Albany trackmen outrun RPI in season opener

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PUBLISHED AT THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY BY THE ALBANY STUDENT PRESS CORPORATION
Albany trackmen outrun RPI in season opener
Jim Gnrzia took third,
The fourth Irack record was set by R.P.I.'s
Eric Waterman who won the 800-meter run
in 1:53.7. R.P.I.'s Scott LcMay, the
800-mclcr indoor stale champ, legged out
Danes Noel Woodburn and Winston
Johnson in Ihe close race for second. Van
Tassel came back lo break up a potential
R.P.I, sweep of the 400-melcr Intermediate
hurdles by taking second place in 59.1
seconds. Albany then swept the 200-meter
dash as Newton took his second win covering
the distance in a very fast 22.5 seconds. Sachs
took another second and sophmore John
Rcilly look third. More poinls came in the
5,000-meler run where Danes Ed McGill and
Ian Clements look second and third respectively. The last event of the day was the 4 x
400-mcler relay with Albuny won handily.
The leant of Riggins, Saccacio, Tony Ri/./.o,
and Sachs ran a very quick lime of 3:25.1.
By Tom Kaccuiulcs
tlllTORIAL ASSISTANT
The track rivalry between Albany and
neighbor R.P.I, is a very fierce one. Wednesday, on University field, the Albany Slate
men's track and field team won Ihe tenth
meeting of Ihe Iwo teams with a score of
101-71, evening Ihe slalc al 5-5. R.P.I, is an
improved team: the Engineers outseorcd
Albany at the Slate Championships, ycl Ihe
tremendous depth of the young Dane squad
prevailed in the hcad-to-hcad competition.
' Albany Head Coach Bob Munsey commented: "Our guys don'l like to lose, but
Ihey really get together when its R.P.I, on the
truck. Most of the learn really did their
homework over the vacation and it showed in
the way we heal them,"
It was an exciting season for the Danes.
The meet was marked by four track
records—three set by Albany—and a slew of
personal bests by Albany runners.
The first of Ihe best-ever efforts came In
the 10,000-mctcr run where Dane runners
Chris Callaci, Pete Wamslcker, and Steve
Guerds finished first, second and third
respectively. Callaei's winning time was
.14:14.2 followed by Wamstekcr at 34:22.2.
On the infield, captain Paul Mancc started
off his double win with a mark of 6.25 meters
in the long jump while teammate Bill Waring
leaped 6.19 meters for second place honors.
Later Mance won the triple jump and Waring
look third. Making the transition from the
35-pound weight to the hammer throw,
sophmore Marc Mcrcurio took second place
with a toss of 45.84 meters. Moving to his
specialty, the discus, Mcrcurio threw 43.04
meters to take first place as Dane Ken Yanneck look third. In the shot put, Bill Nason
threw a respectable 14.66 meters for first and
Cireg Dedes look second with a loss of I3.IK)
meters.
On Ihe Irack, R.P.I, won the 4 x 100 meter
relay after the leading Albany learn dropped
the baton. In Ihe 1,500-meler run, captain
Nick Sullivan was passed and boxed by three
Engineers, bul fought back to lake third in a
Ican-at-the-tape finish. Freshman Chuck
Bronner established a track record for the
3,000-metcr steeplechase when he won in a
time of 10:11.6. Later, freshman Bruce Van
***
LISA SIMMONS UPS
Bruce Van Tassel broke the track record In the 110-meter high hurdles as Albany
defeated R.P.I., 101-71, to win their season opener.
Tassel broke the track record in the seconds. Sach's lime of 49.3 was a full second
110-meter high hurdles with his winning time faster lhan his previous best.Albany also
of 15.1 seconds. The 400-meter dash follow- went one-two in the 100-meter dash where
ed and another record fell as captain Eric sophmores Mike Riggins and Pal Saccacio
ran 10.87 and 11.1 seconds respectively.
Newion broke his own track record. Spurred
by the personal effort of senior Scott Sachs, Junior Rcj Jamerson won Ihe pole vault with
an
impressive jump of 14'0" while teammate
Newion flew through the line in 48.9
Those who run Irack can tell you that indoor and outdoor track are two lolally different sports. Likewise, Ihe outdoor season is
a fresh start for both Ihose that ran indoors
and Ihe new walk-ons. It's much more difficult to run on the smaller indoor tracks
because the tighlcr turns and short straights
make it difficult lo pass opponents, This
hurts taller or inexperienced runners. Outdoors the young Albany squad should perform belter and big-stride runners like
Newion and Sullivan can run unhindered.
t h e 1983 outdoor season promises lo be a
good one if ihe R.P.I, meet is any Indication
of Ihe Danes' ability. In Ihe field events, the
Danes have talent and depth. Mcrcurio, a
shoe-in for the Nationals in the discus,
should go undefeated through Ihe dual
meets. Captain Paul Mance has scored first
or second in Ihe jumps all year and has the
potential lo be a Nationals qualifier in the triple jump. A new face is Jim Anderson who
should score big poinls In the javelin.
In the sprints, the Danes should dominate
their competition. The sprint squad is still
missing the services of senior Mitch Havard,
who should return next week. Harvard is
quite possibly the best dash man for New
York Division III schools and the strength of
his return will be key to Albany's scoring in
19»-
VOLUME
L X X
NUMBER
17
Presidential candidate violates election policies
By Heidi Gralla
STAFF WHITER
SA Prcsidcnlial candidate Joe Ranni has
not fully complied wilh a ruling handed
down by the SA Supreme Courl, ordering
him to lake down illegal posters and deliver
them with the master copy to the SA office,
A hearing was scheduled for 11:30 a.m. to
day, according lo Supreme Court Chief
Justice Sieve I'errin.
Ranni was charged wilh hanging campaign
posters not printed al one of the three locations outlined in elections policy and posting
his campaign posters in illegal places. The
plaintiffs in the hearing, Waller and Anthony
Nasiri — both former Central Council
members, also argued thai since Ranni had
an unknown number of poslcrs primed al an
unknown place, it is possible thai he further
violated election policy by exceeding the
1,500 limit on posters permitted an SA
presidential candidate.
The decision, handed down by Pcrrin and
Associate Justices Steven Ahcarn and Ken
Cilassnian, ruled that all of the illegal posters
be laken down and returned with the master
copy and all remaining copies to Ihe SA office by 4 p.m. Monday.
Additionally, Ranni may not print any
more poslcrs of this design and all posters not
affected by this ruling must be posted only on
bulleten boards and other locations authorized in the SA election policy.
According lo Ranni, I'errin contends that
he saw four illegal posters on a bulletin board
outside the Campus Center after 4 p.m.
Ranni maintained thai he did not miss any
posters outside the Campus Center qnd thai
any posters Pcrrin may have found were
cither pul up by someone after Ranni checked those bulletin boards, or were uncovered
when posters above litem were removed.
Ranni admitted thai he had hung 400
posters that were not primed al University
Rapid Copy, Ihe Diaper copying center, or
ihe SA Contact Office -— the only three locations designated in the elections policy.
Plain Director Dennis Stevens Thursday, he
had removed all posters that were in violation. Walter conlcndcd that one of Ihe pictures of an Illegally posted poster thai she had
submitted as evidence had been laken Sunday
afternoon.
Elections Commissioner Ken Olscn was
called as a wilness by both sides. He said he
had "considcrcd"chccking Ihe three copying
locations for Ranni's receipts, but "deemed
it unnecessary."
"I would not disqualify Joe Ranni ill the
<M case of no receipts," he added.
Waller substantiated her charge wilh
photos of illegally posted poslcrs and
memorandums from Ihe three illegally posted
posters and memorabilia, from the three
authorized copying locutions staling thai
ptior to April 4, there were no receipts on file
for Ranni. She concluded her case saying,
"Joe Ranni is in obvious violation of
•policy...for Ihe courl lo come out and say
ihai his is okay would just be a mockery of
SA policy."
Ranni charged that policy was used
"rather flippantly to fit a certain case,"
citing errors in the plaintiff's filing of
charges, and questioning if they (the plaintiffs) were involved in anyone's campaign.
Council' "C"II seems they weni lo a whole loi of irouble
as 'concerned students,' " he said.
Waller explained dial as a former Council
member, she was aware of policies thai had
been violated. She declined comment on
whether or nol she was affiliated wilh
another candidate's campaign, saying,"!
t.h.„
don'l think that's necessary lo bring out."
SUSAN E MINDICH UPS
Candidate Joe Ranni; Election Regulation Act_
Ranni moved Tor dismissal al ihe statt of
". . . Unit policy was used rather jtippantly lo jit it certain ease.
ihe hearing, arguing thai ihe charges had nol
been
filed in acordance with Supreme Courl
However, Ranni contended that a student
such as lampposts walls, and flagpoles,He ex- policy, thai he hadn't been given enough time
working on his campaign had not followed
plained thai he hadn't been aware that this lo obtain nil ihe necessary policies lo defend
his instructions on where the copies could be
was illegal, since Ihe election policy stales
himself, (hat no elections commissioner's rulmade and had copied them al home. Ranni
that posters musl comply with the guidelines
ing had been rendered, and that ihe charges
maintained that he had been unaware dial
of the exterior/interior poster policy, which
this iiad been done until lale last week.
is nol included in the elections regulations weren'l equitable since no investigation had
been conducted on the other candidates.
packet.
The candidate acknowledged that some of
The courl recessed for 20 minutes after
his posters had been posted in illegal places
He added thai after speaking to Physical
11»-
Albany looks to defend hockey Challenge CupCuomo discusses college costs, voting rights
By Tim Sheil and Malt Reiss
By Barry Gcffner
STAFF WHIIFR
LAURA BOSTICK UPS
The Albany A team will be looking to defend Its title in the AMIA/Mlller Challenge
Cup this weekend in University Gym.
This weekend, six teams from six different
colleges, plus Iwo learns from Albany will
compete in the AMIA Challenge Cup
Hockey Tournament.
Originally, the lournamenl was being
sponsored by Molson Beer. Last Friday,
Molson Beer pulled out their sponsorship,
according lo Andy Weinslock, lournamenl
direclor. "I talked lo a man named Joe Ruggiero who told me thai they (' I' )n) were
overbudgetcd and ihey were i tnging their
advertising and marketing strategy, thus
Molson pulled out of the sponsorship." Ruggiero could not be reached for comment. As
lale as Tuesday nighl, with the lournamenl
scheduled lo begin tonight, there was no
sponsor. However, on Wednesday AMIA
was able to get the Miller Brewing Company
to sponsor Ihe tournament. So beginning
tonight at 6pm, ihe AMIA/Miller Challenge
Cup Hockey Tournament will begin and will
run through the weekend. The lournamenl
will be capped off with the finals, Sunday
night at 6pm.
The colleges competing in the lournament
arc Binghamion, Buffalo Slate, SUNY
Maritime, Oneonla, Downstntc Medical,
Northeastern (the first out-of-state school to
compete in Ihe Challenge Cup), and Ihe Iwo
learns from Albany. The two learns are divided into A and B teams, consisting of players
selected from various learns in the AMIA
floor hockey league.
The defending champions, the Albany A
team will start the lournament off by playing
Oneonta Friday nighl. Al 7:15, the Albany B
leant will play Buffalo Slate.
The Albany A team, with seven players
returning from lasl year, are led by.the line of
Rich Weslcrberg, Andy Weinslock and Larry
Eichen, which set a record this year by scoring 83 points. The second line will consist of
Glenn Weber, Carl Wolfson and Barry
Dampf, who previously held ihe league
record of 64 poinls scored for a line. Also in
Ihe offense will be Barry Levinc, who led Ihe
league in goals scored wilh 20.
The defense will be spearheaded by John
Esposito, Jeff Fredericks, Elliot Goldstein,
Dave Silverman and Andy Martin. Paul
Grima, Mark Witlenstein, and Justin Walsh,
newcomers to challenge cup, should give the
learn depth.
The goaltendcrs will be Keith Litwak and
Ray Prioric. Litwak led Ihe league in least
goals given up this year wilh 19, while Prioric
holds the record, by giving up 10 goals last
season.
The B team, which losl in the finals last
year lo the A team will be lead by returning
players Doug Kalian and Mike I-lallacy. Dave
Skudin, and Mike Hoffman will give the
leant offense up front, wilh Ed Yule, Alan
Beagleman and Dave Ragcr being Ihe players
lo watch,
Newcomers Vinny Cirillo und Mouse
Goldstein will be lite goallendcrs.
All games will played in University Gym
and admission is 50 cents per game.
I 1
STA Til I'RliSS SEH VICE
Governor Mario M. Cuomo yesterday
denied the existence of a formula which
would scl Ihe tuition scale for the Stale
University, a formula which would lead to
$250 tuition increases each of Ihe next four
years, according to Assemblyman Mark A.
Sicgcl.
"1 have no formula. There is no formula,"
Cuomo said in discussing his first one hundred days in office yesterday.
"There may have been that language in the
budget message — I really don'l know. There
is no formula for fixing tuition. What I'd like
lo see happen is for tuition al ihe Slate
University to slay as low as possible,"
Cuomo staled.
Sicgcl, Chairman of the Assembly higher
education committee, said earlier (his year
Governor Marlo M. Cuomo
^
"There is no formula for fixing tuition, . . like to see it stay. . . .as low as possible.
that Cuomo's bitgct formula for SUNY and
CUNY tuilion would raise college costs $250
for four years straight.
Mentioning the slate commitment to
educate "our children" without charging
them tuition, undertaken 100 years ago,
Cuomo said thai to meet that obligation today, "you really should be giving them a free
education right through to Ihe college level.
So, we've fallen behind in our commitment."
Bul the governor quickly added lhal "we
live ill a hard world, a realistic world," and
lhal wilh many costly social services that
have lo be provided for, compromise musl be
sought.
And SUNY must also compromise, but
Cuomo said he favors giving SUNY "more
command over their own money. Bul," he
cautioned, "I'm going to watch them very
closely because sometimes it's easier lo lay
off buildings lhan your friends who are on
Ihe faculty."
Cuomo, sometimes called a 'card carrying
intellectual' by political observers, also addressed the growing need for more emphasis
on high tcchnology-orienlcd education,
"We need a balance of more technical
without losing u liberal arts orientation. We
;have too many lawyers and nol enough
engineers. Now lhal doesn't mean you
.should close down all the liberal aits schools.
You have lo keep the balance,"
But Cuomo did nol agree wilh a privale
school stance voiced earlier Ibis year, lhal
SUNY has no role in Ihe expansion of high
lech education. "I differ from the private
seclor, I believe in Ihe balance between the
private and nitblic seclor that we've main-
tained for so many years."
Cuomo said he believes that the slate's
future depends on high lech training, and "to
do it the way lite private seclor wanls," by
sending all high tech students lo privale
schools, "is lo give the private sector a
dominance over our future that I am uncomfortable wilh."
But stressing his belief in the need for high
lech, Cuomo, a Si. John's graduate, assured
those present thai he believes in a balance
between high tech and liberal arts. "I
graduated with 164 credits in all Ihe subjects
lhal didn't count," lie cracked, "but il will
always be a humanist's world."
To make this point, Cuomo ruminated,
"When you start writing things on a machine
and forgcl the sweet lyric, you have scl back
your society."
On Ihe question of student voting rights,
for which candidate Cuomo expressed his
desire, Governor Cuomo said that he was si ill
in favor of sludenis being allowed lo vole in
their college community. He was not sure
what his thus-far busy administration had
done for voting rights, but promised an
answer soon.
He did say, however, thai a change of ihe
stale constitution, which slates lhal a person
shall neither gairt nor lose voter eligibility due
lo where Ihey live while al school and which
muny believe allows any county election commissioner lo independently •discriminate
against sludenis, would not be "the best way,
the most practical way to do it. That's a long
range thing."
Mr. Cuomo filed Ihe real estate and oil
11*
APRIL 12, 1983 a ALBANY STUDENT PRESS 3
£ ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
Z APRIL 12, 1983
WORLDWIDE
Arms race decried
Toronto, Canada
(AP) The money spent on one modern fighter
plane could innoculate three million children
against disease, an anti-war conference has
been told.
Economist Md Watkins. a teacher at the
University of Toronto, said what is spent
each minute on global arms build-up could
save the lives of .1,000 children.
Not only is the world neglecting basic
social programs by spending an estimated
S650 billion a >-e*r on arms, but the arms race
also is wrecking the economy, he said.
Rather than creating jobs, the arms buildup destroys them, he said over the weekend.
It also takes away scarce scientific and
technical skills thai could be more productively used.
Watkins said information from the United j
Slates shows the spending of $1 billion would .
produce almost twice as many jobs in health j
and three limes as many jobs in education j
than in military production.
Border war seen
Bangkok, Thailand
(AP) The Thai-Cambodian border, where
fighting recently escalated to a four-ycai
high, is likely to remain a battleground foi
years as a formidable Victncmesc armv attempts to crush elusive and determined Cambodian guerrillas.
Cambodian civilians pour across the
border into Thailand. Vietnamese and Cambodian fighters track each other in malarial
jungles. Thais and Vietnamese trade artillery
fire and vitriolic words,
These scenes have been repeated again and
again since earlv 19"9 when Vietnamese invaders drove the Communist Khmer Rouge
covernmem from Phnom Penh, spawning a
fuemlla war and a latge. floating population
of civilians along the western edge of the
country.
The Vietnamese launched their most ambitious drive to date against the guerrillas in
December, making at least five significant
strikes since December, then overrunnning
several key bases in an offensive that began
March 31.
The Soviet-backed Vietnamese have some
180.000 troops throughout Cambodia, along
with warplanes, tanks and heavy artillery.
Although there have been some defections
and reports of poor morale, Hanoi's forces
show no signs of slackening after four years
of the grueling border campaign.
PLO assassin arrested
Lisbon, Portugal
(AP) Police on Monday arrested a 26-yearold man in connection with the assassination
of the PLO's European coordinator.
Issam Sanawi, a 47-year-old physician
who had become a leading PLO advocate of
reconciliation with Israel, was shot Sunday
while attending the final day of the Socialist
International conference in the seaside city of
Albufcira.
A radical Palestine Liberation Organization splinter group, known as the Abu Nidal
faction or the Revolutionary Council of the
Fatah, claimed responsibility for killing Sarlawi. It denounced him as a "traitor" for his
efforts to bring Israelis. Arabs and Palestinians together in peace efforts.
Eleven hours after the murder, Carneito
said, police went to a hotel in Lisbon and arrested a man who identified himself as
Voussef al-Awad.
NATIONWIDE
B R I E F S
Chicago vote today
Chicago, Illinois '
(AP) Harold Washington stumped at a |
breakneck pace Monday to shore up support I
among white liberals, while opponent Der- |
nard Epton coasted to the finish line in the ci- ;
ty's most bitter mayoral contest in decades, j
Washington, a two-term Democratic con- t
gressman who hopes the election Tuesday
will make him Chicago's first black mayor,
returned Monday to a North Side lakcfronl
area where he had rallied with hundreds or
white liberal supporters over (he weekend.
Meanwhile, Epton, a millionaire lawyer
hoping lo become the city's first Republican
mayor in more than 50 years, met with aides
and scheduled a final radio appeal and only
three public appearances, two of them with
his volunteers.
In recent days, both candidates have
zeroed in on the liberal lakcfronl area, considered a critical battleground in a contest in
which racial tensions have frequently surfaced.
Gandhi takes Oscars
Los Angeles, Ca,
(AP)"Gandhi," the epic story of the man
who led India lo independence, dominated
the 55th Academy Awards by picking up
eight Occars Monday night, including best
picture of 1982.
Meryl Streep won the Academy Award as
best actress for her performance as the tragic
Polish survivor of a Nazi concentration camp
in "Sophie's Choice."
Ben Kingslcy, in his movie debut, won the
Oscar as the best acior of 1982 for his performance in "Gandhi" as the apostle of nonviolence who led India to independence.
Louis Gossclt Jr., the tough but fair drill
sergeant in "An Officer and a Gentleman,"
was named best supporting actor of 1982,
while "E.T. The Exlra-Tcrreslial" and
•Gandhi" each took three early Oscars at the
55th Academy Awards.
"E.T." picked up awards for Ihe besl
original score by John Williams, the besl
visual effects and sound effects ediling in ihe
nationally televised ceremony from the
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
"Gandhi" captured awards for best
costume design, art direction and
cinematography. "Quest for Fire" for best
makeup, " T'ango" for besl animated short,
and "A Shocking Accident" for besl live action short.
The award for documentary short subject
went to ihe controversial "If You Love This
Plancl" by the National Film Board of
Canada. Last month, Ihe U.S. Justice
Department labeled the anti-nuclear film and
two others made in Canada as propaganda.
"Volver a Empczar lo Begin Again," a
Spanish movie about a writer exiled during
the Franco era who returns home, was named
the best foreign film. That award was acccplcd by dircclor Jose Luis Garci, who said,
"All my life since I was a kid I dreamed of
this moment. Well, dreams come true
sometimes."
Adelman vote due
Washington, D.C.
(AP) With a close Senate vote ncaring on
Kenneth L. Adelman's nomination as
nuclear arms control chief, a House subcommittee was told Monday thai the agency he
would direct has been so"gutlcd, purged and
starved" lhat it is unable to do its job.
"It is not going too far lo say that the
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
would be an international joke, were it not
thai Ihe situation is so tragic," Dr. William
H. Kincadc, executive director of the Arms
Control Association, a non-profit, nonpartisan research group on arms control
policy, said in prepared testimony.
The Senate is beginning debate Tuesday
and is to vote Thursday on President
Reagan's nominaiion of Adelman, 36, deputy US representative lo (he United Nations,
lo succeed the ousted Eugene V. Rostow as
the agency's director.
STATEWIDE
B R I E F S
Death penalty possible
Poughkeepsie, \ e * Yon
(API Defense lawyer William Kunsiler began
his summation Monday at the first-degree
murder trial of Lemuel Smith, who is accuse!
of killing prison guard Donna Payant at
Green Haven slate prison.
If convicted, Smith, 41, faces the death
penalty automatically under an untested and
legally questionable section of New Y, :•
state law. The rest of ihe stale's deaih penalty
law has been voided for providing deaih
sentences automatically — the same type pr^1vision involved in a murder by a "lifer" like
Smith, who was serving life terms for two
murders when Mrs. Payant wa* strangled
May 15. 1981.
Cuomo will yield
Albany, Vex 1 ••
(AP) Gov. Mario Cuomo positioned hims<
for a possible compromise Monday on I
proposal to speed up stale courl calendar- bv
having judges — instead of lawyers — seleci
jurors.
Cuomo said he would be willing to "c
sider" alterations of his proposal for jury
selection by judges, including a possible oneyear experiment of iis use or Irving out ihe
idea only in a limited number of judicial
districts.
LAURA aOSIICK UPS
Senior Week tickets went on sale Sunday as students overlooked long lines in order to get in on thai final week ol
festivities. Starting on May 14 and going through the 22nd. Senior Week activities include canoeing, trips to Riverside
Amusement Park, Montreal, Boston and New York City as well as the clambake. Senior Night at the Bars and, ol course
graduation.
PREVIEW OF EVENTS
Teaching and AoVuang Awaits* Banquet tici.e-s po on sale on W-onost
April IS. >n trie- =i gflioa Ihe banquet, lo be haid in trie Fallow
flctorri. is open 10 anyone *''!fi a ta«;ara. Dananon is 12
photographers are incited to «.-:>-i •
entries to trie Capital District's Mh
Annual Pnolography Regional En*
Mbarjon Slucllla, amateurs, anfl
protessiciriats may submit w M H
trci- Ap'.: *r;v5 Tr,e- competition,
whtGh i»,bro& b number OJ cash
prices ana gilt oertitic-ates., uviil be
looc-ea Dy Cornell Capa, an intern*-. ona s known plsotograplMM
auincii ana edncn
International Student Association
aflacilcaii w.ii t*e neia Tuesday and
Wednesday, April 19 and 20, in the
Campus Derates lobby and Ssyies
Hail.
StuOy and Travel in England mis
summer at Widdiese* Pctlylecnnc
Summer Ssnco1 Tne 'ee to* Turto*.
and a private •;•:- ':•• I've weei.s s
S.5D0. Course oltermos include perterming arts, luerature, history,
languages. social science, and information technology. For more Information m'iie
Middlesex
Poi)iechnic Som-net School, 114
Chase Side, London Nil 5PN,
England
Central Council, the legislative
booj oil SA, meets ei-ery Wednesday at 7:3G p .m. in CC 3T5. Meet ings
are open 10 the public.
Karma Thaosum Choline, presents a
seminal featuring tthenpo Karthai
D npoona HOT, Friday. April 15, io
Sunday, April 17, at 637 Washington
£.'i Wgan] Pot more information
:.» i.ou Feiit'orni at 489-2151.
Some prosecutors and judicial officials
have complained thai the present selection ol
juries by attorneys often results in lengihv
pre-trial delays. Under the governors
February proposal, judges would ask jurorpertinent questions and designate Juries
themselves. Lawyers would still be able lo
knock some prospective jurors oui of consideration.
The judicial jury selection process is now
used in some federal courts,
Planned Parenthood is sponsoring
a tiaining workshop in "Creative
Ways to Teach Human Sexuality"
on Saturday, April 16, Irom 9:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m., at the Harmanus
Bleeker Center on the comer ol
Washlngion Ave. and Dove St. The
registration lee is $15. which Includes lunch For more Information
call 434-4979.
A Mathematics Colloquium entitled
"Piecewise Linear Vibration" will be
presented by Proleasor Mark
Steinberger ol Cornell University on
Friday, April 15. at 4 p.m. In ES 140.
Campus CrusaOo lor Christ will
meet on Thuisday, April 14, at 8-30
p.m. In CC 375,
A Raquetball Party will be thiown
by the Capital District Raquetball
Player's Association on Saturday,
April 16, Irom 7 p.m. to midnight, al
Club East in East Greenbush al tho
Intersection ol Routes 4 and 9/20.
The lee Is $3. Beginners instruction
will be provided at no extra charge.
Pre-heallh profession students attend an advisement meeting to lind
out application procedures and
schools to apply to. Meetings are
being held on Wednesday, April 19,
and Thursday, April 20, at 4-30 p.m.
In LC 22. Sponsored by CUE.
Community Service registration for
Fall 1983 is still open In LI93A. For
more Information call 457-6347.
Social Welfare School audited for $1,000,000
By Chris Thomas
SUNYA may owe Ihe federal government more than 1.02
million dollars, according lo federal audilors from the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services.
The funds in question stem from three contracts the
School of Social Welfare had undertaken between October
1976 and January 1979. 'Worth a total or 5.8 million
dollars, (he contracts contained 3.8 million dollars of funds
appropriated under federal Title XX, a social service block
grant. The appropriations were used to establish and maintain programs within the Albany areu designed primarily to
Irain workers in Ihe areas of child abuse and adull services.
According lo Prank Zuruff, Branch Manager of Health
tnd Human Services Offices of Inspector General Audil
Vgcncy, the audil is "out of my hands" and unless there
have been any major new developments, the university and
stale will be required lo reimburse the federal government a
substantial amount. He declined estimation, Inn fell thai
numbers substantially lower than the 1.02 mllllion lhat
auditors assess would be unrealistic,
As a mailer of course Ihe federal government allocates,
under certain lilies, money to specific stale departments
who in turn subcontract the federal funds. In this case,
federal funds under a variety of tiles were given lo die Stale
Department of Social Services. Social Services then subcontracted I8.3 million dollars contained within forty separate
contracts und of the forty contracts, SUNYA undertook
three, The university carried out the contracts und
presented Ihe bill io ihe state, a bill which was to he paid for
under die guidelines of federal Title XX.
In I980 Ihe federal government began whin was to be a
routine audit of fonds under the Title XX heading. The
auditors were dealing only with the 3.8 million dollars contracted under Title XX and basically working without
pressure from federal departments. From their point of
view, the school has misused 1,02 million dollars which Tide XX will not cover.
The auditor's final report and previously published
reports stale thai:
a. $272,000 in salaries is being attributed to Title XX for
work not provided for under Ihe Title's guidelines.
• $526,000 was improperly claimed for overhead expenses instead of lower rales for training sessions held at
hotels and motels.
• $42,000 overstated by Parsons Child and Family
Center in Albany for Illegitimate support costs.
SUNYA Director of Community Relations Philip
Johnson poinled out thai Ihe 1.02 million dollars represents
what the auditor's position is." He added that the university, as well as the Slate, believes no misuse has occurred and
that the school may have to reimburse less than $30,000.
Presently, the audil is in the final stage of a three stage
process. In each stage the auditors, the Slate Department of
Social Services and SUNYA submitted approximations of
expenditures, which arc then examined by Health and
Human Services. Each group's final assessments arc currently being examined by officials within Health and
Human Services to determine Ihe validity of each group's
claims.
Associate Grams Coordinator in die Office for Research
Frank DISanto, said thai since the drsl audit draft in I980
| lie and his department have been in contact with federal of-
ficials who, he believes, will allow payment under Title XX
of expenses which audilors found questionable. Furthermore, he added that the "first draft proposed the
disallowance of three million dollars" in expenses.
Slate Social Services Spokesman Tcrrcncc McGrath
described the discrepancies by saying, "audits are a routine
thing...what really counts is Health and Human Services
final analysis or the claims." McGrath explained lhat the
federal auditors act as a check on how Moral money is
spent within each title and that discrepancies arc common.
"We are confident thai Ihe federal departmenr will sec
things our (die university's and State's) way," he said. Both
McGrath and Johnson expect the school will need to reimburse Ihe government little, IT any, money.
"As part or the Inspector General's office, explained
ZuralT, "we're partially independent from Health and
Human Services. If we find something questionable (during
the audit), we contact Health and Human Services Tor their
guidance." He added lhat Ihe main problem now concerns
billing ol overhead costs lo Title XX.
However, it is nol being questioned whether or nol work
contracted lor was actually carried out, nor is program
quality being scrutinized, Bui due to misinterpretation dr
federal Title XX guidelines, this million dollar disagreemeni has arisen, If die Department or Health and Human
Services decides against university claims and orders relmbursemenl un appeal would be made and a rccviilualion
ordered. Stale university officials are confidcnl that federal
monies were properly spent und that the auditors hnve
misinterpreted the Tide XX allocation stipulations,
I I
University Club
votes to permit
women to apply
for membership
By lien G o r d o n
.Y7VI// WHITER
Members of Albany's exclusive University
Club voted March 24 to accept women us full
members wilh voting rights equal lo those of
male members.
The vote was 223-85, wilh a two-thirds majority required for passage. Club President
l'eler Mlhalak said lhat since members musi
be present to vote, die turnout was "very
nice." He explained dial the club has about
1,500 members, of which approximately 500
arc ol non-voting status.
SUNYA Prcsidcnl Vincent O'Leary is
among those members who have resigned
Irom the club in protest or the old policy
restricting women lo the status or "privileged
members," without voting power.
In response to the new policy, O'Lcnry has
said thai although "I have no present interest
in rejoining, in due time I'll muke a decision
on It,"
Questioned whether failure to rejoin the
club would cheapen his protest of resignation, O'Leary responded, "I'm not sure that
I'm obliged to rejoin. I may, and I'm thinking about it." He explained, "I'm not sure
dial il necessarily cheapens it."
O'Leary added, "One doesn't simply join
Ihe University Club." He pointed out that
one is first sponsored by two present
members of the club, und then must be approved by the general membership.
When asked whether it would be difficult
for members who resigned over Ihe issue to
cjoln, Mihalak responded wilh, "No,
lot really." He said lhal it would nol be required ol' them to be rcsponsored since ihey
were previously members or the club.
Mihalak said that "not more than five"
members resigned in protest or the old
policy.
President ol' the Albany Common Council
Thomas Whaleii 111, was another member
who resigned over die former policy. Whaleii
wus quoted in the March 25 edition or the
Albany Times Union as saying that die vote
"was overdue, but heller late lluin never."
The vole was die fifth on die 1'cmalc
membership issue in three years.
Minimum age lor joining the ciglny-lwo
year old club is twenty-one, and applicants
inusl have spenl Iwo years al an accredited
college or university, according lo Mihalak.
Alter meeting with the membership committee, the application is voted on by the thirteen
member Board of Directors.
Mihalak explained dial the application
process takes from one to six months, but
UK-
WILL YUIIMAN UPS
Studanls studying In Ihe library
prior tc
to tho threat
yprior
7Vrt' University Police were notified
lineal called into the library's circulation desk.
~eaofofa abomb
fr
Bomb threats stir commotion on campus
By M i k e Taiiblcb
A series or bomb threats, directed al the
university library, gym and bookstore, were
reported to University Police April 5,
resulting in some evacuations bul no explosions: all die calls were false.
According lo Assistant Director or Public
Safety John Hcnighan, the University Police
were nodded in 10:25 p.m. of a bomb threat
called into the library's circulation desk.
"The library building dircclor senl a number
of employees lo search the public areas of the
building," Hcnighan said. No bomb was
found.
The second lineal was called in directly to
U.P.D, "At 10:30, a male culler warned that
'you'd heller evacuate,' because there was a
bomb in Ihe pool and Iwo in Ihe gym,"
Hcnighan said. This lime, "an evacuation
look place," bul police reported lhal no
bomb was found.
In a possibly related incident, a fire alarm
was pulled on die second floor of die 0 ym at
11:45, Hcnighan reported "Ihe building was
evacuated again, searched, and 15 minutes
later, people were let in," Hcnighan said,
"All three threats were
probably made by the
same person"
—John
Henlghan
'"The alarm turned out lo be false"
Reactions to the evacuation were "very
calm, in general," according lo a secretary
working in the gym al the time. "It was between classes and most coaches and students
were outside anyway. Il was convenient dial
everyone in charge was around at the time of
Ihe call to deal wilh il."
"Most people assumed dun il wus a fire
drill and acted the way they would during any
fire drill. Il was only outside when rumors
started lo circulate about a bomb threat," explained Facility Coordinator for Physical
Education and Recreation Dennis Elkin,
Hcnighun said, A male called an employee of
the Campus Center bookstore," warning
dun "two bombs were to go olT within die
hour. Officers were sent, but (here was no
evacuation."
,
Hcnighan noted "the similarity in lime and
male voice of all these calls, "venturing lhal
"all three threats were probably by the same
person."
"Reasons for such behavior might range
Irom missing an exam to a disgruntled
employee," he said. As lo the uniqueness or
these bomb threats, Hcnighan said that
"they usually occur around finals," and thai
"as many as 100 were made in 1970," during
die Vietnam anti-war movement,
In the case lhal a bomb ducal is found lo
be authentic, "ihe building would be
evacuated, then the surrounding areas," according to Hcnighan, "No disposal" is
handled by die U.P.I)., he said, and recalled
lhal there had been real fircbombing in the
ptist, and one hoax Unit wus disarmed by Ihe
army.
Hcnighan added thai "a bomb thrcul is a
Class A misdemeanor in which a person
could1 go to jail for a year, bin thai it would
be dealt with more harshly by the university,
"Through die university judicial process, a
guilty purly would definitely he referred and
receive anything Irom a residence suspension
to an expulsion from school.
i
Q
*FUERXA
CONFUSED about the structure of
the
ISRAELI GOVERNMENT and how it
Works?
LATINA'
PRESENTS
'LATINO MONTH9
APRIL
TEATRO AVANZADO' P u e r t o R i c a n T h e a t r e G r o u p
PAC R e c i t a l Hall 8PM $ 2 . 0 0 w i t h t a x
$ 2 . 5 0 with o u t
By Ginn Abend
April 15-17
TRIP TO DIPPIKILL $ 1 5 P e r P e r s o n
When: Tues. April 12
Where: LC 6
Time: 7:30pm
Tor Mo.« Info. Conl.cl rrancc! 7 B 9 2 5 or conl.cl olllcc for furtMf Inrorai.llon
A p r i l *!•**
COrlPERErlCE OM LATIN AMERICA- T o p i c T h e
C a r i b b e a n ; Crisis a n d Revolt'
Sponsored by J S C Hillcl Students for Israel
More Info, conl.cl I'rlnc. 7-11(17.1 of Vlvl.n 7H725
PUERZA LATIMA'S 1 0 t h ANNIVERSARY DANCE
A p r i l 3 3 FEATURINOtTlpIca ' 7 3 ' a n d S p e c i a l Q u e s t La S e n s u a l 8 3 '
PLACE C.C. B a l l r o o m
TIME 9PM-2AM
TREE BEER 9PM-10PM
PRICE $ 8 . 0 0 In a d v a n c e
$ 1 0 , 0 0 at the door.
April *4
SA Funded
nUAS Recipe
—a
Might-
Favorite
ANNUAL PICNIC TO THATCHER PARK $ 5 . 0 0
Tot more Info, contact Trance* 7-0025
Butci leflvc circle 0A.M.
Recipe*§ Direct From Yom
Family
Dinner Tuesday, April 1 2 t h on your
quad
Dulcli Quad-Kosher
A p r i l 30
STAFF H'MTEH
Come hear Prof. Marty Edelman
(who teaches Israeli Politics here at SUNYA)
Tor r'urther Intel. Conl.cl Mafale 4BJ-7406
T R | p T Q
. Q R E A T ADVENTURE'
Dutch Quad-
Conl.cl otflLC 7HI1SI c.c. .1.9 or Anoel 7-4S03
Come and participate
For further
Information
Indian Quad-
In the Latin
Culture.
e.e. 345 4 5 7 - 8 6 5 1
State Quad-
sa funded
t
Colonial Quad-
Alumni-
Beef Bourglgnon
by Sharon Debra Klrsch
Beef Strogonoff
by P e t e r Schrocdor
Spanish Rpif with Rico
by Karen Barbara Smith
Indian Quad Stew
by Danny Maurei
C h i n e s e Ginger Beef
by Noney Campola
Beef Stew
by Davkl Karnn'ii
MANDATORY
3W
FAFF
MEETING
THURSDAY, APRIL 14
TM-
LC19
• The Albany Student Press Board of Directors will be
_ _
elected at the meetirw__
• All members of the University Community are invited
to submit letters of self-nomination to Mark Gesner
Editor in Chie£by_midniphtt April 13
• All staff members of the AlbanJ~mule~nTp7^s~'as
listed in the staff box on the editorial pages are required
to attend. Failure to attend the meeting may result in
termination
STUDENT
PRESS
5
Telethon '83 falls short of goal due to economy
If so , you can clear up some of those misunderstanding!.'
and get your questions answeredApril 14
12, 1983 r.) ALBANY
The state of the economy has even taken its
toll at the university level by putting a
damper on SUNYA's student sponsored
Telethon. Approximately $35,700 was grossed by Telethon '83, falling $10,000 short of
last year's gross total, according to Telethon
'83 Co-chair Betsy Kwasman.
However, Scott Birge, assistant director
for the Campus Center and Telethon advisor,
pointed out that the actual amount given to
the designated organizations was roughly
$23,000 In 1982. Kwasman expects this year's
net amount to be roughly $20,000. The
money will be distributed among Telethon's
three 1983 recipients: the Wildwood School,
the Northeastern New York Chapter of the
Neurofibromatosis Foundation and Camp
Opportunitcs, Inc.
Co-chair Eileen Kozln said, "We are trying
to bring the net amount closer to the gross
amount, so that expenses can be alleviated,
and the money announced to the public can
be closer to the amount we actually give to
the recipient organizations."
In an effort lo accomplish this, traditional
fundraisers used in other years were
eliminated this year due lo lack of profits.
"The book exchange and the birthday cake
sales are two examples of events that grossed
a lot of money in previous years," explained
Kwasman, "but the net was very low.
Because the net was so low, we decided not to
run those events this year, and lo try to run
events that would possibly gross more."
This Is what Kwasman believes is the
reason for the difference in the gross
amounts of Telethons '82 and '83, "along
with the fact that hardly anybody has any
money this year due to the recession."
The decrease in the gross amount is no
reflection of the hard work put in by
everyone, she maintained, adding "I don't
think anyone on staff could really have worked any harder."
Telethon '83 was effective in reducing expenses, which total $15,000, said Kwasman;
approximately $4,000 less than the previous
year. In addition, she snid co-chairs must
review events with previous treasurers to
determine which were successful financially.
Birge attributed the difference In the two
years to the recession. "For example," he
said, "five years ago, we could buy and sell
T-shlrls for less money. It was a sound fiscal
decision to eliminate events that led to high
gross figures, but low net figures."
The annual Telethon has several goals,
Birge maintained. One is to earn money.
"Another," said Birge, "Is to have u positive
impact, both financially and on a human and
personal level."
Birge, who has been advisor to Telethon
for the past three years and Involved in other
ways in the past six, explained. " I
characterize this group (staff '83) on having
the greatest Impact on the university community, and informational outreach. II
touched more people than ever," he said.
Kwasman reiterated these Telethon goals.
"One of the major goals is to build relationships with the children by spending time with
them. The money is Important, but to the
children themselves, initially, the money Is
secondary."
Recreational Services Coordinator of the
Wildwood School Dennis Lake agreed that
"One of Telethon '83'smain foci was to keep
expenditures down." He feels the philosophy
ofTclcthon Is giving much more than dollars.
"The support and enthusiasm given to our
organization were more important," said
Lake. "All or our kids know what the word
'Telethon' means." He explained that
Telethon involved the faculty, parents,
recreation workers as well as the children of
Wildwood School. "1 compliment the
SUNYA group on a superior job. Everything
they promised was fulfilled."
Chair of Telethon '83 Community Relations Mary Ellen Murphy felt the major difference in the amount of money raised was
the fact that a much tighter budget was run
this year than last. Having been involved in
both Telethons, Murphy explained, "This
year a lot of time and energy was put Into the
organizations which maybe last year was put
into fund-raising."
She also pointed out that last year, there
were two recipient organizations; this year
there were three.
Spokeswoman for the Northeastern New
York Chapter of the Neurofibromatosis
Foundation Barbara Wcllman said, "In addition lo the money, the publicity through the
news releases about Telethon, and the fact
that Telethon itself was aired, not only
brought
greater
awareness
of
ncurofibromalosis to the general public, but
several families and professionals learned
about our chapter. Equal lo the money," she
maintained, "arc the Telethon activities
throughout the year involving the kids.
Those relationships established arc more
valuable tha the money."
Similar feelings were expressed in an April
8th ASP Letter to the Editor by Shirly
Arensberg, a member of the Wildwood
School Board of Directors. She wrote, "The
fabulous results achieved by these dedicated
(SUNYA) students arc an inspiration to us
all. . . I would like lo draw attention to the
Ircmcndous effort and energy put out by this
group of students throughout the entire
school year. . .forming a personal bond with
the children. . . We at Wildwood thank
them. . .for the help and special love they
have given our children."
"The economy Is at such a stale," commented Camp Opportunities Executive
Director Bcresford Bailey, seeing this as the
reason for the difference in Iwo year's funds.
"Telethon ' 8 3 , " he said, "was a very wellplanned, organized activity, The SUNYA
students' enthusiasm, concern and involvement thrilled me." Bailey thanked the
students community und congratulated the
Telethon stuff on behalf of Camp Opportunities. "It's not the money," stressed
liuilcy, "It's the Ihoughlfulness,"
Telethon '83 Secretary Donna Weidig has
been involved in several Telethons and
pointed out ihul liming of the event may have
been a contributing factor lo the turnout,
Telethon '82 look place on April 2, and
Telethon '83 was March 18-19; suggesting
thai midterms could have had an effect on
student participation in Telethon-sponsored
events. Also, she said thai there was a short
period of lime after winter intercession in
which to promote Telethon. Weidig stressed
thut "this year, there was an excellent staff,
and it was run extremely well. This staff was
just as close-knit us last year's."
Faculty Liason of Telethon Adrienne
Zlmbcrg said, "my aim wus lo involve fucully as well as students in reaching Telethon's
Igonls. If the faculty were a little more concerned, and gave not only their financial support, bin their lime as well, I believe Telethon
'83 would've reaped more profits." She also
mentioned thai the recession may have Influenced the results. "People Just don't hove
money this year," she said.
Student Lynne Roncsi, who viewed both
Telethons, asked, "I low can wc expect faculty and SUNY slaff lo donate money, when
many of their jobs are in jeopardy this
year?"
Rohyn Kubcnstein, another spectator of
the past two Telethons, commented,
"Because our economy is falling apart, peo
pic cannot afford to donate their money.
Students, especially, don't have as much
money this year as last,"
One act performing during the 24-hours ol Telethon
The fuel that less money was raised this year was no reflection on the performances.
Pipe Dream bans SA candidate advertisements
By Suzanne Abels
STAFF H'RITFH
Pipe Dream, SUNY Binghamlon's biweekly sludcnt newspaper has decided lo
deny all SA candidates the light lo put paid
campaign ads in ils publication, according to
a news story published in a recent issue of the
paper.
The decision, according lo the story, came
after a scries of memos directed at the paper
came from the Assistant News Editor
Josephine Schmidt, at issue was whether persons pursuing on-ciimpus office should be
allowed to purchase campaign advertising
space In the school paper.
The issue arose after a candidate for Executive Vice President of SA Michael Brenner, paid and received approval for five
advertisements in Pipe Dream, The ads were
scheduled to be printed in five consecutive
issues of the pupcr prior lo the elections starling Tuosdny March 15,
Co News Editor of Pipe Dream Cerry
Mullany said that Pipe Dream's Editorial
Board voted 6-5 to prohibit campaign ads
"afler about a two hour discussion." He said
"it (the idea of buying an election) doesn't fit
into our ethics" and that is why the decision
was made.
Brenner said he was contacted by an
unidentified person from Pipe Dream March
14 and told that his ad was not going to be
printed due to the "new SA policy" and that
his money would be refunded.
Refusal came prior to a vole on the issue
by the Editorial Board of Pipe Dream on the
evening of March 14.
According to Schmidt, after SA Executive
Vice President Susan Bloodworlh and John
Gyllenlianuncr, chair of the SA election coinmil Ice sent a scries of memos Monday afternoon lo the Board.
Bloodworlh explained thai "someone
from Pipe Dream called the SA office to see
what our policy was on campaign ads. They
asked if we had any policies on mass media
presentation." She said that at the lime of
this call "we had no procedure governing the
candidates"
Bloodworlh said that she "called the SA
lawyer lo see whal they could d o . " They
found they had no uulhorily lo impose new
SA policy without the approval of the Student Assembly. Therefore, Bloodworlh and
Gyllcnhammcr delivered a memo lo the
editorial board of Pipe Dream "informing
them their options." Bloodworlh asserted
thai campaign ads "give certain candidates
the udvanlngc of buying a position, I feel
very strongly aboul this."
The second memo sent by Bloodworlh and
Cyllcnhiimmcr to Pipe Dream said thai
advertisements in the campus publications
"would be detrimental to the election process
of the university." It then suggested ihai
Pipe Dream refuse all requests for campaign
ads by candidates or anyone representing a
candidate. According to Schmidt, the Pipe
Dream decision was loudly independcnl of
the SA.
Candidate Brenner, however, stated that
he asked lo be In the Board's debate over the
issue but was refused admittance. "Who
knows what the hell their ethics are?" asked
Brenner. He has threatened to bring this mailer to the SA Judicial Board "after
elections." Brenner also said, "If SA wasn't
involved (as they claimed they weren't) in the
Board's decision, my ad would have been
printed. I don't feel the paper serves the
students' needs."
Blodworih admitted to being a supporter
of Brenner's opponent in Hie elections, but
she said thai was not the reason for her decision, She said "he has the right to feci
whatever he wants" but that all she did was
support Pipe Dream's decision and send
them memos prior to the Board's meeting.
Bloodworlh hopes to bring the issue of campaign policy for SA ejections to the attention
of the Assembly in a few weeks. She denied
her memos had any influence on the Pipe
Dream decision, despite the fact that the
paper is SA funded.
Pipe Dream docs endorse candidates, like
the ASP, but the ASP allows candidate ads in
its publication. Brenner said, "I wish I went
to Albany."
•
r
CUT & BRING TAX QARP TO THE
CAMPUS CENTER APRIL 13, 14
Start your Friday evening right!
Attend a 'Hockey Game on Wheels'.
No, not rollerskates, but wheelchairs!
This Friday, April 15th from 7:00-9:00pm at the
University Gym, there will be a wheelchair hockey
game.
A%
• VOTE*
• B A R B A R A HURWITZ
• H I T C H FEIG
• RICH GOLUBOW
T h e Unvlersity A c t i o n f o r t h e D i s a b l e d (an SA funded
group) will compete against other student group leaders on
campus. Both teams will play in wheelchairs.
Come and support your student
group, members.
-FOR CENTRAL
OFFER
9.50 admission
GOOD FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS
•^P.I!^.?. S i. M .?^l^.?. FF " CAMPUS
NFyT
YFftr
ELECT
OFF CAMPUS STUDENTS!
COME AND MEET THE
CANDIDATES
Well give you
the way to higher
grades and more
free time.
FISHKIN
FISHKIN
FISHKIN
For Student Association Offices
Hear Their Views Before the Election
TODAY at 3:30 in C.C. 375
Make an Informed Decision
Sponsored by OCA
SA Funded
Give us
lhour.
COUNCIL-
SA. VICE PRESIDENT
3HKCTOR
DUTCH In Association with TIMEOUT PRODUCTIONS Presents.
mmmm
ill
Le FAT CAT
Featuring mSANF^ecials :
83
2 LOCATIONS:
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
Evelyn Wood n»i
Schedule of FREE LESSONS
See schedule at right and
below lor locations and times.
WEDNESDAY
'Location
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FREE SHOTS OF ALL SCHNAPPS
FREE SHOTS OF KAML&IZE
MOLSEN& HEWEKEN$75
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Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people,
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will open your eyes.
CORNER OF
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THIS WEDNESDAY APRIL IS 1 Qs'q
8:00-8:30 8:30-9:00 9:30-10:00 10:00-11:00 PLUS FREE
Would you like to:
• Raise your grade average without long hours
over texts.
D End all-night cramming sessions.
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1/3 the time.
D Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
D Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding, and recall.
Evelyn Wood's new RD2 reading system makes it
all possible.
APR.13
2:00PM
#1;
4:30PM
7:00PM
( • • T O M SAWYER)
The Best Western
Thruway House,
1375
Washington Ave. ' « milo
south ot (he intersection of
Washington Ave and Fuller Rd ,
adjacent to the N.E. section ol
SUNY Albany Campus (directly
across from State Quad).
• 'Location
Admission
$2.00
° ^ Y A CRAZY CAT WOULD
DOCKS c p l f / x g l H I S OFFER!
M M P
THURSDAY
APR.14
NOON
6:30PM
2:30PM r™r0uu""*
<" Tom Sawyer}
#2:
The Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn,
1 4 4 4 Western Ave.
1 Vi blocks east ol the
intersection ol Fuller Rd. and
Western Ave., just Vi mile south
ol the SUNY Albany Campus
(1V4 blocks east ol the Sluyvesanl
Plaza Shopping Center).
FRIDAY
APR.15
NOON
2:30PM
5:00PM
{ • • T O M SAWYER)
£3
C1876 EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS/A URS COMPANY
SEATING
IS LIMITED,
SO PLEASE
PLAN ON
ATTENDING
THE
EARLIEST
POSSIBLE
LESSON!
APRIL 12, 1983 n ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
SUNYA establishes Special Olympics chapter
PRESENTS
A '
C
OF THE
DAY
'swept away'
ROB F I S H K I H
SA Vice President
THE
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By Karen Piro/./l
STAFF HHITI:H
SUNYA established a chapter of
the New York Stale Council of College Students for Special Olympics
this semester, jusl in lime for this
summer's slate games. The games
will be held on this campus June
17-19, according 10 Dorothy
Philips, slate advisor and founder
of the NYSCCSSO,
The Idea for NYSCCSSO, said
Philips got off the ground in 1979 at
Drockport when the excitement
created by the International Oanics,
held that summer, was at its peak.
"We wanted to capture thai spirit
and keep it up when we began al
Brockport," she said. There are
now chapters of the stale council at
Brockport, Gencsco, and Buffalo
Stale as well as Daemon College in
Amhcarsl, NY.
According to Philips, these
groups act as a "support arm" for
whichever Special Olympics district
the college is located In, SUNYA's
chapter is part of area 10 serving
Albany, Columbia, Greene,
Renssalear, Schenectady and
Schoharie Counties.
"Albany was next in line to start
a chapter," said Philips, partly
because of the area games being
held May I, as well as hosting the
state games in June.
The addition of certain learns to
the games will make this summer's
games the largest ever held in Ihe
state.
In explaining why college
students are important to the
Special Olympics Philips said,
"Because we've been going since
1970, coordinators have noticed a
burn out in their areas, and students
come in with a lot of energy. This
group is particularly dedicated."
The Special Olympics was created
in 196H by the Joseph P. Kennedy
Jr. Foundation and has grown to
become the largest program of
sports training and athletic competition for mentally retarded kids
and adults; it gives people Ihe opportunity to partake in activities
they had never been able to.
"These are the kids wild gel held
out from little league baseball,"
said Philips. The attitude is, "No
one wants Tommy. He's loo slow,"
she explained.
A pamphlet put out by Special
Olympics expresses the games as "a
sport in the truest sense. The goal is
not to win, but to try — to experience, not to conquer. No time is
loo slow, no distance too small to
earn a ribbon, a hug, a cheer, or a
sincere 'well done'."
The students involved with the
college council say they want lo
help accomplish these goals, "I was
a clown for the International Olympics al Brockport," said the President or the SUNYA Chapter Debbie Budd. "It was Ihe best thing
I've ever done. I think I learned to
look beyond a lot of material
things, that winning isn't the important thing, and to look a little
deeper, past everyday life."
You gel a lot of self-satisfaction
out of doing something like this.
These people give you something
other people can't."
Budd said the group is still learning what its functions and goals are
but that basically its purpose is lo
serve us a help to the area 10 council
as well as to be an autonomous organization, " T h c y ' c (ihe council) starling lo recognize us and ask
us lo do things," she said.
Budd explained that Ihe group
slarted out with no money al all.
They bad to rely on $1 dues from
Cine 11 LC 18
By Amy Kilgus
I U H 1r«///P
Paul Loch, author of the book
Nuclear Culture, addressed approximately twenty people al SUNYA
Monday nighl on the "common
burden or gill" thai the discovery
and use of nuclear weapons hus
bestowed on everyone.
In Ihe discussion, sponsored by
NYPIRCi, loeb emphasized that
our generation is lire first to have lo
deal with Ihe issues Ihe discovery of
nuclear weaponry has brought with
ii, including ihe threat of human extinction.
Loeb said there arc iwo ways for
one to look al ii: first, as a burden,
or second, as a gift.
One can look al nuclear
weaponry as n gift, he said, by
realizing ihai nuclear armament
eattses a slurred vulnerability by
everyone in tire world turd that this
shared vulnerability allows people
to bridge gaps they've never been
able to before,
"All of us live with the
knowledge ice might not
survive. "
In writing Nuclear Culture, Loeb
spent three years studying the lown
of Hansford, Washington — home
of the world's largest atomic complex which has manufactured ihe
piutonlum for half the weapons in
America's arsenals — which he says
is a "model for how all of us live
wilh Ihe knowledge we might not
survive."
The people of Hansford experience a strange juxtaposition in
their lives — thai of "everyday life
in the shadow of producing
materials for a holocaust," he said,
These people who work on the
production of piutonlum "concentrate on particular discrete lasks"
such as fixing one broken pari
rather than thinking of producing
piutonlum as a whole, he said. They
"didn't make a distinction between
nuclear technology and technology
al home" — such as hobby
building," Loeb observed.
At the bombing of Nagasaki
"they celebrated in a way in which
they wouldn't realize whal they'd
done,.,they celebrated their efforts
that resulled in Ihe war ending
carliei than they thought it would
have. This way of dealing with ihe
bombing of Nagasaki was
replicated around Ihe country, he
said.
He also said residents sanctified
the position taken by the experls
because of their credentials which,
Loeb claims, is only "shutting off
Iheir own values and saying Ihe 'it's
someone else's job.'"
Loeb advised the group lo relieve
discouragement in trying to raise
awareness of the issue, not lo forget
thai "you never know when you
touch it in others. liven Casper
Weinberger — as hard as il may be
to believe — must have it sometime,
jven Reagan must."
I
PAGE HALL 8 P.M.
SATURDAY, APRIL 16
Malcom Arnold's Quintet
'Percy Grainger Suite'
$1.50 w/tax $2.00w/out
Loeb stresses nukes' burden, gift
EASTMM BRASS
PROGRAM
7:30 & toioo
Games. "We want them to feel im- levels of competition and only the
portant and be recognized at the best gel to go on," commented
I Falehook.
games," she said.
' Sludcnls arc certified lo be
Budd suid she hopes this trainers in workshops al area col"spring's games will get Ihe group leges which arc scheduled
off Ihe ground" and gel people throughout the year.
motivated. In the future, she said,
they hope lo run an event at the
Budd commented thai the group
Slate Games and also lo coordinate welcomes all Ihe help ll can get, and
a training program so they can although the response has been
work with athletes all year.
greal, there can never be loo much
"People have to realize the enthusiasm. Anyone interested in
Special Olympics Is a year round becoming Involved, she said should
thing. There is year long training walch for meetings or call Susan
V
and athletes go through different Falehook al 457-3066.
AMERICA'S FINEST BRASS QUINTET
Thurs
April 14
* H & Sat
April 15,16
members and profits from a "guess
the number of M&M's in Ihe jar"
contest to be held . is week in the
campus center. Additionally, the
chapter's first big fund raiser, "a
nighl at Le Fat Cat" is lobe held on
April 27lh. "Even something as
ridiculous us finding a jar to put
M&M's in is a problem cause we
jusl don't have any money," said
Budd.
Public relations chairperson
Susan Falehook said thai the
group's immediate goal is lo raise
enough money lo buy uniforms for
Ihe area kids going lo the Slate
MUSIC COUflTCII, P R E S E N T S
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which Perrin answered each-one of
the charges and denied the motion
to dismiss.
Ranni later said he thought the
court's ruling on the whole case was
fair and he would take down all the
designated posters right ay/ay.
Stevens estimated that the damage
caused by Ranni's illegally posted
posters would cost about $140.
which would not be charged to Ranni provided all the posters were
removed. He said the tape Ranni
used to put up his posters had
removed paint from some posts,
and "environmentally, it's a
mess."
D
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Cuomo
-«Front Page
company lobbies' refusal to pay
taxes which were set forth in the
budget as his most troublesome
concern of his first 100 days.
"I'm very unhappy about the real
estate lobbies and the oil (company)
people having publically announced
thut they wouldn't pay the lax,"
causing investment raters to rate
Cuomo's otherwise balanced
budget at the same (lower) rale as
last year.
"If the oil companies say they're
not going to pay you $200 million,
and the real estate people do what
they did last (year) — which was to
hold off on transfers until the law
(capital gains tax on real estate transactions) is repealed, it's the same
as If lite state university students
stood up and said 'we're not gonna
pay tuition' — The raters would
have had the same conclusion —
Thai "you can't make yolir
budget."
I I
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Listen to the wild.
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iii.' i .ill i.. tin- wild.'
points out that in the past there has
been a three-year wailing list.
In regard to having dissident CAmembers rejoin the club, Mlhalak
said, "I'd love to have them
rejoin."
He delined to comment concerning whether the club would actively
seek to regain those members who
resigned in protcsl. In a week,
Mlhalak said, he would be in a better position to comment on that
subject.
Mihalak, who was quoted by the
Tillies Union as saying that there
may be a "flurry" of women applicants following implemenlaion
of the new policy, said now that
"only four" women have become
full members since the vote.
The University Club's decision to
admit womr.i leaves only two maleonly clubs in the area, the Troy
Club and the Fort Orange Club. LJ
Telethon '83
Co-Treasurer of Telethon '83,
Alan Annex, said, "We like to
stress the net amount because it is
more meaningful, but we won't announce that figure until the checks
are presented to the charities." He
pointed out that almost the exact
amount was raised during the 24
hours of Telethon '83 as '82.
"Stores and merchants in the area
were really super with donations."
However, Annex also feels the
economy took its loll. "Due to the
present economy, the students
don't have as much money as last
year," he said.
As far as entertainment, Ronesi
said, "1 believe that the quality of
the acts in Telethon '83 were
superior to those of last year. Additionally, the scheduling of the acts
were obviously more carefully planned. The fact that less money was
raised this year was no reflection on
the performances."
•
.ifiuoui impgneoana twiueq oy
ArjonlBU b A 01907130(1(1. Mono A uo , inc.
aspects on tuesday
?".Now The Fun Starts
that your seals are situated somewhere in
the Arctic Circle, while at home you're
always assured of a good seal unless unwanted guests are present. At this point,
we'd like to forewarn you of the perils of
section 29 and all adjoining secllons. To
put II bluntly, don't ever sll there. There Is
an overhang which severely obstructs your
view of the right field, not to mention Ihi
total blocking out of the scoreboard due lo
the angle of the seals, To add lo'your
• woes, the Infamous overhang Impedes the
spectators' view of the fact-filled Diamond
Vision board. Vou must strain your neck
Incessantly in order to see Bob Bailor's vital
statistics. At home, unless your mother
decides It's time lo vacuum the living room
during a ninth Inning Mels rally, you will
always have an unobstructed view of the
game.
The sounds you will hear at the ballpark
and in your living room are also In direct
contrast wllh each other. At Shea, you will
be assaulted by the drunken vulgarities that
spew from the pot-bellied, unshaven
hooligans who Inhabit the cheaper seals.
On the other hand, what will be gracing
your cars while viewing at home Is the
melodious tenor of Hall of Famer Ralph
"Followed by myself" Klner or your mother
asking you If you'd like a few hotdogs which brings us lo the subject of food.
js, It's April again and a young
•nan's fancy turns to baseball.
After a full month of being entlo
ed by Spring Training results, each anc1
every American citizen Is more than ready
to hear the hallowed words "play ball"
once more. However, with the arrival of
baseball each spring comes a conflict that I
?ach Individual must wrestle with In his
mind. Is It belter to watch the Mels' opening day game at Shea or In the comfort of
your own living room?
Chris
Considine
yobRatyl )
After having witnessed the triumphant
return of Tom Seaver and his mates from
our seats In section 29, row 9 of the mezzanine, we must ask ourselves this question
one more time. We will weigh the good
and the bad, and you can draw your own
conclusions.
Let's start with transportation. To get to
Shea It is necessary to take buses and
trains, spending upwards of (our dollars,
unless you happen to be among the
privileged few who have access lo a vehicle. Coming form the north (le, Rockland.
Westchester), one must rise at 8 a.m. In
order to catch batting practice. The trek In
from the Island Is far easier, allowing for
much extra sleep. The danger here Is the
possibility of the fan developing a cockiness
thai may cause him lo arrive late (or the affair.
I
A question on which the Jury is stilt out Is
whether It is more enjoyable lo eat ballpark
food or homemade food. At Shea, one
can purchase a jumbo frank for $ 1.75 or a
normal one for $1.25 and the great half
chocolate-half vanilla Ice cream for 95
cents. As is well-known-by all, there is
nothing like a ballpark frank, not even one
prepared at home by your mother. An area
On the other hand, If one opts lo remain in which home food has an edge, though.
at home, all he has to do Is lurn on the TV, Is sheer quanlity of selection, but even this
lie down, and enjoy. The fan can roll out of
Is contingent on whether shopping has
bed at 1:00 p.m.. eat breakfast, and still been done recently. As you can see, the
have plenty of time to catch the pre-game choice Is difficult • free access to Twinkles
festivities at 1:30. No unpleasant train or or those great peanuts In Ihe shell?
bus rides, no hassles - Just the sanctity of
Although 48,626 Melophlles ventured
your own home.
out to Shea lo witness Tom Seaver's return
There's also the possibility of arriving at In person, we're wondering how many of
the ballpark and discovering (as we did) these will opt for the comfort of their home
Rock>n-Roll Ballet
Fulureu/s/on.' This week, we're Introducing a new feMure. We've decided that It
would be proper and fitting to present an
award to that television viewer whose viewing stood our above that o( his peers during
the course of that week. This week's
political messages to pass along to theii
listeners. The music became richer,
layered, and more complex. In addition to
performing their music, the groups often
incorporated fashion shows Into their live
shows. Eye makeup, feathers,'etc, ad or tied both ihe kind', and their fans, Soon,
however, people began to criticize the
Post-punk bands as being little more than
glitter. One heavily criticized hand was
Spandau Ballet They recefilly released .1
new album, True, and it proves beyond a
shadow of a doubt lhal ihey are more than
lust a passing shadow.
It's the third LP from the popular English
band, following Journeys to Glory and
Diamond. To give an example of just how
strong a reputation the band has, True
shipped Gold In England, entering the
charts at * 9 . Two singles from the record.
"Lifeline" and "Com'munlcatlon" have
already gone to the Top Ten over there.
They arc currently on a lour of the UK.
playing to sold out houses wherever they
go. They'll be touring in the U.S. this summer, as a fairly major lour is in the works.
Guitarist and chief songwriter Gary
Kemp has stated that Spandau Ballet Is
primarily a dance band. True bears this
out, as practically every song Is danceable.
The album opens with "Communication" a
tune lhal Is very well endowed. The first
thing we hear Is a stately Gothic organ.
We'd like to apologize for not having I
an article In last Friday's Aspects,, bul
were on special aslgnment. Wo will do i
darndesl In Ihe future to never repe.il si
an atrocity.
Another big hi! from the record lr.
"Lifeline". The song begins with a chorus
that mimics Ihe Pour Seasons falsetto style
lladley sounds a bit like Culture Club's Boy
George on this one. although his voice Is
much more resonant. Jess Bnlley does *<
marvelous job on keyboards, as he does
everywhere else.
Groups like Duran Duran and ABC have
oeen Influenced by Spandau Ballet, and
vice versa "Foundation" bears more than
superficial resemblance lo ABC's "Poison
Arrow", especially In the tempo and
jackbeal. Mosl of ihe songs here are
Jtstlnctly British in performance and
Jeslgn. An exception occurs al the beginning of "Foundation", where the listener Is
treated lo a very funky guitar and synthesizer run. It's a combination of the Isley
Brothers and Rick James, mixed into
Spandau Ballet's own style.
It's very difficult to come up with any
criticisms of True. The production, shared
by Tony Swain and Steve Jolley. from
Bananarnma and Imagination respectively.
Is full and rich. All Spandau Ballet sets out
lo do is make you dance. And on that
note, the album is a great success.
•
End Of The World News
J
ourney made more money last
year than The Rolling Stones or
The Who did on their national
tours. Does that make them great? Not
necessarily, but their last album Escape
sold 5.3 million copies and that makes
them popular to say the least. Willi this
knowledge it was with trepidation that I
listened to Journey'c new album Frontiers.
Would It be a commercial sell-out, a success by association rather than on Its own
merit? Well Jonathan Cain (former
keyboardest for The Babys) has done a lot
to keep Journey credible.
A
handy symbol for Capital Repertory Company's entire production of Thornton Wilder's The
Skin Of Our Teeth is the mammoth
costume in Act One. Despite a tacky exterior and a tendency to loosen at the
seams, the Cap Rep production makes the
best of a limited budget, a wildly energetic
cast, and a Nuclear Age toplcalily lo create
a hugely entertaining version of the 1902
classic.
Andy Carroll
Megan Gray Taylor
Unfortunately. Journey's new frontiers
only hold out for side one of the album.
Not only Is Ihe classic Journey sound there
wllh Ihe big hit single "Separate Ways", but
also a softer, really effective sound on
songs like "Send Her My Love" and
"Faithfully." Cain's songwrltlng ability
shows through in both these songs and
adds a needed dimension to the Journey
repertoire.
Side two of Frontiers Is even less exciting. Cain and Perry team up with Neal
Schon (lead guitarist) on all the songs except "Back Talk" on which they worked
with Stove Smith (drummer). None of
these songs have any originality, melody or
noteworthy lyrics. This Is very early, heavy
metal Journey sound rehashed to fill the
other side of what could have been their
strongest album so far. The title song
"Frontiers" Is a good example of the worst
of Journey. Lyrics as forced and trite as
" W e put hope In front of fear/And all the
heroes/Have gone East of Eden" are backedtjup by really boring music. The only saving brace on many of these songs Is the
strong musical talent of Schon on gullar
and Smith on drums. These two should
which rapidly leads into full instrumenta
Hon, with special emphasis on the rhythm
The chorus Is reminiscent of a fairly recen
Boz Scaggs song known as "Breakdown"
Fortunately, the similarity goes no further.
Perhaps Ihe most impressive thing abou*
Spandau Ballet Is the depth and talent of ill
lead vocalist. Tony Hadely. The man It
blessed with an incredible voice, one which
never grates on the nerves. In " G o l d " ,
Hadely isjilerally given acres of room to
move about, The band steps back, allowing
him to soar to fantastic heights. What's
especially nice about this Is that while his
style Is smooth as silk, he never becomes
schmaltzy, a trap which all too many silky
singers fall inlo. In keeping with the fact
thai Gary Kemp considers his band to be
dance-oriented, the lyrics are often
nonsense • "I'm sorry that the chairs are all
w o r n / I left them here I could have
sworn/These are my salad days/Slowly
being eaten away."
Robert Schneider
Richard M. Welssberg Memorial Au ord
goes lo John Michael Considine J ihn
Michael was flawless In his sports view "9,
deflly catching each New York sp
scasler's report at 6:00 and not mlssln
single sporting event. He was also u
rounded: soaps, sll-coms, and (irsi n
were also part of his repptolre. Congrali
lions John Michael.
False Frontiers
"Separate Ways" may be the big hit
single but I would cast my vote lor
"Faithfully" as the best song on the album.
Reminiscent of the love songs of Yes, this Is
a touching song of a musicians life and Ihe
love he must continually leave behind.
Lyrics like "Two strangers learn to fall/In
love agaln/l gel Ihe Joy/Of rediscovering
y o u " capture that sense of love that stands
"faithfully forever." The other 'soft' song
"Send Her My Love" Is a Joint effort of
Cain and lead vocalist Steve Perry. Again
the combination of a haunting melody and
believable lyrics makes this song work. Slde |
one's only real failure Is "After The Fall"
which suffers Ihe fate of many Journey
songs - deadly repetition. Lyrics like "Can't
stop fallln'/Heartaches callln'" should give
you an Idea of the lack of musical variety
that accompanies Ihem,
F
or every action there Is an equal
and opposite reaction." With
slight modification, that piece of
physics information could apply to the
music trends in Britain in the last six years.
First came the punk bands (Sex Pistols,
Clash): groups that played raw, lean, but"
hard-driving Rock-n-Roll. There were
often heavy political messages In their
songs, and Ihe word "fashion." to punkers,
meant little more than mutilation of both
body and clothing. The reaction to all thlf
came a few years later, with the rise o
bands like Adam and Ihe Ants, Durar
Duran. and Spandau Ballet. In contrast tc
the punks, these bands had few or no
Although
48,626 Metophiles ventured out to Shea to witness Tom
Seaver's return in person,
we're
.wondering how many of these will
opt for the comfort of their home in
the future and how many will brave
the elements at Shea. As for us, we're
like anyone else- most of the time
we'd rather have our feet
on the table, equipped with
Oreos while watching at
Mets telecast, but there
will be times when our
sense of adventure
leads
us out to Flushing.
In the future and how many will brave the
elements at Shea. As for us, we're like
anyone else • most of the time we'd rather
have out feet on Ihe table, equipped wllh
Oreos while watching a Mels telecasl, bul
there will be limes when our sense of
adventure leads us out lo Flushing.
13
stick to the playing and leave the song
writing to Perry and Cain.
Someone said to me when I started this
review, "If you've heard one Journey song
you've heard them all," I disagreed then,
bul now I'm not so sure. There Is a distlncl
similarity In the opening of "Send Her My
Love" and "Troubled Child" (Ihe only decent song on the second side). There Is
also a common theme of troubled love and
"Individual againsl society" In all their
songs. So why has Journey been so
popular for ten years?
The.answer lies In their ability to lurn oul
some really exceptional work and their
iblllly to grow and change. Wllh their last
ilbum ITscape they started Inlo a more
adult contemporary sound along with Iheli
hard rock classics. They have changed personnel several times and wllh each change
gotten stronger (the most noteworthy
changes being Sieve Perry's addition 111
1977 and Cain's addition In 1981).
From the powerful "Chain Reaction"
and "Edge of Ihe Blade" to the more subtle
"Send Her My Love" and "Faithfully" the
group Is still expanding and for lhal reason
alone Frontiers Is the right title (or Ihis
album. The album was produced by Ihe
dynamic duo of Mike Stone and Kevin
Ellson, and the quality of Ihis recording is
really good. We can only hope thai Ihis will
nol be Journey's final frontier and thai
(ulure work will show the progress of side
one and not the backsliding of side two. I 1
The Skin 0/ Our Teeth is Wilder's
somewhat truncated history of the world,
seen through the eyes of the George Antrobus family, whose members are not only
larger than life, but larger than myth. Crisscrossing religious and social palhs paved by
any of a number of the world's religions,
the family broadcasts its particular version
of the world drama — Ice Age, the Great
Flood, the Garden of Eden, and the War of
the Worlds — from their living room in Excelsior, New Jersey, and from the boardwalk of Atlantic City. Father is the Great
Provider, Inventor of the wheel and the
alphabet, and president of the great society
of mammals, Mother is a firm stand-by-hisslder and great advocate of the sanctity of
home and family, which in her case is overrun by a rambunctious daughter and a son
w h o bears more than a passing
resemblance to a biblical character of stone
throwing, brother-keeping fame. Accompanying the whole brood is the somewhat
high-strung maid Sabina, who favors low
cut tops and screeching high-notes
whenever things tend to get out of hand,
which is often.
First of all, It is the Ice Age, which implies
all sorts of physical and psychological
dangers. The family survives that
somehow, only to be threatened by a
cataclysmic flood, Even a war of holocaust
proportions can't destroy the family in this
fable, which Is Ihe whole point. Behind Its
sarcasm, Its black humor, and heavy-
handed Biblical allusions, The Skin of Our
Teeth remains a primarily optimistc,
tremendously theatrical comment on Ihe
human condition.
If you're as baffled as the maid Sabina,
who doesn't even want lo appear In a play
whose author can't decide whether he's In
Ihe Ice Age or Suburbia, it's no surprise.
Although It won the Pulitzer In 1942 and
has remained a staple of high school drama
classes ever since, few can read It the first
lime with anything approaching , clear
understanding. Like Our Town, It Is a play
to be performed, not read. When done on
stage, the ideas flow as easily as the laughs.
That's especially true as it is performed at
Cap Rep, where director Michael Hume
has taken liberties with Wilder's script. He's
updated the Atlantic City scenes so that
they reflect the pan.cularly decadent atmosphere of the modern, casino-lined
boardwalk, and added music wherever he
feels like It. He also proves adept at handling the large cast, the costume changes,
and the tricky production values of Cap
Rep's most ambitious project to date.
Scenic Designer Leslie Taylor has built a
balcony again:' the Market Theater's front
I wall, where the two-man band of Philip
Sollanoff and J. Brubbi Taylor noodles al
an organ and a set of drums,
Down on the stage as George Antrobus
there's Art Kempf, a bearded chap who
looks like a hefty William Windoin. He's
believable as the patriarch, toying variously
with fatherly bluster, military machismo.
I and middle age vulnerability. As his wife.
Joan Kendall benefits from a resemblance
ot Nancy Reagan (at least in her choice of
precious outfits and cute hats). As their son
Henry. Chris Fracchiolla doesn't look quite
like anybody, with his dark, feral good
looks, and the same, barely-under-thesurface violence that made him so good in
this year's The Mound Buiiders.
The choicest role, however, belongs to
Ann Stoney. who borrows a little from the
early Barbra Streisand In her role as
Sabina. A mixture of seductress and yenta,
she makes Sabina's frenetic excursions in
and out of character the evening's
highlight. Stoney is a very funny woman.
It would be criminal to leave out a few
other members of the cast who have allowed themselves to be put to a variety of Indignities. Michael Arkin does some
agreeably smarmy work as a boardwalk
lounge lizard, doing the Greek chorus
number for the better of two acts. Deborah
Van Nostrand goes from little girl to world
weary mother with remarkable dexterity.
And inside that mammoth suit (and outside
as the play's "director") is Cap Rep veteran
Richard Zobel, demonstrating his typical
versatility {and a shadow of his occasional
abrasiveness).
The play's off-stage hero Is Lloyd
Waiwaiole, who has created a surprising
number of exciting costumes. The most
memorable: the "Refugee" tableau of Act
One.
77ie Skin of Our Teeth Is Capital Rep's
final production' of the year, and It exhibits
the qualities that have made it so special
throughout its previous five productions:
the excitement Is as high as the. budget is
low.
D
aspects on tuesdayi
aspects on tuesday
I Now The Fun Starts
2S, It's April again and a young | that your seats are situated somewhere In
-nan's fancy turns to baseball. ' the Arctic Circle, while al home you're
After a full month of being entlcalways assured of a good sent unless uned by Spring Training 'results, each anc* | wanted guests are present. At this point,
we'd like to forewarn you of the perils of
every American citizen is more than ready
section 29 and all adjoining sections. To
to hear the hallowed words "play ball"
put It bluntly, don't ever sit there. There Is
once more. However, with the arrival of
an overhang which severely obstructs your
baseball each spring comes a conflict that
view of the right field, not to mention the
M<-II Individual must wrestle with In his
total blocking out of the scoreboard due to
mind. Is It better to watch the Mets' openthe angle of the seals. To add to'your
ing day game at Shea or In the comfort of
•woes, the Infamous overhang impedes the
your own living room?
spectators' view of the fact-filled Diamond
Vision board. Vou must strain your neck
Incessantly in order to see Bob Bailor's vital
statistics. At home, unless your mother
decides it's time to vacuum the living room
during a ninth Inning Mets rally, you will
always have an unobstructed view of the
game.
Chris
Considine
&\ \v
4-\obRafyl
)
After having witnessed the triumphant
return of Tom Seaver and his mates from
our seats in section 29, row 9 of the mezzanine, we must ask ourselves this question
one more time. We will weigh the good
and the bad, and you can draw your own
conclusions.
Let's start with transportation. To get to
Shea it is necessary to take buses and
trains, spending upwards of four dollars,
unless you happen to be among the
privileged few who have access to a vehicle. Coming form the north (ie, Rockland,
Westchester), one must rise at 8 a.m. In
order to catch batting practice. The trek in
from the Island is far easier, allowing for
much extra sleep. The danger here Is the
possibility of the fan developing a cockiness
that may cause him to arrive late for the affair.
I
The sounds you will hear at the ballpark
and In your living room are also in direct
contrast with each other. At Shea, you will
be assaulted by the drunken vulgarities that
spew from the pot-bellied, unshaven
hooligans who Inhabit the cheaper seats.
On the other hand, what will be gracing
your ears while viewing at home Is the
melodious tenor of Hall of Famer Ralph
"Followed by myself" Kiner or your mother
asking you if you'd like a few holdogs which brings us to the subject of food.
A question on which the jury Is still out Is
whether It Is more enjoyable to eat ballpark
food or homemade food. A l Shea, one
can purchase a jumbo frank for $1.75 or a
normal one for $1.25 and the great half
chocolate-half vanilla Ice cream for 95
cents. As Is well-known- by all, there Is
nothing like a ballpark frank, not even one
prepared at home by your mother. An area
On the other hand, if one opts to remain In which home food has an edge, though.
al home, all he has to do Is turn on the TV, Is sheer quantity of selection, but even this
lie down, and enjoy. The fan can roll out of is contingent on whether shopping has
bed at 1:00 p.m., eat breakfast, and still been done recently As you can see, the
have plenty of lime to catch the pre-game choice Is difficult - free access to Twinkles
festivities at 1:30. No unpleasant train or or those great peanuts in the shell?
bus rides, no hassles - jir t the sanctity ol
Although 48,625 Melophlles ventured
your own home.
out to Shela to witness Tom Seaver's return
There's also the possibility of arriving at
In person, we're wondering how many of
the ballpark and discovering (as we did)
these will opt for the comfort of their home
Rock>n*Roll Ballet
mlthough 48,626 Metophiles ventured out to Shea to witness Tom
\Seaver's return in person,
we're
wondering how many of these will
opt for the comfort of their home in
the future and how many will brave
the elements at Shea. As for us, we're
like anyone else- most of the time
we'd rather have our feet
on the table, equipped withm NEW YORK
Oreos while watching aj\
Mets telecast, but there]
will be times when our
sense of adventure
leads
us out to Flushing.
HEWYORK m
F
or every action there is an equal
and opposite reaction." With
slight modification, that piece of
physics Information could apply to the
music trends in Britain in the last six years.
First came the punk bands (Sex Pistols,
Clash): groups that played raw, lean, but'
haul driving Rock-n-Roll. There were
often heavy political messages In thel!
songs, find the word "fashion," lo punkers,
meant little more than mutilation of both
body and clothing. The reaction to all this
came a few years later, with the rise o
bands like Adam and the Ants, Durar
Duratl, and Spandau Ballet. In contrast tc
the punks, these bands had few or no
OTJI
1st BASE
Robert
• *
in the future and how many will brave the
elements at Shea. As for us, we're like
anyone else - most of the time we'd rather
have out feel on the table, equipped with
Oreos while watching a Mets telecast, but
there will be times when our sense of
adventure leads us out to Flushing.
Futureuision; This week, we're introducing a new feature. We've decided that It
would be proper and fitting to present an
award to that television viewer whose viewing stood our above that of his peers during
the course of that week. This week's
\z
Richard M. Weissberg Memorial Au
goes to John Michael Considin
lohi
Michael was flawless In his sports v
deflty catching each New York sp<
scaster's report at 6:O0 and not missln
single sporting event. He was also w
rounded: soaps, slt-coms, and flrst-ri
were also part of his repetoire. Congiaii
tions John Michael.
We'd like to apologize for not having I
an article in last Friday's Aspects, but
were on special aslgnment. We will do i
darndest in the future to never repeal si
an atrocity.
Another big hit from the record i;<
"Lifeline". The song begins with a chorus
that mimics the I out Seasons falsetto style
I ladley sounds a bit like Culture Club's Boy
George on this one, although his voice is
much more resonant. Jess Bailey does b
marvelous job on keyboards, as he does
everywhere else.
Groups like Duran Duran and ABC have
Deep influenced by Spandau Ballet, and
vice versa "Foundation" hears more than
superficial resemblance lo ABC's "Poison
Arrow'', especially In the tempo and
lackbeat. Most of the songs here are
lisllnctly British in performance and
design, An exception occurs at the beginning of "Foundation", where the listener is
treated lo a very funky guitar and synthesizer run. It's a combination of the Isley
Brothers and Rick James, mixed Into
Spandau Ballet's own style,
It's very difficult lo come up with any
criticisms o l True. The production, shared
by Tony Swain and Steve Jolley, from
Bananarama and Imagination respectively,
Is full and rich. All Spandau Ballet sets out
to do Is make you dance. And on that
note, the album Is a great success.
•
End Of The World News
J
ourney made more' money last
year than The Rolling Stones or
The Who did on their national
tours. Does that make them great? Not
necessarily, but their last album Escape
sold 5.3 million copies and that makes
them popular to say the least. With this
knowledge it was with trepidation that I
listened to Journey's new album Frontiers.
Would it be a commercial sell-out, a success by association rather than on Its own
merit? Well Jonathan Cain (former
keyboardest for The Babys) has done a lot
to keep Journey credible.
A
handy symbol for Capital Repertory Company's entire production of Thornton Wilder's The
Skin Of Our Teeth is the mammoth
costume in Act One. Despite a tacky exterior and a tendency to loosen at the
seams, the Cap Rep production makes the
best of a limited budget, a wildly energetic
cast, and a Nuclear Age topicality to create
a hugely entertaining version of the 1942
classic.
wall, where the two-man band of Philip
Sollanoff and J. Brubbi Taylor noodles at
an organ and a set of drums.
Douyn on the stage as George Antrobus
there's Arl Kempf, a bearded chap who
looks like a hefly William Windom. He's
believable as the patriarch, toying variously
with fatherly bluster, military machismo,
and middle age vulnerability. As his wife.
Joan Kendall benefits from a resemblance
ot Nancy Reagan (at least in her choice of
i precious outfits and cute hats). As their son
Henry, Chris Fracchiolla doesn't look quite
like anybody, with his dark, feral good
1
looks, and the same, barely-under-thesurface violence that made him so good in
this year's The Abound Builders.
The choicest role, however, belongs to
Ann Stoney. who borrows a little from the
early Barbra Streisand in her role as
Sablna. A mixture of seductress and yenta,
she makes Sabina's frenetic excursions in
and out of character the evening's
highlight. Stoney is a very funny woman.
Andy Carroll
Megan Gray Taylor
Unfortunately, Journey's, new frontiers
only hold out for side one of the album.
Not only is the classic Journey sound there
with the big hit single "Separate Ways", but
also a softer, really effective sound on
songs like "Send Her My Love" and
"Faithfully." Cain's songwrltlng ability
shows through In both these songs and
adds a needed dimension to the Journey
repertoire.
Side two of Frontiers is even less exciting. Cain and Perry team up with Neal
Schon (lead guitarist) on all the songs except "Back Talk" on which they worked
with Steve Smith (drummer). None of
these songs have any originality, melody or
noteworthy lyrics. This Is very early, heavy
metal Journey sound rehashed to fill the
other side of what could have been their
strongest album so far. .Jhe title song
"Frontiers" is a good example of the worst
of Journey. Lyrics as forced and trite as
"We put hope In front of fear/And all the
heroes/Have gone East of Eden" are backed up by really boring music. The only savi n g \ r a c e on many of these songs Is the
strong musical talent of Schon on guitar
and Smith on drums. These two should
which rapidly leads Into full instrument i
lion, with special emphasis on Ihe rhythm
The chorus is reminiscent of a fairly recen .
Boz Scaggs song known as "Breakdown" .,
Fortunately, the similarity goes no further
Perhaps the nrost impressive thing abou' .
Spandau Ballet is the depth and talent of it* „
lead vocalist. Tony Hadely. The man I: R
blessed with an Incredible voice, one which .,
never grales on the nerves. In " G o l d " ,
Hadely Is,literally given acres of room to
move about. The band steps back, allowing
him to soar to fantastic heights What's
especially nice about this is that while his
style Is smooth as silk, he never becomes
schmaltzy, a trap which all too many silky
singers fall Into, In keeping with the fact
thai Gary Kemp considers his band to be
dance-oriented, the lyrics are often
nonsense • "I'm sorry thai the chairs are all
worn/1 left them here I could have
Sworn/These are my salad days/Slowly
being eaten away."
Schneider
politico! messages to pass along to their
listeners. The music became richer,
layeied. and more complex In addition to
performing their music, the groups often
incorporated fashion shows Into iheir live
shows F.ye makeup, feathers, etc adorn
ed both Ihe bands and their fans Soon.
however, people began to criticize the
Post-punk Kinds as being little more than
glitter One heavily criticized band was
Spandau Ballel They rccefilly released .1
new album, True, and it prows beyond a
shadow of a doubt that they are mote than
lust a passing shadow
It's ihe third LP from Ihe pop r English
band, following Journeys to Glory and
Diamond. To give an example of just how
strong <» reputation the band has. , . , „ _
shipped Gold in England, entering the
charts al " ' ' Two singles from the record,
"Lifeline" and "Com'municalion" have
already gone to the Top Ten over there,
1'Iiey are currently on B tour of the UK.
playing lo sold out houses wherever they
go. They'll be louring In the U.S. this summer, as a fairly rrrajor tour Is In ihe works.
Guitarist and chief songwriter Gary
Kemp has stated that Spandau Ballel is
primarily a dance band. True bears this
out, as practically every song Is danceable.
The album opens with "Communication" a
tune that is very well endowed. The first
thing we hear is a stately Gothic organ,
NEWYORK
False Frontiers
"Separate Ways" may be the big hit
single but I would cast my vote for
"Faithfully" as the best song on the album.
Reminiscent of the love songs of Yes, this Is
a touching song of a musicians life and the
love he must continually leave behind.
Lyrics like "Two strangers learn to fall/In
love agaln/l get the Joy/Of rediscovering
you" capture that sense of love that stands
"faithfully forever." The other 'soft' song
Send Her My Love" Is a Joint effort of
Cain and lead vocalist Steve Perry. Again
the combination of a haunting melody and
believable lyrics makes this song work. Side |
one's only real failure Is "After The Fall"
which suffers the fate of many Journey
songs - deadly repetition. Lyrics like "Can't
stop fallln'/Heartaches callin'" should give
you an idea of the lack of musical variety
that accompanies them.
13
stick to the playing and leave the song
writing to Perry and Cain.
Someone said to me when I started this
review, "If you've heard one Journey song
you've heard them all," I disagreed then,
but now I'm not so sure. There Is a distinct
similarity In the opening of "Send Her My
Love" and "Troubled Child" (the only decent song on the second side). There is
also a common theme of troubled love and
"Individual against society" In all their
songs. So why has Journey been so
popular for ten years?
The answer Hes in their ability to turn out
some really exceptional work and Iheir
ability, to grow and change. With their last
album F.scape they started Into a more
adult contemporary sound along with their
hard rock classics. They have changed personnel several times and with each change
gotten stronger (the most noteworthy
changes being Steve Perry's addition In
1977 and Cain's addition In 1981).
From the powerful "Chain Reaction"
and "Edge of the Blade" to the more subtle
"Send Her My Love" and "Faithfully" the
group Is still expanding and for that reason
alone Frontiers Is the right title [or this
album. The album was produced by Ihe
dynamic duo of Mike Stone and Ki?vin
Ellson, and Ihe quality of this recording Is
really good. We can only hope that this will
not be Journey's final frontier and lti.it
future work will show Ihe progress of side
0ne
a n d not the backsliding of side two, I 1
The Skin of Our Teeth is Wilder's
somewhat truncated history of the world,
seen through the eyes of the George Antrobus family, whose members are not only
larger than life, but larger than myth. Crisscrossing religious and social palhs paved by
any of a number of the world's religions,
the family broadcasts its particular version
of the world drama — Ice Age, the Great
Flood, the Garden of Eden, and the War of
the Worlds — from their living room in Excelsior, New Jersey, and from the boardwalk of Atlantic City. Father is the Great
Provider, Inventor of the wheel and the
alphabet, and president of the great society
of mammals. Mother is a firm stand-by-hlsslder and great advocate of the sanctity of
home and family, which in her case Is overrun by a rambunctious daughter and a son
w h o bears more than a passing
resemblance to a biblical character of stone
throwing, brother-keeping fame. Accompanying the whole brood is the somewhat
high-strung maid Sablna, who favors low
cut tops and screeching high-notes
whenever things tend to get out of hand,
which is often.
handed Biblical allusions, The Skin of Our
Teeth remains a primarily optimlstc,
tremendously theatrical comment on the
human condition.
If you're as baffled as the maid Sabina,
who doesn't even want to appear In a play
whose author can't decide whether he's in
First of all, it is the Ice Age, which Implies
the Ice Age or Suburbia, it's no surprise,
all sorts of physical and psychological
Although
it won the Pulitzer in 1942 and
dangers. The family survives that
has remained a staple of high school drama
somehow, only to be threatened by a
classes ever since, few can read It the first
cataclysmic flood. Even a war of holocaust
lime with anything approaching clear
proportions can't destroy the family In this
understanding. Like Our Town, It Is a play
fable, which Is the whole point. Behind Its
sarcasm, Its black humor, and. heavy- I to be performed, not read. When done on
stage, the ideas flow as easily as the laughs.
That's especially true as it is performed at
Cap Rep, where director Michael Hume
has taken liberties with Wilder's script, He's
updated the Atlantic City scenes so that
they reflect the pan.cularly decadent atmosphere of the modern, casino-lined
boardwalk, and added music wherever he
feels like it. He also proves adept at handling the large cast, the costume changes,
and the tricky production values of Cap
Rep's most ambitious project to date.
Scenic Designer Leslie Taylor has built a
balcony agalm* the Market Theater's front
It would be criminal to leave out a few
other members of the cast who have allowed themselves to be put to a variety of indignities. Michael Arkin does some
agreeably smarmy work as a boardwalk
lounge lizard, doing the Greek chorus
number for the better of two acts. Deborah
Van Nostrand goes from little girl to world
weary mother with remarkable dexterity.
And inside that mammoth suit (and outside
as the play's "director") is Cap Rep veteran
Richard Zobel, demonstrating his typical
versatility (and a shadow of his occasional
abrasiveness).
The play's off-stage hero is Lloyd
Waiwaiole, who has created a surprising
number of exciting costumes. The most
memorable: the "Refugee" tableau of Act
One.
The Skin of Our Teeth Is Capital Rep's
final production'of the year, ami it exhibits
the qualities that have made it so special
throughout its previous five pioductions:
the excitement is as high as ihe budget is
tow,
•
E D I
T
O
R
I
A
L
#rfm
Beyond the rhetoric
T
, he surface rhetoric provided in political cam' paigns is often the sole cause for a constituent
to vote a certain way. In all too many elections
the poster slogans are more important than concepts
and ideas of the campaign. However, there arc ways
of redirecting misplaced priorities.
In the Student Association1 elections, many
students are simply unaware of what the candidates
have to say. The few debates that arc sponsored have
excellent intentions, yet the audiences they reach arc
not nearly extensive enough. The Albany Student
Press endorsement supplement gives the candidates a
forum to explain their platforms, and allows this
newspaper to express an editorial viewpoint.
In endorsing an SA president and vice president,
we are doing nothing out of the norm. Newspapers
have made political endorsements for decades. The
paper is simply expressing an opinion about the candidates, just as we arc expressing an opinion now.
Of course, we do not ignore the great responsibility
and care that must go into our decisions. The endorsement board is made up of editors who are well
versed in campus issues. One member was an SA candidate who came before the endorsement board a few
years ago and was rejected. Opinions were formed
based on what the candidates had to say rather than
hearsay. When pressed for answers, those questioned
were forced to go beyond the simplistic campaign
rhetoric and give real answers.
The ASP endorsement has recently carried much
weight with the voters. In the past two years, students
have voted all of our choices into office. However,
for several years before this, the ASP endorsements
seemed to act as a jinx. Everyone we supported met
with rejection from the voters. Evidently, in the past
our opinion has not been highly honored.
A factor which adds much credibility to our endorsement is the fact that we are totally independent
of SA. Since we receive no funding whatsocVcr from
SA, wc are belter able to make unbiased judgements.
We arcn'l dependent on these politicians.
The endorsement board sought answers to questions they fell best revealed the most qualified candidate. Each candidate was rigorously interviewed
for about one hour. We iried to concentrate on topics
we fell needed lo be addressed. Wc made sure to ask
every candidate their opinion on certain key issues.
This year, these included the NYPIRG referendum,
bus fees, role of The Student Voice, OCA, political
group funding und voting rights, among others.
Wc also looked at a candidate's intelligence,
character, past performance, intergrity, strength
under pressure and their plans for dealing with faculty, administrators and students.
Afler interviewing all the candidates, the board
then conducted an intense discussion and debate to
determine who would be the most effective,
motivating and progressive elected officials. The
following people were involved in the endorsement
decision: Mark Gcsner, pditor in chief; Wayne
Peercboom, executive editor; Teri Kaplowitz,
managing editor; Lisa Strain, managing editor; Marc
Haspel, senior editor; David Laskin, copy editor and
Dean Bclz, contributing editor. II was not necessary
for the board to vote on cither candidate's endorsement, rather decisions were made through group
consensus.
E
N
D
L. S. Lane
First of all, the drinking age. I don't feel the attempts of
self-important legislators lo tell persons younger than
themselves how to run their lives is going to have any cffccl,
it merely makes us more clever in our means to gain intoxicating liquids. I have never been successfully proofed but
for those out there who have been, that's the breaks. It Is
the law now, and huffing and puffing won't change it, nc
matter how much greedy bar owners try to tell you otherwise. They arc not looking out for your own good or thai
you're old enough to be drafted, you're old enough to
drink, etc., etc. They want your money, because following
their logic, only men should drink, as only men can be
drafted. Kinda puts a crimp in your dating scene, huh?
This law was created to allow those dipsomaniacs in the
State Legislature to avoid their own drunk-driving problems by transposing them to someone else, those below 19
As if suddenly by denying them legal access to alcohol it
would make much difference; I don't think it will because il
ihcy want it, they will get it and those people who are safe
drivers, who know their limit, will still be safe drivers who
know their limit if its legal or not for them lo get alcohol. In
many of the drunk-driving deaths, it isn't if you're drunk,
it's if the guy wavering that yellow line is. If drunk-driving
is the problem toughen drunk-driving laws, don't raise tin
drinking age. This is their way of not answering the problem but staring at one symptom and declaring that they've
cured the entire situalion. And must I point out, if it isn't
evident, that they can still drink, drive and get off because
not one bit of the law affects them. It's nice to be able tc
cover your own tail at the expense of the entire state legal
system, huh?
Now, to approach the tuition raise is going to be controversial, we all know of the hard times this country is going through, whether is needs to be going through them i;
to be left aside for future investigation. The topic is thai
Cuomo wants to both cut personnel and raise tuition which
is like cutting the dog's tail and its head off at the same
time. One or the other, please. The controversial part is
that something will go, whether we want it to or not. Things
are pretty good for us here, and the cost of everything has
gone up. The money has got to come from somewhere.
But there is something else which really is the heart of
this problem — the cut in Pell grants, the cut is 40 percentl
That means that one-half of the students who were getting
money will be now getting money, or people will be getting
half of what they were getting before. Now it should be obvious that the less people who are educated, the worse
shape the country is in, and with jobs in short supply, there
is almost no way lo pay luition short of loans. Most people
who arc truly affected by these cuts will not be able to cover
a loan. This is not to neglect the fad that many loans arc
never repnyed, so banks are getting skeptical of making
loans to people they aren't sure of. The short line is thai
both public and private universities arc getting fcwei
students, there is less money overall. Talks arc raised about
cutting out some schools altogether, and then all suffer,
students today, and business and the nation in five to ten
vears. when thev have less talent in the pool lo draw from.
If Reagan really wants to protect this country from communism, he would keep the mass of the educated growing,
for it isn't the educated and happy who most gravitate
toward communism, it is those who can be most easily induced toward its promises and dreams of glory, the
uneducated. By increasing military spending and decreasing
education, he is assuring internal downfall for this country,
while protecting it from an imagined attack from the outside. And the bigger the guns wc have, Ihc more top heavy
we become — what are wc going to do if Russia takes over,
lets say, Greece? Blow them up? Fight them and risk
nuclear confrontation? It should be clear what corner wc
arc painting ourselves into.
Our cutbacks and personnel losses have a dire effect on
In the end it is important of emphasize once again
that the endorsement is simply our opinion. Find oui
the facts you want lo know and vote for the person
that you feci is most qualified. Together wc should be
able to pick candidates worthy of these Important
positions.
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T~% ich Schaffer clearly displays the awareness and sen3 f sitivily a Student Association president must
JL \l possess. When addressing the endorsement board
he did not need lo Improvise; il was evident that he had
researched and understood each topic beforehand.
Therefore, the board has unanimously voted to endorse
Rich Schaffer for SA President.
Schaffer has several suggestions on how lo improve SA
.'ommunication with the students, administration, anel
Albany community. He believes the president should initiate communication upon assuming office, in order to
provide access to all groups.
More specifically, Schaffer suggests u grass roots concept
in where "we have lo start at the boltom, and work our way
up. In the pasl we (SA) have only taken u bile out of the
lop." Schaffer intends to start at the boltom by utilizing
the quad and off-campus rcpresenlali"es. His new plan
calls for each Central Council member to have a small
recognizable constituency of approximately 300 students,
Currently, there are four members representing l,2(X)
students on un average quad. His arrangement would
facilitate and strengthen communication bclween the
students and their reprcsentitives.
In dealing with the administration, Schaffcr's ideas are
not novel or unique. He favors dealing with the administration on a professional level in order to gain respect.
Schaffer is also aware of the community outside of
SUNYA. He strongly believes thai SA must be a political
organization and that students must utilize the new polling
place on campus. The board wholeheartedly agrees:
students must be prepared lo deal with the governing bodies
which decide upon such issues as budget allocations and
election districting, as well as larger issues like the bottle
bill. Schaffcr's idea of "bringing the world to the podium"
There's much more to the endorsements than our
opinion. On the cover of the election supplement arc
our choices for president and vice president. On the
second and third pages are the reasons why wc felt
the others weren't our candidates, and also on
the third page is an evaluation of each referendum on
Ihc ballot. On the last page is a statement each candidate wrote himself, printed totally unedited so you
could see what they have lo say about themselves.
not just our education but also of our unborn kids. The
lack of Qualified math instructors in our high schools, losi
to better paying Big Business, is leaving only the really exceptional iiiaih students lo have a chance at understanding
the math a former-geology-tcacher-turncd-math-inslructor
is teaching, or you have a truly devoted math teacher, who
will give up the advantages of a corporate job to teach, anel
Ihcy are rare. To assure the Russians beating the Americans
for world stability is to follow the course Reagan has map
ped out. While standing strong and angry to the Russians,
he has left the most open door to our eventual defeul bj
assuring the continuation of fewer qualified people to advance science and technology.
I will admit that the two issues I huve selected to review
might appear to be unrelated but in fact they are related —
I am saying authority is not to be trusted in these instances,
and in fact in many other cases wc go through daily. Look
around you, what do you sec that you question? Why dei
things have to go the way they do, is that the correct way?
Why is it that way? I'm not advocating anarchy but don't
follow blindly, there is logic to everything and if you don'i
see it, maybe it isn't there. And listen to everything you
hear and try to understand it — maybe someone is saying
something you should know.
I I
R
APRIL
N
T
12, 1983
S
President: Schaffer has the ideas
Sobriety, higher tuition & you
1 wish to address a few Issues which seem to be of impor
lance these days — the drinking age and the raise in tuition
at SUNYA. These events have caused an incredible amounl
of overexertion and was1 -d hoi air, all of which we need it
these early days of Spring.
O
SA Election
Supplement
further displays his awareness of the community beyond
Perimeter Road
Schafrer ravors funding NYPIRG, explaining that this
group provides another avenue of bringing oulslilc issues
back to the students. He feels that The Student Voice
should lake political stands lo motivate students, and he is
against censorship of the SA publication. As for the funding of studenl groups In SA, he fell "too many assumptions were made in the Income thai groups arc expected to
bring in — programming is the key. The budget Is not set in
concrete and wc can make mid-year changes."
On the issue of the off-campus association, Schaffer
believes that the existing OCA is not effective. Although he
agrees that the position of professional director should be
maintained, the candidate suggests thai OCA organize a
body similar lo a quad board. This heiard, he said, would
bring some policy direction und belter representation lo the
organization. Whether this idea can work is hard lo determine. Yet the fact that Schaffer has knowledge and has pul
some creative Ihoughl into the mutter is commendable.
Schaffcr's experience nnd achievements also add
'cgitiinacy 10 his campaign, lie has been a Central Council
member for two years, chairperson of Ihc Student Action
Committee, und coordinator of the Albany "Fight the
Hike" rally. In the capacity of "Fight the Hike" coordinator, Schaffer was chiefly responsible for organizing the
2,000 plus Albany turnout at the budget rally.
One reservation we have about Rich Schaffer is that he
ippcars lo be undynumic. While his ideas arc appealing, he
may have some difficulty Inspiring students. SA needs a
president who can motivate the students to action.
Overall Schaffer is a solid, well-rounded candidate. The
board feels he can do a capable job in representing, informing and fighting for the students.
Vice Pres: Schneider - the right skills
ffl
he decision of who to endorse for vice president this
m
year was a lough one. Both candidates — Jeff
JL
Schneider and Rob Fishkin — have consielerable
experience, making I hem viable contenders for the office.
But along with his experience, Schneider's capable communication skills, contagious enthusiasm, and fresh ideas
have won him the ASP endorsement — although not
without some reservations.
The first thing wc noticed about Schneider was his ability
to deal with people. He expressed his ideas clearly and
without hesitation. He's a communicator with charisma.
These skills are necessary for a vice-president who will be
interacting with students, group leaders and administrators. His personality could precipitate more student participation in an SA atmosphere that tends to be
alienating and "cliquey".
Schneider's only a sophomore, but he's already raked in
plenty of experience. He was class of '85 president and a
member of the Student Action Committee and is currently
a member of Central Council, University Senate and class
of '85 treasurer. He's a leader with proven dedication to
student interests.
Much of the vice president's responsibilities involve
reams of paperwork, leaving him or her little time to do
anything else. Schneider's idea is to tackle the paperwork
at night, so he can deal face to face with groups and their
problems during the day. A simple and feasible solution.
The bulk of a vice president's job is to work closely wilth
the SA budget in an effort to discern the needs of student
groups. In order to grapple with SA's current financial
straits, Schneider advocates "tighter control of student
groups" — a somewhat hackneyed idea. But listen again.
He's got another idea. Education. It's one thing to be a
watchdog oin group funding, but Schneider wants to
educate groups on the budgetary process so money allotment could be worked out together.This "friend, not foe"
attitude could clear up some of the animosity some groups
have toward SA. This is a fresh idea that needs lo be tried.
He also wants lo use this idea of education 10 tackle student apathy. He mentioned "education drives" could Inform sludcnls on pertinent issues while uniting them
together. The result would be two-fold — a more politically
aware studenl body with a greater ability to fight for issues,
and the natural decrease of apathy.
Schneider's ideas show he's not a reticent individual who
waits until problems come lo him. He's ready to tackle
them before they become overwhelming. SA needs a visible
vice president who will actively deal with the sludcnls, not
one content to live behind the closed door of his office.
On campus issues, Schneider is in favor of the NYPIRG
and Solomon referenda, he feels OCA should have a professional director, and believes SA should fund most
political groups. We support him in these areas.
For all his capabilities, Schneider admits he has
weaknesses. He cites his perfeclionism as his biggest problem. But we sec a little more than just that. In many ways,
he sounds naive. He is as sophomore who pictures SA as
one happy family — something that is nice but unrealistic.
Educating students lakes a lot of time, and the SA vice
president cannot do il by himself. Schneider also docs not
demonstrate enough knowlcge about the SA budgetary
process. His idea of education sounds a little to campy and
ideological. When asked about the problems in SA,
Schneider mainly cited little things like excess xeroxing.
This shows he's not sleeping down in SA, but big issues
need lo be on his mind, loo. We also worry that he is not
sensitive lo the needs of off campus students. For instance,
he favors a bus fee, if necessary, to off campus students.
Lastly, we fear his unsophislicalion may make him prey to
aelminstralion officials who could try to manipulate him.
Schneider's a sincere, likable guy who'll take an active
role as vice president. Rich Schaffer appears to be a solid
but undynumic presidential candidate. Schaffcr's qualities,
coupled will) Schneider's charisma and communication
skills make the mosl effective team choice.
Inside - Candidate Assessments, Referendums and Statements
ALL SUPPLEMENT PHOTOS : LAURA BOSTICK UPS
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