ENGLISH 1302.203 Spring 2010 SUE BELL PROPST REESE CENTER

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ENGLISH 1302.203

Spring 2010

SUE BELL PROPST

REESE CENTER

SYLLABUS AND POLICY STATEMENT

English 1302.204 Syllabus for Spring 2010

ALL PAPERS AND EXAMS WILL BE SUBMITTED OR A

GRADE OF ZERO WILL BE ASSIGNED FOR THE AVEAGING

OF GRADES.

IF YOU ARE LATE IN SUBMITTING A PAPER OR SET OF

QUESTIONS, A 5-POINT PENALTY FOR EACH CLASS DAY

WILL BE ASSIGNED AT THE TIME THE PAPER IS

SUBMITTED, EXCEPT IN THE CASES OF THE RESEARCH

PAPER, THE POITRY PAPER, AND THE PROSE PAER, IN

WHICH CASE THE PENALTY IS 10-POINTS FOR EACH

CLASS DAY THE PAPER IS LATE.

IF YOU ARE NOT ABSENT ANY DAYS DURING THE

SEMESTER, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO TAKE THE FINAL

EXAM. [THIS DOES MEAN EVERY DAY, REMEMBERING

THAT BEING PRESENT DOES NOT MEAN TO SIGN IN AND

THEN LEAVE, BUT STAY FOR THE ENTIRE CLASS PERIOD.]

YO9U MAY, OF COURSE, ELECT TO TAKE THE FINAL

EXAM EVEN IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED EVERY CLASS DAY

IF YOU BELIEVE THAT THE FINAL EXAM GRADE WILL

BETTER YOUR CLASS AVERAGE.

ATTENDING CLASS IS IMPORTANT! YOU MAY BE ABLE

TO SURVIVE WITHOUT MY INSTRUCTIONS IF YOU ARE A

GOOD ENGLISH STUDENT; HOWEVER, THAT IS NOT THE

INTENT OF SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE; CONSEQUENTLY, IF

YOU HAVE REPEATED ABSENCES, YOU WILL BE

DROPPED FROM THE COURSE ACCORDING TO SPC AND

THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT’S RULES FOR ATTENDING

CLASS.

YOUR ATTENDANCE COUNTS AS TEN PERCENT OF YOUR

FINAL GRADE AS YOU ARE AFFORDED THE

OPPORTUNITY OF NOT TAKING YOUR FINAL IF YOU

HAVE HAD PERFECT ATTENDANCE.

YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO TYPE ANY PAPERS EXCEPT

YOUR RESEARCH PAPER; HOWEVER, IF YOU ELECT TO

TYPE ANY OR ALL OF YOUR PAPERS IN BOLD , TIMES

NEW ROMAN, 20-POINT FONT, DOUBLE SPACED, AN

ADDITIONAL 2 [TWO] POINTS WILL BE ADDED TO YOUR

GRADE FOR THAT PAPER.

1/20/10 – Organization; MLA format; literary terms;

Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73”

1/25/10 – John Donne

1/27/10 – Study the works of John Milton and Andrew

Marvell

SHAKESPEARE PAPER IS DUE . FORMAT FOR THIS

PAPER, AS WITH ALL INDIVIDUAL PAPERS ON AN

AUTHOR’S WORKS, IS IT MUST HAVE THE MLA FORMAT

FOR HEADING, PAGINATION, ORIGINAL TITLE,

QUOTATIONS TO SUPPORT POINTS MADE BY YOU,

CITATIONS FOR EACH QUOTATION, AND A

BIBLIOGRAPHY. IT MUST BE APPROXIMATELY 400-500

WORDS LONG. IT MAY OR MAY NOT BE TYPED;

HOWEVER, ANY PAPER THAT IS TYPED WILL RECEIVE AN

EXTRA TWO POINTS AS LONG AS IT IS TYPED IN 20-

POINT, BOLD TYPE, ACCORDING TO DIRECTIONS.

YOU MUST NOT WRITE ON THE BACKS OF YOUR PAPER.

IT IS MUCH TOO DIFFICULT TO GRADE WITH WRITING

ON BOTH SIDES.

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT I, TOO, HAVE ACCESS TO

SUCH SOURCES AS SPARK NOTES AND OTHER

RESOURCES FROM THE INTERNET. TO USE SOMEONE

ELSE’S WORDS AS IF THEY WERE YOUR OWN IS

PLAGIARISM. PLAGARISM CAN GET YOU AN F ON THE

PAPER OR FOR THE ENTIRE COURSE. IT IS AN OFFENSE

NOT TO BE TAKEN LIGHTLY!

2/1/10 – William Wordsworth

2/3/10 – Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Percy Bysshe

Shelley

DONNE PAPER IS DUE. IT IS THE SAME FORMAT AS THE

SHAKESPEARE PAPER.

2/8/10 - John Keats’s “The Eve of St Agnes” should be read prior to coming to class. We will discuss it in class.

Study “Ode on a Grecian Urn” and “The Eve of St Agnes”

2/10/19 – Poe’s “Annabel Lee” and Tennyson’s

“Crossing the Bar” and “Ulysses”

PAPER DUE ON THE WORKS OF MILTON OR MARVELL .

SAME FORMAT ASS SHAKESPEARE AND DONNE

PAPERSS.

2/15/10 – Walt Whitman’s “When Lilacs Last in the

Dooryard Bloomed” should be read prior to class so we can discuss his style of free verse and his admiration for

Abraham Lincoln, seen symbolically in his poem.

Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess”

2/17/10 – Gerald Manley Hopkins “God’s Grandeur” and A. E. Housman’s “To an Athlete Dying Young”

Discuss research papers.

2/22/10 – W. B. Yeats’s “The Second Coming”

PAPER DUE ON ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:

WORDSWORTH, COLERIDGE, SHELLEY, KEATS, POE,

TENNYSON, OR BROWNING. SAME FORMAT SOULD BE

FOLLOWED AS SHAKESPEARE, DONNE, MILTON, OR

MARVELL POEMS.

2/24/10 Robinson’s “Richard Cory” and various poems of Robert Frost

3110 Imagisst poetry, William Carlos Williams “The

Red Wheelbarrow” and Marianne Moore’s “Poetry” ;

Langston Hughes “Harlem”

ON 3/1/10 PAPER DUE ON POEM OF HOPKINS,

HOUSMAN, YEATS, ROBINSON, OR FROST. FOLLOW THE

SAME FORMAT AS THE SHAKESPEARE PAPER.

3/3/10 T. S Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,”

POETRY PAPER IS DUE TODAY! THIS PAPER WILL BE A

MINIMUM OF 800 WORDS; MLA FORMAT OF HEADING,

PAGINATION, ORIGINAL TITLE, QUOTATIONS,

CITATIONS, AND BIBLIOGRAPHY. THIS PAPER MUST BE

TYPED: 14 POINT FONT, TIMES NEW ROMAN, DOUBLE

SPACED. IT IS A PAPER ABOUT AN AUTHOR’S WORK OR

WORKS, NOT ABOUT HIS LIFE. THE ONLY USE YOU

WOULD HAVE FOR INCLUDING ANY

AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL DATA ABOUT THE AUTHOR

WOULD BE IF THAT DATA HAD A DIRECT IMPACT ON

THE MANNER IN WHICH THE POEM WAS WRITTEN.

YOU DO NOT HAVE TO USE SECONDARY SOURCES;

HOWEVER, YOU MAY DO SO IF YOU WISH. [IF YOU DO

USE SECONDARY SOURCES, YOU MUST HAVE

QUOTATIONS, CITATIONS, AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY

ENTRRY FOR ANY SECONDARY SOURCE USED.

3/8/10 Auden’s “Musee des Beaux Arts” and Dylan

Thomas’s “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night”

REVIEW FOR POETRY EXAM.

3/10/10 POETRY EXAM

THIS EXAMINATION WILL INCLUDE ALL POETS, WORKS,

LITERARY TERMS, AND GRAMMATICAL PROCESSES WE

HAVE STUDIED SO FAR IN THIS COURSE. ALL OF THIS

INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE ON THE REVIEW SHEET

FORMAT WHICH WAS GIVEN TO YOU ON THE FIRST DAY

OF CLASSES!

SPRING BREAK

BEGIN ANALYSIS AND WRITING PROCESS ON SHORT

STORIES. ON EACH OF THE SHORT STORIES, YOU

SHOULD HAVE READ THE STORY PRIOR TO CLASS.

CLASS DISCUSSIONS MAKE FOR MORE INTERESTING

CLASSES; WHEREAS, MRS. PROPST’S BEING THE ONLY

ONE TO SPEAK MAKES THE STORY SEEM LONGER AND

LESS INTERESTING! YOU GET TO CHOOSE; DO YOUR

PART!

3/22/10 Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman

Brown”

3/24/10 Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cassk of Amontillado”

3/29/10 Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”

3/31/10 Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”

MAJOR RESEARCH PAPER IS DUE! THIS PAPER MUST

HAVE AN OUTLINE DONE ACCODRING TO THE MLA

FORMAT; THE BODY OF THE PAPER WILL BE 10-12

PAGES, TYPED, DOUBLE SPACED, 14 POINT FONT, BOLD

TYPE, TIMES NEW TOMAN, 1-1 ½ MARGINS ON ALL

FOUR SIDES; IT MUST FOLLOW THE MLA FORMAT:

HEADING, PAGINATION, ORIGINAL TITLE, QUOTATIONS

TO SUPPORT POINT MADE BY YOU, CITATIONS TO

IDENTIFY SOURCE FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY

SOURCES, AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY TO IDENTIFY SOURCES

OF A MINIMUM OF ONE PRIMARY AND FIVE

SECONDARY SOURCES.

THE PAPER IS ABOUT AN AUTHOR’S WORK OR WORKS,

NOT HIS LIFE.

THE BIBLIOGRAPHY IS IN ORDER ALPHABETICALLY

ACCORDING TO THE AUTHOR’S LASST NAME;

CONSEQUENTLY, IF YOUR SOURCE DOES NOT HAVE AN

AUTHOR, IT CANNOT BE USED. YOUR BIBLIOGRAPHY IS

NOT NUMBERED.

THE ENTIRE PAPER MUST BE TYPED. ANY PAPER NOT

TYPED IN ITWS ENTIRETY WILL NOT BE GRADED. ASS

THIS PAPER COUNTS AS 30% OF YOUR CLASS GRADE,

DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO BE PLACED IN A

POSITION OF RECEIVING A ZERO.

IT IS DUE ON THE DATE ASSSIGNED AND IF IT IS NOT

SUBMITTED COMPLETE ON THAT DATE, 10 POINTS FOR

EACH CLASS PERIOD WILL BE DEDUCTED FOR EACH DAY

IT IS NOT SUBMITTED.

PLAGAIRISM IS AN IMPORTANT ISSUE. DO NOT USE

ANOTHER PERSON’S WORDS AS YOUR OWN. GIVE THE

CREDIT IN THE TERMS OF A CITATION AND

BIBLIOGRAPHY ENTRY FOR THAT INFORMATION.

PLAGARISM CAN RESULT IN A ZERO FOR THE PAPER OR

AN F FOR THE COURSE OR A REPORT TO SOUTH PLAINS

COLLEGE WHO MAY CHOOSE DISMISSAL! IT IS A

SERIOUS OFFENSE. AS THIS IS A RESERCH PAPER, THERE

IS NO REASON WHY INFORMATION THAT YOU HAVE

RESEARCHED CANNOT BE USED AS LONG AS YOU GIVE

THE AUTHOR FROM WHOM YOU OBTAINED THE

MATERIAL WITH THE PROPER REFERENCES.

4/5/10 D. H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking Horse Winner”

QUESTIONS DUE ON HAWTHORNE, POE, DU

MAUPASSANT, AND CHOPIN

4/7/10 Katherine Anne Porter’s “The Jilting of Granny

Weatherall”

4/12/10 John Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums”

4/14/10 Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path”

4/19/10 Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

QUESTIONS DUE ON LAWRENCE, PORTER, STEINBECK,

AND WELTY

4/21/10 Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”

4/26/10 Sandra Cisneros’s “The House on Mango

Street”

PROSE PAPER IS DUE 4/26/10. You must choose one of the works from the textbook. PROSE PAPER FOLLOWS

THE SAME FORMAT AT THE POETRY PAPER.

4/28/10 Short story from the textnbook to be determined.

QUESTIONS DUE ON JACKSON, WALKER, CISNEROS

5/3/10 DISCUSS FINAL EXAMINATION PAPER.

ABSENCES WILL BE EVALUATED AND GRADE AVERAGES

GIVEN TO DETERMINE IF YOU MUST OF WISH TO TAKE

THE FINAL EXAM. IF YOU HAVE NO ABSENCES, WHICH

MEANS SIGNING IN EACH DAY AND STAYING THE

ENTIRE PERIOD, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO TAKE THE EXAM

UNLESS YOU FEEL AS THOUGH IT WOULD IMPROVE

YOUR COURSE GRADE. FINAL EXAMINATION WILL BE

AS FOLLOWS:

5/10/10 7:00 CLASS WILL TAKE IT FROM 7:45-9:45

5/12/10 5:30 CLASS WILL TAKE IT FROM 5:30-7:30

SHORTT STORY QUESTIONS AND POETRY PAPERS 30%

POETRY PAPER, PROSE PAPER, POETRY EXAM 30%

RESEARCH PAPER 30%

FINAL EXAMINATION 10%

ENGLISH 1302 POLICY STATEMENT

SUE BELL PROPST, INSTRUCTOR

SPRING 2010

SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE – REESE CENTER

ROOM 323

Instructor: Sue Bell Propst

Office: Room 115 at Smyer High School; Room 323 at

Reese Centeer

Office Phone: 234-3871 or 234-2901 e-mail address: [email protected]

or [email protected]

Office hours: By appointment only

Scope and Purpose: The purpose of English 1302 is to teach student to understand and apply the principles of

formal thought and written English language as it applies to the analyzing of poetry and short stories.

English 1302 helps students to think well by showing them the methods for reading and writing well, with the primary focus being on the writing process, on the use of appropriate grammar, on the use of logic in understanding hidden meanings as well as concrete meanings in a work of literature, and on the different methods of development that can be used on a single piece of literature. Collected readings from all areas of the humanities are included in the text entitled

Literature. Moreover, the student will be taught to write in the MLA format that will better facilitate his ability to conform to a particular method of writing in his future college/work career.

Required texts:

Janet E. Gardner Literature

Hacker A Research Writing

Requirements:

Students will write from six to eight essays, or their equivalent in the form of advanced questions, including their final examination.

Students will read poems, essays, and short stories from the Gardner text, students will participate in classroom discussions regarding all ramifications of the literary selection, students will be tested over their understanding of the selections read, and assignments will be made for responding to various selections in terms of questions, essays, and papers covering a multitude of different types of answers that can be given to hone writing skills.

Students will be assigned a research paper on an author’s work or works that will teach the ability to analyze critical essays that have been written about a particular work of literature, and they will be shown the way to handle these critical essays as secondary sources in a research paper done according to the MLA formt according to Hacker.

Students will answer a series to questions presented to them over prose selections, with a series of questions being equivalent to one paper grade.

Instructing Objectives:

By the end of the course, the student should be able to understand that writing is a process.

The student should be able to apply the principles of writing , as well as the audience and purpose of a writing assignment.

The student should be able to write a coherent, unified essay that is appropriately developed by means of description, illustration, narration, process, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, argumentation, and/or a combination of two or more of these approaches.

The student should be able to write in standard English, with the type of English being demonstrated in the

Hacker and Gardner texts.

The student should be able to apply the principles of critical thinking as he writes the assigned papers.

Grading Standards:

Research Paper 30%

Essays in Response to Poetry 15%

Essays in Response to Prose 15%

Major Poetry Paper 10%

Major Poetry Exam 10%

Major Prose Paper 10%

Final Exam over Prose 10%

Attendance Policy

Punctual and regular class attendance is required of all students attending South Plains College. There are no excused absences. Students are responsible for all class work covered during any absences from class, even in the event that they are able to convince the instructor that the absence was unavoidable (SPC Catalog). Any student who misses two consecutive weeks will be dropped from the class rolls, but the student whose absenteeism becomes excessive can be dropped at the instructor’s discretion. If the instructor initiates the drop procedure, he can do so with an X or an F, at the instructor’s discretion.

Plagiarism and Cheating

“Complete honesty is required of the students in the presentation of any and all phases of class work. This

applies to quizzes of whatever length as well as final examinations, to daily work, and to all class papers”

(SPC Catalog). Failure to comply with this directive will result in an F for the assignment and can result in an F for the course if the conditions warrant that decision.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities, including but not limited to physical, psychiatric, or learning disabilities, who wish to request accommodations for this class should apply to the Special Services Office early in the semester so that the appropriate arrangement can be made. In accordance with federal law, a student requesting special accommodations must provide applicable documentation of his disability to the Special Services accommodator. For more information call or visit the

Special Services Office in the Student Services Building.

Statement of Nondiscrimination

It is the policy of this instructor not to discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other issue. In addition to

complying with federal and state equal opportunity laws and regulations and/or resolutions of professional organizations in education and psychology, I declare any harassment based on individual differences to be inconsistent with my instructional mission and educational goals in my classroom.

Method of Evaluation

Students’ grades will be evaluated in terms of A, B, C, D, or F, based on superior, good, average, poor, and failing. Numerical grades are assigned to papers, questions, exams, and any other work assigned for the purpose of averaging grades only. All assignments must be submitted and evaluated before the student receives credit for the assignment.

The following criteria will be used for evaluating all assignments:

Use of correct grammar: fragments, comma splices, fused sentences, introductory subordinate clauses, subject and verb agreement, pronoun and antecedent agreement, spelling, use of prepositions

Use of the proper method of development, quotations, and citations

Use of the principles of unity and coherence, introduction, development, and conclusion

Use of factual, logical argumentation to develop and advance the thesis of the of the argument based on the assignment given .

Sue Bell Propst

ENGLISH 1301 SYLLABUS AND POLICY STATEMENT

SUE BELL PROPST, INSTRUCTOR

SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE – REESE CAMPUS

ROOM 323

SPRING 2010

ENGLISH 1301.205 Syllabus

SUE BELL PROPST

Spring 2010

ALL PAPERS, QUESTIONS, EXAMS MUST BE SUBMITTED OR A GRADE OF ZERO WILL BE ASSIGNED FOR THE AVERAGING OF

GRADES. IF YOU ARE LATE IN SUBMITTING ANY PAPER, THERE WILL BE A 5-POINT PENALTY FOR EACH CLASS DAY THAT THE

PAPER IS NOT SUBMITTED, EXCEPT IN THE CASSE OF T HE RESEARCH PAPER AND THAT WILL BE A 10-POINT PENALTY FOR

EACH CLASS DAY THAT THE PAPER IS LATE.

IF YOU ARE NOT ABSENT ANY DAYS DURING THE SEMESTER, YOU MAY ELECT NOT TO TAKE THE FINAL EXAM! REMEMBER

THAT THIS DOES NOT MEAN SIGNING IN AND THEN LEAVING; IT MEANS BEING PRESENT FOR THE ENTIRE CLASS PERIOD.

YOU MAY, OF COUSE, STILL TAKE THE EXAM EVEN IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED EACH CLASS IF YOU FEEL AS IF YOU MIGHT

BETTER YOUR AVERAGE BY TAKING THE EXAM.

ALL SUBMITTED WORK MUST HAVE THE APPROPRIATE HEADING OF YOUR NAME, MY NAME, COURSE TITLE, AND DATE; THE

PROPER PAGINATION OF YOUR LAST NAME AND THE NUMBER OF THE PAGE; AN ORIGINAL TITLE; QUOTTIONS TO SUPORT

THE POINTSS MADE BY YOU; CITATIONS TO DOCUMENT THE QUOTATIONS USED; AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY TO INDICATE THE

SOURCE FOR THAT PARTICULAR QUESTION OR PAPER.

THE MLA FORMAT IS IN TWO PLACES: YOUR HACKER TEXT AND YOUR PATTERNS TEXT.

1/20/10 Organization ; forms; MLA format; Hacker text; Kirszner text; syllabus

1/25/10 “Reading to Write” ; “What’s in a Name?”;

:”The Writing Process”; Argumentation 555-580;

“Declaration of Independence” 584-489”

IN CLASS ESSAY ON THE ISSUE OF WHAT’S IN A NAME

ASSIGNMENT FOR 2/9 IS TO EXPLICATE THE FIRST TWO

PARAGRAPHS OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

IN APPROXIMATELY 400 WORDS, COMPLETE WITH

QUOTATIONS, CITATIONS, AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY.

1/27/10 Intervention” on 15-36; grammar rules in general and analyze the Patterns text for assistance in finding the rules

2/1/10 – Drafting and Revising” 37-66; Grace Paley’s

“Samuel” on 262

2/3/10 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE PAPER IS DUE.

“Editing and Proofreading” 67-80; “Narration”

Sandra Cisneros “Only Daughter” 96-100

2/8/10 Grammar, Format, Terminology

Maya Angelou’s “Finishing School” 101-105

2/10/10 Description 143-159 ; pathetic fallacy;

Kate Chopin’s “The Storm” 194-202

2/15/10 QUESTIONS ARE DUE ON PALEY, CISNEROS,

ANGELOU, AND CHOPIN.

“Exemplification” 203-216; Birnbaum’s “The Catbird

Seat” 227-230

2/17/10 “Process” 267-282; Shirley Jackson’s “The

Lottery” 317-326

2/22/10 EXAMINATION ON “The Lottery.” THE EXAM

WILL CONSIST OF A MAJOR ESSAY DONE IN CLASS OF

THE SYMBOLISM PRESENT IN THE SHORT STORY. IT

WILL BE DONE IN ALL ELEMENTS OF MLA FORMAT. THE

SYMBOLISM MAY BE DONE IN ONE OF TWO WAYS:

JUST SYMBOLIC REPRESENTATION OF OBJECTS, FACTS,

AND CHARACTERS AND/ OR RELIGIOUS ALLEGORY.

YOU MAY HAVE AN OUTLINE READY, AND YOU MAY

USE YOUR CLASS NOTES YOU HAVE TAKEN AS WE

STUDIED THE STORY ; HOWEVER, THE PAPER MUST BE

WRITTEN IN CLASS ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS.

2/24/10 “Cause and Effect” 327-342; Graham’s “The

Black Table Is Still There” on 366-370

3/1/10 “Comparison and Contrast” 387-406; study

Safire’s “The Threat of a National ID” and Derschowitz’s

“Why Fear National ID Cards” 518-520

3/3/10 QUESTIONS DUE ON BIRNBAUM, JACKSON,

GRAHAM, SAFIRE, AND DERSCHOWWITZ. Discuss the poem of “Sadie and Maud.” IN CLASS EXPLICATION OF

THE COMPARISON AND CONTRAST THAT ARE REVEALED

IN THE POEM OF “Saide and Maud.”

3/8/10 Discuss all of the ramifications of the manner in which to do a research paper.

3/10/10 “Classification and Divdsion” 451-462

Brock’s “Five Ways to Kill a Man” 505-506 ; RESEARCH

TOPIC SHOULD BE CHOSEN BY NOW

SPRING BREAK

3/22/10 Definition 507-521; Burciaga’s “Tortillas”

3/24/10 Smith’s “Wife Beater” and “What Work Is”; discuss research paper

3/29/10 ROUGH OUTLINE IS DUE FOR RESEARCH

PAPER ; Adkins’s “Traditional Mother and Father. . .” and Birtha’s “Laws Should Support Loving Couples”

3/31/10 Thesis STATEMENT IS DUE FOR RESEARCH

PAPERS.

QUESTIONS DUE ON BROCK, BURCIAGA, SMITH,

ADKINS, AND BIRTHA.

Discuss all aspects of the research papers: topics, format, quotations, paraphrase, citations, bibliography.

4/5/10 TYPED BIBLIOGRAPHY DUE ON RESEARCH

PAPERS.

Broyles “A War for Us” and Janslaw “For Those Who

Believe We Need a War” ASSIGN GROUPS FOR

TORTURE ESSAYS! WORK ON PRESENTATIONS IN

CLASS!

4/7/10 Cosner “The Case for WalMart” and

Featherstone’s Down and Out in America”

WORK ON PRESENTATIONS IN CLASS!

4/12/10 Torture Essays in Text . There are multiple ones of these. I will assign each of you a different essays in groups and you will be responsible for telling about that particular essay in an oral presentation.

INDIVIDUAL GRADES GIVEN FOR PRESENTATION OF

MEDIA VIOLENCE ESSAY.

4/14/10 COMPARISON AND CONTRAST ESSAY EXAM

WILL CONSIST OF A PAPER IN WHICH YOU WILL

COMPARE AND CONTRAST OR DRAW AN ANALOGY

BETWEEN TWO OR MORE OF THE ESSAYS WHICH

ADDRESS A PARTICULAR ISSUE. GAY OR LESBIAN

ADOPTION, THE DRAFT, MEDIA VIOLENCE, NATIONAL ID

CARDS, OR DISCOUNT STORES ARE THE ESSAYS WE

STUDIED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THIS PAPER BEING

WRITTEN. YOU MAY, OF COURSE, HAVE A POINT OF

VIEW AS A WRITER, BUT THE OBJECT OF THIS

ASSIGNMENT IS TO WRITE AN ESSAY COMPARING AND

CONTRASTING OR DRAWING AN ANALOGY BETWEEN

OR AMONG THE OPINIONS OF THE WRITERS WHO

WERE FOR OR AGAINST A PARTICULAR ISSUE. As usual, you must use the appropriate MLA format of heading, pagination, original title, quotations to support points made by you, citations to identify quotations, and bibliography to document the sources used.

4/19/10 Combining the Patterns” 703; Eighner “On

Dumpster Diving” 712; discuss research papers

4/21/10 Woolf’s “Death of a Moth”’ grammatical principles used in writing the research and other papers

4/24/10 Sandra Cisneros’s “The House on Mango

Street”

MAJOR RESEARCH PAPER IS DUE ON DIVERSE TOPICS

OR ON AN AUTHOR’S WORKS; THE PAPER MUST HAVE

AN OUTLINE DONE ACCORDING TO THE MLA FORMAT,

COMPLETE WITH THESIS AND ALL SUB-DIVISIONS DONE

IN EITHER COMPLETE SENTENCES OR WORDS AND

PHASES [IT CANNOT BE BOTH]. THERE IS NO HEADING

OR PAGINATION ON THE OUTLINE PAGE.

THE BODY OF THE PAPER WILL BE 12-14 PAGES, TYPED,

DOUBLE SPACED, 14 POINT FONT, BOLD, TIMES NEW

ROMAN, WITH 1 TO 1 ½ INCH MARGINS ON ALL FOUR

SIDES; IT MUST HAVE QUOTATIONS FROM EACH OF THE

FIVE [5] SOURCES YOU USE; THESE QUOTATIONS ARE

USED TO SUPPORT POINTS MADE BY YOU; YOU

CANNOT USE A SOURCE UNLESS IT HAS AN AUTHOR

[THE AUTHOR CANNOT BE A COMPANY]; IT MUST HAVE

CITATIONS FOR EACH QUOTATION OR PARAPHRASED

EXCERPT YOU TAKE FROM SOMEONE ELSE’S WORK OR

WORKS; YOU MUST HAVE A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF EACH OF

YOUR SOURCES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY THE

AUTHOR’S LAST NAME; THERE ARE NO NUMBERS ON A

BIBLIOGRAPHY; YOU PAGINATIONATION ON YOUR

BIBLIOGRAPHY WILL BE YOUR LAST NAME AND THE

NEXT PAGE NUMBER AFTER THE LAST PAGE OF YOUR

PAPER; YOUR TOPIC MUST HAVE BEEN CLEARED WITH

Mrs. PROPST IN ORDER TO USE IT FOR YOU RESEARCH

PAPER.

THE ENTIRE PAPER MUST BE TYPED AND SUBMITTED AT

THE SAME TIME, OR IT WILL NOT BE GRADED: OUTLINE,

BODY OF PAPER, BIBLIOGRAPHY.

PLAGARISM WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. ANY

INFORMATION YOU COLLECT MUST BE NOTED IN YOUR

BIIBLIOGRAPHY AND A CITATION. ANYONE GUILTY OF

USING SOME ELSE’S INFORMATION WITHOUT PROPER

DOCUMENTATION WILL RECEIVE A ZERO ON THE PAPER

OR AN F IN THE COURSE, AND THE CENTRAL OFFICE AT

SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE WILL BE INFORMED.

AS THIS PAPER REPRESENTS 30% OF YOUR GRADE, DO

NOT DO ANYTHING FOOLISH WHICH WILL JEOPARDIZE

YOUR COLLEGE FUTURE.

4/28/10 Richard Rodriquez’s “Strange Tools”

Discuss any prevalent errors made on research papers.

5/3/10 QUESTIONS DUE ON EIGHNER, WOOLF,

CISNEROS, RODRIQUEZ.

Discuss Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”

5/5/10Look at each person’s records to determine average and whether or not he or she is eligible to be exempt from the exam.

The final exam will be focused on the short story

“Everyday Use.”

You may elect to take the exam if you wish to better your grade; however, you will get what you make, so your grade could be lowered if you did not do well on the final exam. You must take the responsibility for your own decision about whether to take the exam or not if you are exempt. The person who has missed one or more class days will have to take thefinal.

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES FOR PROPST’S CLASS:

5/10/10 7:00 Class; EXAM WILL BE FROM 7:45-9:45

5/12/10 5:30 cClass; EXAM WILL BE FROM 5:30-7:30

Grade Sheet

RESEARCH PAPER 30%____________

EXAMS 10% __________________

“The Lottery”__________

Compare and Contrast ______

PAPERS AND ORAL 20% ___________

In Class Essay_______

Oral Media Violence _____

“Declaration of Independence”_____

“Sadie and Maud”_____

Sets of Questions 30% _________

Paley, Cisneros, Angelou, Chopin ______

Birnbaum, Jackson, Graham, Safire, Dershowitz ______

Brock, Burciaga, Smith, Adkins, Birtha ________

Eighner, Woolf, Cisneros, Rodriquez _______

FINAL EXAM 10% ________

FINAL GRADE __________

ENGLISH 1301 POLICY STATEMENT

SUE BELL PROPST, INSTRUCTOR

SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE. REESE CENTER

SPRING 2010

ENGLISH 1301 POLICY STATEMENT

Spring 2010

Instructor: Sue Bell Propst

Office: Smyer High School, Room 115, or Reese, Room

323

Office Phone: 234-3871 or 234-2901 e-mail: [email protected]

or [email protected]

Office hours: by appointment only

Scope and Purpose

The purpose of English 1301 is to better understand and apply the principles of correct and formal thought in spoken and written English language. English 1301 enables students to think, while teaching them to read with critical thinking skills which enable them to write well with the primary focus being on the different types of writing which can be used to address a given topic or process. Emphasis is on the correct usage of grammar and diction, with an emphasis on the different types of

development. Correlated readings from all different phases of the humanities provide the materials on which most papers will be written.

Required texts:

Kirszner and Mandell Patterns for College Writing

Hacker A Research Writing

Requirements:

Students will write from six to eight essays, or their equivalent in the forms of questions posed on readings done from the Patterns text, various examinations, the final exam, and a research paper.

Essays will be graded according to the guidelines set forth in this policy statement.

Students will read stories, poems, and essays from the text. Class discussion regarding relevant points to be found in the text regarding writing techniques in the work and writing techniques that can be used to respond to the work.

Students will be tested over their understanding of the writings in the text and will respond in terms of thought-provoking essays.

Students will write a research paper on a topic of their choosing which has been approved by the instructor.

Secondary sources will be used which have an author to eliminate the use of Wikopedia typed sources.

Students will answer a series of questions on the essays/short stories in the text which will collectively function ass one of the essays for the requirements.

Instructional Objectives

By the end of the course, the student should be able to understand that writing is a process, a collective interactive process which includes pre-writing, writing, and revision.

The student should be able to apply the principles of writing to a given process , as well as the audience and purpose of a given assignment.

The student should be able to write a coherent, unified essay that is fully developed through the use of description, narration, illustration, cause and effect,

comparison and contrast, exemplification, and/or persuasion.

The student should be able to write essays using standard English, standard English being those rules and examples given in the two texts for the class.

The student should be able to apply the principles of critical thinking.

Grades for Course

Research Paper 30%

Examinations/Essays in Class 10%

Essays Outside of Class 20%

Series of Essay Questions on Texts 30%

Final Examination Essay 10%

Attendance Policy

Punctual and regular attendance is required for all

South Plains College classes. There are no excused absences. Students are responsible for all class work covered during any absences from the class, even though they might be able to convince the instructor

that the absences were unavoidable (SPC General

Catalog). A student who misses two consdecutive weeks will be dropped from the class, but the student whose absenteeism becomes excessive should not depend on the instructor initiating the drop procedure.

Instructors who drop a student may do so with an X or and F, at the instructor’s discretion.

Plagiarism and Cheating

“Complete honesty is required of the student in the presentation of all phases of course work. This applies to quizzes of whatever length, as well as to final examinations, to detailed reports, and any other related papers” (SPC Catalog). Failure to comply with this policy will result in an F for the assignment, possibly an F in the course, if circumstances warrant that decision.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities, including but not limited to physical, psychiatric, and other disabilities, who meet the need for special consideration should notify the

Special Services Office early in the semester to see that

the appropriate arrangements can be made. In accordance with the federal law, a student requesting special accommodations must provide acceptable documentation of the disability to the Special Services

Office coordinator. For more information, call the

Special Services Office in the Student Services Building.

Statement of Non-Discrimination

It is the policy of this instructor to no discriminate based on age, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, and/or veteran status. In addition to complying with federal and local equal opportunity laws and regulations and/or resolutions of professional organizations in education and psychology, I declare any harassment or basic individual differences to be inconsistent with my professional mission and education goals in my classroom.

Method of Evaluation

Students’ work will be evaluated based on A, B, C, C, or

F, or superior, good, average, poor, and unacceptable.

Numerical grades will be assigned on individual papers

for the purpose of averaging grades only. All assignments must be submitted and evaluated before a student is given credit for an assignment.

The following criteria will be used to evaluate all papers:

Use of the correct conventions of grammar – fragments, comma splices, fused sentences, introductory subordinate clauses, subject and verb agreement, pronoun and antecedent agreement, correct placement of prepositions, spelling, and any other relevant grammar principles – will be evaluated on each paper.

Use of the correct method of development, quotations, citations, and bibliography.

Use of the principles of unity and coherence, introduction, development, and conclusion.

Use of a logical method of development assigned for any given paper – cause and effect, comparison and contrast, explication, exemplification, narration, description, or other relevant development procedure.

Sue Bell Propst

ENGLISH1302.195/DUAL CREDIT

AP ENGLISH IV AT SMYER HIGH SCHOOL

SUE BELL PROPST, INSTRUCTOR

Spring 2010

Week One – Donne, Jonson, Marvell

Submit a paper on Marvell’s syllogistic reasoning

Week Two – Cavalier poets: Herrick, Suckling, Lovelace

Analyze by comparing and contrast Lovelace poetry

Week Three – John Milton sonnets and John Milton

Paradise Lost; MAJOR PAPER ON PARADISE LOST , Satan’s role in the epic

Week Four – Jonathan Swift; write a paper on the type of satire seen in the novel ; study Alexander Pope’s “The

Rape of the Lock”

Week Five – Pope’s “Essay on Man” and “Essay on

Criticism”

Week Six – Exam Week will consist of writing a paper on some work of literature that has been written by any of the authors studied during this grading period

Week Seven – Romantic poets: Gray, Burns, Blake,

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; several minor papers and one major paper on the Romantic

Period

Week Eight – Continue the study of the Romantics

Weeks Nine, Ten, Eleven – Study of Pride and Prejudice.

Week Twelve – Exam week will consist of a major paper on the novel studied during the past three weeks.

Week Thirteen – Tennyson , Browning. Paper on dramatic monologue as seen in “Ulysses” or “My Last

Duchess” or “Porphyro’s Lover”

Week Fourteen – Great Expectations or A Tale of Two

Cities

Week Fifteen – Continue study of Dickens

Week Sixteen – Major Research Paper on Dickens. It will be necessary to have at least three outside sources, outline, quotations, citations, and bibliography.

Week seventeen – Hopkins, Hardy, Housman

Exploration of various short stories from text.

Week Eighteen – Final Exam will consist of a paper to be written on one of the short stories studied during Week

Seventeen

English 1302.195 Policy Statement

Spring 2010

Instructor: Sue Bell Propst

Office: Smyer High School, Room 115

Office Phone: 234-3871

Office Hours: Each afternoon from 2-3:45 e-mail: [email protected]

Scope and Purposse

The purpose of English 1302 is to help students understand and apply the standards of compositions in response to works of literature done in correct and formal thoughts and written English language. English

1302 intends to teach to students how to read, how to use critical thinking skills, and how to write well in response to literature using the correct writing process, the appropriate grammar and diction, and the use of logic in the different methods of development assigned.

Selections from all areas of the humanities are found in the appropriate text of Literature.

Required Texts:

Janet E. Gardner Literature

Hacker A Research Writing

Don Graham Literature ( a Smyer High School textbook)

Requirements

Students will write from 6 to 8 essays, or their equivalent in the form of thought provoking questions of a substantive length, applying the standards of correct thought of formality and standards of the

English language.

Students will read poems, essays, and short stories from the Gardner text, students will participate in classroom discussions, regarding all ramifications of the literary selection, students will be tested on their understanding of the selections read , and assignments will be made for responding to various selections in terms of essays, questions, and papers , covering a

multitude of different types of answers that can be given to hone writing skills.

Students will be assigned a research paper on an author’s work or works that will teach the ability to analyze critical essays that have been written about a particular work of literature, and they will be shown the way to handle these critical essays as a secondary source s in a research paper done according to the MLA format according to the Hacker text.

Students will answer a series of questions presented to them over the prose selections from Literature , with a series of questions being equivalent to one paper grade.

Instructional Objectives

By the end of the course, the student should be able to understand that writing is a process.

The student should be able to apply the principles of writing, as well as the audience and purpose of a written assignment.

The student should be able to write a coherent, unified essay that is appropriately developed by means of

description, illustration, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, process, argumentation, and/or a combination of two or more of these processes.

The student should be able to write in standard English, with the type of English being demonstrated in the

Hacker and Gardner texts.

The student should be able to apply the principles of critical thinking as he writes the assigned papers.

Grading Standards

Research 30%

Papers or Critical Essays 30%

Examinations 30%

Final Examination 10%

Attendance Policy

As the rules for attendance in high school vary from those of South Plains College and as the students attend so many more days in the course of a semester, the attendance policy for dual credit will necessarily be the attendance policy of Smyer ISD.

Plagiarism and Cheating

The plagiarism policy will be the same as that policy spelled out in the South Plains College Catalog.

“Complete honesty is required of all students in presentation of all the phases of class work. This applies to quizzes of whatever length as well as the final examination, to any work, and to all class papers.” (SPC

Catalog) Failure to comply with this directive will result in an F for the assignment and can result in an F for the course and a report to the central office of the failure to follow the rules set forth by the college.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities, including but not limited to physical, psychiatric, or learning disabilities, who wish to request accommodations for this class should apply to the Special Services Office early in the semester so that appropriate arrangements can be made. In accordance with federal and local laws, a student requesting special accommodations must provide applicable documentation of his disability to the Special

Services Office, as well as to the local administrator’s office.

Statement of Non-Discrimination

It is the policy of this instructor not to discriminate on the basis of color, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other issue. In addition to complying to federal and state equal opportunity laws and regulations and/or resolutions of professional organizations in education and psychology, I declare any harassment based on individual differences to be inconsistent with my instructional mission and educational goals in my classroom.

Method of Evaluation

Students’ grades will be evaluated in terms of A, B, C, D,

F, bassed on superior, good, average, poor, and unacceptable. Numerical grades are assigned to papers, questions, and exams as a method of averaging grades.

That numerical grade, as well as the letter grade, will be reported on Faculty Campus Connect in compliance with new regulations given last semester.

All assignments must be submitted and evaluated before the student receives credit on that assignment.

The following criteria will be used for evaluating all assignments:

Uses of grammar: fragments, comma splices, fused sentences, introductory subordinate clauses, subject and verb agreement, pronoun and antecedent agreement, spelling, use of prepositions

Use of proper method of development, quotations, citations, and bibliography

Use of the principles of unity and coherence, introduction, development, and conclusion.

Use of logical argumentation to develop and advance the thesis of the argument based on the assignment given.

Sue Bell Propst

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