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Common Core
Georgia Performance
Standards
Facilitating Student-Led Discussions, K-12
Part 1: Rationale and Discussion Formats
Cynde Snider
Essential Question
How might I incorporate discussion in
my classroom?
Learning Targets
1. I can cite evidence to support the teaching of
discussion skills.
2. I can describe 3 to 5 different types of ageappropriate student-led discussions.
4
Improving Adolescent Literacy
Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Improving Adolescent
Literacy
Recommendation
Level of Evidence
Provide explicit vocabulary instruction.
Strong
Provide direct and explicit comprehension strategy
instruction.
Strong
Provide opportunities for extended discussion of text
meaning and interpretation.
Moderate
Increase student motivation and engagement in literacy
learning.
Moderate
Make available intensive and individualized interventions for
struggling readers that can be provided by trained
specialists.
Source: Kamil, et al. (2008)
Strong
CCR Anchor Standards for Speaking & Listening
Comprehension & Collaboration
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and
collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Presentation of Knowledge & Ideas
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners
can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
PARCC non-summative assessment of speaking and listening skills: locally
scored, required
6
Learning Targets
1. I can cite evidence to support the teaching of
discussion skills.
2. I can describe 3 to 5 different types of ageappropriate student-led discussions.
7
Structured Student-Led Discussion Formats
(Handouts 1a & 1b)
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Body voting
Chalk Talks*
Conversational Moves
Generating Truth Statements
Rotating Stations*
Snowballing
Socratic Seminars
Think/Pair/Share
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Empowering (Rather than Enabling)
1.
Start small—allow student to discuss with teacher, then with
selected peer, additional peers, etc.
2.
Provide student with opportunities to practice “scripted”
contributions before the actual discussion.
3.
Establish cueing system between teacher and student.
4.
Plan threaded discussions using Wiggio, Google Docs, etc.
5.
Conduct real time, online discussions.
9
Learning Targets
1. I can cite evidence to support the teaching of
discussion skills.
2. I can describe 3 to 5 different types of ageappropriate student-led discussions.
10
Essential Question
How might I incorporate discussion in
my classroom?
Resources
Hattie, J. (2012). Visible learning for teachers: Maximizing impact on learning.
New York: Routledge.
Kamil, M. L., Borman, G. D., Dole, J., Kral, C. C., Salinger T., & Torgensen, J.
(2008). Improving adolescent literacy: Effective classroom and intervention
practices (NCEE #2008-4027). Washington, DC: National Center for Education
Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S.
Department of Education. Retrieved from
http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/PracticeGuide.aspx?sid=8.
Cynde Snider
Georgia Department of Education
[email protected]
404-657-9971
13
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