GRADUATE COURSE PROPOSAL OR REVISION, Cover Sheet

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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE COURSE PROPOSAL OR REVISION,
Cover Sheet (10/02/2002)
Course Number/Program Name SW 8813 / Social Work
Department Social Work and Human Services
Degree Title (if applicable) Master of Social Work
Proposed Effective Date August 2012
Check one or more of the following and complete the appropriate sections:
New Course Proposal
Course Title Change
Course Number Change
Course Credit Change
XX Course Prerequisite Change
XX Course Description Change
Sections to be Completed
II, III, IV, V, VII
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
Notes:
If proposed changes to an existing course are substantial (credit hours, title, and description), a new course with a
new number should be proposed.
A new Course Proposal (Sections II, III, IV, V, VII) is required for each new course proposed as part of a new
program. Current catalog information (Section I) is required for each existing course incorporated into
the program.
Minor changes to a course can use the simplified E-Z Course Change Form.
Submitted by:
_____
Faculty Member
Approved
Date
Not Approved
Department Curriculum Committee Date
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Not Approved
Department Chair
Date
College Curriculum Committee
Date
College Dean
Date
GPCC Chair
Date
Dean, Graduate College
Date
Not Approved
Not Approved
Not Approved
Not Approved
Not Approved
Vice President for Academic Affairs Date
Approved
Not Approved
President
Date
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE COURSE/CONCENTRATION/PROGRAM CHANGE
I.
Current Information (Fill in for changes)
Page Number in Current Catalog
___
Course Prefix and Number SW 8813
___
Course Title Family Therapy
___
Class Hours
_3___Laboratory Hours__0_____Credit Hours_____3___
Prerequisites Admission to the MSW Program
Description (or Current Degree Requirements)
___
This course discusses family systems theory as a paradigm for conceptualizing the family as a
system in society. This course addresses the major theories in the family therapy field, the core
concepts and their relevance for clinical application, the phases of therapy with a family
including assessment, basic interventions, implementation of change, and the formulation of a
psychosocial assessment of a family system, with attention to the therapist’s use of self within
the “therapeutic system.” Students will study their own clinical work and focus on specific
strategies of intervention according to different types of families relative to race, culture, sexual
orientation, religion, and family structure. A family therapy case with supervision under a
licensed clinical social worker is required.
II.
Proposed Information (Fill in for changes and new courses)
Course Prefix and Number ___________________________________
Course Title _________________
___________
Class Hours
____Laboratory Hours_______CreditHours________
Prerequisites All MSW Foundation Level Courses
Description (or Proposed Degree Requirements)
This course provides a framework for applying practice knowledge, values, and skills
when working with families from diverse populations and a variety of psychosocial
problems. It exposes students to techniques for initial engagement with families and
orienting family members to the treatment process. Students learn family assessment and
treatment interventions. Students have the opportunity to practice and apply clinical
techniques in the classroom setting. The course emphasizes the importance of culturally
competent practice with structurally and culturally diverse families. Students examine
how personal and professional values affect their practice and learn models for ethical
decision-making and intervention planning. Assigned readings, lectures and class
discussions introduce students to specific family systems theories and their applicability
to diverse client populations and psychosocial problems. Written assignments are used to
evaluate a student’s understanding and integration of family systems theories and
intervention techniques. These assignments are designed to also evaluate a student’s
capacity to critically analyze these theoretical frameworks and their applicability to
diverse family systems and structures. Classroom experiential exercises provide students
with opportunities to apply family treatment techniques to improve their clinical
engagement, assessment, and intervention skills when working with families. Feedback
and evaluation from peers and the instructor provide students with an assessment of
their clinical skill attainment and development when working with clients in a family
treatment context."
III.
Justification
The description has been changed to make it succinct on the website and to ensure its
compliance with the course syllabus.
IV.
Additional Information (for New Courses only)
Instructor:
Text:
Prerequisites:
Objectives:
Instructional Method
Method of Evaluation
-
V.
Resources and Funding Required (New Courses only)
Resource
Amount
Faculty
Other Personnel
Equipment
Supplies
Travel
New Books
New Journals
Other (Specify)
TOTAL
Funding Required Beyond
Normal Departmental Growth
VI. COURSE MASTER FORM
This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the
Registrar once the course has been approved by the Office of the President.
The form is required for all new courses.
DISCIPLINE
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL
(Note: Limit 30 spaces)
CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS
Approval, Effective Term
Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U)
If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas?
Learning Support Programs courses which are
required as prerequisites
Social Work
SW 8813
Family Therapy
3-0-3
Fall 2012
Regular
N/A
N/A
APPROVED:
______________________________________________
__
Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee __
Current Syllabus
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM
SW 8813: Family Therapy
Instructor
Steve King, PhD, L.C.S.W.
Meeting Time
TBA
Semester Credits
3 Credit Hours
Email Address
[email protected]
Phone Number
678-797-2451
Office
Prillaman Hall, Room #3315
Office Hours
Tues.9-12; Wed.1-4; Thur. 9-3.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course discusses family systems theory as a paradigm for conceptualizing the family as a
system in society. This course addresses the major theories in the family therapy field, the core
concepts and their relevance for clinical application, the phases of therapy with a family
including assessment, basic interventions, implementation of change, and the formulation of a
psychosocial assessment of a family system, with attention to the therapist’s use of self within
the “therapeutic system.” Students will study their own clinical work and focus on specific
strategies of intervention according to different types of families relative to race, culture, sexual
orientation, religion, and family structure. A family therapy case with supervision under a
licensed clinical social worker is required.
COURSE OVERVIEW
This course provides a framework for applying practice knowledge, values, and skills
when working with families from diverse populations and a variety of psychosocial
problems. This course will expose students to techniques for initial engagement with
families and orient family members to the treatment process. Students will learn
family assessment and treatment interventions. Students will have the opportunity
to practice and apply clinical techniques in the classroom setting. The course will
emphasize the importance of culturally competent practice with structurally
andculturally diverse families. Students will examine how personal and professional
values affect their practice and will learn models for ethical decision-making and
intervention planning.
REQUIRED TEXTS:
Patterson, J., Williams, L., Edwards, T. M., Chamow, L., & Grauf-Grounds, C. (2009).
Essential Skills in Family Therapy. (2nd ed.) New York: The Guilford Press.
COURSE RATIONALE RELATIVE TO THE MISSION OF THE MSW PROGRAM
The Master of Social Work Program at Kennesaw State University was established to
address the psychosocial and clinical needs of a diverse population of clients. Social
Work has a strong tradition of working with families in need as well formative and
seminal contributions to the field of family therapy. This course supports the
systemic and ecological approaches to clinical social work from a client strengths
perspective. This course emphasizes the principles of inclusion and cultural
competence and an evidence based approach to clinical social work practice. This
course is related to and consistent with the mission of the Master of Social Work
Program as it prepares students to deliver high quality clinical services to families of
oppressed, vulnerable, and at risk populations.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Knowledge Objectives: Students completing this course will be able to describe…
1. The unique dynamics of structurally and culturally diverse families (EP 2.1.3;
2.1.4)
2. A variety of family assessment techniques for use in clinical practice. (EP 2.1.3)
3. How various social-ecological systems within society promote, limit or deter
optimal psychosocial functioning of families in need. (EP 2.1.3)
4. Evidence based social work practice intervention strategies that are most relevant
for working with families. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.3; 2.1.4)
Value Objectives: Students completing this course will have an awareness of and
sensitivity to…
1. The values and ethics that guide professional practice with families. (EP2.1.2)
2. The importance of assessing one’s own values relative to clinical intervention with
oppressed and vulnerable populations. (EP2.1.1; 2.1.2)
3. Diversity and the spheres of diversity. (EP 2.1.2; 2.1.4)
Skills Objectives: Students completing this course will be able to…
1 Engage and join with clients in the treatment setting. (EP2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
2. Evaluate family structure, psychosocial strengths, and problems using a variety of
assessment techniques. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
3. Select and implement evidence based intervention strategies relevant and
appropriate to assessment data. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
4. Intervene with families struggling with a wide variety of psychosocial problems
and their subsequent unique needs and dynamics (2.1.4; 2.1.10, a-d).
COURSE METHODS
The course methods will include lecture/class discussion, group exercises and
experiential role plays. Students will be expected to have read materials before each
class meeting and be prepared to discuss reading assignments. Students will be
unprepared to participate in experiential exercises and class discussions unless they
are present in class. Therefore, class attendance and participation is imperative.
COURSE EXPECTATIONS
Attendance Policy- Students are expected to attend each and every class and to
arrive on time. Roll will be taken regularly. Students are allowed to miss two classes
without penalty. After one absence, you will lose 1 point of your
attendance/participation grade for each additional day missed (up to 10 points
maximum). Students do not need to notify the professor regarding the reason for
their absence(s). Be aware that tardiness will also affect your final grade. Please put
cell phones on a silent or vibrate setting.
Make-up Policy- Make-up exams, as a rule, will not be permitted. Only in
extraordinary circumstances this may be considered. The professor reserves the
right to determine the format of any make-up exam.
Incomplete Policy- Only emergency situations that prohibit a student from
completing the course will warrant a grade of “I”. Therefore, it will not be given
automatically.
Assignments Policy
All papers must be completed per APA 6th edition guidelines
(see www.apastyle.org). That includes, but is not limited to, using double-spacing, as
well as standard fonts (Times New Roman 12) and margins (1 inch on all sides). Page
number requirements do not include the cover page, reference pages or appendices.
For all assignments: References counted as ‘required’ include ONLY peer reviewed
journal articles or book chapters published from a scholarly press (such as Columbia
University Press, Free Press, Allyn & Bacon, etc. [ask if you are not sure]).
*IMPORTANT COMMUNICATION WITH STUDENTS - All communications from me
will be posted on Georgia View/Vista and you should check our page frequently. If
you have not activated your KSU e-mail, you should do so as soon as possible.
Information on activating and using your KSU e-mail can be found
at http://students.kennesaw.edu. I also strongly encourage students to use e-mail as
a way of communicating with me. I check my email frequently throughout the day
and I will make every effort to respond within 24 hours.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STATEMENT
http://catalog.kennesaw.edu/content.php?catoid=11&navoid=489&returnto=search
#stud_code_cond
CRITERIA FOR STUDENT EVALUATION
A total of 100 percent is possible in the course and will be distributed as follows:
-Family assessment/Genogram and Class Discussion
20 %
-Exam I
20 %
-Exam II
20 %
-Theoretical Research Paper
20 %
-Attendance/Participation
20 %
TOTAL
100 %
Course grades will be assigned on the basis of:
A = 90 or greater
B = 80-89
C = 70-79
ASSIGNMENTS
Family Assessment- Students will present a family assessment to the class using a
Genogram and facilitating a class discussion regarding the assessment.
Exams – These will cover course readings and lecture material.
Theoretical Research Paper- In this assignment student will write a research paper
regarding a family therapy theoretical perspective of their choice.
Class Participation and Attendance- This is an advanced clinical skill focused class.
For this reason, participation is weighted equally to all other assignments.
Details regarding all of these assignments will be discussed in depth in class.
The class schedule may be adjusted to meet the learning needs of the class.
Course Outline, Assignments, and Activities
Date
Assignment/Activity
8/23
Syllabus Review, Essential Skills (ES), p. 101, p. 135.
8/30
ES- Chapters 1-2, Experiential Exercises (EE)
9/6
ES- Chapter 3, EE
9/13
ES – Chapter 4, Assessment, EE
9/20
ES-Chapter 5, Treatment Planning, EE
9/27
ES-Chapter 6 Presentations
10/4
ES- Chapter 7 Presentations
10/11
ES - Chapter 7, Exam 1(Chapters 1-5)
10/18
ES- Chapter 8, EE
10/25
ES- Chapter 8, EE
11/8
ES-Chapter 9, EE
11/15
ES-Chapter 9, EE
11/22
Exam 2 (Chapters 7-9)
11/29
-ES-Chapter 10, Field Reflections.
12/6
Final Paper Due
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Ackerman, N. W. (1958). The Psychodynamics of Family Life. New York: Basic Books.
Beckvar, D. S., & Beckvar, R. S. (1988). Family Therapy: A Systemic Integration.
Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Bowen, M. (1978). Family Therapy in Clinical Practice. New York: Jason Aronson.
Corcoran K., & Fischer, J. (2000). Measures for Clinical Practice: A Source Book. New
York:The Free Press.
Corsini, R. J., & Wedding, D. (2005). Current Psychotherapies, 7th edition. Belmont,
CA: Brooks/Cole.
Cournoyer & Powers. (2004). “Chapter 1 Systematic Reviews of Evidence-Based
Studies and Practice-Based Research: How to Search for, Develop, and Use
Them. In Evidence- Based Practice Manual: Research and Outcome Measures
in Health and Human Services. eds. A.R. Roberts & K.R. Yeager. New York:
Oxford University Press, p.7.
DeJong, P., & Berg, I. K. (2008). Interviewing for Solutions. Belmont CA: Brooks/ Cole.
DeJong, P., & Berg, I. K. (2001) Constructing cooperation with mandated clients.
Social Work.46(4) 361-374.
Jordan, C., &Franklin, C. (2003). Clinical Assessment for Social Workers. 2nd edition.
Chicago: Lyceum Press.
Kincaid, S., & Caldwell, R. (1995). Marital separation: Causes, coping, and
consequences. Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, 22(3), 109-128.
McGoldrick, M., & Gerson, R. (1985). Genograms in Family Assessment. New York: W.
W. Norton & Co.
Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and Family Therapy. MA: Harvard University Press.
Nichols, M. P. (2011). The Essentials of Family Therapy. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Okun, B. F., & Kantrowitz R. E. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and
CounselingTechniques. UNITED States: Brooks/Cole.
Ried, W. (2000). The Task Planner. New York: Columbia University Press.
Sherman, R.S., Oresky, P., & Roundtree, Y. (1991). Solving Problems in Couples and
Family Therapy: Techniques and Tactics. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Revised Syllabus
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM
SW 8813: Family Therapy
Instructor
Steve King, PhD, L.C.S.W.
Meeting Time
TBA
Semester Credits
3 Credit Hours
Email Address
[email protected]
Phone Number
678-797-2451
Office
Prillaman Hall, Room #3315
Office Hours
Tues.9-12; Wed.1-4; Thur. 9-3.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
"This course provides a framework for applying practice knowledge, values, and skills
when working with families from diverse populations and a variety of psychosocial
problems. It exposes students to techniques for initial engagement with families and
orienting family members to the treatment process. Students learn family assessment and
treatment interventions. Students have the opportunity to practice and apply clinical
techniques in the classroom setting. The course emphasizes the importance of culturally
competent practice with structurally and culturally diverse families. Students examine
how personal and professional values affect their practice and learn models for ethical
decision-making and intervention planning. Assigned readings, lectures and class
discussions introduce students to specific family systems theories and their applicability
to diverse client populations and psychosocial problems. Written assignments are used to
evaluate a student’s understanding and integration of family systems theories and
intervention techniques. These assignments are designed to also evaluate a student’s
capacity to critically analyze these theoretical frameworks and their applicability to
diverse family systems and structures. Classroom experiential exercises provide students
with opportunities to apply family treatment techniques to improve their clinical
engagement, assessment, and intervention skills when working with families. Feedback
and evaluation from peers and the instructor provide students with an assessment of
their clinical skill attainment and development when working with clients in a family
treatment context."
COURSE OVERVIEW
This course provides a framework for applying practice knowledge, values, and skills
when working with families from diverse populations and a variety of psychosocial
problems. This course will expose students to techniques for initial engagement with
families and orient family members to the treatment process. Students will learn
family assessment and treatment interventions. Students will have the opportunity
to practice and apply clinical techniques in the classroom setting. The course will
emphasize the importance of culturally competent practice with structurally
andculturally diverse families. Students will examine how personal and professional
values affect their practice and will learn models for ethical decision-making and
intervention planning.
REQUIRED TEXTS:
Patterson, J., Williams, L., Edwards, T. M., Chamow, L., & Grauf-Grounds, C. (2009).
Essential Skills in Family Therapy. (2nd ed.) New York: The Guilford Press.
COURSE RATIONALE RELATIVE TO THE MISSION OF THE MSW PROGRAM
The Master of Social Work Program at Kennesaw State University was established to
address the psychosocial and clinical needs of a diverse population of clients. Social
Work has a strong tradition of working with families in need as well formative and
seminal contributions to the field of family therapy. This course supports the
systemic and ecological approaches to clinical social work from a client strengths
perspective. This course emphasizes the principles of inclusion and cultural
competence and an evidence based approach to clinical social work practice. This
course is related to and consistent with the mission of the Master of Social Work
Program as it prepares students to deliver high quality clinical services to families of
oppressed, vulnerable, and at risk populations.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Knowledge Objectives: Students completing this course will be able to describe…
1. The unique dynamics of structurally and culturally diverse families (EP 2.1.3;
2.1.4)
2. A variety of family assessment techniques for use in clinical practice. (EP 2.1.3)
3. How various social-ecological systems within society promote, limit or deter
optimal psychosocial functioning of families in need. (EP 2.1.3)
4. Evidence based social work practice intervention strategies that are most relevant
for working with families. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.3; 2.1.4)
Value Objectives: Students completing this course will have an awareness of and
sensitivity to…
1. The values and ethics that guide professional practice with families. (EP2.1.2)
2. The importance of assessing one’s own values relative to clinical intervention with
oppressed and vulnerable populations. (EP2.1.1; 2.1.2)
3. Diversity and the spheres of diversity. (EP 2.1.2; 2.1.4)
Skills Objectives: Students completing this course will be able to…
1 Engage and join with clients in the treatment setting. (EP2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
2. Evaluate family structure, psychosocial strengths, and problems using a variety of
assessment techniques. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
3. Select and implement evidence based intervention strategies relevant and
appropriate to assessment data. (EP 2.1.1; 2.1.10, a-d)
4. Intervene with families struggling with a wide variety of psychosocial problems
and their subsequent unique needs and dynamics (2.1.4; 2.1.10, a-d).
COURSE METHODS
The course methods will include lecture/class discussion, group exercises and
experiential role plays. Students will be expected to have read materials before each
class meeting and be prepared to discuss reading assignments. Students will be
unprepared to participate in experiential exercises and class discussions unless they
are present in class. Therefore, class attendance and participation is imperative.
COURSE EXPECTATIONS
Attendance Policy- Students are expected to attend each and every class and to
arrive on time. Roll will be taken regularly. Students are allowed to miss two classes
without penalty. After one absence, you will lose 1 point of your
attendance/participation grade for each additional day missed (up to 10 points
maximum). Students do not need to notify the professor regarding the reason for
their absence(s). Be aware that tardiness will also affect your final grade. Please put
cell phones on a silent or vibrate setting.
Make-up Policy- Make-up exams, as a rule, will not be permitted. Only in
extraordinary circumstances this may be considered. The professor reserves the
right to determine the format of any make-up exam.
Incomplete Policy- Only emergency situations that prohibit a student from
completing the course will warrant a grade of “I”. Therefore, it will not be given
automatically.
Assignments Policy
All papers must be completed per APA 6th edition guidelines
(see www.apastyle.org). That includes, but is not limited to, using double-spacing, as
well as standard fonts (Times New Roman 12) and margins (1 inch on all sides). Page
number requirements do not include the cover page, reference pages or appendices.
For all assignments: References counted as ‘required’ include ONLY peer reviewed
journal articles or book chapters published from a scholarly press (such as Columbia
University Press, Free Press, Allyn & Bacon, etc. [ask if you are not sure]).
*IMPORTANT COMMUNICATION WITH STUDENTS - All communications from me
will be posted on Georgia View/Vista and you should check our page frequently. If
you have not activated your KSU e-mail, you should do so as soon as possible.
Information on activating and using your KSU e-mail can be found
at http://students.kennesaw.edu. I also strongly encourage students to use e-mail as
a way of communicating with me. I check my email frequently throughout the day
and I will make every effort to respond within 24 hours.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STATEMENT
http://catalog.kennesaw.edu/content.php?catoid=11&navoid=489&returnto=search
#stud_code_cond
CRITERIA FOR STUDENT EVALUATION
A total of 100 percent is possible in the course and will be distributed as follows:
-Family assessment/Genogram and Class Discussion
20 %
-Exam I
20 %
-Exam II
20 %
-Theoretical Research Paper
20 %
-Attendance/Participation
20 %
TOTAL
100 %
Course grades will be assigned on the basis of:
A = 90 or greater
B = 80-89
C = 70-79
ASSIGNMENTS
Family Assessment- Students will present a family assessment to the class using a
Genogram and facilitating a class discussion regarding the assessment.
Exams – These will cover course readings and lecture material.
Theoretical Research Paper- In this assignment student will write a research paper
regarding a family therapy theoretical perspective of their choice.
Class Participation and Attendance- This is an advanced clinical skill focused class.
For this reason, participation is weighted equally to all other assignments.
Details regarding all of these assignments will be discussed in depth in class.
The class schedule may be adjusted to meet the learning needs of the class.
Course Outline, Assignments, and Activities
Date
Assignment/Activity
8/23
Syllabus Review, Essential Skills (ES), p. 101, p. 135.
8/30
ES- Chapters 1-2, Experiential Exercises (EE)
9/6
ES- Chapter 3, EE
9/13
ES – Chapter 4, Assessment, EE
9/20
ES-Chapter 5, Treatment Planning, EE
9/27
ES-Chapter 6 Presentations
10/4
ES- Chapter 7 Presentations
10/11
ES - Chapter 7, Exam 1(Chapters 1-5)
10/18
ES- Chapter 8, EE
10/25
ES- Chapter 8, EE
11/8
ES-Chapter 9, EE
11/15
ES-Chapter 9, EE
11/22
Exam 2 (Chapters 7-9)
11/29
-ES-Chapter 10, Field Reflections.
12/6
Final Paper Due
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Ackerman, N. W. (1958). The Psychodynamics of Family Life. New York: Basic Books.
Beckvar, D. S., & Beckvar, R. S. (1988). Family Therapy: A Systemic Integration.
Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Bowen, M. (1978). Family Therapy in Clinical Practice. New York: Jason Aronson.
Corcoran K., & Fischer, J. (2000). Measures for Clinical Practice: A Source Book. New
York:The Free Press.
Corsini, R. J., & Wedding, D. (2005). Current Psychotherapies, 7th edition. Belmont,
CA: Brooks/Cole.
Cournoyer & Powers. (2004). “Chapter 1 Systematic Reviews of Evidence-Based
Studies and Practice-Based Research: How to Search for, Develop, and Use
Them. In Evidence- Based Practice Manual: Research and Outcome Measures in
Health and Human Services. eds. A.R. Roberts & K.R. Yeager. New York: Oxford
University Press, p.7.
DeJong, P., & Berg, I. K. (2008). Interviewing for Solutions. Belmont CA: Brooks/ Cole.
DeJong, P., & Berg, I. K. (2001) Constructing cooperation with mandated clients.
Social Work.46(4) 361-374.
Jordan, C., &Franklin, C. (2003). Clinical Assessment for Social Workers. 2nd edition.
Chicago: Lyceum Press.
Kincaid, S., & Caldwell, R. (1995). Marital separation: Causes, coping, and
consequences. Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, 22(3), 109-128.
McGoldrick, M., & Gerson, R. (1985). Genograms in Family Assessment. New York: W.
W. Norton & Co.
Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and Family Therapy. MA: Harvard University Press.
Nichols, M. P. (2011). The Essentials of Family Therapy. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Okun, B. F., & Kantrowitz R. E. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and
CounselingTechniques. UNITED States: Brooks/Cole.
Ried, W. (2000). The Task Planner. New York: Columbia University Press.
Sherman, R.S., Oresky, P., & Roundtree, Y. (1991). Solving Problems in Couples and
Family Therapy: Techniques and Tactics. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
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