“Sex Sells” Coordinated Studies class Grinley/Clapp 2011

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“Sex Sells” Coordinated Studies class Grinley/Clapp 2011
Instructions for the Daily Reading Write-Ups
There are 39 readings here in our course Reading Packet. You will be assigned to read all of them and for
each you need to complete a Write-Up. Most days there will be more than one reading due, and
therefore there will be more than one Write-Up due as well. Write-Ups are due at 10:00 a.m. and are
never taken via email or taken late. In addition to the readings in this packet, you will also need to do a
Write-Up for the chapters of Beyond XX & XY (book) that are assigned. A Write-Up is only one page long,
single spaced, and typed (with 1” margins and in 12 pt. font). Put your name and the title, author, and
packet number at the top of each page, flush right, like this:
Isadora Ulysses Dench
“Individual’s Perspective” by W. James Potter
Packet Reading #46
Then, write a concise summary of the reading (at least 5-7 sentences). This summary should clearly
identify the author’s main idea as well as the major supporting points. You should include no personal
response in the summary. Write in the academic third person (no use of “I”) and refer to the author by
his/her last name. As an example:
Summary: In this reading, Potter describes how we consciously or unconsciously process media messages through filtering, meaningmatching, and meaning-construction. He explains how each step in the series of processing works: 1) to retain important media messages by
matching them to a previously memorized meaning to give it context (attaching to a schema), and then 2) consciously giving it personal
meaning, thus furthering the understanding of the message. Potter then breaks down the elements of media exposure and the process of
exposure a certain message must go through (physical, perceptual and psychological) before it can be called attention. To differentiate
between “automatic processing” and “paying attention,” he then explains the four exposure states (automatic, attentional, transported and selfreflexive). He explains how each type of exposure gives a different type of experience with a media message. The chapter wraps up by
reiterating everything he already said, and then he emphasizes the importance of media literacy as a pathway to independent thought.
Then, write a brief personal response (about 5-7 sentences). This is where you get to react, respond, and
question what the author says. Write this section in the first person (use “I”). As an example:
Response: While a lot of this chapter was repetitive from what we already read from Potter earlier in the term, I do think that Potter is a clear
and concise writer, and he explains the topic in a way that’s very clear. I was very engaged by the topic matter, but if you’d have asked me
before I read this, I probably would have said that I was very conscious about the way I engage with the media. Turns out I didn’t know as
much about how messages are processed as I thought I did. This chapter made me newly aware and thoughtful of how much I much media I
view on a day-to-day basis with a glazed-over view. Something I found especially interesting was the section on the four types of exposure; I
feel like that information alone is going to make me a lot more aware of my media interactions.
Finally, write two open-ended discussion questions that you can use during our class discussion of the
reading. Label the questions! For example:
Discussion Questions:
1. Do different types of media almost require different states of exposure? As in, a transported state seems appropriate for watching a
movie, but does one really need to be self-reflexive when watching Wife Swap?
2. Why are some people more naturally skilled at media literacy than others? If research were done, would there be findings that
differentiate between circumstances such as class and age, or would it be a totally mixed bag?
The next page provides a complete visual sample of exactly what each completed Write-Up should
look like.
Sample Reading Write-Up
Isadora Ulysses Dench
“Individual’s Perspective” by W. James Potter
Packet Reading #46
Summary: In this reading, Potter describes how we consciously or unconsciously process media
messages through filtering, meaning-matching, and meaning-construction. He explains how
each step in the series of processing works: 1) to retain important media messages by matching
them to a previously memorized meaning to give it context (attaching to a schema), and then 2)
consciously giving it personal meaning, thus furthering the understanding of the message.
Potter then breaks down the elements of media exposure and the process of exposure a certain
message must go through (physical, perceptual and psychological) before it can be called
attention. To differentiate between “automatic processing” and “paying attention,” he then
explains the four exposure states (automatic, attentional, transported and self-reflexive). He
explains how each type of exposure gives a different type of experience with a media message.
The chapter wraps up by reiterating everything he already said, and then he emphasizes the
importance of media literacy as a pathway to independent thought.
Response: While a lot of this chapter was repetitive from what we already read from Potter
earlier in the term, I do think that Potter is a clear and concise writer, and he explains the topic
in a way that’s very clear. I was very engaged by the topic matter, but if you’d have asked me
before I read this, I probably would have said that I was very conscious about the way I engage
with the media. Turns out I didn’t know as much about how messages are processed as I
thought I did. This chapter made me newly aware and thoughtful of how much I much media I
view on a day-to-day basis with a glazed-over view. Something I found especially interesting
was the section on the four types of exposure; I feel like that information alone is going to make
me a lot more aware of my media interactions.
Discussion Questions:
1. Do different types of media almost require different states of exposure? As in, a
transported state seems appropriate for watching a movie, but does one really need to
be self-reflexive when watching Wife Swap?
2. Why are some people more naturally skilled at media literacy than others? If research
were done, would there be findings that differentiate between circumstances such as
class and age, or would it be a totally mixed bag?
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