Executive Officer for Science &
Technology Advancement at the South Coast Air Quality Management District. He is
responsible for the District’s Technology Advancement Office, Mobile Source Division, and
Monitoring and Laboratory Analysis Division. Dr. Liu’s principal charges at the AQMD are to
identify, evaluate, and stimulate development and commercialization of clean air
technologies, develop and coordinate mobile source regulations, and to conduct ambient
monitoring, source testing, and laboratory analysis. Dr. Liu received his B.S. in chemistry at
Fu Jen University in Taiwan. He was awarded an M.S. in organic chemistry, an M.B.A. in
finance and management science, and a doctorate in environmental science and
engineering – all from UCLA. Dr. Liu serves on the Board of WestStart/CALSTART, the
California Air Resources Board Research Screening Committee, and the University of
California at Davis Institute of Transportation Studies Advisory Board.
 Dr. Jiming Hao (郝吉明), Tsinghua University, member of Chinese Academy of
Engineering, China
环境系教授,博士生导师,中国工程院院士。1946年生,山东梁山人。
1970年毕业于清华大学给水排水工程专业,1981年获清华大学核 环境工程
硕士,1984年获美国辛辛那提大学环境工程博士学位。曾任环境科学与工
程系主任、教育部长江学者奖励计划特聘教授,现任环境科学与工程研究院
院 长,兼任世界工程组织联合会工程与环境委员会委员,教育部环境工程
教学指导(分)委员会主任,"环境科学"、"中国环境科学"、"环境科学学报
"、"J. of the Air & Waste Management Association"副主编等职。研究领域
为大气污染控制工程,主持酸沉降控制规划与对策研究,划定酸雨和二氧化
硫控制区,被国务院采纳实施。以北京为典型城市,建立了城市机动车污染控制 规划方法,
促成我国轻型车排放标准与欧洲标准的接轨。获得国家和部委科技进步二等奖以上奖励10
次,主讲 “国家精品课程”一门,获全国高等教育国家级教育教学成果一等奖一项。代表性箸
作有:《大气污染控制工程》、《燃煤二氧化硫污染控制技术手册》、《酸沉降 临界负荷及
其应用》、《城市机动车排放污染控制》等。
 Prof. Daiqi Ye, Dean, Department of Environmental Engineering, South China
University of Technology, China
Education
 Ph.D. South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 1990
 M.S. South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 1987
 B.S. South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 1984
Research Interests
 Air Pollution Control Engineering
 Catalytic Elimination of Vehicle Exhaust Emission
 Volatile Organic Compounds Control
 Nitrogen Oxides Removal with SCR/SNCR technology
 Novel Materials Development for Nitrogen Oxides Removal
 Research & Development of Nonthermal Plasma Technology for Hazardous Airborne
Pollutants Elimination
Honors and Awards
 Novel technology for cleaner production of enameled wire. A first-class advanced award
for Science and Technology, Dongguan, Guangdong province, 2009.(2009-1-26-02)
 Silencing device with exhaust purification for motorcycle meeting European III Standard. A
third-class award for Science and Technology, Foshan, Guangdong province, 2007. (20063-135-02)
 Combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysis in air purification. A second-class award
for Science and Technology on Environmental Protection, Guangdong province, 2006.
(HBKJ2006-2-G01)
 The purification of waste gas using the integrated system of non-thermal plasma and
catalysis, A second-class award for Science and Technology, Guangdong province, 2005.
(2005-2-003-R01)
 Air pollution purification using non-thermal plasma integrated with catalysis, A third-class
advanced award for science and technology, Guang Zhou, Guangdong province,2004.
(2004-3-03-R01)
 Dr. David T. Shaw, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA
Born in Jiangxi, China, Dr. Shaw obtained his B.S. degree in
mechanical engineering from National Taiwan University, and his M.S.
and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Purdue University.
Subsequently, he joined the faculty of the State University of New York
at Buffalo where he is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering and
Director of the Center for Innovation in Engineering Learning. He has
served as a visiting associate at the California Institute of Technology,
a visiting scientist at the Centre L’Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-auxRoses, and a visiting professor at the University of Paris and the
University of Marseille (France).
Dr. Shaw’s research interests are focused on control technology for nanoparticles,
generation and characterization of nanoparticles, hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes,
high temperature superconductivity, microelectromechanical systems, and web-based
multimedia technology education. He has published over 230 refereed journal articles and
conference proceedings. He has also edited numerous monographs, handbooks,
conference proceedings, and holds eight patents. In 1983, he was appointed the founding
president of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) and the founding
editor-in-chief of the Association’s journal, Aerosol Science and Technology, the premier
journal in nanoparticle sciences and their applications. He is currently the Americas
Regional Editor of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research. His contributions in nanoparticle
research led to his appointment to a National Science Foundation panel that assessed the
global R & D status in nanotechnology. The panel’s report, Nanostructure Science and
Technology, was the technical document used as the basis for the National Nanotechnology
Initiative announced by President Clinton in January 2000.
Dr. Shaw has represented the U.S. in many official international cooperative agreements,
including the nuclear space power programs with the International Atomic Energy Agency
(IAEA) and the former Soviet Union, as well as the high temperature superconductivity
program with Japan. He has been appointed to Honorary Professorships at Sun Yat Sen
University and the South China University of Technology (both in Guangzhou, China), as
well as the Shenyang Metal Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His
many awards and honors include the Ford Foundation Career Development Award, National
Institute of Health (NIH) Special Fellowship and Career Development Award, AAAR
Association Award, International Aerosol Association Fellow Award, Outstanding
Achievement Award of the Chinese-American Engineers and Scientists Association of
Southern California, and Distinguished Achievement Award of the Chinese Institute of
Engineers/USA.
Luncheon Keynote Presentation
Dr. Li-San Hwang (黃立三博士), Founder and CEO/Chairman Emeritus
Tetra Tech, Inc.
Dr. Li-San Hwang received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from National
Taiwan University, and his M.S. from Michigan State University in 1962.
He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the California Institute of
Technology in 1965. Dr. Hwang joined Tetra Tech in 1967. In a short
time, Dr. Hwang was able to secure many projects and attracted many
talented engineers. In 1974, Dr. Hwang was named Vice President.
Under his leadership, Dr. Hwang’s division developed numerous unique
models to solve complex environmental and water resource problems, notably tsunami
generation and propagation, storm surge and coastal flooding, ecological issues, and
watershed management. These models were instrumental in solving the complex problems
faced by clients.
In 1982, Tetra Tech was acquired by Honeywell. Subsequently, Honeywell incorporated the
company’s defense-related business into its principal business. The Water Management
Group left in Tetra Tech was managed by Dr. Hwang. Later he expanded the business into
coastal pollution discharge and hazardous waste management. In 1987, Dr. Hwang was
named President and CEO of Tetra Tech. In the following year, Dr. Hwang led a
“management buy-out” of Tetra Tech from Honeywell. As an independent company, Tetra
Tech’s business grew rapidly, with revenue doubling from $25 million to $51 million in three
years. To finance the company’s growth and pay off existing bank debt, Tetra Tech went
public in 1991. After the company went public, Dr. Hwang led Tetra Tech to consistent
strong growth, and increased profitability and return on investment. As a result, Tetra Tech
was named by Forbes, Fortune and Business Week as one of the “Best Small Companies” a
total of eight times. By 2003, Tetra Tech’s revenue exceeded $1 billion, and Engineering
News Record (ENR) ranked Tetra Tech as the largest environmental consulting firm in the
United States. From the “management buy-out” in 1988 until Dr. Hwang’s retirement in
2006, the company’s stock price increased 84-fold due to Tetra Tech’s exceptional results
and continual growth over that period.
Dr. Hang published extensively. He was one of the world’s leading experts in tsunamis, and
served as an advisor to numerous government and professional society committees. Dr.
Hwang received numerous professional awards, including the Entrepreneur of the Year
Award for the Los Angeles region, and Lifetime Achievement Awards from ChineseAmerican Engineers and Scientists Association of Southern California (CESASC) and
Achievement Award from the Monte Jade Science and Technology Association.
Afternoon Panel: Soil and Groundwater Remediation
 Dr. Rebecca Chou, Section Chief, Cal/EPA Los Angeles Regional Water Quality
Control Board (LARWQCB)
Dr. Rebecca Chou has more than 30 years experience in the environmental field, cleaning
up contaminated air, soil and groundwater contamination. She is currently the Section Chief
of Groundwater Permitting and Land Disposal for the California Environmental Protection
Agency (Cal EPA), Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board),
where she oversees and regulates over 600 discharges to groundwater and landfills in the
watersheds of Ventura and Los Angeles County.
From 2006 to 2008, she was the Branch Chief for the School Program and Cleanup
Operations -- a high priority initiative at a sister agency, the Department of Toxic Substances
Control (which is also a Cal EPA agency). In addition to overseeing cleanup of school sites,
her responsibilities included Superfund and brownfield cleanups.
From 1992 to 2006, Dr. Chou worked for the Water Board in Permitting, enforcement and
remediation programs. She has worked with USEPA and other government agencies to
issue a landmark Administrative Civil Liability Complaint $2.2 million against the City of
Thousand Oaks, for an unauthorized sewage discharge in 1997. She was the Chief of Site
Cleanup Unit in charge of Spills, Leaks, Investigation, and Cleanups (SLIC) Program
Management. She has helped revitalize many brownfields, including the Kodak Theater,
Cathedral Church, and Staples Center.
From 1987 to 1992, Dr. Chou worked for GTEL Environmental Lab as the Lab Director in
charge of State Lab certification, daily operation, quality assurance/quality control protocol
and method development.
From 1980 to 1987, she worked as a research assistant for various environmental research
projects at the Plant Protection Agency in Taiwan and at the University of Southern
California.
Dr. Chou received her M.S. in Environmental Engineering and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering
from the University of Southern California, and her B.S. in Chemistry from the Providence
University in Taiwan. She is a registered Professional Engineer in Civil Engineering in
California.
 Mr. Hung-Teh Tsai received his M.S. degree from National Taiwan
University. He is the Technical Superintendent and Executive
Secretary of Soil and Groundwater Remediation Fund Management
Board (SGRFMB), Environmental Protection Administration, R.O.C. He
has many experiences in Administration, Site Supervision and
Management.
 Prof. Youkuan Zhang (张幼宽), Director, Research Center of Water Science, Nanjing
University
张幼宽教授的主要研究领域为地下水计算与模拟,随机地下水文学和地质统计学。他分别于
1982年和1990年取得南京大学水文地质学硕士和美国亚利桑那(Arizona)大学水文学博士并
先后任教于美国内布拉斯加林肯大学和依阿华大学,为依阿华大学终身正教授, 2006年9月
起担任南京大学水科学研究中心主任,2010年入选为国家“千人计划”特聘专家。他主持过
多项美国,意大利和中国政府资助的科研项目,发表论文80余篇,目前担任《地下水》
(Ground Water)和《随机环境研究和风险评价》(Stochastic Environmental Research
and Risk Assessment)等国际专业杂志副主编及美国地球物理学会(AGU)地下水专业委员
会委员。2005年当选为美国地质学会(GSA)Fellow。曾任美国地球物理年会水文学分会优
秀研究生论文评选委员会主席和由海外杰出华裔地球科学家组成的中国地球科学促进会
(IPACES)主席。
 Dr. Jun Ma (马骏), P.E., Chief Technology Officer, BCEG Environmental Remediation
Co., Lid.
Dr. Ma graduated from Tsinghua University in 1997 with two B.S. degrees. He received a
M.S. degree and a Ph.D. degree from Case Western Reserve University in 2001 and 2005,
respectively.
Dr. Ma is currently the Chief Technology Officer for BCEG Environmental Remediation Co.
LTD (BCEER). Dr. Ma is an experienced environmental engineer specializing in
environmental site investigation and remediation. His work included management of various
investigative activities and remedial activities, which span from the environmental site
assessment (ESA), remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS), remedial design (RD),
and remedial action (RA). Dr. Ma is responsible for providing technical oversight for two of
the largest soil remediation projects in China to date. In addition, Dr. Ma is tasked with
leading the research efforts for a number of high-profile state-funded projects in remediation
field. He has well-balanced experiences in both private sector projects and state and federal
government projects.
Prior to BCEER, Dr. Ma had been with two environmental consulting firms in US:
Conestoga-Rovers & Associates, Inc. (CRA) and Camp Dresser & Mckee Inc. (CDM)
between 2004 and 2010. During his stay with CRA and CDM, Dr. Ma completed
environmental investigation/remediation for a wide variety of complex contaminated sites,
including but not limited to Superfund sites. Dr. Ma is a professional engineer registered in
New Jersey and Connecticut, and an active member of American Society of Civil Engineer.
 Dr. Chin Man Mok, P.E., Principal Engineer, AMEC
Dr. Chin Man (Bill) Mok is a Principal Engineer and Hydrogeologist in the Environmental
Science and Engineering group of the Oakland Office of AMEC Environment and
Infrastructure. He is concurrently a Diesel Fellow and affiliated professor (engineering risk)
at the Institute for Advanced Study of the Technical University of Munich, as well as an
adjunct professor (earth and environmental sciences) at the University of Waterloo.
Dr. Mok graduated from the University of Hong Kong with his first degree in civil and
structural engineering in 1985 with first-class honours. After working in Hong Kong as a
consulting geotechnical and structural engineer for over a year, he was awarded the S.L.
Pao Education Foundation Scholarship and the Stephen Hui Fellowship to pursue graduate
study at the University of California at Berkeley. He obtained a master degree in 1987 in
geotechnical earthquake engineering and a doctoral degree in 1999 on reliability analysis of
groundwater systems.
Dr. Mok has 27 years of industry experience in a wide range of engineering and earth
sciences disciplines worldwide. He has directed numerous projects supporting the design
and evaluation of groundwater and surface water resources amenities, locks and dams,
chemicalcontainment and remediation systems, water supply and wastewater treatment
facilities, landfills, land development, nuclear-related facilities, bridges, buildings, tunnels,
and underground structures. In addition to being a practitioner, Dr. Mok participates actively
in research and teaching. He has been a visiting associate professor at the University of
Hong Kong in 2010. In the past ten years, he has been a principal instructor of short
courses in California, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Israel, India, and China on various subjects,
including soil and groundwater contamination, environmental statistics, health risk
assessment, geotechnical earthquake engineering, carbon reduction, climate change, and
green buildings. Dr. Mok has been a principal investigator in many research studies funded
by national organizations. He has been an invited speaker and keynote lecturer at
conferences, workshops, and seminars. He is currently the Chair-Elect of the groundwater
management committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers.
 Prof. Jeff Kuo, California State University at Fullerton, USA
Dr. Jeff Kuo worked in the chemical/environmental engineering industries for more than ten
years before joined the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at California State
University, Fullerton in 1995. He gained his industrial experiences from working at several
major environmental Engineering consulting companies (Groundwater Technology, Inc.,
Dames and Moore, and James M. Montgomery Consulting Engineers) and the Los Angeles
County Sanitation Districts. He has also worked for Nan-Ya Plastics and Su-Chiang Co. in
Taiwan. He has published more than one hundred technical papers and authored a book,
titled Practical Design Calculations for Groundwater and Soil Remediation.
He received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from National Taiwan University, an M.S.
degree in chemical engineering from University of Wyoming, an M.S. in petroleum
engineering, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from University of
Southern California. He is a registered professional engineer in California in three different
engineering fields: civil, chemical, and mechanical engineering. He is also a registered
environmental engineer in Taiwan. Dr. Kuo received Carol Barnes Outstanding Teaching
Award in 2010, the Distinguished Professor of College of Engineering and Computer
Science in 2007, and the Professor of the Year (2003-04) of the MESA Engineering
Program. His research areas cover water/wastewater treatment, groundwater and soil
remediation, stormwater runoff, and air pollution control.
Saturday, August 11, 2012 Platform Sessions
TECHNICAL SESSION 1
Surface Water and Watershed Management (1)
Moderator: Jason Wen, Ph.D., P.E., Utility Superintendent, City of Downey
Storm Water Management Forum
This special forum will discuss the issues related to recently released Tentative MS4 permit for
LA County. TMDLs incorporated in the new permit will post a significant impact on local
municipalities and communities. Panel who represents various stakeholders will give their
perspectives and try to answer some challenging questions: What are the stormwater problems
and challenges? How do we effectively control the stormwater pollution? Are residents ready to
pay for the cost of program, especially in the current economic condition?
 LA County MS4 Permit and TMDL Implementation
Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E., Unit Chief, Cal/EPA, LARWQCB
 US EPA Perspective on Stormwater Management
Cindy Lin, D. Env., US EPA Region 9
 NGO Perspective on Stormwater Pollution
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission
 Overview of Los Angeles County and Los Angeles City Stormwater Monitoring
Programs
Donna Chen, Assistant Division Manager, Charlie Yu, Sr. Chemist
City of LA Watershed Protection Division
 Implementation Experience of Orange County MS4 Permit
Jian Peng, Ph.D., Environmental Scientist, Orange County Watersheds Program
 Solution for Stormwater Control: BMPs, LID, and Other Control Measures
Tianpeng Guo, Ph.D., P.E., Water Resource Engineer, CH2M Hill
 Methods for Environmental Flow Assessments in the Yellow River Estuary
Tao Sun
State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing
Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Abstract: Balancing conflicting demands for water required for ecosystem health and irrigations
of agricultural systems has become an important challenge in water resources management,
particularly in downstream of a river basin. We developed an approach to assess environmental
flows in estuaries. The method consists of three steps including identifying ecosystem protection
objectives, determining initial environmental flows based on habitat simulations, and providing
recommended flow regimes after balancing water requirements for ecosystem protection and
irrigation processes. The method was applied in the Yellow River Estuary. Based on the results,
we defined a boundary of environmental flows as limits in water allocation for ecosystem
protection, and provided recommended environmental flows which may be accepted by
stakeholders requiring water for other needs. Integration of diverse objectives was suggested to
be a critical issue in environmental flow assessment. Water-saving measures should be
employed to improve water-use efficiency in balancing water utilization.
Key words: environmental flow assessment; water resources allocation; Yellow River Estuary
 The Impact of the New National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit
Requirements on Vector Control
Renjie Hu, Ph.D.
Supervising Public Health Biologist, California Department of Public Health, Vector-Borne
Disease Section, Ontario, CA 91730
Abstract: Effective vector control includes pesticide application and is considered an important
part of preventing vector-borne disease outbreak. The use of pesticides for public health in
California is typically regulated by environmental and public health agencies including the
Environmental Protection Agency, the California State Water Resource Control Board (the State
Water Board), the California Department of Public Health, and the California Department of
Pesticide Regulation. Recently, the State Water Board adopted a General National Pollutant
Discharge Elimination System Permit for Residual Pesticide Discharges for Vector Control
Applications. The purpose of this permit is for clean water and reduction of pesticide use. It
also imposes monitoring, testing and reporting requirements. Under the permit, the agencies
that apply pesticides are required to conduct both visual and physical monitoring of the pesticide
applications and report the results to the board. The State Water Board and vector control
agencies are working closely to develop a mutually beneficial plan to protect public health and
environment. The issues and concerns raised and the impact of the permit on vector control will
be presented in detail.
TECHNICAL SESSION 2
Air Quality Management
Moderators:
Daiqi Ye, Ph.D., Prof., Dean of Department of Environmental Engineering, South China
University of Technology, China
Hung-Li Chang, Ph.D., Air Resources Engineer Cal/EPA Air Resources Board (ARB)
 Air Quality Impacts of a Scheduled Closure of an Interstate Freeway: Local and
Regional Scales
DAVID C. QUIROS1, QUNFANG ZHANG1, WONSIK CHOI2, MEILU HE2, SUZANNE E.
PAULSON2, ARTHUR M. WINER1, RUI WANG3, and YIFANG ZHU1*
1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University
of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772 USA
2
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772 USA
3
Department of Urban Planning, Luskin School of Public Affairs, University of California Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772 USA
* Corresponding author phone: +1-310-825-4324; fax: +1-310-794-2106; e-mail:
[email protected]
Abstract: Elevated concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs, < 0.1 µm) are commonly found
near roadways. On the July 16-17, 2011 weekend, a section of a major Los Angeles freeway,
the I-405, was closed for 36 hours. We measured UFPs and other pollutants at two fixed
locations, one upwind and one downwind, and at various distances from I-405 using a mobile
monitoring platform (MMP) on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays before, during, and after
closure. On the closure Saturday on July 16, I-405 traffic flow was reduced by ~90% relative to
non-closure Saturday observations. Downwind of I-405, fixed site measurements showed the
following reductions: 83% of particle number concentration (PNC), 36% of PM2.5, and 62% of
black carbon (BC). Daily average UFP size distributions were bimodal for non-closure conditions
(nucleation modes ~20 nm, accumulation modes ~60 nm), but only showed an accumulation
mode ~50 nm during closure. Spatial measurements from the MMP confirmed no nucleation
mode was detected at any location 0 to 350 m downwind during closure. During closure, major
freeway traffic was reduced basin-wide, with greater reductions closer to the I-405 closure
center, compared to five selected control Saturdays. PM2.5 concentrations from eight stationary
monitoring stations were reduced between 18 and 36% relative to the same control days. In
2011, non-closure emission factors (EFs) were 5.0, 2.7, and 3.4 x 1013 particles vehicle-1 km-1
for Friday through Sunday respectively. After accounting for instrumental and traffic flow
differences, PNC in 2011 was 73% lower than 2001 at the same study location. The outcome of
the natural experiment during the I-405 closure serves as a proof-of-concept that traffic
reduction can improve local and regional air quality in sprawled urban regions such as Los
Angeles, CA.
 Objectives and Measures to Mitigate PM 2.5 Air Pollution in Guangzhou City during
the 12th Five-Year Plan (2012-2016)
Liang, Jin-quan, Former Chief Engineer
Guangzhou City EPA, China
Abstract: For the 12th Five-Year Plan (from 2012 to 2016), the City of Guangzhou, China, has
established its objectives to mitigate PM 2.5 air pollution, and it will implement as many as ten
measures to achieve the objectives.
To monitor and control PM 2.5 air pollution, Guangzhou has done sufficiently technical
preparations. The City is one of the first municipals in China to start real-time automatic
monitoring of air quality. Since 2009, the City has started a trial project to monitor PM 2.5.
During the 17th Asian Game in Guangzhou in October 2010, PM 2.5 was one of the monitoring
parameters to monitor and control air quality. Since 2004, the City has continuously to reduce
sources of air pollution from industrial facilities (such as power plants), automobile emissions,
and dust discharge from construction sites.
For the 12th Five-Year Plan (from 2012 to 2016), PM 2.5 air pollution will be the focus of air
pollution control for Guangzhou. The city will implement the measures to effectively mitigate its
air pollution: control consumption of coal; control automobile emissions; regulate emission and
dust discharge from power plants; regulate discharge of VOCs into the atmosphere; reduce dust
discharge from construction sites, transportation and storage facilities; regulate smog discharge
from restaurants; regulate burning of trash and dry crops in countryside; complete air pollution
monitoring system and information broadcasting mechanism; initiate significant air pollution
early warning and response system; and promote public participation on air pollution control.
 Temporal Trend and Spatial Distribution of Emission Inventory of Hazardous Heavy
Metals Pollutants in China
HezhongTian*, Ke Cheng, Dan Zhao, Long Lu,Yan Wang, and JiajiaGao
School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China.
Presenter and Corresponding Author: Dr. H.Z.Tian. E-mail: [email protected]
Abstract: With the continuous economic development and rapid urbanization in China, large
amounts of fossil fuel consumption and intensive industrial activities have caused substantial
release of hazardous trace elements into the atmosphere, which have aroused great concerns
for their adverse effects on eco-environment and public health. An accurate and complete
emission inventory can help both modeler community and policymakers in assessing the current
status of environmental contaminations, identifying major emission sources and spatial
distribution characteristics, as well as understanding the contribution of the atmospheric
pathway to the contamination of terrestrial and aquatic environments. In this study, a multipleyear comprehensive emission inventory of atmospheric hazardous trace metals including
mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium(Cd), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), nickel
(Ni), and Antimony (Sb) in China for the period of 1980-2009 has been developed, which covers
major anthropogenic sources and a bottom–up approach is adopted to compile the inventory for
the sources where possible. Our results indicate that coal combustion accounts for a major
source of Hg, As, Se, Cr, Pb, Sb, and Ni in China. Another major source category is nonferrous
metal smelting, which ranks the largest source of atmospheric emissions for Cd, and also
contribute a very large proportion of other elements. As for spatial allocation, the majority of
anthropogenic atmospheric trace elements emissions are demonstrated to be highly distributed
among regions of costal eastern and northern China, which can be partly explained by the
rapidgrowing demands for fossil energy and the increasing industrial production activities in
these regions. We believe that this inventory will be benefitfor better understanding the historical
and current situation of these hazardous trace elements emissionsandpromulgating more
effective ways for preventing the environmental pollution and poisoning accidents by the
policymakers and relevant researchers.
Fig. 1 Anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of trace elements in China, 2009
Key words: atmospheric emission inventory; hazardous trace elements (HTEs); anthropogenic
sources; coal combustion; nonferrous smelting; China.
 Evaluation on the Performance of Air Pollution Control for Chinese Cities
Guojun Song
Environmental Policy and Planning Institute (EPPI), Renmin University of China
Abstract: This presentation is the results of a research which is finished recently. The
evaluation shows the performance with the evidences from three aspects: air quality and trend,
pollution control activities, and information publication.
For the air quality and its trend, the picture, including 287 larger cities, three indicators, daily
mean value, rate exceeded grade 2 ambient air quality standards (AAQS) and days complying
AAQS, population exposure, is given within 2005 to 2010. Generally speaking, the air quality for
most cities is still poor and worse for the PM10 and SO2;
For the pollution control activities, the most effective measure is the centralized heating system
to north cities for PM10, same for SO2, and NO2 emission density for NO2.
For air quality information publication, the urban residents concern the information much.
However, the information published by municipal EPB is very poor.
The policy to PM10 and SO2 is effective, not effective to NO2, generally speaking.
 高雄港區溫室氣體與空氣污染物排放量比較
葉雨松
高雄市是一工業城市,轄內的高雄港是 2010 年排名全球第 12 大貨櫃港,周圍圍繞著臺灣最重
要的重工業區。當局歷年來對工廠固定污染源的管制不遺餘力,但是對船舶的空氣污染掌握及
管制仍屬空白。本研究建立了高雄港 2009 年、2010 年港區遠洋船舶排放 SOx, NOx 等空氣污
染物及溫室氣體的排放清冊,並與該年度港區鄰近工業區之排放量進行比較,提供未來研擬管
制策略之參考。
關鍵字:高雄港,排放清冊,溫室氣體,空氣污染,船舶
TECHNICAL SESSION 3
Soil and Groundwater Remediation
Moderators:
Rebecca Chou, Ph.D., P.E. Section Chief, Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control
Board, Cal EPA
Jeff Kuo, Prof., California State University at Fullerton
 Current Status of China’s Remediation Market and Case Studies
Jun Ma, Ph.D.
BCDG Environmental Remediation Co. Ltd
Abstract: China has been undergoing a rapid industrialization over the past half century, but
this does not occur without consequences. Inappropriate management and disposal practices
of hazardous waste and chemicals, spillage, leak etc., as related to past and ongoing industrial
activities, have contributed to the deteriorating quality of soil, groundwater and/or sediment in
many regions across the country. Land contamination has become one of the major challenges
facing the government and the public. However, not until recently has the urgency of
addressing the contaminated land been fully realized, partially because of the raised public
awareness following a series of serious environmental incidents that have occurred during the
past decade.
A systematic strategy is currently being developed to deal with the land contamination issue. As
a part of the efforts, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) has published four guidelines in
2009 seeking public comments, including “The Technical Specification for Environmental Site
Investigation (Draft)”, “Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Contaminated Sites (Draft) “,
“Guidelines for Soil Remediation of Contaminated Sites (Draft) “, and “Technical guidelines for
Environmental Monitoring of Sites (Draft)”. In addition to that, the “12th Five-Year National
Planning for Comprehensive Prevention and Control of Heavy Metal Pollution " and the
“National Groundwater Pollution Prevention Plan (2011-2020)” were approved in February 2011
and August 2011, respectively. Last but not least, MEP internally approved the “Interim
Measures on Management of Soil Pollution in Contaminated Sites (Draft)”, which is applicable
to contaminated sites where land use or land ownership has changed.
This presentation provides two case studies of remediation projects that BCEER is involved.
The first case study summarizes a large-scale soil remediation projects at a former chlor-alkali
plant, whose contaminants of concern (COCs) were mostly chlorinated volatile organic
compounds (CVOCs), such as 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, chloroform. Approximately 1.5
million cubic yards of CVOC-contaminated soils were treated using mechanically-enhanced
VOC desorption technology within 2 years. A variety of safety measures were adopted during
project implementation to mitigate risks posed to construction workers and adjacent
communities. In addition, pilot test of CVOC-contaminated groundwater was completed at the
site as well. A total of 7.2 tons of EHC remediation reagents were injected into subsurface
(0.5% dosage in mass), resulting in the reduction of CVOC concentrations in excess of 95%.
The second case study involves the remediation of hexavalent chromium-contaminated soil and
groundwater at an auto-part manufacturing facility. A comprehensive remedial approach was
followed for the site, consisting of active remediation, engineering control, and natural
attenuation. The project is still on-going, but the remedial approach appears to work relatively
well based on the preliminary results.
 Consolidation of Risk Assessment and Management of Contaminated Lands in
Taiwan
Wan-Ying Tsai*、Pek-Hoon Lim*、Yu-Jen Chung*、Hung-Teh Tsai**
* Sinotech Engineering Consultants INC, R.O.C.
** Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Fund Management Board, Environmental
Protection Administration, R.O.C.
Abstract: To prevent and remedy soil and groundwater contaminated, improve living
environment, protect human health, and ensure sustainable utilization of land and groundwater
resources. Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (Taiwan EPA) passed the Soil and
Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act in 2000 and targeted several tens of environmental
pollutants by setting control standards. In accordance with the Soil and Groundwater Pollution
Control Site Preliminary Assessment Regulations, the sites are divided into control sites and
remediation sites, which are then further classified into farm lands, factory, gas station, storage
tanks, illegal disposal sites, and others. Since the implementation of the Soil and Groundwater
Pollution Remediation Act, 12 years of statistics indicate Taiwan once had over 1,400 hectares
of contaminated sites listed, with only 480 hectares of de-listed sites which are all farm lands.
Approximately 700 hectares of factory or illegal disposal sites are highly contaminated and still
on-list. There were only 3 sites of the 56 high-risk remediation sites de-listed, because of the
pollutants concentration lower than control standards. To allow the continued use or revitalize
the sites while protecting human health and ecology, the Taiwan EPA agrees that the
implementation may remove the land use limitations in accordance with Article 24 of the Soil
and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act, where there is a financial or technical
impracticability, or a need to accommodate land development, and remediation goal can be
achieved with the approval from the competent agency via appropriate remediation methods
and risk management strategy.
Pursuant to Article 24 of the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act, Taiwan EPA has
created the Human Risk Assessment Guideline, Risk Management Guideline and Risk
Communication Guideline in the recent years. It is also beginning to establish the Ecological
Risk Assessment Method. A recent case study where there is no responsible party for the site
indicates that after health risk and financial assessments, the government needs to pay for
remediation expense as high as US$ 3.5 million. The cost is not worth the value of the land. If
risk managements are adopted, including denial measures, groundwater use limited and
periodic monitoring, the site will achieve risk level with only 10% of the expense. The residents
can be safeguarded.
The assessment/determination methods and review mechanism are more uncertain than the
regular cases where control standards are the basis for de-listing, thus Taiwan has not
technically impractical cases. However, sites contaminated by dense-non aqueous phase liquid
still may face technical impracticality. The relevant execution and management are to be
carried out.
To utilize the contaminated lands sustainably, Taiwan EPA is currently establishing
contaminated sites revitalization framework. The concept of land life cycle management is then
raised to adopt a two stage execution framework of “restricted-land release” and “land
redevelopment” to attempt reducing the possible conflicts between environmental and landdevelopment regulations. “Restricted-land release” is land restriction removed under risk level
by technical tools such as site investigation, remediation technology, and risk assessment, etc.
They can sure both human health and living environment are protected during land
development and future use. In addition, Taiwan has a robust renewal regulation for outdated
industries and rural development. To consolidate reuse mechanism of contaminated lands and
land development regulations, “land redevelopment” system prioritizes the three development
objects of industrial, residence, and infrastructure. We raise economic incentives for expecting
to accelerate the contaminated lands revitalization.
Keyword:risk assessment、contaminated lands、revitalization
 Application of microwave irradiation in the degradation of persistent organic
pollutants
Dr. Xitao Liu
Abstract: In this study, microwave heating was adopted to take the place of conventional
heating to induce hydrothermal reaction. Under microwave irradiation, NaOH and H2O absorbed
microwave energy by space charge polarization and dipolar polarization and instantly converted
it into thermal energy, which initiated the occurrence of hydrothermal reaction that involved with
zero-valent iron. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis found Fe3O4/NaFeO2 and confirmed the
occurrence of microwave-induced hydrothermal reaction. The developed microwavehydrothermal reaction was employed for the dechlorination of PCBs. Hexadecane containing
100 mg/L of Aroclor1254 was used as simulative transformer oil, and the dechlorination of PCBs
was evaluated by GC/ECD, GC/MS and ion chromatography. For 10 mL simulative transformer
oil (with 0.3g iron powder, 0.3g NaOH and 0.6 mL H2O added), almost complete dechlorination
was achieved by 750 W microwave irradiation for 10 min. The effects of important factors
including microwave power and the amounts of reactants added, on the dechlorination degree
were investigated, moreover, the dechlorination mechanism was suggested. Microwave
irradiation combined with the common and cheap materials, iron powder, NaOH and H2O, has
provided a fast and cost-effective method for the treatment of PCB-containing wastes.
 Regulatory framework of Waste Discharge Requirements for Soil and Groundwater
Remediation
Eric Wu, Ph.D., P.E.
Cal/EPA Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board
Abstract: All discharges are subject to the California Water Code 13263 and the responsible
party will be issued with Waste Discharge Requirements (WDRs) by the Regional Board. The
purpose of WDR issuance is to protect beneficial uses of groundwater.
The common soil and groundwater contamination in the greater Los Angeles area largely
results from leaks of underground storage tanks (USTs), or industrial operations. To effectively
and timely mitigate petroleum hydrocarbon, volatile organic compound and/or hexavalent
chromium contaminated soil and groundwater, the Regional Board has adopted a general
permit which allows the use of several agents. If the remediation method is not included in the
general permit, an individual site-specific permit will be adopted by the Regional Board.
Associated with either the general permit or an individual permit, each discharger shall also be
issued with a Monitoring and Reporting Program (MRP). The MRP prescribes sampling
requirements and requires periodical report submittal.
All the submitted information including monitoring well coordinates, groundwater quality, and
hydrogeological records are uploaded to GeoTracker database. GeoTracker database compiles
data from various dischargers and provides an overview of regional groundwater quality to
general public. Through issuance of WDRs, groundwater quality, beneficial uses and public
health are better managed and protected.
 Dynamic Duel-Phase-Extraction Treatment of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contaminated
Soil and Groundwater at a Former Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site
Rain Zeng (PhD, PE); Justin Soo Hoo; Dave Reinhard; David Cheng (PhD, PE)
Accord Engineering Inc.
Keywords: Dual-phase-extraction, soil and groundwater remediation, leaking underground
storage tank site, petroleum hydrocarbons, gasoline and additives, natural attenuation
Abstract: A dual-phase-extraction soil and groundwater remedial pilot study and treatment was
performed at a former leaking underground storage tank site located at northern California. The
DPE pilot study and treatment were conducted to assess the effectiveness and implementability
of DPE technology to remediate gasoline and associated petroleum hydrocarbons from the soil
and groundwater at the Site. During the same period the entire Site was actively remediated to
treat the hot spots using a full-scale, extraction well network.
A trailer-mounted DPE system was operated for a 5-day, 15-day, 35-day, and 30-day phases
over a one-year period at the Site. Comprehensive field and laboratory data were collected
including field measurements of groundwater levels, vacuum pressures, hydrocarbons, oxygen,
carbon dioxide, and methane in the vapor phase, and collection of vapor and groundwater
samples for conformational laboratory analysis. During various phases of the DPE treatment,
the effective radius of vacuum influence, the flow rates of extracted vapor, and the achievable
contaminant-concentration extraction rate were evaluated. The accumulated mass removal was
calculated and the natural attenuation potential was assessed based on soil vapors
concentrations of hydrocarbons and natural attenuation parameters oxygen, carbon dioxide,
and methane. Using a dynamic approach, more than 700 lbs. of hydrocarbons was actively
removed through DPE during this treatment period. Also the hydrocarbons removed by in situ
biodegradation were estimated to be over 1,000 lbs.
 A Case Study of Site Investigation and Remediation at A Chemical Manufacturing
Facility in the San Francisco Bay Area
Xinggang Tong, Ph.D., P.E. Principal Engineer
OTG EnviroEngineering Solutions, Inc.
7700 Edgewater Drive, Suite 260, Oakland, CA 94621, USA
Abstract: This private chemical company operated a 21-acre manufacturing facility in the San
Francisco Bay Area from 1956 through 2002. Its rise and fall from the 1980s to 2002 were
closely tied to the manufacturing activities of integrated circuit boards and chips in the Bay Area.
For over two decades, the author provided environmental support services to the company
when the facility was in operation and led a team of environmental scientists and engineers for
soil and groundwater investigation and remediation after the facility was shutdown in 2002. The
site was recently re-zoned for residential redevelopment.
The author will give an overview of environmental compliance requirement and regulatory
agencies involved during the facility’s active operation time. The author will then discuss in
details of the nature of soil and groundwater contamination and remediation activities. Two
regional groundwater plumes exist in the area: one is dominated by 1,2-DCA and the other is
dominated by TCE, PCE, and DCE. On-site contamination included chlorinated VOCs,
petroleum hydrocarbons (BTEX, TPH-gas, TPH-diesel), SVOCs (dominated by
pentachlorophenol), and heavy metals (arsenic, copper, chromium, and lead). Remediation
activities conducted to date included capping (3-acre area was capped in place), excavation and
off-site disposal, in-situ pH neutralization, in-situ chemical oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, insitu bioremediation, and 10 years of groundwater extraction and treatment operations.
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TECHNICAL SESSION 4
Surface Water and Watershed Management (2)
Moderators:
Charles Cheng, Ph.D. Engineering Geologist, San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board,
Cal/EPA
Guangyu Wang, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission
 Risk Assessment of Water Environment Based on the Respond Net Model (RNM) in
Haihe River Basin Estuary of China
Liu Jingling,* Chen Qiuying
State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control & School of
Environment, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing, China
*Liu Jingling e-mail: [email protected]
Abstract: Ecological risk assessment for water environment is significant to water resource risk
management of basin. Effective environmental management and ecosystems restoration such
as the Haihe River Basin requires holistic understanding of the relative importance of various
stressor-related impacts throughout the basin. The risk sources of Haihe River Bain was
concluded to industrial sources (mining industry and contaminated industry), agricultural
sources (farming, animal husbandry and aquaculture industry), domestic sources (domestic
sewage and urbanization) and hydraulic engineering sources. This paper comprehensively
considered the interactions of many kinds of sources, stressors, habitats and endpoints based
on the characteristics of estuary water environment. We take Haihe River Basin Estuary as
examples to carry out risk assessment model-respond net model (RNM) applied in regional
scale.
The results indicated urbanization was the biggest source, the second was shipping and then
was industry, their risk scores are 5.65, 4.71 and 3.68. The habitat destruction was the largest
stressor with the risk scores (2.66), the second was oxygen consuming organic pollutants (1.75)
and the pathogens (1.75). These three stressors were the main influencing factors of the
ecological pressure in the study area. For habitats, open waters (9.59) and intertidal mudflat
(6.80) were enduring the bigger pressure. Ecological service values damaged (30.54) and
biodiversity decreased(24.99) were facing the biggest risk pressure.
Comparing of Ecological Risk of Single Pollution in Haihe River Basin Estuary: Distribution and
characteristics of seven heavy metals in sediment in the representative ecological unit rivers,
lakes and estuaries of Haihe River Basin were analyzed.The sequence of risk from high to low
of the representative eco-units was as follows: Zhangweinan River (2278345.68 risk level
high) >estuary (161914.74 risk level high) >Luanhe River (191.54 risk level moderate) >
Baiyangdian Lake (120.95 risk level moderate). According the results some suggestions were
given for the water environment safety and management of the Haihe River Basin: control water
pollution, balance water-salt, monitor ecological factors and face risk management.
 Case Study – Use TMDL to Control and Restore Sediment Impairment in the Los
Penasquitos Lagoon
Charles Cheng, Ph.D.
San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board
[email protected]
Abstract: About 90% of historical salt marsh wetlands in California have been lost to urban
development. Los Peñasquitos Lagoon (LPL) is one of the few remaining and irreplaceable
coastal lagoons in southern California providing valuable estuarine habitat as well as numerous
other important beneficial uses, including salt marsh and estuarine habitat support for migratory
and resident birds and other wildlife, protection from flooding, and assimilation of water pollution.
LPL suffers from excessive sedimentation due to a variety of man-made causes, including
construction of the railroad, Highway 101, I-5 freeway, intense urban developments, and hydromodification. LPL is currently placed on the CWA section 303(d) List of Water Quality Limited
Segments due to sedimentation and siltation. The beneficial uses that are impaired by
excessive sedimentation are those associated with protection of aquatic life (e.g., Estuarine
Habitat, Marine Habitat, Rare, Threatened, or Endangered Species, and Preservation of
Biological Habitats of Special Significance, etc.). In order to control and restore this impairment
and to meet the requirements of CWA section 303(d), the San Diego Regional Water Quality
Control Board developed and adopted a Sediment TMDL for the Lagoon.
The TMDL establishes two parallel numeric targets to control sedimentation and restore the
lagoon: (1) reduce sediment discharge from surrounding watersheds into the lagoon by 67%, to
the discharge level that existed in the early 1970s; and (2) take actions in the lagoon itself as
needed to restore salt marsh vegetation to 80% of the acreage that existed in 1973. The TMDL
identifies Responsible Parties that include the Cities of San Diego, Del Mar, and Poway; the
County of San Diego, Caltrans, numerous entities regulated under the statewide General
Construction Storm Water Permit, the statewide General Industrial Storm Water Permit, and the
statewide Phase II General Municipal Storm Water Permit. The TMDL requires Responsible
Parties to develop and implement Comprehensive Load Reduction Plans (CLRPs), and set a
timeframe to meet the TMDL within twenty years.
 The Occurrence of Controlled Substances in Hospitals Effluents and Surface Waters
Angela Yu‐Chen Lin
Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University
[email protected]
Abstract: Occupational exposure to controlled substances has long been recognized as a
potential health hazard. However, exposure to controlled substances such as narcotics is not
limited to the pharmacies and hospitals where these drugs are prepared and administered to
patients. In fact, it is very likely that exposure can occur through environmental waterways,
potentially impacting the population and local ecological systems even more broadly.
Water scarcity has long been an issue, forcing us to rely increasingly on degraded water
sources such as recycled wastewaters for drinking water. Water resources are prone to
pollution through natural and anthropogenic contaminations, resulting in death and disease
worldwide. A major source of water pollution is the treated, undertreated and untreated
wastewaters released from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In Taiwan, hospitals, drug
production facilities and sewage treatment plants also release their effluents into neighboring
waterways. Therefore, all pollutants not completely removed during the treatment process are
released and enter the receiving water bodies. Among these are pharmaceuticals that have
raised significant concerns in the twenty‐first century.
We have investigated the occurrence of controlled substances in hospital effluents and rivers in
Taipei, Taiwan, and report the concentrations of controlled drugs used as prescription
medication or drugs of abuse. Target compounds include: methamphetamine, ketamine,
meperidine, morphine, codeine, cocaine, methadone, fentanyl and sufentanil. The presence of
these contaminants in the aquatic environment may pose significant risk to aquatic and human
life. Further studies are needed for verification and may contribute to the development of
sustainable strategies for environmental remediation.
Keywords: controlled drugs; emerging contaminants; pharmaceuticals; occurrence
 Nitrate Loss from Subsurface Drains in an Agricultural Watershed Using SWAT
YingHui Sui, Ph.D.
For author correspondence e-mail: [email protected]
Abstract: Many soils in the Indiana need artificial drainage for economical crop production, but
nitrate loss from subsurface tile drains can cause environmental problems downstream. The
impact of tile drains on nitrate loss at the watershed scale is not well quantified. SWAT2005,
with its modified tile drain component, was used to evaluate nitrate loss through tile drains in a
heavily drained watershed, Sugar Creek watershed in Indiana. Monthly stream flow predictions
resulted in Nash-Sutcliff Efficiency values of 0.88 for both the 5-year calibration period and the
6-year validation period. Monthly nitrate-N loads were also predicted well, with Nash-Sutcliff
Efficiency values of 0.63 in the calibration period and 0.67 in the validation period. Nitrate-N
load from tile drains was added as an output, and the simulated nitrate loss through tile drains
was compared with nitrate losses from surface flow, groundwater and lateral flow. The
estimated median percentage of monthly nitrate loss entering Sugar Creek that flows through
tile drains ranged from 0% to 37%, and was more than 30% for three months, April to June.
Results like these could be used in estimating potential nitrate reductions at the watershed level
that would be achieved by implementing drainage-related conservation practices throughout the
watershed.
 Improvement of Nitrogen Removal Through Riverbank Restoration
Yuansheng Pei and Hua Zuo
Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, PR China, [email protected]
Abstract: Ecological restoration of hard embankment is increasingly significant in China.
However, in restoration practices of degraded riverbank, less attention has been paid to
purification aspect of the riverbank while the hydrological and ecological functions are frequently
addressed. A new media screen technique with soil bioengineering had been developed and the
restored riverbank was endowed with purification function. An inner zeolite layer within the
riverbank could adsorb ammonium and remove nitrogen by both autotrophic and heterotrophic
processes. Both the intensified test and the normal test were conducted by artificial pumping
and natural hydrodynamic, respectively. The average removal rate of total nitrogen could
achieve 63.2 mg m-3d-1 in the intensified test while ammonium and total nitrogen concentrations
moderately decreased from outside to inside layers in the normal test. In particular, natural
biogeochemical nitrogen removal was driven by fluctuations of water level on both sides of the
riverbank. Without extra energy consumption, the newly developed technique could be
extended to more riverbank restoration projects.
 Development and Use of Biological Objectives for Protection and Ecological
Restoration of Wadeable Streams in California
Guangyu Wang, Ph. D.
Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission, CalEPA
Abstract: This presentation provides an overview of the efforts made by the State of California
water quality and natural resource management agencies to develop biological objectives as a
regulatory tool for protecting the ecological health and facilitating ecological restoration of
wadeable streams in the State. Traditionally and until very recently, water quality criteria used in
the State have all been based on physical and chemical parameters. However, there has been
growing recognition that physical and chemical criteria alone are not sufficient in protecting
aquatic life and the health of the aquatic ecosystem. Biological criteria are necessary not only
for determining directly whether the aquatic life beneficial uses are supported by a waterbody,
but also for assessing whether the physical and chemical criteria are effective and adequate in
protecting these beneficial uses.
The development of biological objectives by the State of California is guided by a set of basic
principles which include a) biological objectives should be developed for all waterbody types, b)
multiple indicators should be used for biological objectives, c) biological objectives should
include numeric endpoints, and d) there should be statewide consistency with regional flexibility.
But given the highly variable and complex nature of streams in the State, the responsible
agencies, mainly the State Water Resources Control Board chose to first focus on development
of biological objectives for the wadeable streams. Similar to chemical criteria, the biological
objective development has been done through a stakeholder process involving collaboration
and participation of a stakeholder advisory group, a scientific advisory group, as well as a
regulatory advisory group. Key steps of the development process include establishment of
reference condition, identification of waterbody expectation, stressor identification, definition of
numeric endpoint and/or quality indices, and finally rule making.
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TECHNICAL SESSION 5
Low Carbon Economy and Sustainable Development
Moderators:
Chengwen Wang, Prof., School of Environment, Tsinghua University , China
John Chien, P.E., City of San Jose, California
 Studies on the Mechanochemically Modified Photocatalysts Applied in the
Environmental Remediation and Green Energy
Pengwan Chena*, Jianjun Liub, Xiang Gaoc, Naifu Cuic
a
School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology
b
State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical
Technology
c
School of Mechatronics, Beijing Institute of Technology
*Corresponding author, e-mail: [email protected]
Abstract: Photocatalyst can catalyze many useful reactions to occur under light irradiation
including degradation of environmental pollutant in gaseous and aqueous phase and production
of hydrogen from the splitting of water which will be the one of most hopeful candidates for
future’s green energy.
Among many photocatalysts, titania has been widely studied for its wide application in
photocatalysis, solar cells, and hydrogen production because of its nontoxicity, stability in
aqueous solution, and no photocorrosion. However, most applications so far are limited to UV
light irradiation because the light absorption edge of pure titania is less than 380 nm. Recently,
Ritterskamp et al reported that the light-absorption characteristics in UV-visible region
(ca.360∼800nm) of TiSi2 are ideal for solar applications and have a good photocatalytic activity
of splitting water into hydrogen.
Shock wave action of high temperature, high pressure and high strain rate lasting for very short
time (10-6 s) will cause a series of catastrophic changes of chemical and physical properties of
materials. In our study, high velocity impact was used to apply shock wave loading and to
produce high temperature and high pressure to obtain shock-induced nitrogen-doped titania and
Ti-Si intermetallics.
The photocatalytic degradation to rhodamine B of the TiO2 samples after doping with
dicyandiamide was enhanced due to the higher N doping concentration and wider response to
visible light. For the Ti-Si system, it is found that TiSi2 is formed under impact loading and
exhibits certain photocatalytic activity of splitting water into hydrogen. Consequently, Ti5Si3
synthesized under impact loading has much better photocatalytic activity of splitting water into
hydrogen than that of TiSi2 synthesized under impact loading at identical condition. The coupled
photocatalyst of Ti5Si3 and Ti8O15 were dynamically synthesized by adding oxidant of
NH4ClO4(wt.5%) and exhibits superior photocatalytic activity.
In summary, by means of mechanochemical method with the shock treatment, our lab is trying
to find out some new photocatalysts with high catalytic activities and reproduce it on a large
scale for possible industrialization in the environmental remediation and green energy.
Key words: photocatalyst, mechanochemistry, titania, Ti-Si intermetallics
 Coastal Effects of Tsunamis at Pacific Coast Harbors
Xiuying Xing1, Zhiqing Kou2, Ziyi Huang3, Jiin-Jen Lee4
1
Coastal Engineer, Moffatt & Nichol Engineers, 3780 Kilroy Airport Way, Long Beach, CA
90808.
2
Postdoctoral Research Associate in Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of
Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2531.
3
Ph.D. Candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA 90089-2531.
4
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, CA 90089-2531. E-mail: [email protected] Fax: 213-740-8399
Abstract: Tsunamis waves caused by submarine earthquake or landslide might contain large
wave energy which could cause significant human loss and property damage locally as well as
in distant regions. The response of three harbors located at the Pacific coast (i.e. Crescent City
Harbor, Los Angeles/Long Beach Port, and San Diego Harbor) to six well-known tsunamis
events generated (both near-field and far-field) between 2005 and 2011 are examined and
simulated using a hybrid finite element numerical model in frequency domain. The computed
responses including the resonant periods and modes of oscillation for these three harbors are in
good agreement with the energy spectral analysis of the time series of water surface elevations
recorded at tide gauge stations during the six tsunamis events. The computed wave induced
currents based on the present model are also in qualitative agreement with some of the
reported eyewitness accounts. The simulated results show that each harbor responded
differently and could significantly amplify certain wave period(s) of incident wave trains
according to the shape, topography, characteristic dimensions and water depth of the harbor
basins. The results of the present study could be used by environmental planners to derive
emergency response plans to mitigate potential hazards.
 Estimation of Methane Emissions from California Natural Gas Industry
Jeff Kuo*, Travis Hicks, Tat Fu Chan, and Brian Drake
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California State University, Fullerton
800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton, CA 92831, USA
e-mail: [email protected], Tel: +1-6572783995, Fax: +1-6572783916
Abstract: The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) established a
comprehensive program of regulatory and market mechanisms to achieve real, cost-effective,
quantifiable reductions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Public Interest Energy Research
(PIER) Program of California Energy Commission (CEC) has been funding climate change
research since 2001 to study options available to reduce GHG emissions in California.
The objective of the project was to produce current, reliable, and California-specific methane
fugitive emission factors, which can then be used to establish a more accurate methane
emission inventory for the California natural gas industry. The results from this project would be
used to support regulatory programs to achieve effective and efficient methane emission
reductions from California’s natural gas system, and, consequently, minimize adverse
environmental impacts from these emission sources.
The research team screened equipment and systems in all five segments of California gas
industry (production, processing, storage, transmission, and distribution). Equipment/systems
screened included 172 wellheads, 131 separators, 17 dehydrators, 145 piping segments, 66
compressors (51 reciprocating, 9 centrifugal, 6 rotary), 374 pneumatic devices, 19 metering and
regulating stations, 34 hatches, 2 pumps, and 12 customer meters. Components screened on
the equipment consisted of 10,101 flanges, 10,765 manual valves, 384 open-ended lines, 358
pressure relief valves, 930 regulators, 146 seals, 57,061 threaded connections, 12,274 welded
connections, and 138 “others”. Using the data generated from field activities during this study,
three types (average, screening ranges, correlation) of component-level emission factors were
developed, when appropriate. These component-level emission factors were then used to
develop equipment-level average emission factors, when appropriate.
Key words: California Energy Commission, methane, natural gas industry, fugitive emission,
greenhouse gases, climate change, emission factors, AB32, Public Interest Energy Research
 Development of Wastewater Treatment Plants in China: With Special Focus on
Energy Consumption and Sludge Disposal
Xie Tao1, Wang Chengwen1,
1
School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Abstract: With the increase of the number and treatment capacity of wastewater treatment
facilities in China, operation of the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has become a serious
problem. Management of energy consumption and sludge disposal from WWTPs is of great
importance, which was related to the economic and environmental benefits of the plants.
This paper presented the basic situation of energy consumption in China based on the data
from 1856 plants in 2009 and discussed the impact of different factors including scales and
operation rate on the energy consumption. The analysis of the result showed that average
energy consumption of 1856 WWTPs in China in 2009 was 0.254 kWh/m3. The energy
consumption in WWTPs decreased with the increase of scale and operation load rate. A typical
WWTP in North China was selected as the case study to analyze the operation of different
energy related unit, concluding that aeration was an important part and took more than a half of
the total energy consumption.
Meanwhile, it’s of great importance not only to analysis the energy consumption, but also to
simulate the excess sludge production. A model was established to simulate the discharge of
excess sludge in the wastewater treatment plants based on the data of 696 plants in China in
2009. Indicators including temperature, influent, COD, SS and TN were considered in the model.
Indicator factors were calculated based on four main treatment process including AnaerobicAnoxic-Oxic Process (A2O), oxidation ditch process, Sequencing Batch Reactor Activated
Sludge Process (SBR) and traditional activated sludge process. Comparison of the original
values and simulation results showed that the model could simulate the situation of excess
sludge discharge quite well. The model application in a typical plant in South China was
conducted, illustrating that it could reflect the operation of excess sludge discharge basically.
However, simulation results in August and September were not so accurate due to the reduction
of influent BOD and biodegradable ability, leading to the relatively lower sludge production. The
model could be developed more comprehensively in the future. With the accuracy and
convenience of the model, it could be widely used in the control and disposal of sewage sludge
from different treatment processes.
The result could be used to guide the operation of WWTP with lower energy consumption and
sludge discharge.
Key words: Wastewater Treatment Plants, Energy Consumption, Excess Sludge, Modeling
 Green Bioventing Study and Implementation Using Wind Power
Jim Leu, Ph.D., P.E., LEED AP, Project Manager
Parsons Corporation
2121 North California Blvd., Suite 500, Walnut Creek, CA 94596, USA
Abstract: A site is impacted with total petroleum hydrocarbons, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene,
and xylenes in soil. The most significant impacts range from approximately 20 feet below
ground surface (ft bgs) to 40 ft bgs in a sandy soil, above a clay aquitard. The site is located on
a hill top with frequent high speed winds.
A bioventing pilot study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of chemicals of concern
(COC) removal and collect parameters for full-scale design and implementation. The pilot study
indicated that bioventing would be effective to remove COC with a promising 77-foot radius of
influence, air permeability of 42 Darcy, and oxygen utilization rate of 9.4% per day at injection
pressure of 0.7 psi and air flow of 70 scfm. To evaluate the potential to use wind-driven
bioventing technology, two mobile weather stations were installed at the site and monitored for
one month. Collected wind speed was shown to have 97% correlation with a local public
weather station which was used to predict the wind speed at the site on an annual basis.
Based on the pilot test data and wind speed research, 12-inch diameter funnel/vane 360o wind
collectors with check valves and monitoring ports were designed as passive wind-driven air
injection devices. After three months of system operation, oxygen delivery increased to 20%,
carbon dioxide decreased from 5% to 0%, and hydrocarbon concentrations were reduced by
80% to 90%. The benefits of the green bioventing system included an estimated reduction in
electricity consumption by approximately 20,000 kWh per year and elimination of air pollutants
and greenhouse emissions.
 Environmental Performance Evaluation of Beijing’s Energy Use Planning
Linyu Xu,
School of Environment, Beijing Normal University
Abstract: In line with rapid economic development, urban energy consumption is increasing
rapidly, resulting in environmental problems. After considering several methods to evaluate the
environmental performance of energy use, including: energy ecological footprint, input–output
analysis, emergy–exergy analysis, and multi-criteria decision-making, an environmental
performance evaluation model is proposed, which combines the analytical hierarchy process,
fuzzy extent analysis, and membership degree analysis. In the model, 18 sub-indicators of
environmental performance from energy use planning are classified into four categories:
structure of energy use and industry, technology and efficiency of energy use, environmental
impacts caused by energy use, and the socio-economic benefits of energy use. Membership
degree analysis is applied to each indicator. Three energy use scenarios which are, respectively,
environment-friendly, technology-led, and economic policy-led are evaluated. The results show
that the technology-led energy use planning is best. The sustainable energy use policies are
proposed from three aspects, including optimizing the energy use and industrial structure,
encouraging development of energy-saving and air pollution control technologies, and
enhancing legislation on energy use management. The policies are helpful to optimize the
trade-offs between economic growth and environmental protection in Beijing.
TECHNICAL SESSION 6A
Wastewater and Solid Waste Management
Moderators:
Michael E. Shiang, RG., CHG, President, ADvTECH Environmental, Inc.
Tianpeng Guo, Ph.D., P.E., Water Resource Engineer, CH2M Hill.
 Dewatering of Sewage Sludge Conditioning with Skeleton Builders
Jiakuan Yanga, Fei Shia, Yalin Lia, Huan Liua, Wei Maoa, Hao Zhanga, Xin Xua, Ye Lib, Shu
Heb, Wenbo Yua, Shinan Zhanga
a
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and
Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074, P.R.China
b
Universtar Science & Technology (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518057,
P.R.China
Abstract: Dewatering of sewage sludge is a bottle-neck in the sewage sludge treatment and
disposal since sewage sludge has higher content of organic matter and moisture. Chemical
conditioner is usually used before sewage sludge is dewatered, and polymer conditioner, i.e.
PAM, is most commonly used, followed by the mechanic dewatering process. However, such
conditionally dewatered sludge cake is still with a high water content of about 75-85 wt%, which
has a negatively effect on the following sludge disposal or incineration. In this paper, physical
conditioners, often known as skeleton builders, are used to improve the dewaterability of
sewage sludge. Three types of composite conditioners comprising skeleton builders are studied,
i.e. ferric salt combined with skeleton builders, Fenton’s reagent combined with skeleton
builders, cationic surfactants combined with skeleton builders. The several evaluation indexes
were used to evaluate the dewaterability of sewage sludge conditioned with composite
conditioners, i.e. specific resistance to filtration (SRF), capillary suction time (CST), and
dewatering efficiency. The results show that composite conditioners comprised skeleton builders
can sufficiently improve the dewaterability.
Key words: Sewage sludge, dewatering of sludge, skeleton builder, specific resistance to
filtration (SRF)
 An Innovative Adsorption/Nitrification/Denitrification/Sludge-Hydrolysis
Wastewater Treatment Process (Andh) for Wastewater Treatment
Xianghua WEN, Ph.D
Department of Environmental Engineering, Environmental School, Tsinghua University
Abstract: An innovative adsorption/nitrification/denitrification/sludge-hydrolysis wastewater
treatment process (ANDH) characterized by carbon source manipulation with a biological
adsorption unit and a sludge hydrolysis unit was developed to enhance nitrogen removal and
reduce sludge production for municipal wastewater treatment. The system presented good
performance in pollutants removal, yielding the effluent with average COD, NH4-N, TN and TP
of 48.5, 0.6, 13.2 and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Sixty percent of the total carbon source in the
influent was concentrated and separated by the quick adsorption of activated sludge, providing
the possibilities of reusing waste carbon source in the denitrification tank and accumulating
nitrobacteria in the nitrification tank. Low temperature of 6–15C and high hydraulic loading rate
of 3.0–15.0 m3/d did not affect NH4-N removal performance, yielding the NH4-N of lower 1.0
mg/L in the effluent. Furthermore, 50% of the residual sludge in the ENRS system could be
transformed into soluble COD (SCOD) by alkaline thermal hydrolysis with temperature of 60C
and pH of 11, and the hydrolyzed carbon could completely substitute methanol as a good
quality carbon to support high efficient denitrification.
The microbial communities in the different functional units as showed by the results of clone
library, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 sequencing tools
were apparently different, such as the content of Proteobacteria in absorption tank, nitrification
tank and denitrification tank were 29.41%, 14.16, and 29.53% respectively. Each tank had a
microbial structure which was different from the others.
 Stabilization of Fly Ash from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators Utilizing
Landfill Leachate
Yanyu Wu, Xiaoying Hu, Xiaochun Peng
South China Institute of Environmental Science, MEP, Guangzhou, 510655
Abstract: Synergistic co-disposal of concentrated leachate rejected from reverse osmosis (RO)
and fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators were investigated. Batch tests were carried
out by agitating suspension fly ash with certain concentrated leachate without pH adjustment,
and then the mixture was placed in an incubation vessel for setting incubation time. Scanning
electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, X-ray fluorescence technique
(XRF), low temperature N2 adsorption-desorption (BET) were used for the characterization of fly
ash before and after incubation. The results showed that there were obvious changes in
microstructures and crystalline phases before and after stabilization. Ca(OH)2 disappeared with
the appearance of CaCO3. Moreover, phosphate crystal, sulfide deposits and hydroxide
precipitation of heavy metals occurred after incubation. The experimental results suggested that
the immobilization mechanism for heavy metals was mainly deposits precipitation and surface
adsorption. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test revealed that almost all of
heavy metals could be stabilized through landfill leachate treatment. The leaching concentration
of the critical heavy metals decreased 35%-60% after incubation. When the incubation time was
longer than 7 d, the leaching concentration of critical heavy metals decreased insignificantly.
The pH of incubation system reduced from 12.67 to 11.32. In addition, as the main organic
pollutants in landfill leachate, humic acids isolated from incubation system decreased over 75%
indicated that the carbonation occurred while incubation. Moreover, surface adsorption also
played an important role on the disappearance of pollutants in landfill leachate. Overall, due to
the presence of landfill leachate along with fly ash in the synergistic co-disposal, the results
presented herein can be applied to the management of fly ash and landfill leachate
simultaneously.
Keywords: Synergistic co-disposal, fly ash, landfill leachate, stabilization
TECHNICAL SESSION 6B
Environmental Corporation Case Study
 Water Reuse and Desalination
Qingshan Wang, Senior Design Manager and Operational Lead
CHM2 Hill
Abstract: Water reuse, the practice of using water that has been used, is currently considered
a key component of water supply portfolio in California and some other part of the county. The
importance of efficiently using existing water supplies is becoming increasingly evident as
sources of new supply become more difficult to acquire. Water reuse, the practice of taking
water that has already been used and using it again for a beneficial purpose, is a key
component of the state’s water supply portfolio. Typically this practice uses reclaimed water (or
reclaimed wastewater), which is domestic or municipal wastewater that has been treated to a
quality that makes it suitable for a beneficial use. When talking about water reuse, it is important
to make the distinction between direct reuse and indirect reuse. Water reuse is safe, sustainable,
cost effective approach to deal with water scarcity.
Desalination: Desalting refers to a water treatment process that removes salts from water.
Desalting technologies can be used for a number of applications. Desalination is an integrated
part of water management portfolio. The underlying market driver is water scarcity and this
continues to grow. In most parts of the world the cost of desalinated water is greater than the
price charged to consumers. This means that the growth of the market is limited by the
availability of subsidies. The long term outlook for the desalination industry is strong. Most of the
desalination plants in the US utilize membrane processes for desalting brackish water. However
there are several large seawater plants in the planning phase.
 Air Quality, Climate Change, and Clean Truck Program
Eddy Huang, Ph.D. Air Quality Director
Tetra Tech, Inc.
Abstract: Confronting the threat of global climate change is a challenge that will reorder
priorities for decades to come. It will require a long-term vision and the discipline to make
critical public and private investments in renewable energy, infrastructure, and environmental
technology. Reducing carbon footprint will bring multiple environmental benefits, with cleaner
air, better public health, and more open space.
This presentation covers Tetra Tech’s experience in managing and implementing large-scale air
quality and climate change projects. A prime example is the San Pedro Bay Ports Clean Truck
Program (CTP). This is a large-scale, multi-year air quality improvement project by enforcing a
truck ban and replacing higher-polluting older trucks with cleaner, newer models. The CTP is
very complex; it involves the San Pedro Bay Ports, trucking communities, terminal operators,
cargo owners, and regulatory agencies. Some of the key elements of the CTP include:
 Grant application, administration and management
 Truck registration and updates
 Terminal truck gate move analysis
 Outreach to trucking communities
 Alternative fuel vehicles
 Special truck moves analysis and projections to support policy-making



Coordination with regulatory agency to implement truck ban
Help line support to trucking companies and drivers
Ports’ Drayage Truck Registry (PDTR) support
 Groundwater Impacts and Fate Transport Modeling of Perchlorate Stringfellow
Superfund Site, Riverside County, CA
Jim Fingan, Ph.D. CHg, Principal Hydrogeologist
Kleinfelder
Abstract: The Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California, overlies an aquifer system
comprising alluvium, weathered bedrock, and unweathered bedrock. Groundwater impacts
from aerospace and other wastes include trichloroethene and other organic compounds, acidic
conditions, and various inorganic compounds including perchlorate. Perchlorate impacts to
groundwater extend approximately 5 miles downgradient from a box canyon containing the
source area through an alluvial paleovalley towards the Santa Ana River. A three-dimensional
numerical model of groundwater flow and perchlorate transport in this system downgradient of
the source area was developed in 2003 and has subsequently been updated and refined to
provide predictions of solute transport and evaluation of remedial alternatives. Following
completion of a Remedial Investigation and subsequent investigations, substantial refinement of
the model was performed, providing more realistic parameter inputs and enabling more
accurate predictions of perchlorate transport.
Existing remedial systems installed to control the migration of volatile organic compounds
comprise pump-and-treat extraction wells along the plume path. Following detection of
perchlorate in 2001, remedial investigations have focused on control of this compound, although
additional perchlorate sources (e.g., Chilean fertilizer and quarry blasting chemicals) besides
the Stringfellow Site have also been identified as impacting regional groundwater.
The numerical model has been used to test several remedial alternatives in support of the site
feasibility study, including no action, continuing current pump-and-treat remediation, modifying
existing pump-and-treat systems, and in-situ bioremediation. However, because there are
additional ambient sources of perchlorate, setting a cleanup goal included statistical evaluation
of ambient concentrations and establishing zones of separation of the comingled plumes. The
numerical model was therefore used to evaluate cleanup times to both prescriptive and
statistically based goals. Predicted cleanup times for perchlorate to the different cleanup levels
range from 11 to over 100 years. The numerical model has also been used to support a
technical impracticability evaluation for remediating groundwater impacts in unweathered
bedrock and is expected to serve as a tool for other ongoing and future site investigations.
專題會議日程
第五屆全球當前環境挑戰與
第五屆全球當前環境挑戰與政府
當前環境挑戰與政府應
政府應對措施研討會
對措施研討會
專題會議和培訓講座
主辦單位:
主辦單位:美國南加州華人環保協會
美國南加州華人環保協會 (SCCAEPA)
污染場地修復和綜合管理
時間:
時間:2012年
2012年8月13 - 16日
16日
地點:
地點: 洛杉磯聖
洛杉磯聖蓋博希爾頓大酒店
請登陸協會網站:
請登陸協會網站:www.sccaepa.org
美國南加州華人環保協會(SCCAEPA)將與2012年8月13日至16日舉辦題為“污染場地修復和綜合管
理”的專題會議和培訓講座。協會將邀請美國政府官員,專家,學者就土壤與地下水污染場地評估,
清理和檢测的綜合管理等相關題目做專題報告,並組織實地現場參觀洛杉磯地區污染場地清理項目,
污染地下水處理等設施。所有講座將使用中文講解。
講座主要內容:
講座主要內容
1. 美國及加州有關污染場地管理的法律法規及執行細則和監管架構
2. 污染場地調查及管理程序
3. 土壤與地下水污染清理技術及預期效果
4. 污染土壤的處理要求
5. 綠色清理技術在污染場地治理中的應用
6. 新技術在污染場地調查和清理中的應用(納米技術,環境痕跡學,等)
7. 美國加州土壤與地下水清理目標的確定及相關標準
8. “超級基金”和“棕色場地”項目管理
9. 污染場地清理中的許可證管理及受污染土壤的處理要求
10.污染場地風險評估和結案標準
11.污染場地清理的市場機制和檢測數據認證
12.污染場地數據庫管理(GeoTracker,EnviroStor)
13.污染場地清理案例分析
14.加州室內毒氣入侵風險評估和執法
現場參觀路線:
現場參觀路線:
土壤污染修復場地;原位修復場地; 地下儲油罐污染場地修復工程; 大型地下水井口污染處理設施;
注冊費 : 每人每天$100
每人每天$100(
100(注册费包括資料,
注册费包括資料,午晚餐,
午晚餐,參觀交通等)
有關報名登記事宜, 請洽王光宇博士 (Dr. Guangyu Wang)
電話: (213) 576-6639
電子郵件:[email protected]
請在我會網站下載報名表,填表後請寄: [email protected]
1
報告講座
專題講座日程
8月
月 13 日 (9:00 am —12:00 pm)
上午
1. 中國土壤與地下水污染防治規劃概述(吳舜澤副院長,中國環保部環境規劃院)(
(9:00 —10:00 am)
2. 美國及加州有關污染場地管理的法律法規及執行細則和監管架構(童衛星博士)(
(10:00 —10:50 am)
a.
美國聯邦政府有關污染場地管理的法律法規
b.
加州政府有關污染場地管理的法律法規
c.
美國污染場地管理的政府架構設置和責任劃分
d.
各級政府有關土壤和地下水污染預防的相關規定和措施
2. 污染場地調查及管理程序 (童衛星博士)
a.
土壤與地下水污染物分類
b.
場地污染項目分類
c.
地下儲油罐污染預防與清理管理程序
d.
其它類型污染場地管理程序
3. 污染場地清理中的許可證管理 (吳基銜博士)(
(11:10 am —12:00 pm)
a.
法規要求
b.
許可證類別
c.
許可證要求
d.
檢測及報告
e.
達標認證
下午 (2:00 —5:30 pm)
1. 土壤與地下水污染清理技術及預期效果 (容 躍博士) (2:00 — 3:50 pm)
a.
b.
2.
土壤與地下水污染清理技術综述,
•
挖掘土壤(soil excavation)
•
土壤氣相抽吸法 (soil vapor extraction)
•
電阻和燃氣加熱法 (electrical resistance heating, gas heating)
•
地下水抽吸加處理(groundwater pump and treat)
•
原位化學和生物注射法(in-situ chemical and biological injection)
•
檢測自然衰减法( monitoring natural attenuation)
土壤與地下水污染清理技術的優缺點評估
美國加州土壤與地下水清理目標的確定及相關標準 (容 躍博士)
a.
有機污染物在土壤和地下水中的遷移轉化
b.
污染物對人類健康風險評估
c.
土壤與地下水清理目標的决定
d.
加州政府水質管理總局理事會新頒”地下儲油罐系统低風險結案政策”(2012)
2
報告講座
3.
專題會議日程
土壤廢氣抽吸法和水洗法設計與施工要素及實例分析 (郭繼汾博士)(
(4:10 — 5:30 pm)
8月
月14日
日
上午 (9:00 am —12:00 pm)
(9:00 —10:20 am)
1.
綠色清理技術在污染場地治理中的應用 (張寧武博士)(
a. 綠色清理之起源
b. 綠色清理之原則與應用
c. 綠色清理之實例
2.
污染場地風險評估和結案標準 (鄭傳贏博士)(
(10:40 am —12:00 pm)
a. 簡介
b. 風險評估概述 –風險評估的歷史和要素
c. 風險評估的作用和場地清理的結案標準
d. 案例分析 / 典型項目
e. 結論
下午 (2:00 —5:30 pm)
新技術在污染場地調查和清理中的應用(納米技術,環境痕跡學,等)
1.
利用零價鐵對受污染地下水和土壤的修復 (熊忠博士)(
(2:00 —3:00 pm)
a. 零價鐵用於污染場地修復的介紹
b. 利用納米零價鐵修復受污染地下水和土壤的工程案例
c. 利用零價鐵-可滲透性反應牆修復受污染地下水的工程案例
2.
石化碳氫化合物痕跡學 — 原理和案例分析(盧軍博士)(
(3:00 —4:00 pm)
a.
爲什麽要使用痕跡學?
♦
♦
♦
b.
法律層面
環境層面
污染物洩漏檢測
痕跡學原理
♦
c.
石油成因
♦
石油提煉
♦
環境變異
♦
混合與融合
案例分析
♦
污染物洩漏影響區的圈定
3
報告講座
專題會議日程
♦
♦
3.
洩漏污染物的時間區分(過去和現在的洩漏區分)
混合的“輕非溶水性液體”污染暈區分
“超級基金”和“棕色場地”項目管理 (胡桂君 高級工程師)(
(4:30 — 5:30 pm)
a. “棕色場地”定義和法律依據
b. 加州“棕色場地”的分類和概況
c. 加州“棕色場地”的管理架構和管理程序
d. 加州“棕色場地”管理中面臨的挑戰
e. 聯邦環保署“超級基金”項目在加州的執行與管理
8月
月16日
日
上午 (9:00 am —12:00 pm)
1.
美國聯邦環保署“超級基金”項目管理經驗介紹(譚思理 主任)(
(9:00 — 9:50 am)
a. 歷程:超級基金的緣起
b. 法定權限:超級基金如何發揮作用?
c. 成就:超級基金取得的成果
d. 融資:“超級”基金是什麽?
e. 各州的融資機制
f. “超級基金”項目的特色
2.
受污染土壤在垃圾填埋場的處理和利用 (楊文博士)(
(9:50 —10:40 pm)
a. 垃圾填埋場的種類, 建造標準, 和日常營運
b. 垃圾填埋場的執法管理
c. 受污染土壤再生利用的標準
d. 與受污染土壤再生利用有關的防污染措施
3.
污染場地數據庫管理(童衛星博士,楊文博士) (11:10 —12:00 pm)
a.
GeoTracker 歷史及其目的
b.
GeoTracker 內容及功能
c.
地下水水質區域檢測和評估(GAMA)資料庫
d.
e.
地下水許可證和垃圾填埋場資料庫
EnviroStor 數據庫簡介
下午 (2:00 —5:30 pm)
1.
污染場地清理案例分析 —地下儲油罐污染場地調查與修復(陸誼博士)(
(2:00 —3:30 pm)
a.
場地概況和使用歷史
b.
污染調查和污染暈圈定
c.
場地污染清理(土壤挖掘,原位注入釋氧化合物,雙相抽吸,安裝廢氣阻隔模)
d.
討論
4
報告講座
2.
3.
專題會議日程
污染場地清理的市場機制和檢測數據認證 (許仙育博士)(
(4:00 — 5:30 pm)
a.
污染責任方,諮詢公司,政府管理部門的作用和責任
b.
專業資質認證和環境實驗室認證計劃
c.
野外採樣和實驗室樣品分析的質量控制與質量保證
加州室內毒氣入侵風險評估和執法 (許仙育博士)
a.
加州室內毒氣入侵風險評估最新指南和檢測要求
b.
加州環境執法的法規和政策
c.
環境執法案例分析
現場參觀選項包括:
現場參觀選項包括:
8月
月15日
日
1. 丹尼市前美國航天局航天器裝配試驗場土壤和地下水污染清理項目
•
•
主要污染物:揮發性有有機化合物,三氯乙烯(TCE),四氯乙烯(PCE),等
生物原位修復
2. 大型地下水井口處理設施 (Charnock Well Field MTBE Treatment System, City of Santa Monica)
•
處理污染物 — 甲基三丁乙醚 (MTBE)
•
設計處理量:每分鐘五千加侖(約每天2.7萬
•
噸)
處理技術: “綠沙”過濾,活性炭(GAC)
吸附,逆滲透(RO)
•
•
設備投資:約五千萬美元
設計運營時間:20年
3. 地下儲油罐污染場地清理 (Tuller Remediation System, City of Culver City)
•
處理污染物 — 硒, 甲基三丁乙醚 (MTBE)
•
設計處理量:每分鐘350加侖
•
處理技術: 空氣剝離,活性炭(GAC)吸附,生物反應罐
•
設備投資:約兩千萬美元
5
專題會議日程
報告專家名單:
張寧武博士, 加州環保署有害物質控制局高級有害物質控制工程師
許仙育博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局地下水許可證和垃圾掩埋場處處長
郭繼汾博士,加州州立大學富樂頓分校土木與環境工程系教授
胡桂君先生, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局高級水資源管理工程師,部門主管
盧軍博士,美國 AECOM 環境諮詢公司主任工程師
陸誼博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局高級工程地質師,部門主管
容 躍博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局地下儲油罐處處長
譚思理女士,美國聯邦環保署第九大區中國項目部 主任
童衛星博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局高級工程地質師,部門主管
吳基銜博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局高級水資源管理工程師,部門主管
楊文博士, 加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理局高級工程地質師,部門主管
鄭傳贏博士, 加州環保署有害物質控制局毒物學家
熊忠博士,美國 AMEC環境諮詢公司項目經理
6
Southern California Chinese-American Environmental Protection Association
2012 Best Student Research Awards
The SCCAEPA recognizes the winners of the 2012 Best Student Research Competition. As part of
the symposium program, all levels of college students were invited to submit their recent research
papers related to environmental protection issues. The submittals were judged by a student
scholarship committee. The winners were selected based on originality, scientific and technical merit,
relevance to the field, quality of the writing, and student’s specific role and contribution to the paper.
First Place Winner (Receives $500):
Ling Wang, University of California, Irvine
Photochemical Fate of Pharmaceutically Active Compounds in Simulated Water and Advanced
Oxidation Process for Water Treatment
Second Place Winner (Receives $300):
Dongbin Wang, University of Southern California
Development of a Two- Stage Virtual Impactor System for High Concentration Enrichment of Ultrafine,
PM2.5 and Coarse PM
Third Place Winners (Each Receives $200):
Xin Fan, University of California, Riverside
Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass and Biosolids Waste into Synthetic Gas Products Using
Steam Hydro-gasification Technology
Liyan Jin, University of California, Riverside
In Situ Remediation of Perchlorate in Vadose Zone Soil
Meng-Horng (Chris) Hsu, University of California, Los Angeles
Understanding How Hydrophobic Organic Pollutants Distribute in Urban Runoff: Stormwater and Dry
Weather Flow
Jun Wang, University of Florida
Decreasing Biotoxicity of Welding Fume Using Silica Precursor as a Reducer
Zhijiang Lu, University of California, Riverside
Oxidation of Nonylphenol and Octylphenol by Manganese Dioxide: Kinetics and Pathways
Juying (Irene) Li, University of California, Riverside
Fate of Pharmaceutical Compound Carbamazepine in Soils and Biosolids-amended Soil
Tao Xie, Tsinghua University
Energy Consumption in Wastewater Treatment Plants in China
Fang Jia, University of California, Riverside
Bioavailability Study of Marine Sediments from Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site
Xiao (Isaac) Dai, University of California, Irvine
Activated Sludge Sample Preparation and Quantification by Microfluidics Devices--Sample Preparation
Chinese-American Environmental Protection Association – Southern California
A COMPILATION OF FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL STATUTES*
(Gensen Kai / SCCAEPA Longtime Member)
1899
1918
1938
1947
1948
1954
1955
1963
1964
1965
1965
1965
1965
1967
1969
1970
1970
1970
1970
1970
1972
1972
1972
1972
1972
1972
1973
1974
1974
1975
1975
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1976
1977
1977
1977
Refuse Act
Migratory Bird Treaty Act
Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act
Federal Insecticide Fungicide and
Rodenticide Act
Federal Water Pollution Control Act
Atomic Energy Act
Air Pollution Control Act
Clean Air Act
Wilderness Act
Solid Waste Disposal Act
Water Quality Act
National Emissions Standards Act
Motor Vehicle Air Pollution Control Act
Air Quality Act
Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act
National Environmental Policy Act
Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act
Environmental Quality Improvement Act
Clean Air Act
Occupational Safety and Health Act
Federal Water Pollution Control Act
Federal Insecticide Fungicide and
Rodenticide Act
Noise Control Act
Coastal Zone Management Act
Marine Mammal Protection Act
Consumer Product Safety Act
Endangered Species Act
Safe Drinking Water Act
Forest Rangeland Renewable Resources
Planning Act
Federal Coal Leasing Act Amendments
Hazardous Materials Transportation Act
Toxic Substances Control Act
Resources Conservation and Recovery Act
National Forest Management Act
Federal Land Policy and Management Act
Solid Waste Disposal Act
Fisheries Conservation and Management Act
Clean Air Act
Clean Water Act
Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act
1978
1978
1980
1980
1980
1982
1984
1984
1986
1986
1986
1987
1988
1988
1989
1988
1990
1990
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1996
1996
1996
2002
2005
2005
Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act
National Energy Conservation Policy Act
Comprehensive Environmental Response
Compensation & Liability Act
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation
Act
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act
Nuclear Waste Policy Act
Hazardous and Solid Waste Act
Amendments
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
Amendments
Emergency Planning and Community Right
to Know Act
Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments
Superfund Amendments and
Reauthorization Act
Water Quality Act
Medical Waste Tracking Act
Ocean Dumping Act
Basel Convention
Shore Protection Act
Pollution Prevention Act
Oil Spill Pollution Prevention Act
Clean Air Act Amendments
Intermodal Surface Transportation
Efficiency Act
Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard
Reduction Act
North American Free Trade Agreement
Implementation Act
Executive Order 12898 on Environmental
Justice
Food Quality Protection Act
Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments
Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable
Battery Management Act
Small Business Liability Relief and
Brownfields Revitalization Act
Energy Policy Act
Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient
Transportation Equity Act
*Some Acts in the list were the Amendment to a previously adopted Act, such as the Air Quality Act (1967) to
the Clean Air Act (1963) and the Clean Water Act (1977) to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (1972)
Chinese-American Environmental Protection Association – Southern California
Environmental Website List
(Dr. Wei Li / Board Member)
U.S. EPA
Regional Office Locations
Region 9
U.S. EPA Staff Directory
www.epa.gov
www.epa.gov/aboutepa/where.html
www.epa.gov/aboutepa/region9.htm
cfpub.epa.gov/locator/index.cfm
Cal/EPA
Air Resources Board
Department of Pesticide Regulation
Department of Toxic Substances Control
Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment
State Water Resources Control Board
Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board
Cal/EPA-wide Staff Directory
www.calepa.ca.gov
www.arb.ca.gov
www.cdpr.ca.gov
www.dtsc.ca.gov
oehha.ca.gov
www.swrcb.ca.gov
www.swrcb.ca.gov/rwqcb4
www.calepa.ca.gov/StaffDirectory/
Energy Agencies
International Energy Agency (IEA)
U.S. Energy Information Administration
U.S. Department of Energy
California Energy Commission
Vehicle Fuel Economy
www.iea.org
www.eia.gov
www.energy.gov
www.energy.ca.gov
www.fueleconomy.gov
Other California Departments and Local Agencies
California Department of Water Resources
California Department of Public Health
Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery
California Local Air District Directory
South Coast Air Quality Management District
www.water.ca.gov
www.cdph.ca.gov
www.calrecycle.ca.gov
www.arb.ca.gov/capcoa/roster.htm
www.aqmd.gov
Chinese Agencies
Ministry of Environmental Protection, China
Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration
Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department
Macau Environmental Protection Bureau
www.mep.gov.cn
www.epa.gov.tw
www.epd.gov.hk
www.dspa.gov.mo
Associations
Association of California Water Agencies
California Air Pollution Control Officers Association
Southern California Association of Governments
American Lung Association
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
www.acwa.com
www.capcoa.org
www.scag.ca.gov
www.lungusa.org
www.ipcc.ch
Air Quality and Radiation Monitoring
Air Quality
Radiation
www.airnow.gov
www.epa.gov/radiation/rert/radnet-data-map.html
Regulation Resources
Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)
Regulations.gov
California Code of Regulations (CCR)
California Legislative Info
www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
www.regulations.gov
www.calregs.com
www.leginfo.ca.gov
(415) 947-8000
(916) 323-2514
(800) 242-4450
(916) 445-4300
(916) 324-1826
(916) 324-7572
(916) 341-5250
(213) 576-6600
(202) 586-8800
(202) 586-5000
(916) 654-4287
(916) 653-5791
(916) 558-1784
(916) 322-4027
(909) 396-2000
(916) 441-4545
(916) 441-5700
(213) 236-1800
(202) 785-3355
Southern California Chinese-American Environmental Protection Association
COMMONLY USED ENVIRONMENTAL THRESHOLDS
(Dr. Wen Yang / SCCAEPA Life Member)
Total Threshold Limit Concentration (TTLC) and Soluble Threshold Limit Concentration (STLC) and Solid
Waste Classification: TTLC and STLC are used to determine the toxicity of a waste as outlined in Title 22 of the
California Code of Regulations. TTLC determines the total concentration of each analyte in a sample, while
STLC determines the amount of each analyte that is soluble in the Waste Extraction Test (WET) leachate. When
any target analyte exceeds the TTLC limits, the waste is classified as hazardous. If the TTLC results do not
exceed 10 times the STLC limit, then normally no further analysis is required. Otherwise, the waste must be
analyzed for STLC. In the WET leachate procedure a sample of the waste is tumbled in 10 times its weight of a
0.2M sodium citrate solution for 48 hours. This leachate is then analyzed to determine the soluble concentrations.
The waste is classified as hazardous if the concentration of any target analyte in the leachate exceeds its STLC.
(Web link: http://www.excelchem.net/Documents/STLC.doc)
California Proposition 65: Proposition 65, formally titled The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of
1986, is a California law enacted as a ballot initiative in November 1986. Its goals are to protect drinking water
sources from toxic substances that cause cancer and birth defects and to reduce or eliminate exposures to those
chemicals by requiring warnings in advance of those exposures. Proposition 65 prohibits businesses from
knowingly discharging listed substances into drinking water sources, or onto land where the substances can pass
into drinking water sources. It also prohibits businesses from knowingly exposing individuals to listed substances
without providing a clear and reasonable warning.
(Web link: http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/files/p65single072012.pdf)
Public Health Goals (PHGs): PHGs are concentrations of contaminants in drinking water that pose no
significant health risk if consumed for a lifetime, based on current risk assessment principles, practices, and
methods. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of California Environmental
Protection Agency (CalEPA) establishes PHGs pursuant to California Health & Safety Code §116365(c) for
contaminants with maximum contamination levels (MCLs), and for those for which California Department of
Public Health (CDPH) will be adopting MCLs. Once OEHHA establishes or revises a PHG for a contaminant,
CDPH determines whether the MCL of the contaminant should be revised.
(Web link: http://oehha.ca.gov/water/phg/allphgs.html)
Regional Screening Levels (RSLs): RSLs (formerly Preliminary Remediation Goals or PRGs) are developed by
the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the remediation of chemical contaminants at Superfund
sites. They are used for site screening and as initial cleanup goals, if applicable. Generally, at sites where
contaminant concentrations fall below RSLs, no further action or study is warranted under the Superfund
program as long as the exposure assumptions at a site match those taken into account by the RSL calculations.
Contaminant concentrations above the RSL would not automatically designate a site as "dirty" or trigger a
response action; however, exceeding a RSL suggests that further evaluation of the potential risks by the
contaminants is appropriate.
(Web link: http://www.epa.gov/region9/superfund/prg/)
California Human Health Screening Levels (CHHSLs): CHHSLs are concentrations of 54 hazardous
chemicals in soil or soil gas that the Cal/EPA considers to be below thresholds of concern for risks to human
health. The thresholds of concern used to develop the CHHSLs are an excess lifetime cancer risk of one-in-amillion and a hazard quotient of 1.0 for noncancerous health effects. Under most circumstances, the presence of
a chemical in soil, soil gas or indoor air at concentrations below the corresponding CHHSLs can be assumed to
not pose a significant health risk to people who may live (residential CHHSLs) or work (commercial/industrial
CHHSLs) at the site. The presence of a chemical at concentrations in excess of a CHHSL does not necessarily
indicate that adverse impacts to human health are occurring or will occur, but suggests that further evaluation of
potential human health concerns is warranted.
(Web link: http://www.calepa.ca.gov/brownfields/documents/2005/CHHSLsGuide.pdf)
Call for Abstracts
第二屆全球環境高峰會議
Second World Environmental Summit (WES II)
August 8-10, 2013
A joint conference of
th
6 Symposium on Global Emerging Environmental Challenges and Government
Responses
And
th
16 Mainland Taiwan Environmental Protection Conference (MTEPC)
主辦單位
美國南加州華人環保協會 (SCCAEPA)
海外華人環保學會- 美洲中國工程師學會 (OCEESA/CIE-USA)
全球華人科學家環境論壇(GCSEF)
協助單位
南加州分會-美洲中國工程師學會 (SOCAL/CIE-USA)
南加州中華科工學會 (CESASC)
海峽兩岸環保諮議委員會 (MTEPCC)
洛杉磯聖蓋博希爾頓大酒店
會議主題:
未來空氣,水,土壤和能源之相互影響
研討會内容包括:
 環保政府管理
 海洋環境保護与海岸带環境管理
 水資源保護
 棕色場地再利用和土地使用管理
 土壤与地下水污染處理
 空氣污染和碳排放交易
 大氣品質管制及廢氣處理技術
 空氣質量管理和氣候變化
 固體廢物管理及再生利用
摘要請寄:
SCCAEPA
 廢水排放許可證管理
P.O.Box 90783
 湖泊與水庫管理 - 富營養化 防治
City of Industry, CA 91715-0783
 低碳簡介和替代能源
www.sccaepa.org, www.oceesa.org
或电邮:[email protected]
投稿截止日期 (Abstract due date):
2013年4月15日 (April 15, 2013)
其他支持和協辦單位:中國環境科學學會,美國聯邦環境保護署第九區,加州環保署洛杉磯地區水質管理
局, 聖迪亞哥地區水質管理局,加州州立大學聖伯納迪諾分校,全球中國環境專家協會.
Fifth
B
uilding a better tomorrow
by providing solutions to
clean air, water, and soil.
協和工程公司提供清洁
空气, 水和土壤的最佳方案,
共享美好明天。
www.accordeng.com
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