Spring 2014 Dr. Don Hankins GEOG 426

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Spring 2014
GEOG 426
Dr. Don Hankins
CSU Chico
Water Resource, Policy, and Planning
Tentative Syllabus
Instructor:
Don L. Hankins
539 Butte Hall, phone 898-4104, email [email protected]
Office Hours:
Tuesday and Thursday , or by appointment
Time and Location:
Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM, 103 Butte
AND various field locations/dates
Course Format:
75-minute seminar and lecture
Assigned Reading:
A selection of electronic documents and articles will be distributed (some are noted in the table below).
http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/PublicReview/HowtoComment.aspx
Recommended Readings:
Holden, J. editor 2014. Water Resources: an Integrated Approach. Routledge. New York, NY.
Course Description:
This course reviews the physical and social parameters of water. We will review water resources via
analysis of local, regional, national, and international water resource policies, projects, distributions, and
characteristics. An emphasis of our discussions will highlight the impacts of water resource projects on
biotic communities and ecosystem services.
Course Objectives:
 Develop an appreciation of the significance of water resource utilization
 Obtain a basic understanding of hydrology
 Develop a working knowledge of key water policies and laws
 Synthesize the relationship between resource utilization and implications
 Obtain an understanding of California’s water delivery infrastructure and major water projects
 Assess water quality and water use/reuse practices
 Integrate and interpret the ecosystem services of watersheds
My Philosophy:
We all share responsibilities as caretakers of our environment. We live in a time of declining natural
resources (i.e., biodiversity, water, soil, and air) and relationships to the natural world. A primary goal of
my teaching is to instill a sense of appreciation for the resources and baseline knowledge, which is integral
to sustainable living.
Assignments:
 Periodic reading assignments (material may appear on exams).
 Homework, weekly current events, and brief writing assignments.
 Leading discussion for assigned articles (sign up in advance)
 Service Learning Project (Watershed Protection with Broom Eradication Education Program in
Forest Ranch [see attached])
o Contact Dulcy Schroeder ([email protected]) to coordinate a Saturday morning to
work
 Review journal for Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) and Draft EIR/EIS.
 Public comment letter on BDCP by April 15th.
 Fieldtrip and write-up (TBD)
 Exams (one midterm and a final).

Graduate students are expected to take on additional responsibilities which may include the
following:
o Facilitate group discussion and support projects
o Facilitate at least four article discussions at beginning of class
Grading:
Grades will be assigned on a straight scale based on the points earned for each assignment (See example
grade ranges below). This system will enable each student to earn a fair grade based upon the percent of
points earned on assignments rather than competing with others in the class for the top grade.
 Make-up exams will be given for excused absences only, and must be completed within a week of
returning to class.
 One late homework assignment will be accepted without an excused absence.
 Other late assignments will have 10 % deducted for each day they are late.
 No assignments will be accepted more than one week after the due date.
 All written assignments based on assigned readings will be due one week from the date assigned
unless otherwise advised.
 Incompletes will only be considered if most of the course requirements have been fulfilled.
A
AB+
B
B-
0.935
0.90
0.87
0.835
0.80
Participation and attendance
Leading article and current event discussion
BDCP Journal
BDCP Comment Letter
Homework/Assignments
Service learning project
Fieldtrip write-up
Midterm
Final exam
Total
C+
C
CD+
D
0.77
0.735
0.70
0.67
0.635
15
15
50
30
60
20
15
50
50
305
points
points
points
points
points
points
points
points
points
points
(5 %)
(3 %)
(17 %)
(10 %)
(22 %)
(5 %)
(5 %)
(17 %)
(17 %)
(100 %)
(Note: these values are an approximation of point allocation. Additional points for other
assignments may be assigned at instructor’s discretion)
Class Rules:
Aside from University policies, I have simple rules: respect the learning environment and the
opinions/contributions of others, learn (and share what you have learned), have fun (laugh a little), and
please avoid tangential conversations and cellular phone use/text messaging during instruction. Plagiarism
will not be tolerated, please submit original works.
Tentative Activity Schedule/Learning Objectives:
Lecture/Date*
Topic(s)
Tentative Readings/Activity
Cultural Connections
Lecture 1
Overview and Cultural
Hankins 2009
21 January
Water
Hopkins 2009
Holden 2014 CH 1
Lecture 2
Cultural Water
Water We Know
23 January
continued
Ngarrindjeri’s Being
Learning Objective(s)

Develop a synthesis of cultural
connections to water

Identify the cultural values of water

To review the basic properties of water
Heard
Lecture 3
Hydrologic Cycle and
Physical Considerations
Holden CH 2
2
28 January
Climate
Lectures 4-6
30 January-6
February
Hydrology Basics
Lectures 7-8
11-13 February
Lectures 9
18 February
Wetlands
Landscape
Contributions
Lecture 10
20 February
Lectures 11 – 14
25 February-6
March
Lecture 14
11 March
Lecture 15
13 March
Policy
Water Resources
Development
Uses and Best Practices

Holden CH 3
Tentative establishment of
review groups
Water Budget

Holden CH 6


Assess the global parameters
contributing to the natural distribution of
water resources
To assess the basic principles of
hydrology
To develop a basic level synthesis of
hydrologic components acting as a
system
To identify the value and services of
wetlands for water resources
To identify the feedback relationships
between landscapes and water
Rapid Assessment

Methodology
Venn Diagram
Tentative BDCP Discussion Day
Policy
Student presentation of
assigned policies (TBD)
Holden CH 11
MIDTERM DUE
Water Manipulation
Mullholland’s Dream
Holden CH 7,10


To interpret the legal framework for
water policy in the U.S. with
applications in California
Assess the foundations of water policy

To compare and assess the distribution
and impacts of water infrastructure

Identify the major components of water
projects/diversions in California
Assess the utility of hydropower as a
renewable resource
Identify the impacts of hydropower
development
Storage, Conveyance
and Transfers: Federal,
State, and Local Water
17-21 March
Lecture16
25 March
Lecture 17
27 March
Spring Break
Hydropower
Cumulative Effects
Fieldtrip 29 March


1 April
Lecture 18
3 April
Lecture 19
8 April
10 April
Ground Water
Management
Water Treatment
Lecture 20 and 21
April 15
Desalination
Lectures 22 and 23
22 and 24 April
Water and Habitat
(Endangered Species)
Lecture 23
29 April
Aquatic Invasives
Restoration
The Dammed Columbia
Holden CH 5

To evaluate the status and impacts of
groundwater use
Holden CH 9
 To survey the methods for water and
wastewater treatment
Finalize BDCP Comments
Fieldtrip Alt. April 12
BDCP DUE
 Survey the use and implications of
desalination as a source of freshwater
 To assess the pros and cons of
desalination
Environment and Habitat
Role Play
 To interpret the use of policy to provide
water for fish and wildlife
 To assess the methods and values in
managing and conserving the interface
between land and water
 Identify threats to water bodies, and
remediation measures
3
Lecture 24
1 May
Water Quality
Lecture 25
9 May
Water and Health
Lecture 26
6 May
Water Resource
Alternatives
Water Quality and Epidemiology
Butte Creek Water
Sampling
Dr. Hankins will be at Butte
Creek in afternoon from 14:30 allow two hours for
activity
Holden CH 4
American Nile
Holden CH 8
Water Scarcity
The Last Oasis
Holden CH 12
8 May
Catch Up Day
Thursday May 15
Final
2:00-3:50
*Fieldtrip dates may shift, and thus will change lecture dates.
4

To identify parameters of evaluation for
water quality

Implement techniques to assess water
quality using biota
Interpret the array of contaminants in
water

Assess the alternative sources of water
available to our society
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