I. Instructor: Zackary Vosen

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I.
Course Title:
Instructor:
Class Schedule:
Office Hours:
Credit:
Telephone:
Office:
Email:
Course Text:
Kinesiology 401
Facility Design and Event Management
Zackary Vosen
TTh, 12:00-1:15 p.m., CCROFT 24
Please check my office door for current information.
3 hours
601-925-3985
CCROFT 20-A
[email protected]
Sport Facility and Event Management
By Aicher, Paule-Koba, and Newland; ISBN: 978-1-284-03479-0
II.
PREREQUISITES:
Junior Standing
III.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed as an overview of the fundamentals of
planning and managing sports facilities and sporting events.
IV.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES:
1. Be able to perform a SWOT Analysis prior to event management planning to help guide
project.
2. Have a clear understanding of the various aspects of sport event planning to consider
prior to carrying out an event.
3. Be able to formulate a specific event management plan that takes into consideration the
possible problem areas during an event.
4. Have the ability to carry out a successful event management plan.
5. Gain a broad understanding of the differences in event planning in different sport events.
6. Explain the key success factors of operating sport facilities and running sport events.
7. Describe the planning, development, and operating of new sport facilities.
8. Describe the process of event operations.
V.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
It is expected that a student attending Mississippi College will be scrupulously honest.
Therefore, plagiarism and cheating will be dealt with in accordance with the policies of
the university. Theses policies are stated in the current Undergraduate Bulletin, Policy
2.19.
VI.
COURSE TOPICS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Introduction and History
Management Theory
Facility Design and Construction
Finance and Budgeting
Bidding and Planning for Different Events
Designing the Event Experience
Project Management and Event Implementation
Marketing the Facility and Events
Consumer Behavior
10. Sponsorship
11. Traditional Revenue Generation in Sport and Recreation
12. Customer Service
13. Risk Management
14. Measurement and Evaluation
15. Sustainability and Legacy
VII.
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS: Instructional procedures used in this course include large
and small group work, lecture and guest lecturers.
VIII.
ASSIGNMENTS:
TESTS.
There will be four unit tests covering the pervious concepts covered in the course. NO
MAKEUP tests will be given. The lowest unit test grade will be dropped. If a test is missed
because of an excused absence this will count as the drop grade, If a second test is missed,
it will be recorded as a zero.
EVENT MANAGEMENT PROJECT.
Each student will be placed in groups of two or three and be responsible for creating a
complete event management plan for a sporting event of the group’s choice. Every detail
must be considered. The group will create both a detailed write-up and a PowerPoint to
be presented in class.
FINAL TEST.
A final examination will be given that will include work after the previous test.
IX.
EVALUATION: The student will be evaluated on the basis of the following:
The basis for assignment of grades will be this scale:
91-100% = A 81-90% = B 71-80% = C 61-70% = D
Below 61 = F
Students will be evaluated on the basis of the following:
Four Unit Exams--------------------------------------------------Five Case Studies--------------------------------------------------Business Plan Project--------------------------------------------Final Exam-----------------------------------------------------------Total-------------------------------------------------------------------
56%
10%
20%
14%
100%
*Note: The instructor reserves the right to alter the grading system as needed to account for time
constraints, changes of schedule, etc.
X.
OTHER COURSE INFORMATION:
CLASS ABSENTEE/TARDY POLICY.
Students are allowed one unexcused absence, without question from the course
instructor, for each credit hour of class. The exception to this policy is night classes
and/or classes that meet only once a week which carry two or more hours of academic
credit. In this case, one unexcused absence is allowed. More than the acceptable number
of unexcused absences will lower the semester grade of the student one letter for each
extra unexcused absence. For example, in a three-hour semester course, the student is
allowed three unexcused absences. A fourth unexcused absence will result in lowering
the semester grade one letter. If the student has a semester grade of A and one too many
unexcused absences, his/her semester letter grade will be a B.
*
Excused absences must be documented by the student and approved by the instructor. It
is the responsibility of the student to see the instructor to verify an excused absence. Otherwise,
the absence will be considered unexcused.
*
Three tardies (five minutes coming in late or leaving class early) will equal one absence.
It is the responsibility of the student to see the instructor after class about changing an absence
to a tardy.
*
Regardless of a student's semester grade, he/she will not receive credit for any course in
which the combined number of absences exceed the number established by Mississippi College.
Note the following statement from the 2015-2016 Mississippi College General Bulletin:
A student receives a grade of F in any course immediately upon accumulating the following
number of absences in that class:
12 in semester classes meeting 3 times per week
8 in semester classes meeting 2 times per week
4 in semester classes meeting 1 time per week
6 in summer day classes
Proportionate numbers in classes on other schedules.
If a student misses more than the number of class periods specified in university policy and
believes that there are reasonable explanations for the absences, he/she may appeal the
absences to the Dean of the School in which the course is being taught. Students may obtain a
Student Absence Appeal Form from the Dean’s Office.
*
Makeup for Absences: Students are responsible for making up work they miss. If
handouts are given, they should arrange to have another student in the class get their handouts.
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS. If special accommodations due to learning, physical,
psychological, or other disabilities are needed, please contact the Counseling and Career
Development Center.
LATE ASSIGNMENTS. Note due dates for assignments located in this syllabus. Assignments will
NOT be accepted after these dates. Students need to plan ahead to be sure they can complete
assignments early and/or by the due date.
Tutoring is available Wed. 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Contact Dr. Washam @ 925-3302.
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE
(This course sequence will be followed. Dates and chapter selections may vary somewhat.)
JANUARY
12
14
19
21
26
28
Course Overview
Chapter 1 – Introduction and History
Chapter 2 – Management Theory
Chapter 3 – Facility Design and Construction
Chapter 3 (continued)
Chapter 4 – Finance and Budgeting
2
4
9
11
16
18
23
25
Catch-up and review for Exam #1
Exam #1
Chapter 5 – Bidding and Planning for Different Events
Chapter 6 – Designing the Event Experience
Chapter 7 – Project Management and Event Implementation
Chapter 8 – Marketing the Facility and Events
Catch-up and review for Exam #2
Exam #2
1
3
8,10
15
17
22
24
29
31
Chapter 9 – Consumer Behavior
Chapter 10 - Sponsorship
NO CLASS – SPRING BREAK
Chapter 11 – Traditional Revenue Generation
Chapter 11 (continued)
Catch-up and review for Exam #3
Exam #3
Chapter 12 – Customer Service
Chapter 13 – Risk Management
5
7
12
14
19
21
26
28
30
Chapter 14 – Measurement and Evaluation; Review for Exam #4
Exam #4
Project Presentations
Project Presentations
Project Presentations
Project Presentations
Project Presentations; Review for Final Exam
NO CLASS – DEAD DAYS
(Saturday) – FINAL EXAM @ 12:00 noon
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
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