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Sports
PUBLISHED
By Murk Lcvinc
ASSISTANT
They will begin running on June
I of this year. They will finish some
time near the middle of August.
They will run through six stales and
cover approximately 1,200 miles,
averaging in the neighborhood of
22 miles each running day. They are
running for charity, with all proceeds going 10 the Americun Heart
Association. They are Blake Marson and Liz Neporcnt, and their
story Is truly remarkable.
Marson, a senior here at Albany
Slate, had been a wrestler for 10
years before he turned his dedication strictly to running in his
sophomore year. His first competitive nice was the Long Island
Marathon in May of 1982 where he
ran an outstanding lime of 2:58.
His most recent marathon eumc In
November of lasi year when he ran
a 2:49, which qualified him for the
some of the real world before we go
on to graduate school or work,"
Marson said.
The planning and scheduling for
the run has taken a tremendous effort on the pari of Murson and
Neporcnt. On December 28 of last
year they received an official sponsorship Idler from the Heart
Association. With thai taken care
of, the next steps involved writing
away for maps and information to
places all over New England.
"Writing the letters and mapping
lite routes was probably the worst
thing we had to d o , " Neporcnt
said. "We had to write lo till the
different Slate departments for
maps, of the areas we wanted to sec,
and lots of places weren't too
helpful. We senl out about 100 letters, and have had only about a forty percent response rate."
"We knew I he general area of
where we wanted lo go, bill we
needed some maps for the sped He
The idea of the 1200 Mile Run for
Heart came about late last summer.
Marson and Neporent wanted lo see
the sights of the area anil figured
that by running, Ihey got a chance
lo do something ihey love and lour
the Northeast. "We wanted lo
check oul the urea so we could see
mileage," Marson added. "We had
lo use the scales on the maps to approximate the miles, anil we spent a
lot of hours figuring oul the
distances between the cities,"
As expected both runners are in
peak physical condition. They both
I rain by running 70-100 miles per
week, and Neporent uses her work
on the track team as a way of improving her speed in Iter distance
running. Mosl of their training,
however, is done off the track and
away from the cars and noise of
local streets.
"We do most of our running out
in places like (Jiiilderlund and
Voorheesville," Marson explained.
"We love just running through the
hills and. farmland, looking down
and seeing horses oul in Ihc fields.
There are no cars, no traffic. It's
great."
"The training for the races is probably the thing i like most,".
Ncporenl adds, "It's one of the only chances we get lo be together,
and it's a greal way of getting
away."
Despite gelling greal pleasure oul
BY THE ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
CORPORATION
Tuesday
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
VOLUME
March 22,1983
L X X
NUMBER
15
lly Ben Gordon
STAT? IIRUHR
DAVE ASHER UPS
Albany State students Blake Marson (left) and Liz Neporent (right) are participating in the 1200-mile
Run lor the Heart beginning this June. Their trip will take them through all six New England states.
of their training, Marson and
and Hampshire, Rhode Island and Con- fairly simple. Marson and Neporent
Ncporenl have run into many dif- necticut. A friend will meet litem at are looking for people to sponsor
ficult situations, During Ihc recent cetaln destinutons along the way to them per mile. After deducting the
snowstorm Neporent ran II miles supply them wilh food, water or expenses they incur during the trip,
which she termed "one of t tic worst first aid. Their housing will moslly the duo will donate the money to
days running I ever had." Marson involve camping out, anil their did the Hearl Association. By getting
recalls many a day running in the
'" consist of large amounts ofcur- different organizations to provide
snow where he has had lo jump ink) bohydrales. "Lois of spaghetti and them with sportswear, housing or
anything else thai will help them to
snowbanks to avoid cars. Still, they pizza," Marson said.
insist that they will run In any
There tire many rest days, and cut down on expenses, ihc pair are
weather.
their lime structure is very flexible, attempting to have as much money
The run itself will begin in "The mileage figures are jusl rough as possible remaining for the
Neporcnt's hometown of Kingston, guesses, so we're not really sure Association. They hope lo donate
N. Y. They have mapped oul a route how much we're going lo run or about $2,000.
Ihal will lake litem lo dozens of how long we'll lake. We figure
As far as the Run itself is concities all over New York, around 1,200 miles," Marson said. cerned, the two see il as a challenge,
Massachusetts, Vermont. New
The financial aspect of the Run is hut also expect lo have a lot of fun.
•'Menially, I don't think il will be
as hard as ti marathon, where you
have to go all oul for 2d miles. This
will he much more relaxing. We're
not really concerned wilh how fasl
we run, we just want lo finish,''
John Dleckelman can add yet two more laurels to his crown.
Neporent said.
The 6'5" senior center was noted SUNYAC-East Player-of-the
Year in a poll ol all the East division coaches and was selected
"It's like taking a trip while we're
to the All-SUNYAC team for the third consecutive season.
running," Murson added. "It's difDleckelman led all scorers in the SUNYAC with a 20.5
ferent from a race, where it's a rail
average In conference competition. The lefthander from the
grind, always thinking about lime.
Albany area finished the 1982-63 season with a 16.3 overall
Physically, il will be very demanaverage.
ding, but mentally il won't be as
tough as running in a marathon."
Dleckelman was joined on the All-SUNYAC team by Cortland's Tom Spanbauer, Potsdam's Leroy Wltherspoon, PittIf their physical capabilities are
sburgh's Paul Glodls, Oneonta's Mike Pocyntyluk and the
half a strong as their heart and
University of Buffalo's John Fltzpatrlck as repeaters.
courage, the Run will no doubt be a
huge success.
An All-American candidate, Dleckelman was edged in the
tabulations for SUNYAC Player-of-the-Year by Leroy Qettys of
Buffalo State. Qettys, who averaged 17.4 points and six ro
Anyone interested In helping the
bounds a game, led the Bengals to an 18-5 record and second
runners in their heartwarming efplace in the conference.
fort can contact Blake or Liz tit
4.18-7760 for information on
Cortland Red Dragon coach Bill Williams won Coach-of-thebecoming a sponsor. They are also
Year honors. A sophomore coach, he directed his team to an
attempting to set up a table in the
Impressive 7-3 conference record and 16-7 overall.
Campus
Center lo ptovide addi—Mure Haspi'i
tional information.
Two laurels for Dleckelman
ALANCALtM.UI'8,
OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY
Arabs preach Palestinian view as Jews protest
"We're not really concerned
with how fast we run, we just
want to finish."
—Liz Neporent
Boston Marathon next month.
M a r s o n , who hails from
Hellmore, N.Y., comes from a
background where running lias
played a major role in his family's
recreational activities,
"You might say that I come from
a running family," Marson said.
"My father does a lot of running,
and my younger brothers are just
starling to gel interested in it, loo."
Neporcnt, also a senior, began
running at age 13. A member of the
women's track team here, she has
been running track since eighth
grade. She has run five marathons
in lite lasi three years, mosl recently
finishing second among women in
the Hudson Mohawk Road
Runner's Club marathon earlier
this year. Her lime of 3:20 qualified
her for the Boston Marathon.
UNIVERSITY
MARCH 18, 1983
Two Albany students in 1200 Mile Run for Heart
LMIimiM.
AT THE STATE
Accusing Ihc Arab Students Association of
being a front for Palestine Liberation
Organization propaganda, campus Jewish
groups protested the presence of a PLO
representative at an ASA lecture Saturday.
ASA President Zarl Salch insisted, however,
that Ihc lecture was meant simply lo inform
the public about Arab viewpoints.
ASA and Revisionist Zionist Alternative
both agreed Ihc prolest stayed within the area
designated by lite university — in from of
Lecture Center one. The Jewish groups' singing and chants of such slogans as, "Hell no,
PLO," were occasionally audible inside lite
lecture room, but according to RZA President llilscnraih, "as far as the ASA goes,
they had no problem with the protest at till."
However, Salch pointed oul I lint noise
from (he Jewish prolesl occasionally drowned oul Ihc lecture proceedings. "More than
ten people from the audience requested that
the volume of the microphones be
increased," he said, adding, "We don't mind
their demonstration, as long as one can slill
hear the speaker."
ASA member Mohammed Kayed confirmed that the ASA fell Ihal the protest fell
within their right to free speech. ASA President Salch, however, said Ihal Ihc purpose of
the "Teach-In" was lo educate, and he wished lite protesters would come listen |o the lectures.
Dr. Mohammed Hullaj, Ihc first speaker
on the progrum, spoke for approximately 20
minutes on Palestine and the cultural identity
of the Palestinian people. Hallaj, who is
Dr. Hatem Hussainl
director of the Institute of Arab Studies, said
"You can never silence lite voice of Hie people.
thai Palestinian culture is in jeopardy due lo
ing the series was Dr. Halem llussaini, Depuan act of "psychological genocide" by the
for...jusl ice."
ty Observer to the PLO Mission lo lite United
Israelis. He described "the deslruclion of
RZA Executive Secretary Glenn Moncs
Palestine," calling Israel the rightful home of
said
thai the Teach-in was in reality "a PLO
Nations.
the Palestinian people.
rally." He supported litis view by pointing
The PLO is synonpmous with the Palestioul the presence of pro-PLO banners and a
nian people, Hussainl said. "You cannot
The second speaker at the event was Dr.
PLO flag in the lecture room. He added thai
destroy the PLO because Ihc PLO is Ihc
Carol Berrigan of Syracuse University. Bcrthere was a banner in lite lecture room thai
rigan recently toured the Mideast wilh a Palestinian people, and you cannot destroy a
said in Arabic, "All guns lo liberate
people. You can never silence ihc voice of the
group of women Interested in Middle Eastern
Palestine."
people." He portrayed Israel as an enemy lo
problems, and her presentation included
Palestinians, staling that "Israeli policies of
numerous slides taken on the tour. Berrigan
Responding lo a charge by Moncs thai the
harassment
and
killing
and
kidnapping
of
said Ihal the reason for her involvement was
ASA is a from for PLO propaganda, Kayed
Palcslinians have conlinued." Despile recent
her concern for "Injustices" wherever Ihey
said, "The ASA is made of Arab students
opinions expressed in the media suggesting
occurred. She used slide photographs depicwho come from all Arab stales. We are comthai the PLO has been devastaled by their
ting wartime destruction to show that the
pletely independent. We invite speakers who
forced withdrawal from Lebanon, llussaini
United Slates was at fault by aiding Ihc
are PLO and speakers who are not PLO. We
Israeli military despile the actual displace- said Ihal lite Palestinian people are "stronger
feel ihal Ihc PLO has a poinl and should be
than ever, ready lo raise their voice
ment of many Palestinians by Israel. Closgiven il chance lo express this poinl." ASA
"We don't
think that
anything the
Arabs have to
say will stand
up to historical
scrutiny.'
— RZA Executive Secretary
Glenn Manes
R)(z) A
* " • '
\
i
member Mined Sad added, "We feel Ihal the
PLO equals Ihc Palestinian people, the same
as any Jewish group on campus can feel ihal
Israel is their representative."
Speaking about points made by the Arab
speakers, Moncs said, "We don't think that
anything the Arabs have to say will stand up
lo historical scrutiny." Compared to RZA
literature, Moncs said that the ASA literature
available at the Teach-In was, "a batch of
baseless. I ruthless propaganda which not only ignores history and twists facts, but makes
them up as well." He added Ihal, "Anyone
who can prove thai anything in the literature
Ihal we distribute is not true can claim a $100
reword from RZA." Moncs was shocked at
Constitution question confuses Junior Council
By Heidi Gralla
STAFF WRITER
Controversy surrounding a missing constitution and
election procedures has stirred confusion and frustration
within the Class of 1984 Council.
The confusion is aggravated by unverifiablc amendments and the constant change of voting status among
members of ihc Council.
The inaccessibility of the constitution recently became a
healed issue within council when several members requested a copy in order lo propose an amendment, according lo class council member Dan Robb. The amendment, Robb explained, would allow for all Class of '84
members to elect officers. Currently, the entire class elects
a council, and Ihc council, in turn, voles on officers.
According to former class president Tom Phillips, at
the beginning of the freshman year election for class
council members and officers were open to all class
members. After a "very poor turnout," the conslitulion
was amended lo conduct class council elections univcrsitywlde, bill hold elections for officers within the class council. Phillips explained that his was done to prevent people
from running for offices for "selfish" reasons such as
wanting a title, and lo prevent elections from becoming
"a popularity contest."
Class council member Johunna Sarrocco said she would
like to sec Ihc constitution amended because "an Internal
election is more of a popularity contest titan a university*
wide election."
Regarding the issue of Ihc availability of Ihc coin Million, Class President Chip Fody explained that he was
never given a copy from previous officers, and added Ihal
he never asked for one. "I knew what was in the constitution," he said, "and anything I didn't know I just asked
Tom (Phillips). He's as good a resource as having one
(constitution)." However, Fody added Ihal Phillips had
ler.l him a copy of the conslitulion lasi year, but lie had
relumed II after reading il.
Phillips, who was studying in Denmark lasi semester,
apparently has the only copy of the constitution at his
house on Long Island. Phillips said he plans to bring ihc
conslitulion back to school after the vacation "and
hopefully, we can straighten out this mess."
('onsii in ions of all SA groups arc supposed to be on file
in lite Student Association and Student Activities offices,
according lo Assistant Director or Student and University
Affairs Jessica Casey. However, she explained that copies
of all class constitutions are filed, with the exception of
•84.
SA Office Manager Rita Lcvinc noted that the situation
is the same at the SA office. She questioned whether or
not ihe conslitulion was ever filed.
"According lo the index sheet it was not here last summer," Lcvinc said, adding, "1 don't know if il was ever
here."
Casey was unable lo say whether the conslitulion was
previously filed wilh llic Sh Jcnt Activities office because
she has only been at her present job for one year.
Although she contends thai she has never seen a copy
of the constitution, Casey commented, "There is no
doubl in my mind thai there was a constitution at some
time." She explained that "sometimes groups will borrow
a conslitulion and forget to return it."
Fody said the fuel ihal a constitution is missing from
both offices "seems strange" but is probably just a "I'll
ing error."
Class of '84 Secretary Ellen Murray and Treasurer Pete
Oiglio, boll) maintained that they've never seen a copy of
the constitution,
Class council member Ann Marie LaPorta said she
hasn't seen a constitution since freshman year, when she
"discarded il while packing." She explained, "I don't
believe il was my responsibility lo keep the constitution
for this class — I was only a member, not an officer."
Several council members complained that they arc being told by Fody how elections will be conducted, what
constitutional amendments were previously made, and
what Ihc requirements arc to obtain voting privilcdges,
without a conslitulion to document it.
However, Phillips attacked some of the members who
have complained about the management of Ihc Class of
'84, saying, "1 see a very insincere motivation in the Class
5*-
2 ALBANY STUDENT PRESS i l MARCH 22, 1983
WORLDWIEHK
More Marines likely
MARCH 22„ 1983, i . ALBANY STUDENT PRESS O
Foreign Secretary Francis Pym scheduled
talks with the seven-member delegation led
by Jordan's King Hussein following a reception at the Foreign Office. Later in the day,
the delegation headed by King Hussein of
Jordan drove lo Buckingham Palace for an
audience with Queen Elizabeth I I .
British officials said the delegation's visit
will provide an opportunity for a broad
review o f Middle East peace plans, including
President Reagan's September Proposal calling for self-determination for West Bank
Palestinians, in association with Jordan. Britain supports the initiative, which has made
no visible headway.
The Arab League cancelled Its original visit
lo London, scheduled for last November,
after the British government objected to the
presence in il of Farouk Kaddoumi, the official foreign affairs spokesman for thel
Palestine Liberation Organization. Britain,
which has refused to recognize the P L O
unless II renounces terrorism and admits that
Israel has a right lo exist within secure
borders said Kaddoumi would not be permitted lo participate in talks with Mrs. Thatcher
and Pym. Kaddoumi has been dropped from
Ihe current delegation.
Beirut, Lebanon
(AP) President Reagan is ready to send additional murines lo Lebanon for peacekeeping
duly If necessary, special Lebanese envoy
Saeb Salam said Monday after reluming
from a week's talks in Washington.
Salam, a former prime minister and special
representative of President A m l n Gcmayel,
said Reagan showed his "readiness to assist
Lebanon in many fields, even by sending additional marines." " T h i s will depend on the
necessity for such a move," Salam said.
There are already 1,200 U.S. Marines with
I ho mullinalionnl peacekeeping force In
i cbanon, and their commander, Col. James
M . Mead, has reported several Confrontations with Israeli troops. On Sunday, Mead
said thai Israel's "indiscriminate" use of
"reconnaissance by f i r e " ladies to flush but
guerrillas endangers civilians and members of
I he muliinaiional peacekeeping force,
Gunmen fired bazookas and small arms at
an Israeli position east o f Beirut Sunday
night and rocket-propelled grenades at an •
Israeli pnlrol southeast of Beirut Monday,
bill I here were no casualties, I he Tel Aviv
command said.
The Israelis invaded Lebanon June 6 to
smash ihe Palestine Liberation Organization
Washington, D.C.
and refuse to withdraw until ihey have securi(AP) President Reagan Monday nominated
ty guarantees along Lebanon's southern
William D. Ruckclshatts for u second lour ns
border with Israel. Israel demands a
chief of the Environmental Protection Agensimultaneous withdrawal of Syrian troops
cy and Ihe corporate official said lie has a
from Lebanon when Israeli forces pull out,
"free h a n d " to run the beleaguered agency.
I he Syrians have been in-Lcbanon since snufReagan personalty announced Ihe nominafing out the (975-76 Moslcin-C'hrisiian civil
tion and said of Ruckclshaiis: " N o one could
war, and provide cover for Pl.O guerrillas
bring more impressive credentials . . . l i e is
operating in northern and eastern parts of the
the right man for the rigln j o b til Ihe righl
country.
lime . . . " Anne McOill Burford resigned as
EPA administrator on March 9 after half-adozen congressional panels launched investigations of ihe EPA.
Ruckclshatts, a vice president for
Sasebo, Japan
Weyerhaeuser, the timber firm, was the first
(AP) The U.S. aircraft carrier Enterprise director of EPA, under President Nixon. He
docked al this southwestern Japanese port
slood beside Reagan who sung his praises "as
M o n d a y m o r n i n g a m i d protests by
tough, fair and highly competent."
demonstrators who claimed the flattop may
The While House hopes the nomination
be armed with nuclear weapons.
will bring credibility lo Ihe mueh-iiivesligatcd
Six demonstrators in a small boat were arE P A , and Ruckclshatts, when usked how
rested after hurling what were believed lo be
much Independence was given, t o l d
smoke bombs at a patrol vessel of Japan's
reporters: " I have a free h a n d , "
Maritime Safely Agency Sasebo police
repotted. They said the six were arrested
about .10 minutes before the Enterprise docked at 9 a.m. (7 p.m. EST Sunday), and they
were in one ot\ 26 boats launched by
demonstrators protesting the four-day visit
of the nuclear-powered Enterprise,
NATIONWIDE
B R I E F S
EPA head named
Protests greet flattop
nuclear power saga: a project that is encountering opposition not in its formative
stages o f construction', such as Nine Mile
Point 2, and not after it had been generating
electricity for years like the Indian Point
plants. Shorcham's woes have arrive at just
Ihe worst time for L I L C O : after the utility
has spent billions constructing the plant and
before it has gotten a cent's worth o f power
from its nuclear generator.
Suffolk County officials have concluded
that Long Island Is too populous and major
roads loo few lo ever risk starting that
generator up. " Y o u almost have lo believe in
the Tooth Fairy If you think that we could
evacuate the people of Long Island in the
event of a nuclear accident at Shoreham,"
said Cohalan, a Republican who is seeking
re-election this November. Some opponents
have attributed his adamnncc on Shoreham
in part lo that impending re-election bid.
Budget pact penned
Albany, N. Y.
(AP) The job for Gov. Mario Cuomo and
legislative leaders this week is lo write the
specific languuge thai will translate their
"general agreement" for a new $31.62 billion
state budget into reality.
Late Friday afternoon, Cuomo and the
legislative leaders reached agreement after a
one and a half hour negotiating session. " W e
have had some pleasant announcements over
the lust 76 or 77 days; we have another o n e , "
said Cuomo as he announced the agreement
al a Friday evening news conference with Ihe
leaders. The new budget calls for spending
about 7 percent higher than in Ihe stale's current fiscal year which ends March 31. Cuomo
said Ihe details of how the final budget would
look would come out Ihis week.
The agreement calls for no increases in the
slate's three major taxes — sales, personal income and corporate franchise taxes.
However, the new budget will require higher
taxes on alcoholic beverages and cigarettes
and increased fees for driver's licenses and
automobile registrations.
And the new agreement calls for a 10 percent capital gains lax on all real estate taxes in
the state worth more than SI million. In all,
the new taxes and fees will cost New Yorkers
more than $900 million in the next year.
Strike talks stalled
New York City
(AP) Negotiators went back to the bargaining table Sunday night in hopes of ending the
trainmen's strike against Ihe Metro-North
Railroad, but it appeared the walkout would
go into its third week with the parlies stalled
over the Issue o f crew size.
Officials of the Metropolitan .Transportation Authority, the parent organization of
Metro-North, had hoped to have Ihe trains
running again by the morning rush.
However, as midnight approached, there was
no sign of an agreement, and il was likely
thai 90,000 commuters would face at least
one more day of using buses, subways and
cars lo gel lo work. M T A Chairman Richard
Ravitch had told reporters earlier that the
system needed six hours to gel rolling.
As the two sides arrived for their meeting
at M T A headquarters, there was no evidence
of movement on the central issue: management's Insistence on ending a traditional
system of negotiating crew consist, or size,
wilh the trainmen's union.
Ruviich told reporters us he arrived, " M y
position on the crew consist has nol
changed." Ihe M T A , the parent authority of
M e l r o - N o r l l i , is seeking ihe sole power lo
determine the size of iis train crews.
I The next ASP will be April 8
I Today is the last to drop a class.
Remember, it's hell from here on in.
A police spokesman said the Maritime
Safety Agency had 24 patrol boats at the
scene to maintain order.
Police
expected
so m c
It), 000
demonstrators would stage a rally later Monday, and 3,000 riot police were mobilized.
Britain meets Arabs
London
v
(AP) After months of haggling over British
objections to the inclusion of PLO representative, an Arab League delegation and
government officials held talks Friday that
may improve Britain's troubled relations
with the Arab world.
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and
PREVIEW L OF
EVENTS
I S. T.-'I N a:: &
TT-jT
T
Class o l '84 Council will hold a
meeting on Tuesday, March 22, at
10 p.m. In the Fireside Lounge. Elections procedures will be discussed.
Members of Ihe Class o( '84,aro
welcome to attend.
r
ASUBA Is sponsoring a forum entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"
on Wodnosday, March 23, at 7:30
p.m. In the PAC Recital Hall. The
evening will feature minority
senators and representatives from
the State Capital.
"Christian Attitudes Toward Israel"
will bo discussed by Sister Cecilia "Labor Relations" will bo the topic
Holbrook on Wednesday, March 23, of a lecture presonted by Mr. Jack
at 8 p.m. In the Campus Centor Houlihan on Thursday, March 24, at
8:30 p.m., in LC 5, sponsored by Tho
Ballroom.
Pledge Class ol Delta Sigma PI.
Assertlveness Training for Women
will be ollorod on Wednesday, The last day to drop a semester
March 23, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on course Is Tuesday, March 22. You
can pick up drop forms in CUE.
Dulch Quad, Schuyler 103.
The fire occurred Dec. 14, 1981, on Ihe
14th floor of Slate Quad's Eastman Tower.
The fire, which' was discovered around 6
p.m. by one of Ihe students, destroyed
almost everything in Ihe room belonging to
Hinder and Levy, where il started. Although
the adjacent room in the suite, belonging to
Pine uiul Kelslien, did nol actually catch fire,
most of Ihe contents of the room were
damaged by smoke, heal, and waler.
\
The four women arc seeking reimbursement for their loss of properly and the money
they had paid for housing because they did
not use Ihe room for Ihe contracted period,
and $25,000 in personal distress. The oilier
iwo students who resided in the suite are nol
seeking damages.
According lo Mishler, ihe four women filed u notice of Intention to file a claim last
Murch, preserving their righl lo sue after a
90-day deadline for filing. There has been no
offer for out-of-court settlement from the
slate.
The official university report, according to
Mishler, staled llial the students were
negligent because an extension cord o f theirs
caused Ihe fire. Mishler contended that the
fire was slurted instead by a university lamp,
which was located in the same spot. This was
indicated by Albany Fire Department personnel responding lo Ihe scene, Mishler said, bin
was not stated specifically in their report,
which listed the cause o f Ihe fire as "elec-
NHWSmilTOK
University Senator Phillip Chonigman has
leveled a campaign aguinsl Ihe recent differential tuition resolution reached by Ihe
Senate Executive Committee in a Feb. 18
emergency session, charging that the resolution was readied by a non-reprcscntatlvc
fraction of the entire Senate. The resolution,
that tuition at university centers be higher
than oilier SUNYA schools, was passed 10-2
Shoreham unsafe
Shoreham is a new chapter In the slate's
Four S U N Y A students have filed suits
against Ihe Slate of New York for damages
resulting from a fire in their Slnic Quad suite
last year, according to SA attorney Mark
Mishler.
The separate suits were filed March 15 by
Mishler on behalf of four women, Ellen
Binder, Diane Pine, Madeline Kelslien and
Tina Levy against the Slate of New York,
Slate University of New York, Slate University of New York al Albany and Ihe New
York Slate Dormitory Authority. The slate
has until April 24, 1983 lo make formal
answer lo Ihe suit.
By Debbie .Indue
F S
Shore/win, N. Y.
(AP) Imagine building an aircraft, Nol just a
ruii-of-the-niill plane, bill a real " a i r c r a f t , "
the pride of Ihe fleet. Imagine spending a
decade and $3.1 billion on it. Now, jusi when
il is ready to fly, think about being loid it
should be grounded permanently because it's
conceivable il could crash and hurl people.
Thai's how Long Island Lighting Co. feels
about its Shoreham nuclear power project,
an 809-incguwull plain the utility says will be
ready for generation early next year. Suffolk
County Executive Peter Cohalan and the
County Legislature say the risk of a serious
accident at the plant is too great to let LII.CO
ever generate commercial electricity there,
By Karen P i r o z z i
trical"
" F r o m my own Investigation of what happened, and an examination of reports submitted by others such as the fire department
and the plant department of S U N Y A , I
believe the fire was caused by negligence on
the part of SUNY and nol in any way ihe pari
of Ihe students," Mishler said. " A l this point
there is no way lo know exactly what caused
the fire. It's just clear that II was electrical.
We may have to hire an electrical expert lo
examine the evidence."
Mishler said the suil includes two separate
sections, or causes of action, The First is based on negligence, charging the stale with
"failure lo perform iheir duly lo claimant 10
maintain electrical outlets, electrical wiring,
lighting fixtures and lamps." The second
cause of action charges the slate with a
breach of an implied promise In the
claimant's housing contract. " I n the contract
was a warranty by defendants that no condition exislcd on the premises which was
dangerous, hazardous or detrimental lo claimant's life or safely," and 11lls was breached
" I n ihai there were defects in ihe electrical
wiring, outlets, fixtures and lamps in suite
1402."
Dennis Stevens, Director of Physical Plant
and Assistant Vice President of facilities
management, said he was nol free lo comment on the ease.
Mishler.explained that after ihe stale goes
on record as answering each claim in the still,
there will be a period of pre-trial disclosure,
during which both sides exchange Information, a settlement can be made at any lime. If
no settlement is made, ihe case will go lo trial
al the Court of Claims.
According lo Hinder, the four decided lo
sue because, " w e deserve our stuff back. The
school acknowledged receiving notice o f our
intention lo sue, bill Ihey never told us yes
and never lold us no. They jusi kind of ignored u s . "
Stevens pointed out thai it is generally the
responsibility of Ihe claimant lo file suil
ugainst the slate before receiving payment for
damages.
II
S t a t e Q u a d ' s E a s t m a n Tower
Cause of blaze termed simply ' 'eteelrleal.
University Senator protests executive resolution
STATEWIDE
B R I E
Four students file suits claiming fire damages
by an executive commission vole during the
February meeting. In a two-page letter lo
President O'Lcary Chonigman charged that
during a Match 14 Senate meeting a motion
was blocked to discuss the differential tuition
resolution, l i e added the committee's decision was conveyed to the Senate in a onesentence notice included in the Committee's
Report to ihe Senate,
" I dare say thai few Senators noticed the
Item," Chonigman wrote. "There is little
doubt that the relevance anil importance of
Al Ihe full Senate meeting on March I4.
Chonigman said he requested thai the subject
of the differential lullion he discussed. A
vole wns taken on whether lo address the
mailer, Chonigman continued, resulting in a
16-16 tie. Chairman Peter I I . Krosby was empowered lo break the tic, which he d i d ,
casting ihe deciding vole ugui.nsl bringing up
tile resolution, said Chonigman,
AMV COHEN UPS
Telethon '83 under the direction of co-chairs Eileen Kozln end Betsy Kwasman,
grossed over $35,000 In their 24-hour event this weekend, Dedicated to "Special
Children, Special Dreams," proceed* will benefit the Wildwood School for the
Developmental^ Disabled, Camp Opportunities, and the N.Y. Northeastern
Chapter of Neurofibromatosis.
4 + 2 is an alternative living environment
whose
members
are
dedicated to a set of personal
values that will load to a better community. If you're Interested In participating In this program attend an
Interest meeting on Tuesday, March
22, at 10 p.m. In the Indian Quad
I
Penthouse.
Senior portrait proofs and orders
are due. Studio reps will be on campus April 6-8, 10-4 pm, outside CC
305.
Special Olympics will hold an Interest meeting on Wednesday,
March 23, at 7:30 p.m. In LC 11. This
Is a chance to help with fundralsIng, sports training, area games and
morel For more Information call
457-3066.
Nominated a Teacher or advisor lor
the Fourth Annual Excellence In
Teaching and Advising Awards.
Financial Aid applications for
Nomination lorms are available In
1983-84 are due In just one short
the
SA office (CC116) and must be
Over 100 positions In student
month. Donald Whlllock reminds
government are open this yoar. rolurnod by Friday, March 25,
students that fully complotod
Nomination forms can be picked up Sclonco Fiction writer Samuel It
SUNYA applications, with all reat the SA office. If you're Interested Dolanoy will speak on Tuosday, quired Income d o c u m e n t a t i o n ,
In getting Involved stop by tho SA March 22, at 8 p.m. In the Campus must be postmarked or returned lo
office or give thorn a call at Center Assembly Hall. Ho will bo tho Office of Financial Aid no lalor
457-8087.
speaking on "The Necessity ol that April 22, 1983. The deadllno
Tomorrown" and admission Is free. rotors lo applications for campusbased aid (National Dlroct Student
Mohawk Valley Archeologlcal Flold
School
will hold an Inlorost An Introduction to |ob searching Loan, Collego Work-Study and Supmooting on Wodnosday, March 23, will bo ollorod Irom 4:15 p.m. to 6:16 plemental Educational Opporlunlly
al 7 p.m. In LC 2.
Qrnnl).
p.m. In ED 120.
ihe mailer was inappropriately relayed lo ihe
Senate,"
Chonigman pointed out thai ihe resolution
in its entirely was nol made readily accessible
lo Senalors, since il was nol included in Ihe
information packets distributed among
Senators prior to Ihe meeting. Il was only
listed as being available ill Ihe Scheie office,
The measure*, Chonigman said, was intended
to keep ihe mailer from ihe entire Senate. In
discussing his case, lie observed thai oneihird of the members on the full Senate ate
students, while only one student — SA President Mike Corso — is represented' on the
12-inemher Executive Committee,
W i l l VUHMAN UPS
University Police have recovered 235 a s s o r t e d s h i r t s bolieved t o have been
s t o l o n I r o m D u t c h Q u a d w a s h r o o m s r e s u l t i n g In t h e arrest of t w o s t u d e n t s M a r c h
12. The s t u d e n t s , a c c o r d i n g t o A s s i s t a n t Director of University Police J o h n
H e n l g h a n , were In the p r o c e s s of s e l l i n g the s h i r t s w h e n they ware a r r e s t e d .
The s t u d e n t s were a r r a i g n e d before Albany Police Court J u d g e M o r t o n M. Z.
Lynn o n M a r c h 13th a n d released o n $500 b a i l , a c c o r d i n g t o court records. They
are s c h e d u l e d to reappear in court this W e d n e s d a y .
The s h i r t s are n o w b e i n g held at t h e Department of Public Safety, w h e r e they
may be I d e n t i f i e d a n d c l a i m e d by their o w n e r s .
— Debbie Judge
According lo Chonigman, Krosby said " i l
was loo Imporlnnl an issue lo discuss in only
ten minutes" when questioned about ihe
vote. Chonigman noted in his Idler llial the
topic was brought up at 4:50 in a meeting
scheduled to close al 5; however, he also
noted llial ihe Chair is capable of several oplions in Ihe situation, including recessing until a liner dale, extending ihe meeting, or
tabling ihe current lopie.
" W i l l i all due respect tii Chairman
Krosby, this seemed lo be a wholly Inadequate reason lo withhold discussion of the
mailer," Chonigman wrote. He also added
later, "There is no reason for ihe mailer I D
nol be on the agenda."
Krosby could nol be reached for comment.
Chonigman also questioned the necessity
of ihe Feb, 18 emergency Executive Cdmnilllee session Itself, According to Ihe resolution,
the committee exercised its authority under
ihe Faculty Hy-l aws, which allows ii to act
for the Senate " o n urgent mailers al such
times as il is clearly impractical or impossible
lo convene Ihe Senate."
The Senator questioned Ihis polnl on three
counts: one, can ihe Executive Committee
act on behalf of the entire Senate any lime a
mailer requires attention between regularly
scheduled meetings, or only when Ihe Senate
cannot in fuel he called logclhcr; two, lo
what extent musi Ihe committee inform ihe
Senate of its actions; and three, should an
issue of such urgency as a matter of course be
bronchi before ihe next full Semite meeting.
l i e pointed OIII ihai ihe issue, at First
urgent because of ihe March I deadline for
Ihe Hoard of Itusicc's Uudgel proposal, was
still pending ill the time of lite Match 14
Senate meeting, the Stale 1 cgisluturc having
until A p r i l I lo adopt Ihe budget. " I l escapes
all reasoning," Chonigman wrote, " f o r the
resolution to base nol been included on ihe
agenda for Monday's Senate meeting."
Chonigman said lie had spoken lo other
Senalors on Ihe mailer, not all of whom were
againsi the differential lullion idea Inn all of
whom, he said, felt the opportunity for
discussion should have been provided,
Senator Cathy LaSusa supported Ihe basic
idea o f Chonigman's letter, saying the Executive Committee "aeied in good faith in
using Iheir powers." Bill, she also said the
issue definitely should have been discussed til
the Senate meeting, calling Chairman
Krosby's reason for not discussing the issue
"very poor. The urgency is still there,"
she said. " T h e meeting could have been extended." LaSusa also said the Senators
would have been more willing lo vote for
discussion after looking over all the facts and
reviewing them. " I l they'd known, it could
have been close," she said.
Senators who were against differential lullion would probably continue trying lo
discuss i l , LaSusa said. " W e ' l l get a hold o f
as many Senators as possible and try to put
on pressure."
Concluding his letter, Chonigman appealed to President O'Lcary lo call a special
meeting of Hie Senate lo discuss the issue
before Ihe Spring break, or, if llial Is not
within his power, that the president make a
11t»
MARCH 22, 1983 Ii ALBANY STUDENT PRESS 5
BECOME PART OF THE
ULTIMATE RECREATIONAL
SPORT!
BETA GAMMA SIGMA
National Business Honor Society
ULTRALIGHT
FLYING
The following students have been
elected to membership
THE SUNY ALBANY FLYING CLUB
IS EXCITED
|TO ANNOUNCE THE INTRODUCTION OF
ULTRALIGHTS TO SUNYA
WATCH FOR MORE DETAILS
AND COME SEE US DURING
ULTRALIGHT WEEK
APRIL 4 - APRIL 8
Graduate
Students
Seniors
Juniors
Timothy Blake
Mary Ann Bomengo
Thomas Condulis
James De ponle
Linda Earle
Lucy Edwards
Laurie l-'uness
Nancy Glassman
Lauren Goldberg
Jennifer Gurkan
Sheryl Johnson
Diane Lahm
Kevin McCormick
Peter Morici
Tracy Nlmmo
Debra Saks
Waldemar Schaefer
Brett Schoenig
David Singer
Jodi Solomon
Barbara Aldrige
David Berkowltz
Carolee Carmello
Joseph De Angelo
Christine Dratch
Monica Geschwind
William Hodash
Michael Levine
Edward Palmese
Scot Robinson
Steve Sanders
Jackie Serota
Rona Silver
Eddie Straks
Susan Swift
Patricia Travis
Michael Weilheimer
Jan Wnorowski
Mo Wong
Margery Zietchick
Adrienne Beeb
Richard Carillo
Jeffry Cohen
Elizabeth Clinic
Michael Demak
Linda Dickerl
Mark Frankel
Margaret G a m ,
Richard Gicewii
Michael Gilliy.m
Martin Greenwi
Rita Guille
Marguerite Kurz
Pamela Ladd
Diane R. Lindar
Mary Menzies
Yokesan Reynol
John Sand
Edward Smith
Robert Thlbodea
Nancy Utterback
Janice Wehren
Kenneth Wilting
Bruce Woods
Congregation supports Jewish gays
including gays and lesbians as well as nonJews," he said.
Mark Maxwell, another member of A m
Tikva, said that the organization "offers a
way for a non-Jewish lover to understand the
cultural differences' and learn about traditional Jewish culture. We also can help people through our experience o f coming out to
their families."
Prlscilla Golding, an A m Tikva representative, said that A m Tikva is a member of the
World Congress o f Gay and Lesbian Jewish
Organizations which is international in scope
and has member groups all over Ihe world.
" W e are I here," she said. " W e arc a warm
group and we are open to Jews and nonJews. It is good because wc are able to give
Jewish exposure 10 the community."
When asked about A m Tikva's relationship will) Israel, Golding said, " I n 1979 our
conference was held in Israel. There were major problems. One o f ihem was that an arrangement was made for accommodations
" I feel best," Passer said, "that ai A m and by the lime people gol lo Israel the hotel
Tikva we are u supportive network. People said they had been threatened with the loss o f
who can't come out 10 their families can gel a their license. They cancelled within a day and
Jewish family feeling with u s . "
when everyone arrived there was no place to
meet. They ended up staying in people's
Emphasizing that A m Tikva docs not
houses. They jusl traveled around in a group
represent "traditional Judaism," Passer exlooking for a place 10 slay."
plained that it offers its members an opportunity to practice their religion and openly
Golding said that the members of the condeal with their "alternative lifestyle" at the
ference brought money for Irccs 10 be
same time. " I n a mainstream synagogue," he
planlcd in Israel. " W h e n they arrived in
said, " i t is difficult 10 have a remembrance
Israel the money had alrcaly been seal ahead
prayer said in honor o f ihe death o f a lover.
and accepted by Ihe Jewish National Fund,
Bui at A m Tikva the congregation says a
However, they were told that a plaque could
prayer together and any member o f the connol go up saying 'Guy and Lesbian Jewish
gregation can request the name o f anyone Oganizalion.'" Thai was in 1979 she said,
they want remembered."
and Ihe debate still goes on. " T h e decision
was made Ihal a blank plaque would go up so
Once a year Passer said, A m Tikva has a
you notice something Is missing. They ofmemorial service for those who died in the
fered to give Ihe money back bul most people
holocaust. " W e honor everyone who died,
By Christine Falk
" I don't find that my conception of
Judaism rules out my being g a y , " said David
Passer, a representative from A m Tikva, a
community o f gay and lesbian Jews in Ihe
Boston area. Passer's comment expressed Ihe
apparent concensus of Ihe group, which met
at the Campus Center, on Sunday.
" 1 have a Jewish lover," Passer said. " O u r
parents know we are gay. They know we arc
a couple and we are friends," he explained.
" T h i s is unusual, and il's good 10 know we
arc accepted in Ihe family and we can continue involvement
i n Ihe Jewish
community."
Passer said his family was always active in
the religious community and thai, although
they supported his decision lo make his sexual perfcrcnccs known 10 that community, ii
was only when he came lo Boston and joined
A m Tikva ihal he was able 10 " b r i n g these
iwo Identities logcihcr."
fell thai Ihe Israelis should keep i t . "
Anli-gay and lesbian feelings are not
unusual for a place like Israel, Golding said,
because it is " a small country and everyone
lives so close. Some o f us would have probably never come out if we did nol move
away from our families."
A l l three members of the group agreed thai
A m Tikva did nol encounter any Iroublc
within ils own community o f Boston.
"Boston is u n i q u e , " Passer said. " I t has
always been active politically and supports
many organizations, We are accepted as
another Jewish organization o f an alternate
lifestyle." " W e base a lot of support from l l i l l c l at
LAURA BOSTICK UPS
MIT,'>' Golding said. "They arc Ihe ones who
Ann Marie LaPorta
allow us a place on their campus 10 meet,"
"Insincere motivation "
Golding said that Ihe group now has about 54
members ranging in age from 23 10 50 wilh a
mean age o f about 30 and is evenly split between men and women. " B u i some religious
^ F r o n t Page
cvenls," Golding said, " d r a w as many as IIX)
people, especially Ihe Jewish New Year. Lvcn
of 'H4 on ihe pari o f Ann Marie LaPorta,
if ihcy only come once a year they want 10
Johanna Sarraceo, and Dan R o b b . " He
celebrate with other gays and lesbians."
charged thai ihcy all have poor allendeucc
records, and called the current situation a
A m Tikva means '"People of H o p e . " I he
"soap opera."
organization holds Sabbath evening services,
Robb, who lost his soling rights after missholiday celebrations, and social events, It is
ing lliree consecutive meetings, said he
run by committees, with no president or Rabwanted
10 make an amendment in ihe elecbi. A m Tikva is 1101 affiliated with any of ihe
tions procedures, bul "couldn't bring up an
official branches of Judaism and uses ils own
amendment because there's no constitution
degeiKlerized liturgy.
10 amend." He claimed thai he's been rcIhe event on Sunday was organized by
qucsiing a constitution since September,
G A L A and llillcl and ils purpose, according
Member Johanna Sarraceo, who has also
10 a G A L A representative, " i s not to conlost her soling rlghls, said there have-been
vince anyone o f anything or negate anyiliing,
some discrepancies in election procedures in
bin simply 10 offer an educational forum for
ihe pasi. She added thai she loo has been tryanyone Interested in learning about an allering 10 gel a constitution since September 10
nale lifestyle." About 25 10 30 students boih
find out exactly what the procedures
gay and nol gay, Jewish and non-Jewish alale.Specifically, Sarraceo said ihe number of
tended the event.
scats 10 be opened on class council election
apparently varied from year 10 year.
Council controversy
NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN
For Spring Elections
April 13th and 14th
'Positions to bo filled
Apply for positions whore you will bo residing next year.
Student Association Officers
President
Central Council
Alumni Quad (3)
Colonial Quad (3)
Dutch Quad (3)
Indian Quad (3)
State Quad (3)
Off-Campus (9)
University Senate
Alumni Quad (3)
Colonial Quad (3)
Dutch Quad (3)
Indian Quad (3)
State Quad (3)
Off-Campus (7)
ED MARUSSICH UPS
Maria Muacarella, Dr. Nabll Khoury, Dr. Mohommad Halla)
'We mini to make information available, . . and 'el students Judge for themselves. "
Vice President
Jewish groups rally against ASA speakers
^ e t i t i o n s Required)
University Council
1 Seat Open
Student Association of
the State University (SASU)
2 Seats Open
Alumni Board
5 Seats of Graduating Senior Class
Class Councils
Class of ' 8 4 - 1 5 officers
Class of '85 - 13 officers
Class o f ' 8 6 - 17 officers
*Self Nomination forms and petitions available in SA Office (CO U*\
and should be submitted between 9 a.m. and 5 p m
^
Deadline; S p , m , f F r L i
M a r c h
2
3
Kayed did nol see any reason for a JSC
-« Front Page
delegation at ihe series in Ihe first place. " I
Dr. Ilerrigan's appearance in Ihe speaking
don't sec why Ihe JSC should participate in
series, Mones said, " I l ' s sad that a woman
Ihe talks. The conflict is between Ihe RZA
like this, who is nol a malicious person,
and the A S A . "
allows herself 10 be used like a prostitute by
Mones said thai as long as the ASA is atihe A r a b propaganda e f f o r t . "
Kayed
tempting 10 "legitimize" Ihe PLO, the RZA
responded 10 thc.se comments, saying, " W e
will not give Ihem credibility by holding
don't buy and sell facts. Wc want to make Indiscussions wilh Ihem. Referring lo the seformation available 10 ihe students free, and
Id Ihe students judge for themselves. A n d cond o f a series o f forum meetings between
ihe ASA and campus Jewish groups schedulour information is nol to challenge their Ined for tomorrow, Mones said ihal "there is,a
formation. It is our philosophy ihal Informavery good chance ihal tomorrow will be Ihe
tion has t o be made available l o Ihe
last lime we will sii down al a table wilh Ihe
students.1-1 He added thai, " n o group has the
ASA."
right to slop Ihe students' right to k n o w . "
The first forum meeting, convened after a
Ira Frome, Treasurer o f Jewish Students
confrontation at ihe World Week festival on
Coalilion-Hillcl, said, " I ' m sure Ihal both
March
3, resulted in both groups saying thai
sides believe their interpretations are
Ihcy were pleased ihal a process had started
correct," JSC-Hlllel co-sponsored ihe proin airing views over a table. The dispute durtest with R Z A .
ing World Week focused on Ihe question o f
JSC-Hlllel President Mclindu Miller did
whether the A S A could display material
not feel thai ihe ASA lecture scries presented
which the RZA found offensive at an event
any reason for ceasing to hold discussions
which was inlendcd lo emphasize Ihe positive
with A S A . " I feel ihal wc should participate
aspects o f various cultures.
in the t a l k s , " she said, and added that "the
Dean o f Student Affairs Neil Brown, who
Jewish sludcnls and Arab students can
understand each other, and wc can program has been assisting i n mediating ihe discussions
between the A S A and the Jewish
events on Ihis campus that won't step on
groups, would not comment on the subject.
anyone's toes."
Another potential issue of friction arose on
Monday evening when members o f Ihe ASA
encountered posters around the campus
podium which allegedly called for Ihe dcaih
of Ihe P L O . According 10 Kayed, members of
the ASA approached Mones and Hilsenraih
of Ihe R Z A for informalion about ihe
posters, and were told ihal ihe posters
featured ihe symbol o f ihe Jewish Defense
League, which has no chapters on campus.
Mones says ihal Ihe RZA had "nothing lo
d o " wilh Ihe posters, and may have been put
up by a J D L member, or by someone else
pretending 10 be a JDL member.
About the proiesl Itself, Mones said, " I i
went fine. II was basically what was planned.
We thought Ihal what was planned was very
reasonable, we were restrained, as part of our
agreement wilh ihe university. I think that
the university should have recognized Ihal
and not Iried l o restrain us as much as they
d i d . " According 10 Mones, a university official whom he declined to name allegedly
asked Ihe demonstrators 10 lower Ihe level o f
volume o f their chanting and singing.
H i l s e n r a i h a d d e d , " W c bent
over
backwards" to underline ihe peaceful nature
of the demonstration.
•
Fody claimed that 12 or 13 council scats
weie opened last year allhough only seven or
eight people ran. This y ; . u , he explained,
"Since it's elections for senior year, and people might want to gel involved," 15 seats will
be open. Although he has given this number
10 SA, the class council has nol voled on il as
yet.
Any member of ihe junior class can obiain
voting rights within (he class council, by attending three consecutive meetings, Phillips
explained, and can lose their rights by missing three meetings in a row. Phillips said the
constitution was written ihal way " s o people
who really like 10 be involved can acquire
voting provilcdgcs."
This rule, noled LaPorta, can be abused by
Ihe president in a situation where he/she conducis three meciings in one evening to create
new soling members.
Robb claimed Ihis procedure was
employed by Phillips lasi spring, ihe night
Fody was elected, " H e (Phillips) held three
meciings in less than five minutes," Robb
said. This was nol Ihe only occasion when
ihis occurred, he added.
Phillips strongly maintained thai ihe only
instance where he held Ihrce consecutive
meciings was ihe evening mentioned by
Robb. "Sometimes legislative bodies do ihal
in order 10 lake care of things. That's Ihe way
Ihe agenda was drawn u p , " he explained.
Pari o f Ihe problem, noled LaPorta, is
thai meciings arc nol held on a regularly
scheduled basis. LaPorta also added thai she
isn't notified o f a meeting until iwo days in
advance, if at all.
She criticized the class officers for nol
publicizing meciings and claimed, " I t ' s (cluss
council) a group of friends operating al Ihe
exclusion of others,"
Class meetings, maintained Fody, have
been advertised in Ihe ASP al leasl five limes
ihis year. Usually the advertisements were for
upcoming events and Ihe class meeting informalion was noled in ihe ad. " I t comes down
10 a question of money," he said, explaining
that paying for ads every week is a financial
drain."Wc jusl assume ihal i f people really
wanted to get involved they would get in
touch wilh an active member,"
Fody has called a mccling for this Tuesday,
to discuss amendments to election procedures. He plans lo hold Iwo consecutive
meciings so that, all members at the last
meeting, when Ihis issue was discussed, will
be assured voting rights.
The meeting Is scheduled for 10 p.m. at the
Fireside Lounge in the Campus Center.
Q
ii
aspects on tuesdayi
Francis Farmer: Where Are You?
F
rances Is the best exploitation flick
to come along since / Spit On
Your Grave. That comparison Is
not made randomly, because the two films
are remarkably similar In approach, If not
subject matter. What they 'share Is the
pretense of being repulsed by violence
while actually reveling In It. One could
even go so far as to say that without
violence and torture.'neither of these films
would have been possible.
Mark Rossier
Of the two. Spfl Is more successful simply because It feigns repulsion only for a
vague, surface respectability. The director
doesn't want to come across as a homicidal
maniac, so he pretends, not very convincingly, to sympathize with his heroine. But,
this Is really only an attempt at common,
decency; the movie can afford to be
nothing more than a series of bloody Images because when a movie Is called / Spll
On Your Grave, people don't expect a lot
of subtlety. Frances has a tougher time
because when audiences go into a theatre
expecting to see a biography of Frances
Farmer, the director has to at least make
some attempt at making a real movie.
What director Graeme Clifford attempts
Is actually very little. He is so bad at concealing his desire to gel to Farmer's torture
in a mental hospital that he sacrifices even
coherence to get there. One can almost see
him rubbing his hands together In anticipation of the horror show he has planned.
For Clifford, Farmer is not a tormented,
strong-willed aclress of the past, but merely
an excuse to show Jessica Lange naked
and brutalized.
The script, written by Frlc Bergren,
Christopher Devore and Nicholas Kazan,
takes the Reader's Digest approach to
biography. We are shown a few key Incidents, from which we are supposed to Infer a life. We are, apparently meant to
guess at the motivations and relationships.
that make up Farmer's We because we get
so little background of any substance, that
these selected incidents don't really mean
much.
The issues of Farmer's political and
religious beliefs are touched upon, but
dodged enough to keep audience sympathy. Similarly, her promiscuity In later
life Is glossed over, presumably for the
same reason.
However, what Is really missing from this
porlrail Is any concept of Farmer as an artist. She was a woman who strove to, excuse the cliche, be an actress not a star.
The quality of her work Interested her
much more than Its popularity. Her refusal
to compromise her standards and accept
the Hollywood lifestyle made Farmer unpopular, so unpopular that when she eventually broke down, no one bothered to
help her.
We get none of this from Francis, In fact
II Is never even made clear whether Farmer
actually has a break down, or If she Is simply put away out of spite. Jessica Lange has
said that she sees Farmer as a fighter who,
"never realized that some battles are Just
not worth fighting." Unfortunately, that Is
not the vision of Farmer we get here. She Is
reduced to nothing more than a cliche
Hollywood star who can't handle success.
She Is not a fighter, but a victim who
resigns herself to her torture all too willingly.
It is unfair though to criticize the film's
failure to depict the real, or even an
understandable, Frances Farmer because
she Is of very little Interest to Clifford and
company. Their concern lies with her torture and once she is locked up. they really
hit their stride.
Just like I Spit On Your Grave, Frances'
depiction of horror Is at the very basest
level. Clifford doesn't bother with
psychological torture, he goes right for the
needle in the eye. That particular Image
crops up several times, most gruesomely
during Farmer's lobotomy. We are also
treated to various sequences In which
Farmer Is raped, drugged, bealen. burned
and given shock therapy.
Such scenes serve no purpose beyond
providing some cheap thrills. Since no one
bothers to develop Farmer's character,
there are no powerful before or after consequences. Our sympathy exists only
because we would feel sympathy lor any
character who goes through whal she
does. But there Is no sense ol loss or
tragedy, only pity.
Jessica Lange does whal she can. but
that Is really very little. She is obviously ,1
capable actress and she has some brllllam
moments, but Clifford doesn't want to be
bothered with her attempts to put some Integrity and conviction Into his tawdry Utile
picture; he'd Just as soon she strip, which
she does, completely without purpose on
numerous occasions,
The rest of the cast are Just cardboard
cut-outs, especially Ihe usually talented
Kim Stanley as Farmer's stereotyplcally evil
mother. Sam Sheppard as Harry York
seems confused and with good re.ison
Who he is supposed to be and why he
keeps popping up like a knight In shining
armour are questions that no one ever
bothers to answer. Presumably, he is
Farmer's one chance at salvation and by
turning him d o w n , she seals her (ale. Not
only Is the movie set In the forties and liltles, It shares those eras sexist morals ,15
well.
Ironically, Ihe recent T V movie, Will
There Really Be A Morning? based on
Farmer's autobiography, was vastly
superior to this big budget theatrical venture. Although It had certain problems
particularly with lis overly sentimentalized
ending, that film at least managed in be
about Frances Farmer, which Is more lhan
can be 'said about Frances.
What Frances Is about Is crude, tasteless
theatrics. It Is as much a piece of exploltaHon as f Spit On Your Grave. The dil
ference is, that while it was only Ihe title ol
the previous film, I spit on your grave is
actly whal Graeme Clifford does to Fran
Farmer.
Segal Strikes Out
O
ld Erich Segal has done It again
folks. You remember him, Ihe
master mind behind such movie
greats as Loue Story and the touching sequel Oliver's Story. Well the new Paramount release Man, Woman and Child Is
Erich's newest venture Into lllmdom. Like
his previous attempts, this too Is based on
his best selling book of the same title.
Megan Gray Taylor
This little film Is the story of a happily
married professor (Martin Sheen) who,
while his wife (Blythe Danner) was pregnant with their second child, he was In
France lecturing and having an affair with
an exquisite french doctor (Nathalie Nell),
Ten years later this very same woman dies
(what else?) In a car accident and Sheen's
old friend In France feels compelled to tell
him of Ihe existence of his son. Sheen, suffering from extreme guilt wants to see Ihe
child when out of undefined fear his wife
offers to bring the child here (here being
California) for a visit.
O.K., so this Isn't a 28 year old girl dying
of Lukemla, Instead It Is a 38 year old
French doctor (who by the way just happened to do her year of Internship al
Boston General - In case you don't gel II,
Segal teaches at Harvard and Boston
General Is the medical school's affiliate
hospital). So we are given the happy couple, complete with their two daughters (yes
we get to deal with poor Blythe's sense of
Inadequacy because she couldn't give him
a son), and their trauma over this new person.
Like Loue Story, we are given the
perfect college community. We see Sheen
teaching Whitman and we hear how the
humantles department Is being cut In half
but these are Just briefs moments of reality
I
j Sebastian Dungan and Martin Sheen are the father and son In Segal's film
In this maudelln tear-jerker. Just to make
the picture complete, after Ihe child arrives,
Danner Is tempted to have an affair with a
very successful writer whose book she Just
happens to be editing. They have Ihe appropriate number of sterotyplcal .friends,
Including the male Jock-big mouth whose
son overhears the truth about Ihe 'little
French kid' and spills the beans to the unprepared legitimate daughters.
The hardest thing about panning this
movie, although I am truly compelled to do
so, Is that the acting per se Is really quite
good. I'm not sure why actors the calibre of
Danner, Sheen and I lemmings agreed to
do this In the'first place, but given what
they had to work with, they make the best
of it.
Blythe Danner has established herself as
an actress of some standing, and despite
this film, her reputation should remain In
tact. She Is really quite good as the woman
torn between Ihe desire to save her marriage and Ihe all-consuming Jealousy of Ihis
child. Sheen too, Is very credible as a man
struggling to hold his family together and at
the same time gelling to know and love his
son. The two daughters are played by
Arlene Mclnlyre (who could be the new
Broo e Shields for looks and she Is g e
nulnely talented besides) and Missy Francis
who could out cry any full blooded profes
sional Irish mourner.
D a v i d H e m m l n g s ( n o w grossly
overweight) still has Ihe sex appeal of his
earlier days, and is charming and convlncIng as the lonely writer turned seducer.
Last but not least Is Ihe "Child", Jeai
Claude, played beautifully by Sebastian
Dungan. All kids can be cute In the right
role, but this boy has a real film presence, .1
humanity you cannot help but relate to.
So If all these performances were so
good, why did I hate this movie? Well I
really hale being able to predict whal a
character will say In a truly emotional moment before they say It. It somehow lacks
the spontanlety a film should have. In fad
this happened so many times, that al one
point I was so accurate those around me
Joined In my mirth, which continued even
to the final scene when believe it or nol
they let the poor orphan go back to France
Like Six Weeks this Is a film geared to
make you cry at certain moments, and as a
viewer I refuse to be manipulated (especial
ly since I went through a whole box ol
tissues over Love Story I have a special
reluctance to do II again here). Il Is ohviou
from beginning to end that this 'novel' was
written as a screen play, and Dick
Richards, as director, Just filled In some
stage directions.
Then there is the music, composed and
conducted by Georges Delerue. Im nol
sure, but I think they got the sound tracks
mixed up. The title song sounds more like
it belongs to A Summer Place lhan this
film.
If you loved the earlier Segal sagas you
might enjoy wasting the two hours this
movie will consume. Even though I have a
host of wonderful high school memories to
go with Love Story I can't find any redeeming factor In Man, Woman and Child (the
title alone should convince you).
II
iaspects on tuesday
Legendary Lou
Portrait Of The Punker As An Old Man
Lou came from Freeport, L.I.
Claims that he Is just your "Average Guy"
He's a rebel without a cause
Sings about bums, the City and whores
Fie says "Hey babe, take a walk on the wild
side,
Fie said hey honey, lake a walk on the wild
side, alright..."
J
t certainly doesn't fit Ihe Image...
The grandaddy of punk rock,
champion of Ihe subculture that
calls Itself "Ihe Village" Is a Long Island
boy. To make things worse, he's from the
South Shore. He went to Syracuse University and his major was (I hope you're silling
down) Literature. He was a middle-class,
suburban, conventional family kind of a
guy-
Gail Merrell
S o , as the English Beat say ,
"Wha'ppen?". Where did Lou gel all ol his
hale? When he started In Ihe Velvet
Underground, It wasn't so much his sarcastic lyrics as II was his deadpan vocals
that conveyed his hostility. He was aloof
and without feeling, hating no one yet
despising them all. At Ihe core ol this
disgust sat Lou himself. Fie externalized his
self-hate and made himself Into a cannibal
that ate his friends up alive. He had no
sympathy for his subject matter. Lou used
his Irony and dry wit to paint portraits of
the decadent and the destitute, separating
himself from all of Ihe emotions and
sadness that should've accompanied Ihe
songs.
After the disintegration of the Velvets,
depression led Lou to a self-imposed exile.
Then, In 1972, under Ihe guidance and
prodding of David Bowie and Mick Ronson, Lou surfaced with a hit single, "Walk
on Ihe Wild Side", and a solo album,
Transformer.The album set Ihe direction
(or his solo career of the 70's. Most of his
songs were short stories, journalistic Insights into other peoples lives. His sllceofllfe monologues aptly described Ihe dregs
of New York City. Perhaps his saddest moment came on Street Flassle, which includes "Waltzing Matilda", "Street Hassle"
and "Slip Away." The beautiful violins of
"Waltzing Matilda" fade as Ihe "Street
Hassle" takes place. The girlfriend of a
guesl at Lou's parly had just OD'd. Lou
suggests that his guest should "drag your
old lady by the feet and leave her In Ihe
darkest street and In Ihe morning she'll be
another hit and run." He says he's nol
"gonna wear his heart on his sleeve" and
thai "people get all emotional and some
limes they think they're on T . V . " and you
can't help but agree. Still It amazes me how
M
A
R
he can remain so alienated.
He just saw a girl turn blue and die!
C'mon Lou! Under that punk stance,
beneath lhat so-cool-I'd-look-lough-lnplnk countenance there's got lo be a Rock
V Roll Heart Bui there Isn't. As Lou has
written, "realism was the key. The records
were letters. Real letters from me lo certain
other people."
His music Is very real loo. Lou's the kind
of guy who'd rather emphasize Ihe feedback than edit il out. Fie always chooses
the stripped-down, rough and ready, no
frills brand over the customized, polished
model, Up-fronl. untamed guitars are supported by Stones' bass riffs and drums lhat
really swing. The sound Is usually dense,
offllmes discordant and always bluesy. His
sly off-lhe-cuff-Dylanesque vocals Incorporate Ihe Nell Young wobble affectation.
The dry vocals are enriched by gospel harmonies thai force you lo sing and holler
along lo Ihe music. No matter how mellow,
muddled or loud and sloppy Lou gets, his
, music always whispers "sway" and you
always do.
Then Lou changed his band line-up.
And Lou gol married. Yeah, that's right,
Mr. anti-establishment, the man least likely
lo conform did. And he loved il. Praises lo
marital bliss, his wile, his home and his
friends flowed from his pen. It seemed like
Lou didn't know any more heroine addicts,
pimps, or girls that did II all night long. Lou
was finally starting lo get to know Lou.
That new Lou Heed came out last year
on The Blue Mask. Besides Lou's laurels
for home sweel home, he look a slab al the
seedier side ol life But his seedy side
wasn't the same. He used fictitious
characters, and although his words on such
topics as alcoholism, guns and sadomachlsm rang true, they couldn't compare
to the dullest seconds on his more personal
numbers. What a treat it was to hear Lou
sing "I love women, I Ihink they're great"
and really feel it. Lou was finally starting to
feel. He sang "Heavenly arms, reach lo
hold me..." he was asking to be loved. Lou
loved his wife Sylvia and best ol all Lou
loved Lou. "I've really got a lucky life, my
writing, my motorcycle and my wife."
And Lou was slill morbid. Il seemed that
he wasn't yet ready lo shake Ihe macabre
lhat Ihe Velvet Underground embraced In
"Heroin." On Ihe title track. "The Blue
Mask", Lou sings "Make Ihe sacrifice,
Mutilate my lace...Please don't set me free.
Death means a lot lo me...Take Ihe Blue
Mask down from my face, And look me in
Ihe eye, 1 gel a thrill from punishment, I've
always been thai way." The guitars crash
and scream and you find yourself thrusting
your fist In the air to the beat. The scariest
part of Lou's cannibal Is lhat II eats itself
alive, and worse yet, Ihe cannibal Is power-
ft
ful enough to sit us down at the (tinner
table and yet us to ask for seconds
On Lou's new album. Legendary
Hearts, his cannibal is slill there, but it's on
a liquid diet. On "The Lasl Shot" Lou continues his saga of his Battle with the Bottle
"Mere's a toast to all that's good, And
here's a toast to hate,,,Hut when you quit
you quit. Rut you always wish. You knew
il was your last shot," Lou doesn't see Ii
quor so much as a drug as an enemy that
haunts him wherever he goes Popeye's
Bluto. On "Bottoming Out" ihe album's
groovinyesl cut, the sloshed cannibal lakes
a spill on a motorcycle. A doctor patches
him up, and Ihe James Dean metaphor
continues, as our drunken Rough Rider
alms "that bike at thatJal pothole"and bottoms out.
The musicianship on the album Is of the
highest caliber. The guitars blend into a rich
full sound, yet are able to maintain ihe
straightforwardness of a punk-rock band
Guitarist Robert Qulne mixes his own style
• X,
Legendary Heart Is a highly personal
album, where Lou Reed, ihe happily married average guy, is also the Intoxicated
snnlbal on a motorcycle It works, first
because his lyrics are brllllanl and the music
is extroadlnary. but mosily it works because
Lou Reed is. at long last, content to be Lou
Reed. Take a bow.
Lou was just speeding mnoy
Thought fie was James Dean (or a decade
Then I guess he had to crash
Chose valiun), nol smack for that hash
He saos,"Heu babe, take a walk on the
mild side...
Steady Eddie
A
s he says on his album, 19H2 has
been a good year for Eddie
Mrphy, aiid with or without this
sucess, he is happy. This year has seen him
catapulting to fame and fortune. To begin
with he wrote an acclaimed article on
humor for Newsweek. His very funny but
violent movie with Nick Nolle. 48 hrs. has
been a box office smash. Adding to his
popularity are to articles: a major piece in
New York magazine and a 6,000 word
feature In Playboy's Holiday issue, he also
did his first solo-headline show at Northwestern along with appearences at
several awards ceromonies. All this was
done around his busy Saturday Night Live
schedule on which he begun his third
season
Lee Greenstein
if ^nP*
wilh that of Lou's playing from the Velvet
Undergound days Qulne brought In drummer Fred Maher. who is more Interested in
precision lhan he is in flourishes. The
quartet's bassist Is Fernando Saunders, a
jaK-rock artist who steps into Ihe album
with the most skill And of course, there's
Lou. After some encouragement from
Qulne, he comes in strong on his guitar
This recent good fortune is no accident:
Eddie Murphy is funny as shit.
His happiness in '82 was in reaction to a
bad year In ' 8 1 . "Because...in '81 man,
they was killing people," he says in "The
pope, and Ronald Reagan" "They shot
John Lennon...they shot Reagan...they
shot Sadat...they shot the Pope." This
peice of reality actually silences his rambunctious audience. The silence is shortlived as Eddie helps the crowd laugh at life, H
goes on: "What can someone's rationale
for shooting the Pope be?" "I want to go to
hell and I don't want to wait on lines with
nobody." Obviously this man wanted to
take the "Hell Express!"
It Is refreshing to hear him mention a
topic with some substance, even if only
briefly. Puts this forth in such a manner,
that the absurdety of such thoughtless actions Is made clear. A deep political
analysis Its not, but such simplistic com-
mentary is stunning.
Olherwise his approach (dare insult Ihis
God tike figure) is basic. If I may. I'd like to
label a new genre, that of dryoresque comedy (yes you heard it hear first). Regardless
of the subject matter he banters constantly
in the colloquial manner lhat has made
Richard Pryor the funniest man. (black
man according to Steve Martin), in
America, Granted its funny stuff but often it
is too similar to Pryor's material. For example he does a bit on how a "white guy" yets
mad, humor made famous by Pryor. In
general his satires are cluttered with
"fuckers" and "mother fuckers". But with
his natural ability, not much more is needed
The album is varied. The last cut on each
side are songs lhat were released as singles
in the past. "Boogie In Your butt" is rap
dance song co-written by Murray that
never hit Ihe dancehalls as big as was planned. "Enough is Enough" Is a version of
the Dona Summer hit sung by Murray in
the guise of two of his satirical characters,
Richard Simmons and Buckwheat. The
comedy value of these variations is low.
My (avorile piece is "Drinking Fathers."
In it he imitates the classic Dad ranting and
raving about everything gone wrong, blaming he €ind his brother for it all. His father
comes home with a load on and challenges
his kids to fight: Eddie and his brother proceded "to beat the shit out that old man"
when he bet them his paycheck.
Like all good comedians Eddie Murray
has the ability to make us laugh at
ourselves, His humor is aimed at whites,
blacks, Chinese, the Pope, homosexuals,
the young and old. Although this is nothing
new It is none the less rare. It is this barallty
of weakness and faults among people that
can bring us close together.
The album's pretty funny.
'
aspects on tuesday;
-
A
2
2
'
9
f
•J
Francis Farmer: where Are You?
• S ranees Is the best exploitation flick
fr^
to come along since / Sp/f On
•»
Your Grave,. That comparison Is
not made randomly, because the two films
are remarkably similar In approach, If not
subject matter. What- they -share Is the
pretense of being repulsed by violence
while actually reveling In It. One could
even go so far as to say that without
violence and torture, neither of these films
would have been possible.
Mark Rossier
Of the two, Spit Is more successful simply because It feigns repulsion only (or a
vague, surface respectability. The director
doesn't want to come across as a homicidal
maniac, so he pretends, not very convincingly, to sympathize with his heroine. But,
this is really only an attempt at common
decency; the movie can afford to be
nothing more than a series of bloody Images because when a movie is called / Spit
On Your Crave, people don't expect a lot
of subtlety. Frances has a tougher time
because when audiences go Into a theatre
expecting to see a biography of Frances
Parmer, the director has to at least make
some attempt at making a real movie.
What director Graeme Clifford attempts
Is actually very little. He is so bad at concealing his desire to get to Farmer's torture
In a mental hospital that he sacrifices even
coherence to get there. One can almost see
him rubbing his hands together In anticipation of the horror show he has planned.
For Clifford. Farmer Is not a tormented,
strong-willed actress of the past, but merely
an excuse to show .Jessica Lange naked
and brutalized.
The script, written by l-'rlc Borgren.
Christopher Devore and Nicholas Kazan,
lakes the Reader's Diaest approach to
biography. We are shown a few key incidents, from which we are supposed to Inter a life. We are, apparently meant to
guess at the motivations and relationships,
that make up Farmer's lite because we get
so little background ol any substance, that
these selected Incidents don't really mean
much.
The Issues of Farmer's political and
religious beliefs are touched upon, but
dodged enough to keep audience sympathy. Similarly, her promiscuity In later
life is glossed over, presumably for the
same reason.
However, what Is really missing from this
portrait Is any concept of Farmer as an artlsl. She was a woman who strove to, excuse the cliche, be an actress not a star.
The quality of her work Interested her
much more than Us popularity. Her refusal
to compromise her standards and accept
the Hollywood lifestyle made Farmer unpopular, so unpopular that when sh>: eventually broke down, no one bothered to
help her.
We get none ol this from Francis, In fact
II Is never even made clear whether Farmer
actually has a break down, or if she is simply put away out of spite. .Jessica Lange has
said that she sees Farmer as a fighter who,
"never realized that some battles are Just
not worth fighting." Unfortunately, that Is
not the vision of Farmer we get here. She is
reduced to nothing more than a cliche
Hollywood star who can't handle success.
She Is not a fighter, but a vlcllm who
resigns herself lo her torture all loo willingly.
It Is unfair though lo criticize the film's
failure to depict the real, or even an
understandable. Frances Farmer because
she Is of very little inlerest to Clifford and
company. Their concern lies with her torlure and once she is locked up, they really
hit their stride.
Just like I Spit On Your Grave, Frances'
depiction of horror is at the very basest
level. Clifford doesn't bother with
psychological! torture, he goes right for the
needle In the eye. That particular Image
crops up several times, most qruesomelv
during Farmer's lobolomy. We are also
treated to various sequences in which
Farmer Is raped, drugged, beaten, burned
and given shock therapy.
Such scenes serve no purpose beyond
providing some cheap thrills, Since no one
bothers to develop Farmer's character,
there are no powerful before or aflei conse
quences. Our sympathy exists only
because we would feel sympathy for any
character who goes through whal sindoes. But there is no sense ol kiss or
tragedy, only pity,
Jessica Lange does whal she can, but
that Is really very little. She Is obviously ,i
capable actress and she has some brilliant
moments, but Clifford doesn't want lo be
bothered with her attempts to put some integrity and conviction into his tawdry linkpicture; he'd Just as soon she strip, which
she does, completely wllhoul purpose on
numerous occasions.
The rest of the cast are Just cardboard
cut-outs, especially the usually talented
Kim Stanley as Farmer's stereolyplcally evil
mother. Sam Sheppard as Harry York
seems confused and with good reason
Who he Is supposed to be and why he
keeps popping up like a knight In shining
armour are questions that no one ever
bothers lo answer. Presumably, he is
Farmer's one chance at salvation and by
turning him down, she seals her (ale. Nut
only Is Ihe movie set in the forties and III
ties, It shares those eras sexlsl morals as
well.
Ironically, Ihe recent TV movlo, Will
There Hcallv Be A Morning? based on
Farmer's autobiography, was vastly
superior to this big budgel theatrical ven
lure. Although II had certain problems
particularly with Its overly sentimentalized
ending, that film at least managed i
about Frances Farmer, which Is more than
can be said about /-ranees.
What Frances Is about Is crude, tasteless
theatrics. It is as much a piece of exploitation as f Spit On Your Grave. The dllference is, that while It was only the title ol
the previous film, 1 spit on your grave Is e>
aclly what Graeme Clifford does lo l-'i.ni. es
Farmer.
Segal Strikes Out
O
ld Erich Segal has done It again
folks. You remember him, the
master mind behind such movie
greats as Loue Story and the touching sequel Olluer's Story. Well the new Para-'
mount release Man, Woman and Child Is
Erich's newest venture into lllmdom. Like
his previous attempts, this loo is based on
his best selling book of the same title.
Megan Gray Taylor
This little film is the story of a happily
married professor (Martin Sheen) who,
while his wife (Blylhe Danner) was pregnant with their second child, he was In
France lecturing and having an affair with
an exquisite french doctor (Nathalie Nell).
Ten years later this very same woman dies
(what else?) In a car accident and Sheen's
old friend In France feels compelled to tell
him of the existence of his son. Sheen, suffering from extreme guilt wants to see the
child when out of undefined fear his wife
offers lo bring the child here (here being
California) for a visit.
O. K., so this Isn't a 28 year old girl dying
of Lukemla, Instead it Is a 38 year old
French doctor (who by the way Just happened to do her year of Internship at
Boston General - In case you don't get II,
Segal teaches at Harvard and Boston
General is the medical school's affiliate
hospital). So we are given the happy couple, complete with their two daughters (yes
we get to deal with poor Blylhe's sense of
inadequacy because she couldn't give him
a son), and their trauma over this new person.
Like Loue Story, we are given the
perfect college community. We see Sheen
teaching Whitman and we hear how the
humantles department Is being cut In half
but these are just briefs moments of reality
in this maudelln tear-jerker, Just to make
the picture complete, after the child arrives,
Danner Is tempted to have an affair with a
very successful writer whose book she Just
happens to be editing. They have the appropriate number of sterotyplcal friends,
Including the male Jock-big mouth whose
son overhears the truth about the 'little
French kid' and spills the beans to the unprepared legitimate daughters.
The hardest thing about panning this
movie, although I am truly compelled to do
so, is that the acting per se is really quite
good. I'm not sure why actors the calibre of
Danner, Sheen and Hemmlngs agreed to
do this In the-first place, but given what
they had to work with, Ihey make the best
of II.
Blylhe Danner has established herself as
f " a ' " e s s , ° ' s ° ™ standing, and despite
this film, her reputation should remain In
tact. She Is really quite good as the woman
lorn between the desire to save her marriage and the all-consuming Jealousy ol this
child. Sheen, loo, Is very credible as a man
struggling lo hold his family together and at
the same time getting to know and love his
son, The two daughters are played by
Arlene Mclnlyre (who could be the new
Brook. Shields lor looks and she Is g e
nulnely talented besides) and Missy Francis
who could oul cry any full blooded profe.
slonal Irish mourner.
David H e m m l n g s
(now grossly
overweight) still has the sex appeal ol his
earlier days, and is charming and convincing as Ihe lonely writer turned seducer
Last but not least Is Ihe "Child". .1.-."
Claude, played beautifully by Sebasllai
Dungan. All kids can be cute In Ihe righ
role, but this boy has a real film presence, <i
humanity you cannot help but relate to
So If all these performances were so
good, why did I hate this movie? Well I
really hate being able to predict what .i
character will say In a truly emotional moment before they say it. Il somehow lacks
the spontanlety a film should have. In (acl
this happened so many limes, that at one
point I was so accurate those around unjoined In my mirth, which continued even
to the final scene when believe II or nol
they let the poor orphan go back lo Frani e
Like Six Weeks this Is a film geared lo
make you cry at certain moments, and as a
viewer I refuse to be manipulated (especial
ly since I went through a whole box . >f
tissues over Loue Storv I have a special
reluctance to do it again here). It Is obvious
from beginning lo end that this 'novel' was
written as a screen play, and Dick
Richards, as director, just filled In sum.'
slage directions.
Then Iherc Is the music, composed and
conducted by Georges Delerue. Iin nol
sure, but I think Ihey got the sound tracks
mixed up. The title song sounds more like
It belongs to A Summer Place than this
film.
If you loved Ihe earlier Segal sagas you
might enjoy wasting Ihe two hours this
movie will consume. Even though I have a
host of wonderful high school memories I"
go with Love Storv I con'l find any redeeming (actor In Man, Woman and Child (the
title alone should convince you).
II
Legendary
iaspects on tuesday
Lou
Portrait Of The Punker As An Old Man
Lou came from Freeport. L.I,
Claims that he is just your "Auerage Guv"
He's a rebel without a cause
Sings about bums, the City and whores
He says "Hey babe, take a walk on the wild
side.
He said hey honey, take a walk on the wild
side, alright..."
he can remain so alienated
He just saw a girl turn blue and die!
C'mon Lou! Under that punk stance,
beneath that so-cool-1'd-look-tough-inplnk countenance there's got to be a Rock
VT Roll Heart. But there Isn't. As Lou has
written, "realism was the key. The records
were letters. Real letters from me to certain
other people,"
Z
l certainly doesn't (It the image...
The grandaddy of punk rock,
champion of the subculture that
calls Itself "the Village" is a Long Island
boy. To make things worse, he's from the
South Shore. He went to Syracuse University and his major was (I hope you're sitting
down) Literature, He was a middle-class,
suburban, conventional family kind of a
guy.
Gail Merrell
S o , as the English Beat say ,
"Wha'ppenV". Where did Lou get all of his
hate? When he started In the Velvet
Underground, It wasn't so much his sarcastic lyrics as It was his deadpan vocals
that conveyed his hostility. He was aloof
and without feeling, hating no one yet
despising them all. At the core of this
disgust sat Lou himself. He externalized his
self-hate and made himself into a cannibal
that ate his friends up alive. He had no
sympathy for his subject mailer. Lou used
his irony and dry wll to paint portraits of
the decadent and ihe destitute, seperating
himself from all of the emotions and
sadness that should've accompanied the
songs.
After the disintegration of the Velvets,
depression led Lou to a self-imposed exile.
Then, In 1972, under the guidance and
prodding of David Bowie and Mick Ronson, Lou surfaced with a hit single. "Walk
on the Wild Side", and a solo album,
Trnns/ormer.The album set the direction
(or his solo career of the 7()'s. Most of his
songs were short stories, journalistic insights into other peoples lives. His slice-oflife monologues aptly described the dregs
of New York City. Perhaps his saddest moment came on Street Hassle, which Includes "Waltzing Matilda", "Street Hassle"
and "Slip Away." The beautiful violins of
"Waltzing Matilda" fade as the "Street
Hassle" takes place. The girlfriend of a
guest at Lou's party had just OD'd. Lou
suggests that his guest should "drag your
old lady by the feet and leave her In the
darkest street and In the morning she'll be
another hit and run." He says he's not
"gonna wear his heart on his sleeve" and
that "people get all emotional and some
times they think they're on T V . " and you
can't help but agree. Still it amazes me how
M
A
R
t
His music Is very real loo. Lou's Ihe kind
of guy who'd rather emphasize the feedback than edit It out. He always chooses
the stripped-down, rough and ready, no
frills brand over the customized, polished
model. Up-front, untamed guitars are supported by Stones' bass riffs and drums thai
really swing. The sound Is usually dense,
offtlmes discordant and always bluesy, His
sly off-the-cuff-Dylanesque vocals Incorporate Ihe Nell Young wobble affectation.
The dry vocals are enriched by gospel harmonies that force you to sing and holler
along to the music. No mailer how mellow,
muddled or loud and sloppy Lou gets, his
music always whispers "sway" and you
always do.
Then Lou changed his band line-up.
And Lou got married. Yeah, that's right,
Mr anil-establishment, the man least likely
lo conform did. And he loved it Praises to
marital bliss, his wife, his home and his
friends flowed from his pen, It seemed like
Lou didn't know any mine heroine addicts,
pimps, or girls thai did fl all night long. Lou
was fin.illy stalling In get lo know Lou.
That new Lou Reed came out last year
on The Ulne Mask. Besides Lou's laurels
for home sweet home, he look a stab .it the
seedier side of life. But his seedy side
wasn't Ihe same, He used fictitious
characters, and although his words on such
topics as alcoholism, guns and sadomachism rang true, they couldn't compare
to the dullest seconds on his more personal
numbers. What a treat it was to hear Lou
sing "1 love women, I think they're great"
and really feel it. Lou was finally starting to
feel. He sang "Heavenly arms, reach to
hold me..." he was asking to be loved. Lou
loved his wife Sylvia and best of all Lou
loved Lou. "I've really got a lucky life, my
writing, my motorcycle and my wife."
And Lou was sllll morbid. Il seemed that
he wasn't yet ready to shake the macabre
that the Velvet Underground embraced in
"Heroin," On the title track. "The Blue
Mask".
Lou sings "Make Ihe sacrifice.
Mutilate my face...Please don't set niefree.
Death means a lot to me...Take the Blue
Mask down from my face, And look me In
Ihe eye, I gel a thrill from punishment, I've
always been that way." The guitars crash
and scream and you find yourself thrusting
your fist In the air to Ihe beat. The scariest
part of Lou's cannibal is that it eats Itself
alive, and worse yet, the cannibal is power-
ful enough to sit us down at the dinner
table and get us to ask for seconds
On Lou's new album, Legendary
Hearts, his cannibal is still there, but It's on
a liquid diet. On "The Last Shot" Lou continues his saga of his Bailie with the Bottle
"Here's a toast lo all (hat's good. And
here's a toast to hate.. But when you quit
you quit, Bui you always wish, You knew
It was your last shot " Lou doestl'l see li
quor so much as a drug .is an enemy that
haunts him wherever he goes Popeye's
Bluto. On "Bottoming Out" the album's
groovingest tut. the sloshed cannibal takes
a spill on a motorcycle. A doctot patches
him up. tint! the James Dean metaphoi
continues, as our drunken Rough Ruler
alms "that bike at thtiliat pothole"and bottoms out.
The musicianship on the album is of Ihe
highest caliber. The guitmsblemi into .1 rlcn
full sound, yet are able to maintain the
straightforwardness of a punk-rock band.
Guilarlst Robert Quine mixes his own style
with thai ol Lou's playing from the Velvet
Undergound days. Quine brought In drummer Ered Maher. who Is more Interested In
precision than he Is In flourishes. The
quartet's bassist is Fernando Saunders, a
jazz-rock artist who steps into the album
with the most skill. Ami of course, there's
Lou, After some encouragement from
Quine. he comes In strong on his guitar
Legendary Heart Is a highly persdnal
album, where Lou Reed, the happily married average guy. is also the intoxicated
initial on a motorcycle It works, first
because his lyrics are brilliant antl the music
is extroadinaiy. but mostly it works be< nuse
Lou Reed is, at long last, content to be Lou
Reetl Take a bow.
Lou ii'as Just speeding away
Thought he was .James Dean far a decade
Then I yuess lie had lo crash
Chose Valium, MO/ smack for that hush
lli' says,"Hey babe, take a walk on the
mild side...
I]
Steady Eddie
A
s he says on his album. 1982 has
been a good year for Eddie
Mrphy, ahd with or without this
sucess, he is happy, This year has seen him
catapulting to fame and fortune. To begin
with he wrote an acclaimed aiticle on
humor for Newsweek Ills very funny hut
violent movie with Nick Nolle. <18 hrs. has
been a box office smash Adding to his
popularity are to articles: a major piece In
New York magazine and a d.OOO word
feature In Playboy's Holiday issue, he also
did his first solo-headline show at Northwestern along with appearences at
several awards ceromonies. All this was
done around his busy Saturday Night Live
schedule on which he begun his third
season
Lee
Greenstein
This recent good fortune Is no accident:
Eddie Murphy is funny as shit.
His happiness In '82 was in reaction to a
bad year in ' 8 1 . "Because,..In '81 man.
they was killing people," he says in "The
pope, and Ronald Reagan
1'hey shot
John Lennon, they shot Reagan...they
shot Sadat ..they shot the Pope." This
pelce of reality actually silences his rambunctious audience, The silence Is shortlived as Eddie helps Ihe crowd laugh at life. H
goes on: "What can someone's rationale
for shooting the Pope be?" "I want to go to
hell and I don't want to wall on lines with
nobody." Obviously this man wanted to
take the "Hell Express!"
It Is refreshing lo hear him mention a
topic with some substance, even If only
briefly. Puts this forth in such a manner,
that the absurdely of such lhaughlless actions Is made clear. A deep political
analysis Its not, hut such simplistic com-
mentary is stunning.
Otherwise his approach (dare insult this
Got! like figure) is basic. If I may. I'd like to
label a new genre, that of tlryoresque comedy (yes you heard il hear first). Regardless
of Ihe subject matter he haulers constantly
in the colloquial manner that has made
Richard Pryor the funniest man. (black
man according to Steve Martin), in
America, Granted Its funny stuff but often it
is too similar lo Pryor's material. i : or example he does a bit on how a "white guy" gels
mad, humor made famous by Pryor. In
general his satires are cluttered with
"fuckers" and "mother fuckers". Bui with
his natural ability, nol much more is needed
The album is varied. The last cut on each
side tire songs thai were released as singles
in the past. "Boogie in Your butt" Is rap
dance song co-written by Murray (hat
never hit the dancchalls as big as was planned, "Enough is Enough" is a version of
the Dona Summer hit sung by Murray In
the guise of two of his satirical characters,
Richard Simmons and Buckwheat, The
comedy value of these variations is low
My favorite piece is "Drinking Palhers."
In it he imitates Ihe classic Dad ranting and
raving about everything gone wrong, blaming he and his brother for it all. His father
comes home with a load on and challenges
his kids to fight: Eddie and his broth*. 1 proceded "lo beat the shil out that old man"
when lie bet them his paycheck,
Like all good comedians Eddie Murray
has the ability to make us laugh at
ourselves. I lis humor Is aimed at whites,
blacks, chlnese, the Pope, homosexuals,
the young and old. Although this Is nothing
new it Is none the less tare. It is this barality
of weakness and faults among people that
can bring us close together.
The album's pretty funny,
'
E
D
I
T
O
R
I
A
L
Steps toward communication
W
hen political views conflict, issues often find a
way to become overwhelming. However, if two
opposing sides communicate clearly and effectively, a mutual understanding car, be achieved. Over the past
two weeks Hie Revisionist Zionist Alternative and the Arab
Student Association appear to have taken some appropriable steps to sort out their conflict.
The political clash was ignited on Thursday, March 3
when students from RZA tore down a poster from a
cultural display by Arab students during the World Week
Ethnic Block Parly. RZA had claimed that the poster was
"anti-Semitic and anil-Jewish."
Professor Frank Poguc.-a World Week Coordinator, met
with all involved and organized a forum to help mediate the
dispute. Dean of Student Affairs Neil Brown, Dean o f
Undergraduate Education Helen DcsFosses, and delegates
from A S A , RZA and JSC-Hillel all attended the forum and
came out with an overall satisfied reaction. It was the first
step.
This past Saturday, the next step was made. Campus
Jewish groups protested the presence o f what they believed .
10 be a speaker representative of PLO propaganda. ASA
provided what they called a " T e a c h - I n " which they said
was meant to educate the public about Arab viewpoints.
ASA was given ihe freedom lo speak, and the Jewish
groups were given the freedom lo assemble. Constitutional
rights were observed and bolh groups were partially
satisfied.
Today a second forum is scheduled lo lake place.
Although actions by the groups have seemingly become
S
L
more positive, solid verbal communication is still lacking
There is no doubl that the feelings on both sides arc v 8
real and pertinent. However, namccolllng and Immature
remarks arc not the appropialc reactions lo this SCT
UI1IS
dispute. Forums and controlled debates can
is far
more productive starting blocks.
Hopefully, today's forum will not be the hisi tisne the
groups sil down lit ai ihe mediation tabic. Ratlici toilnv
should serve as the next positive step in closing Ihe communication gaps.
ASP: The Betz Years
he first indication thai it was nol going lo be a normal editor's term came about on Dean's third Issue.
A piece of typesetting equipment broke down and
there didn't seem lo be a repairman in Ihe slate who could
fix it.
About the same lime, several key members of the staff
decided they had other things lo do with their lime. Issues
had lo be cut in size while Ihe remaining slaff members had
to put In triple-lime.
After a while it seemed the only logical thing lo do was lo
cease publication. But one thing kept il going — the idea
that things couldn't get any worse. But things got worse —
T
u
M
more breakdowns, more staff turnover, and a
misunderstanding over an A p r i l fools issue that turned Into
a sit-in.
But things did Improve. Refusals to print Inaccurate
military ads and selective service public service announccments drew a good bit of media intension.
And there is a happy ending. The cqulpmcm goi fixed
Ihe issues got bigger und ihe ASP gol a much needed injection of new blood. As Dean left lo heed the call of the
rcglslar and lo give others a chance, he left behind a strong
slaff and a newspaper vastly improved in design and layout.
Yeah, he left behind some good memories loo,
N
Heightened tensions in Assam
Last month, the stale o f Assam in India suffered the
iorsi form of human tragedy in its history. According to
official estimates, over 3,000 people — Muslims, Hindus,
iribals, Assamese and Bengalis, including women and
children — were killed and over 200,000 people became
homeless. The 40-monlh old agitation by the native
Assamese which had largely been peaceful and non-violent
took a different turn after Indian Prime Minister Indira
Gandlu's government unilaterally cancelled negotiations
with the agitation leaders and arrested them, and Ihe worst
of all, announced on January 6 lo hold elections in Assam
on February 14, 17, and 20 lor Ihe legislative assembly and
twelve parliament seats. The Assamese have been demanding the central government to deal with the massive influx
of non-Assamese Immigrants primarily from Bangladesh
over Ihe lost three decades.
Roli Varma
The western news ipedia has largely emphasized the
violence as a religious conflict between native Hindu
Assamese and Muslim Bengali immigrants. Some organizations of Muslims from New York, New Jersey i(nd Connecticut have also portrayed the tragedy as Hindus killing
Muslims by condemning the massacre of Muslims on
March 4 outside the U N . The Islamic Center, the Mosque,
and Ihe Arab-American ami-discrimination Committee of
Albany held a protest on March 5 on similar grounds. This,
we think, is a misrepresentation of the tragedy in Assam.'
First of all, available facts do not corroborate thai only
Muslims were killed in Ihe recent violence though most o f
Ihe victims of ihe last major massacre were Bengali Muslim
immigrants. The first report of the major clash between
native Assamese and Bengali immigrants came on February
2 when a Muslim mob attacked a native Assamese Hindu
village, killing many people including children and women.
Subsequent attacks until February 18, after Ihe second election day, were or similar nature; there was also a report o f
an attack by iribals (who are indigenous people of ihe area)
who supported the election on a native Assamese village
which was boycotting the election. Major killing took place
on February 20 when 10,000 Iribals reportedly armed with
homemade guns, spears and bow and arrows attacked 100
villages Inhabited by Bengale Muslim immigrants, many of,
who had been living there for 30 years or so. Over 1500 peo-'
pie including women and children have been reportedly killed. In addition, there have been reports of heavy violence
by 100,000 paramilitary forces and police on the Assumes
protesters killing over 150 people since January 6.
Soon after ,thc announcement of elections, iwo student
groups, A l l Assam Students Union (AASU) and All Assam
Gana Sangram Prasbid (AAC1SP), which have been
spearheading Ihe agitation,decided lo boycott the elections,
Their leaders were arrested when they stepped out from
their plane which brought them from New Delhi lo Assam's
capital Gauhntl after the negotiations were cancelled. The
twp groups viewed the Imposition of Ihe election us a denial
of Ihe promises made by the government to them as well us
making il more difficult to reach any resolution on the issue
of immigrants; most o f the immigrants had already appeared on (lie old electoral rolls which were going to lie used for the elections, Furthermore, the government imposed
press censorship, and under many preventive detention
laws, arrested anyone who opposed government's decision.
Over I0(),(XX) paramilitary forces were moved to Assum to
suppress Ihe protesls by the agitators. Consequently, protests in urban areas were virtually made impossible. The ac-
tivists of student organizations moved lo the villages,
mobilizing people lo boycott Ihe elections. After February
2, the protesters became aggressive and burned quite a few
wooden bridges so as lo disrupt election activities.
The unpopularity o f ihe election among the native
Assamese was so widespread that Mrs. Gandhi had to send
over 5,000 bureaucrats from New Delhi and other stales lo
supervise the elections, as Ihe local officials refused to do
anything related lo elections even ai the risk of losing their
jobs. The printing | resses in Assam refused to prim electoral rolls and ballots. There were relatively few nominalions filed for 126 seats as most major parties boycotted the
elections, the polling was extremely low with less than 10
percent o f eligible voters voting. For the first lime in lite
electoral history o f India, a call for boycott of elections,
though given many limes in the past, was widely successful.
The day Ihe newly elected Congress (I) government was
sworn, Ihe agitation leaders gave a call for a 24 hour general
slrike which was again very successful.
Despite all this, Mrs. Gandhi held Ihe election because In
ihe recent elections in Ihe southern states o f Andhra and
Kamalaka her parly suffered a humiliating defeat for the
first time since independence. To present herself as still Ihe
leader and in charge o f ihe country, who had nol losl her
political grip over Ihe parly and country, she wanted a
quick win elsewhere. Assam was chosen to serve Gandhi's
personal and political ambitions, thus destroying whatever
limited gains had been made during ihe talks w|(h Ihe agitation leaders over the last 3 years.
T o top II all, Gandhi and her puny leaders travelled to
Assam and pluyed upon Ihe fears of the immigrants, thus
adding fuel lo the fire already burning in Assam. She even
said in her campaign speeches that only her party "could
look niter the Interests of the Muslims" and that no one
would be deported. Her party functionary and Union
Railways Minister Ghuni Khan Clioudliry, a Bengali
Muslim himself, were entrusted to campaign anion,; Ihe immigrants who reportedly told them " i f they kill one of you;
kill four of t h e m , " and that " i f you do not vote foi (on.
grcss (Indira), you will be thrown out o f ihe country,"
All of these factors and fears und Ihe Inaction ol the central government culminated in the agitation of llic
Assamese in 1979 which has had very wide supporl among
the local population including a sizable nuinbci ol
Assamese Muslims. The protesters have been demanding
Ihe preservation of Ihe Assamese culture, language and national political rights. They have proposed thai Ihe whole
country, not just Assam, should bear the burden of Ihe
refugees. The ngilallon leaders have had over 25 rounds ol
talks wilh the government. The agitation leaders have
agreed that immigrants prior lo 1961 could slay in Assam,
bul they want those who entered Assam following l%l
cither to be settled in other pans o f India or to be made lo
return lo Bunglcdcsh. The government instead wants lo
keep the refugees prior to 1971 to remain In Assam which
has led lo a deadlock. Agitation leaders had recently shown
some flexibility but the government has been adamant,
Mrs. Gandhi knew very well thai elections in Assam were
nol going lo resolve Ihe 40-month-old crisis; hei govern,
menl ignored intelligence reports fearing the kind o(
violence Assam saw if elections were held. Even during lire
election period, when it was quite clear how the situation
was worsening, she did not postpone the elections bul
ordered Ihe army lo control the situation. Now Assam, like
most of ihe northeastern slates — Nagaland, Mizornm,
Manipur, etc., is also under army rule, and the divisions
between Bengalis und Assamese, Iribals and nontrlbals, and
Hindus and Muslims have hardened; tensions have never
before been so heightened.
E
Our chosen path
To the Editor:
As a university elected student leader, I feel it is Imperative thai the inaccuracies In Sandy Starke's Idler eniilled " G o o d for the W h o l e " be brought to light.
The New York Public Interest Research Group
(NYPIRG) is run by students. PIROat SUNYA Is governed*
by a local board of directors, which is comprised of
students. Ms. Starke may have been confused concerning
the fact-thai PIRG at SUNYA does employ one project
coordinator who assists as a reference person, to facilitate
the smooth running of the scmeslerly projects. These projects arc voted upon by the student board of directors,
Therefore, students do have control over the issues or projects chosen,
Ms. Starke asserts that PIRG at SUNYA's projects are
nol student oriented. Firstly, N Y P I R G was the major force
in the Truth in Testing legislation which gives students the
ability to review standardized tests such as SATs, M C A Is,
[.SATs, and GREs. Secondly, NYPIRG deals with issues
thai seem nol to be directly related to our education, Our
quality of life is Intrinsically linked to our ability to perform
well academically. NYPIRG deals with ihose issues of
quality of life — Nuclear waste, rape, acid rain, recycling,
clean drinking water and disarmament,
Because college should be more than Just going lo class,
addressing these Issues is vital lo our overall education, We
are nol living in a vacuum. We must begin lo realize that
these issues will be (he issues o f o u r generation und musl he
addressed now and not once we receive degrees.
I hope thai Ms. Slarke will now realize Ihal our education is broader than our transcripts, A n organization like
PIRG at S U N Y A is essential for our well being. We are
people of this world first and being a student is a side path
we have chosen in our life and lo lose sight o f that fuel Is lo
lose sight of our very existence,
—Ann Marie l.ul'orla
Vice President, Student Association
Struggle for peace
To the editor:
Last Thursday, two candles were III In the Campus
Center in memory of Emil Grunz.weig, a member o f Kebbulz. Revivim, u paratroop reserves officer (who had recently returned from Lebanon), a masters student In
philosophy, and the father o f a three your old girl. On the
evening of February 8lh, he became the first Jew killed during a political demonstration, since the creation of the state
of Israel, when a grenade was thrown at a Peace Now
demonstration in Jerusalem.
What makes this event significant, is that Emil Grunzweig was killed because of the particular views he chose to
support, through his participation In the rally. The cmolions and altitudes that prompted this attack of Jew against
Jew, must be examined and evaluated. They demand our
attention simply because they are far more complex, and in
many ways, even more disturbing than the attack Itself, In a
democratic stale such as Israel, an Incident of such
magnitude cannot go unheeded.
In order for the death of Emil not lo have been In vain,
like those of the countless other victims of political
violence, two things musl happen. Firsl, the motivating
force behind the perpetration of this murder musl be
eliminated. That is, violence musl be rejected as an acceptable way of dealing with Ihe problems In ibis region. Second, the beliefs that Emil expressed musl be transformed
into reality. A policy of tolerance, respect, negotiation, und
patience must be encouraged and pursued. Emil's belief in
peace through moderation and understanding is a message
which musl be sent everywhere — from Jerusalem to Amman, and' even In Albany, where recent events during
T
T
E
World Week have proven once again the ill effects o f lack
of communication and misunderstanding.
The components and altitudes necessary lo achieve a
peaceful solution, musl evolve bolh here and in Israel. The
premeditated spilling o f Jewish blood by Jews is something
the Jewish people cannot and will not allow lo exist. The
situation must change.
In response lo, and in memory of, the death of Emil
Grunz.weig, let us all'begin the difficult, yet profitable
si niggle for peace.
< liama Silverman
False premises
I n the Editor:
As a member of Campus Crusade for Christ, I am writling in response lo a letter in the Friday, March 18, 1983
issue of the ASP. In that letter Jeff Schulman suggested
that "Crusade's" advertising for a lecture on success was
misleading 10 ihe reader. While I agree wit h Jeff
Schulman's statement that SA funded or recognized
organizations should lake credit and lull responsibility for
events ihey sponsor, I would like lo lake Ihis opportunity to
answer some of the questions which lie raised.
"College L i f e " was nol Intended 10 he a pseudonym
behind which "Crusade" was Irying to hide. It is a
meeting we have twice during the semester, in which we
choose a topic specifically related to college life. In addition
IO our advertisement on the blackboards, " C r u s a d e " also
posted over one hundred flyers oil Ihe podium und the
quads. These flyers advertised our "College L i f e " meeting
as being sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ. For
most of the week there was also u banner in ihe Campus
Center lobby advertising "College L i f e " sponsored b>
Campus Crusade for Christ. In trying to keep out
blackboard message brief, we may nol have written "sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ" on all of the
blackboards,•bill we never Intended to mislead anyone. The
last Ihing "Crusade" wants is people coming lo our
meeting on a false premise. We assumed people would
make die connection between our blackboard announcement and the other advertisements, If we caused anyone an
inconvenience due lo our advertisements for "College
L i f e " we sincerely apologize. In the future, "Crusade" will
lie sure to have our name on all events we sponsor. To
avoid any further misunderstandings, in our nest College
Life meeting on Thursday April I 4 l h , we will assume sponsorship with the Initials; " C . C . c . "
—Thomas E.Orlung
Rule of the few
To the Editor:
As an elected Class o f '84 Council member, I recently
went to a Class of '84 meeting. At that meeting, a few Interesting facts were brought forth thai, I think, the whole
class should know about.
Firstly, we have no formal constitution. There is neither
u constitution on file with ihe Student Association nor with
the Student Activities Office in CC 130. I have been asking
Ihe present Class of '84 President Chip l-'ody for a copy
since early September. I have consistently been met wilh the
answer of " . . . might have It, I'll see what I can d o . " Il is
almost A p r i l , and I slid nol have seen a copy.
At Ihe last meeting on Monday, March 14, 1983, I queslioned Ihem ugnin und it was slated by l o i n Phillips,
former class president, that a copy of Ihe constitution was
at his permanent address and he would bring il up alter
Spring break.
Although there was no constitution on hand, I was told
thai I did nol have voting riglils because Ihe constitution
says that If any voting member missed three consecutive
meetings s/he lost her/his voting rights and I wouldn't gel
ihem buck until I attended three consecutive meetings,
Now, 1 do question whether thai is actually in the conSusan Psarlman, Advertising Manager
John Trolsno, Sales Manager
Billing Accountants
Karon Sardotl, Judy Torol
Payroll Supervisor
Arlono Kallowltz
Olllce Co-ordlnslor
Junnllor Blocli
Classlllod Manager
Mickey Frank
Composition Msnagar
Melissa Wassorman
Advertising Sslss: Peter Forward. Mike Krolmer, Grogg Hall, Nell SuBsmun.
Advertising Production Managers: Jano Hirsch, Mlndy Horowitz, Advertising
Production: Randoo Dollar, Michelle Horowitz, Polgo Marcus. Julio Mark.
Eileen Slovln, Sue Sommorlold. Melissa Wassorman, Rhonda Wull, Otllco
Stall: LIBO dayman. Gay Poross
Jack Durachlag, Production Manager
Palrlcla Mllchell, Associate Production Manager
Mark Goaner, Editor In Chief
Wayne Peeroboom, Executive Editor
Tetl Kaplowllz, Llaa Strain, Managing Editors
m
^ * W » «IX MM ART TO D m ^ 5 2 /
Nawa editors
Dnbblo Judge, Dubblo Prololo
Aaaoclaln Nawa Editor
Anthony Sllbor
Aspects Editor
Dobbin Mlllmnn
Aaaoclale ASPacta I an
Mooan G. Taylor. Gall Morroll
Sound Editor
Robert Sclinoldor
Vlalon Editor
LlBnnno Sokolowakl
Sporla Editor
Mnrc Hospol
Associate Sports Editor
Marc Schwari.
Editorial Pnoos Editor
Lisa Strain
Copy Editor
David L.L. Laskln
Contributing Editors
Donn Bolz, Mark Mamrnonil
Editorial Assistant; Mark Lovlno. Wlro Sorvlco and Evanta Editor: Holrll Gralln,
Stall writers: Glnn Abend, Suznnno Abels, Amoy Adams, Dill Browrdor, Bolh
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Qroonsloln, Andy Horowitz, Tom Kneantlos. Amy Kllgus, DnnlBO Knight, llluo
Lovlno, Craig Marks, Robort Mathnlano, David Mlchnolson, llun Nissan,
Laura NUBB. Mall Nichols, Uob O'Drlnn, Mob O'Connor. Carl Palku. Kurort
Plrozzl, Phil Plvnlck, Linda Qillnn, Liz Reich, Mark flossier, Ranily Roth, Ellon
Snnlnalora, Alan Somkln, Metin Ulug, Mark Wlln.mt, Adam Wllk, Spectrum
and Events Editors: flonl Ginsberg, Kim Dornbaum
aonrtlfl Slovens, ar/srrress Manager
Hody Brodsr, Associate (Justness Manager
,
Vortical Camera
_
• " " O J ,J
Posle-up: Kolloy Durko, Donna Coiwin. Holly Prosll, Typists: Bill Boonoy, Jim
Copozzolo, Erica DActnmo, Joonnu Gildoisloevo, Elizabeth Hoyman. Glnny
Hubor. Mary Allco Llpka, Mark Walter
Photography principally supplied by University Photo Sorvlco. a sludont
group,
Chlol Pholographer: Dave Asher. UPS Stall: Chuck Botnsloln, Laura Bostlck,
Alan Calom, Amy Cohen, Shotry Cohen, Radial Litwln, Ed Mntusslch, Lois
Mallubonl, Susan Elnlna Mlndlch, Joan Plorm Louis. David Rivera. Lisa SimmoriB. Erica Spolgel, Warron Sloul, Jim valenllno, Will Yunnan
Entire contents copyright
1083 Albany Student Press Corporation, all
rights reserved.
The Albany Student PIOBS la published TueodayS and Fridays halwuen
AUUUBI and Juno by Ilia Albany Slndenl Press Corporation, an Independent
nol-lor-prollt corporation.
Editorials are wrlltan by lite Editor in Chlul with members ot the Editorial
Board; policy Is subject lo review by tiro Editorial Board. Advertising policy
doos nol nucessnrlly ralloct editorial policy.
Mailing address:
Albany Sledonl Press, CC 320
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Albany, NY 12222
(5in|4o7Bu02l3322/33U0
R
S
stltution.But aside from thai, I and other members o f the
council as well as interested juniors, have not always been
contacted about meetings. There have not even been advertisements In the ASP or memos sent around letting us know
of Class Council meetings.
What this has done is given the rule of the class of '84 to
a very select few who do nol wish lo cnlenain the wants of
the entire class. You sec, the other thing I learned at the
March 14 meeting was that the present officers, one of
which, the Vice President, does not have voting rights,
disagree with opening up the election for class officers to
the whole class.
They contend that the constitution stipulates that ihe officers ate voted for by the class council members and that
opening up Ihe elections would be a populariiy contest.
Isn't having tin In-housc election more o f a popularity conies!? This way you don't have to worry about reaching loo
many people, just fifteen. Besides, what arc Ihey afraid of?
Are ihey afraid of having more programming Ihcn the
class of '84 has already hud? This year's Class Council has
managed to alienate ihe olher classes who now find it difficult to work with us successfully,
It seems lhal Ihose in power now want to slay there
wilhoul any input of others. The present officers have no
faith in the class Itself, othersvl.se liiev would open up election universiiy-wide. They maintain ihul we don't have
the ability to decide what is right for us.
Next year is our scnlot year. We have been here three
years and deserve lo have a class council which is bolh
responsive and responsible io us. We deserve lo vole for
our class officers — it is otti rigltl nol our privilege. I felt il
necessary lo raise these issues so lhal Ihe class o f '84 knows
whai is going tin. Ncxl year should lie our best year. But we
need new blood and Input,
Johanna Sarraeen
The real minority
I n the Editor:
I read with Interest your recent article about SUNYA's
efforts to lure more minority students to our campus, and I
commend you on Ihis. However I am nol sure you are
focusing on ihe appropriate minority. Webster's dictionary
defines " m i n o r i t y " us lite "lesser purl or smaller number,
less than h a l l . "
According lo an article by .ludie Elschbcrg appearing on
March 15th. SUNYA enrolls 7.4 percent minority students
out of the total undergraduate academic population of
11,178. The point of this article was to show thai S U N Y A is
Interested in acquiring u more diverse student body as
quoted by admissions director Rodney Hurt.
The polni of my letter Is that ihe real mlriorliy here is nol
the black, nor the Hispanic sludeiit, Inn Ihe oiit-of-slalers
which make up approximately 3 percent of S U N Y A . I f
S U N Y A ' s trite Intentions are in achieving a truly distinct
student population then please explain how raising out-ofstate tuition by $1,400 will attract non-New Yorkers and
make SUNY more diverse. In essence, by raising out-ofstate tuition, nol only is ihe scope of the diversity of future
students being limited, hut also a powerful signal is being
sent to present oul-of-siaters lhal they arc no longer
welcome here.
I think I spenk for all non-New Yorkers (ihe true
S U N Y A minority) lhal il you truly want a more diverse
population I hen stop placing mosi of the burden of NY's
budget woes on those oui-of-slalers that appreciated the
quality o f education ai SUNY. We, like those who make
their home in Ihis slate, "love N Y " — bul nol for $1,400
more!
—Gary I.aehow
Established thought
I'o the Editor:
It should be ihe function of a campus based Jewish
orgain/ation lo foster ihe furtherance of Jewish ideals and
values. As'a " J e w i s h " organization, il seems only pioper
ihul the organization should follow and promote established Jewish thought.
On our campus, though, Ihe " J e w i s h " organization
doesn'i necessarily observe the basic values of liidtllsm
followed by Jews for millenin. This Sunday, JSC -I lillcl was
co-sponsoring an event with the Gay and I esbiun Alliance
which can only be described as anti-Jewish oi anll-Torah,
The event is entitled, "Jewish Identity - - sun you keep it as
a Gay ami Lesbian."
Judaism in no was endorses homosexuality from either a
moral or religious viewpoint. Many laws concerning sexualiiy can be found within Jewish religious doctrine, and
for a " J e w i s h " organization to support and sponsor an
event of this type is nothing less than a denunciation " I
those laws.
If JSC-Hillel is willing io accept the responsibility lor
promoting anii-jewish activities as homosexuality, 'hen
dial's (heir choice. Bul, lo do so us a " J e w i s h " organi/alion which accepts upon itself ihe yoke of Halaeha (Jewish
Law) is wrong from a moral point of view (hypocrisy),
unless of course JSC doesn'i consider itself a " J e w i s h "
organization but rather an organization of Jews.
Presently,JSC is contributing their name and $100 for
Ihis event. JSC, though, doesn't have funds for Jewish
events, yet there are funds for an event which deals with
ami-Jewish values. There was no need for JSC lo cosponsor this event, especially when the event could have
been sponsored solely by G A L A .
—Howard tistiimni
i«mm;i|«ijiijiii
mmvtmfm*
sttHmtw'n.MmumMmBiimwm'miimii
1»."»**4..^J •*:
MARCH
IKi-H 22, 1983
1983 - ALBANY STUDENT PRESS "\-\
I.ALBANY STUDENT PRESS II MARCH 22, 1983
Culinary major for eight-week summer camp chet position. Three
meals dally serving 200. Located
Pennsylvania. Call (215) 224-2100.
Quality Typing—Letlersm term
apers, dissertations, etc. Call
69-7149 before 9:00 p.m. Professional Typing Service. IBM
Selectrlc Correcting Typewriter. Experienced. Call 273-7218.
g
7B Honda Hawk Motorcycle. 400cc.
Excellent Condition. $1000 or best
olfer. 4S6-39S9.
For sale: 1978 Kawasaki 1000. Tiplop shape, dirt cheap to pay tuition.
Mark-482-69B6,
Rug lor sale—6x9
Blue, $20
Call 489-1696
JVC LA31 direct drive turntable.
$100.00. 457-5095.
BIC960 turntable. QoorTcondltlon.
$50.
or best
oiler.
Pete
Forward—457-5040.
IS
ervicel
Word Processing Service (typing):
Papers, resumes, cover letters; affordable rates. Call 489-8836.
If you live on State, Indian, or Dutch,
you can have Nowaday delivered
directly to your room everyday.
Call Todd—7-3016
Specializing In "Volkswagen" bugs,
gnlas, and buses. Bought, sold, and
repaired. Also parts, new and used.
Roy's —756-2090 days till 5 p.m.
OVRNITE TYPE
Pressed for time? Ovr-Nlte Type
Is fast, high-quality computerized word processing geared for
student needs as at student
prices. Call 785-8218 anytime.
Pickup & Delivery available.
Thesis Term Papers Reports
Vi price with SUNY I.D.
Allen's Halrstyllng
869-7817
Passport/application photos—CC
305 Tues. 12:00-2:00, Wed. 4:30-6:30.
No appointment necessary. $5.00
(or first two prints, $1.00 every additional two thereafter. Any questions
call 457-8867.
For Rent: 3 bedrom apt. Uptown
near Marine Midland Bank. June 1,
1983. Furnished, no utilities, parking tor 2 cars. Excellent condition.
$450<mo.—438-7602.
Subletter wanted for this summer.
Nice room, large, furnished, parking. Call Dan at 482-4552 or Pete F.
at 457-5040.
For rent: 3 bedroom, between Quail
and Ontario, furnished, washer &
dryer, no utilities, available June 1,
1983. $340/mo, 438-760?.
Apartment for rent—442 Spring. 3
bedroom, furnished, very near
busline, call to see.
Al, Gary, Bill
489-2620
For renlT 3~bedroom apt. Uptown,
near Marine Midland Bank. No
utilities, parking lor 2 cars. Excellent c o n d i t i o n . $450/mo.
43B-7602.
For rent: 3 bedroom, between Quail
and Ontario. Furnished, no utilities,
available June 1, 1983. $340/mo.
438-7602.
Counselors: Co-ed children's camp
N.E. Penna. 6/22-8/23/83. Swim
(WSI), tennis, gymnastics, waterskl,
team sports, fine art, photography,
dance, dramatics, guitar. Resident
Assistants needed for supervisory
positions. Group leaders (22 + j .
Camp Wayne, 12 Allevard St., Lido
B e a c h , . N Y 11561.
Campus
R e p r e s e n t a t i v e : Iris Novlck
455-6778.
RIDERS WANTED
"Come to the Mountains"
Top Brother/Sister camps In
Pooonos—June 25-August 2 1 .
Counselor and kitchen positions
available. Good salary. Application
available at college |ob placement
olllce or call/write camp office:
(215) 224-2100, 110A Benson-East,
Jenklntown, PA 19046.
Bartending—Northeast
Beartenders 111 In bartending training. Class fee, job placement.
899-4272,
.
tomorrow's Jobs. Know what Is and
will be available through this Indispensable booklet ol current
Government studies covering all industries and states Including
Alaska and Hawaii. $8.75 Lyntol
Research, Dept. TA3225, P.O. Box
99405, Cleveland, Ohio 44199.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
" N o Frills" Student Teacher
Flights. Global Travel, 125 Wolf
Road, Albany, New York 12205. (518)
482-2333.
Cruise Ship Jobsl $14-$28,000. Carrlbean, Hawaii, World. Call for
Guide, Directory. Newsletter.
1-916-722-1111 Ext. SUNYAIbany.
Buses leaving from the circle:
Fri., March 25th
Ticket sales and information in
CC Lobby
Thurs. & Fri. 3/17 & 3/18
Mon-Fri 3/21-3/24
9 a.m. -2 p.m.
wanted: #805 or #807 pieces lor
McDonald's Million Dollar Taste
Game. Good money oflered.
Call Maureen—462-9610.
Models: males, lo pose lor
freelance photographer. No experience necessary. Earn some
money. For Inlormallon call
434-4014.
.
S o f t b a l l t e a m , competitively
oriented, Is seeking 2 well-qualified
men to play Infield positions. Call
7-5028.
Wanted: Photographer to take ap>rox. 75 slides of artist's painting
or portfolio.. Slides must be top
quality. If Interested call Russ
465-2903 evenlnas.
VjVvent^
Spring Break Rocks
Ft. Lauderdale
at Studio 51
Wednesday, March 30,
Free drinks—9-10:30 p.m.
(across the street from Le Fat Cat)
| Monday n U e
I Tuesday Hlte
10:00pm
$2.00
-1:00am
Pitchers
10:00pm-1:00am
2 Schnapps
HAPPY
ft
EASTER
,«M.tl<
BREAK
I I !
$1.00
{ W e d n e s d a y m t e 10:00pm-1:00am
.75* Bar Drinks
!
Ladies Nite
•
j T h u r s d a y Mite 10:00pm • 1:00am
,'
.3 7oz.Bud. $1.00
We love you.
—Aspects (your most
devoted sports fans)
Congratulations!
You're leagal agalnl
Happy B-day!
Take the break at the Hyatt
Regency Tampa. Just S39 a
night, four to a room.
Beaches 15-25 minutes
away. Ten minutes lo Busch
Gardens. Close to Disney
World.Epcot a n d all the
major Florida attractions.
Pool a n d sun deck. S1.00
drinks at H a p p y Hour a n d
deluxe rooms In a sparkling
new hotel.
Call today (or reservations
— this special offer g o o d
M a r c h 3 0 lo April 3, (with
this a d . )
HYATT REGENCY.©TAMPA
A l t A M I ' A Q I Y * INIIIrf
Two Tampa City Center
Phone813/225-1234 Ext. 7200
Luv,
L&E
SUNY Night at Xenon's
Wednesday, March 30th
Guest Mom: Dorri Blank
Jugan,
I love you so much.
Fritz
Tom,
Our first anniversary was very
special to me. I know there will be
many more to come, because you
are the one I love.
My love always,
Bunny Rabbit
Dear Vlkkl,
Have a good
Washington state.
vacation
In
California Bound
David (GM Elect),
It's the Joint.
Congrats.
pi;
T3o8m8
P.S. Get psyched, the tun is about
to start.
Mlnke—
Have a fantastic time in Florida and
try not to miss me too much. I'll
miss you and your chicken cutietsl
I love you,
Listen to 91 FM WCDB for an Inside
look at SUNYA's Fiscal Future,
Thursday, March 24, at 7:00 p.m.
Tamar,
I Dub You
Buc Wheat
Monica,
Have a very happy 21st birthday.
Adria, Jackie, Kim, LalMel
Dear Anita,
Have a nice vacation.
Wahed
Roomie,
Here's your lirst personal. Beware
ol others.
A
P.S. This Is becoming habit forming.
Mary,
I don't |ust love ya 'cause you're
honest, caring, and everything a
friend could ask for... Just love ya
'cause you're my roomie and you re
always there lor us.
_ _
-K
To the people at the ASP,
I've enjoyed every moment working
on this paper with all ol you. Thank
you lor letting me share It with you.
—Marc
Listen to 91 FM WCDB lor an Inside
look at SUNYA's Fiscal Future,
Thursday, March 24, at 7:00 p.m.
Listen to 91 FM WCDB lor an Inside
look at SUNYA's Fiscal Future,
Thursday, March 24, at 7:00 p.m.
Klmmer,
Trues me; do you have a nickel; P
and C.
A
Rich Schalfer
Rich Schalfer lor SA President
Rich Schalfer
Love,
Steph
Since It's official, I guess I can
say... Congratulations!.!!!) to the
new general manager of Albany's
New power. I know you'll be great,
pal.
Stoyve
To my honey,
The past six months with you have
been fantastic. Thank you for making me so very happy.
I love you, Tanla
40-hr. course begins April 12 at
the Albany Thruway House.
For a tree brochure and an invitation to a free sample
class covering the LSAT and the Law School admission
CALL COLLECT:
(516)481-4034
or write;
Adelphi University's LSAT Preparation Course
Center lor Career & Litelong Learning
307 Eagle Avenue, West Hempstead, N.Y. 11552
In cooperation with
i The National Center for Educational Testing, Inc.
GUARANTEE: Score in the top 2 5 %
i or take the next course FREE,
at 7 p.m.
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Albany, New York
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$ 1 O f f A n y Large P i e
BELLA'S PIZZA
A PANEL DISCUSSION
ON
GETTING INTO THE LAW SCHOOL
OF YOUR CHOICE
featuring:
SALLY P. GOLDFARB (JD YALE)
Editor of The Insiders' Guide To Law Schools; a
guide by students, for students
STANLEY D r H F S S , ESQ. (JD Cornell)
President of the B A R / B R T Professional Testing
Center and Law Lecturer
Date : Saturday. March 26th
Time 1:00 p.m.
Place The New York Statler Hotel
401 7th Ave, N.Y., N.Y.
(opposite Perm Station)
HL
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This offer expires April 8, 1 9 8 3
Good at Central Ave. and Bogarts locations
"COMING SOON"
Introduction to Law School
course
your
TEACHER or ADVISOR
OTHER IJOUHSES AVAILABLE
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CALL TOLL FREE; 8 0 0 - 2 2 : 1 - 1 7 8 2 J
Nomination Forms Available At
STUDENT ASSOCIATION CCU6
Deadline : March 25
S.A. FUNDED
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Medical opportunities
White sandy
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Warm Gulf
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medical careers at L.W.
BLAKE HOSPITAL. And
our procedural &s
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career goals.
Our 298 bed, expanding to
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facility is I.C.A.H.
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Naturally we, H , u »iu^
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Your career p.> u mediuai
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MEMORIAL
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2020 • 59th Street West
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• LOANS AVAILABLE • INTERVIEWS BEGINNING IMMEDIATELY
For further details and/or appointment call'
ii
Dr. Manley (716)832-0763/
" i ,
celebration
PROUDLY PRESENTS
S.U.N.Y. NITES
124 W. 43rd STREET, N.Y.C.
FRIDAY NITE MARCH 25th
FRIDAY NITE APRIL 1st
1
;
(on w a l k - i n
purchase)
NOMINATE
To the Foxiest RA Indian will set Its
eyes on next year—Congrats Mar,
and thanx lor everything.
Love you lots,
Kath
This Friday Is Sue Hlllman's 21st
birthday. Please wish her a Happy
Birthday belore you all leave for
Florldal
P.S. Clyde made me do II.
Extensive 40-hr. or 32-hr. "Weekender" courses
• Live lectures • Simulated exam conditions •
Special home-study materials • Tape library •
Up-to-date course materials • Counseling
_
---------.«•«•„.„„,
(
I
I
I
I
PRESENTS
THOMAS MARTINSON. ESQ. (JD Harvard)
Editorial Director of the B A R / B R I LSAT Course
and the nation's leadiag authority on the New LSAT
ASP
Editorial
Board
Meeting
Thurday
BAR/BRI LSAT
SATDATGRE
Sweet William,
Thank you lor listening.
Megan
ADELPHI UNIVERSITY OFFERS:
was an issue that was put to Idem","
O'Lcary said. "They did not
'adopt' it. Thai's not accurate."
, But Ihc president's main reply
was thai Chonlgman was chasing
ihc wrong official.
"The Senate is a self-governing
body," he said. " I t is nol my role lo
call Ihc Senate." Ralhcr, O'Leary
noted that Senate Chair Krosby was
Ihc one with power over Ihc Senate
and thus the one lo whom
Chonigman should have addressed
his Inquiry, "The cure lies in Ihc
Senate," O'Lcary asserted.
Dave
SUNY Nites
Admission $5
Friday, March 23 &
Friday, April 1
Be therel!
Prepare Now For
June 20 Exam
"It's not true," O'Lcary said of
Ihc Scnalor's stalcmcnl that the
Hoard or Trustees recommended
differential tuition be adopted for
Ihc budget. " I t (differential tuition)
I Love You!
Pla,
Happy 19th!II Here's to 7 more
years of good times.
Chris
P.S. I am not Whackol
• Albany, NY
• Connecticut
• Garden City, LI
• Huntington, L I .
• Ithaca, NY
• Manhattan
• Central & North
New Jersey
• Westchester
Although Chonlgman said he had
not yet heard from O'Lcary, when
contacted the president said he had
jusl thai duy prepared a reply in
which lie stressed iwo poihis: one
being the inaccuracy of a conienllon or Chonlgman's, the other
simply thai Chonigman was requesting answers from the wrong
man. O'Lcary maintained he was
nol the one In a position lo lake —
or lo have laken — action'on lite
resolution,
Brett,
Rich Schalfer
Rich Schaller lor SA President
Rich Schaller
LSAT
\
nowlll
Xenon, Xenon, Xenon
Dean and W a y n e It has truly been a pleasure this
year. Thanks a lot.
- M a r c H.
process
Sean,
Heaven exists and I know where It
Is. Now let's see what we can do
about eternity, OK?
I love you,
Lisa Marie
Bonnie (our business manager)—
Because you're once, twice, three
times a lady, we love you.
Aspects
Lima Bean,
A twlzzler for your thoughts. No
dimes.
A
Doo—Turn Florida upside down! I'll
miss you, Cambridge-breath.
Spike—
We never got our brass railings and
candlesticks but we still had lour(!)
great years! No one can stop us
protests
formal request lo the pcrson-who
docs have iKat authority lo order
one.
Rich Schaller
Rich Schaller lor SA President
Rich Schaller
Dukl
SUNY Night at Xenon's
Wednesday, March 30th
Featuring: Jell Kalz
Senator
Dear Moe,
Happy 53 week anniversary. I love
you I
Love,
JIM
Kldd,
By the way, did ewe know...
Luv,
Plgme
Happy Birthday!
Happy Blrthdayl
Happy Blrthdayl
Love,
The Human League
W I L L A H D GARDEN HOTEL
4S mlnulei from F l . Leuda'i IUIH only tB.OO round trip,
SPRING
BREAK
SPECIAL
CACSNEY'S
•
Mark, Marc, and Mark,
I have really enjoyed working with
you all to create the best section In
(he world. Larry Kahn would be proud!
Marc "The Bear"
$39
Sponsored by Delta S i g m a Pi
Cake,
I'm really sorry about yesterday.
You're not gonna miss much,
anyway.
Rob
David,
I wish I could be with you on the
31st, but I promise to bring you
some sunshlnel
Happy Blrthdayl
I love you I
Ellen
"Rlzzy",
This year Fort Lauderdale, next year
Dutch Quadl We're therel And we're
there togetherl
I luv ya!
"Ruzy"
P.S. Janice—you're going to have
an unforgettable time next yearl
Dear Stopslgn,
I hope you will have a very happy
birthday. All I can say Is come you
21st birthday, I know It will be great.
Love, Steve
David,
kersonali
$24
$31
$27
$27
$27
$25
Dana,
So maybe llle Isn't translenti Happy
Birthday!
Love,
Pat
Haspel—
TRAILWAYS BUSES
to New York City
PORT AUTHORITY
SMITHTOWN
CARLE PLACE
QUEENS
YONKERS
BROOKLYN
SUNY Might at Xenon's
Wednesday, March 30th
Special guest: Nancl Hansen
Dear Pig,
Wishing you all the best on this very
special day. Have a very happy 19th
birthday—you deserve it I
Love always,
"Super" Pickle
Hey 496 H u d s o n Meow! Meow! Meow!
You chicks are the cat's meowl
Love
Clyde
9:30 p.m. til...
FEATURING THE LATEST DISCO AND ROCK PLUS AN
AEROBICS DANCE SHOW
ADMISSION $5 BEFORE 10:30 with this invitation
$9 after 10:30 with this Invitation
Inlormallon 520-1267
"Please present this Invitation at the door"
EVERYONE
IS PICKING UP
O N PILOT PENS
WATCH OUT FOR
THE STUDY HALL SNATCHERS
/
MARCH 22, 1983
A'ondering where you
fit in...
Worried about your
relationships... ^ ^ ^ — ^
ConcernetRiDouT"
birth control...
VD.homosexuallly...
a a w a f IQ84-COUMCIL
SIAII
interest meeting
concerning: constitution revisions
GENESIS
Monday, A p r i l 4
CC173
10:00 PN
Sexuality Resource
Center
105 Schuyler Hall
457-8015
A service provided by
Student Affairs and Student Association
C A L L OR S T O P I N
A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE
Help the Off Campus Association
Improve conditions for student tenants
and earn 3 credits for your efforts. O C A
counsels students, provides information.
'survival' guides, publishes a monthly
newspaper, and sponsors off campus
entertainment events. Learn about Albany,
meet interesting people, and earn 3 credits!
Register for OCA Community Service credits
April 5-8 between Lecture Centers 3&4.
Space is limited, so get there EARLY.
For info, call OCA at 457-4928.
CHRISTIAN ATTITUDES
1TOWARDS ISRAEL
•SISTER CECILIA HOLBROOK *
- College of St. Rose
- Lecturer
-Author
WEDNESDAY, M A R C H 2 3 R D
CC B A L L R O O M 8 : 0 0 P . M .
Sponsored by JSC-Hillel Students for Israel
| SA FUNDED
TONIGHT !
Speakers Forum brings you
Four of the lop seven teams went down in defeat this
past weekend in the A M I A League .1 basketball
playoffs.
The number one ranked Riders on the Storm, after
easily defeating Twilite Zone Breakers 70-41 in the
opening round ran Into trouble with number seven A l l
World. A l l World had no trouble getting by Leslie
Fund in their first round game. They defeated them
38-25. In the quarterfinals, A l l World was to much lo
handle for Riders on Ihc Storm as ihey defeated litem
48-36. The win allows A l l World lo advance lo Ihc
semifinals.
Heat'em on Brains upscl Ihc number four ranked
Super C's 36-35 and advanced lo lite quarterfinals,
while Ihc Wharf Rats also pulled off an upscl, as Ihey
beat number eight Wally's Hoard Hangers 36-28 in
ilieir opening round game. The quarterfinals pitted the
Wharf Rats against Heat'em on Brains. The Wharf
Rals squeezed by lleai'em on Brains 36-35, on a lasl second sitol lo advance lo Ihc semifinals.
The semifinals will match the Wharf Rals against A l l
World tonight at 8:15 in Ihc gym.
In lite other division in League 3, auoihci upscl look
place. Qnw-Wnq easily bcal the number Ihlec BUZZlirolhcrs 46-34 l o advance l o Ihc quarterfinals,
Number six ranked Members Only bad no problem
dealing wilh Creek Salad, as they crushed litem 62-34.
In the quarterfinals, Qnw-Wnq could not pull off
another upscl. Members Only outlasted Qnw-Wnq
41-36 lo advance lo Ihc semifinals.
No. 5 Chappy's had no problem wilh Dynasty, as
Ihey bcal litem 55-44 in Ihelr opening round game. The
outcome was ihc same for Ihc Rim Jobs, as they were
easily beaten by Disasler, 43-35. The winner of Ihc
Chappy's-Disasler quarterfinal game, which was
played late last night, will meel Members Only in the
LOIS MATTABONI UPS
semifinals tonight at 10:15 in the gym. The finals in
I n t r a m u r a l b a s k e t b a l l p l a y o f l a c t i o n was In l u l l
League 3 will be played Thursday night at 9:15 in lite
s w i n g this past w e e k e n d .
gym.
the semifinals.
Unlike League 3, in which four ranked learns wenl
out in the first round, all Ihc ranked teams in League 4
Number three Jefferson Cleaners advanced lo the
won Iheir opening round playoff games.
quarlerfinals by healing Skoal Bros, and number five,
I lit- number one ranked Bishops shot pasl Horn
Clinton Running Gunners advanced by healing lliirm
Brothers lo advance lo the quarterfinals, while No. 8 Toasl.
Upchuck Ihc Boogie bcal Ihc Tracers l o meel the
In the quarterfinals, Jefferson Cleaners put away
Bishops in the quarterfinals. In Ihc quurlcifinals, the
Clinton R-Ci 45-37 lo advance lo the seniilinals. The
semifinals pitted Big Monslers against Jefferson
Bishops crushed Upchuck the Boogie, 57-37.
Cleaners. This game was also played late lasl niglil.
In Ihc oilier quarterfinal game in their division,
The League 4 finals will be played lonighl al 9:15 in Ihc
number four ranked Ba-Va's bcal Nice & White lo adgym in between the semifinal games of League 3.
vance lo the quarterfinals, while number seven ranked
In League 2, in ihc semifinals, ihc Untouchables
Minu, Shall We Dance advanced lo ihc quarterfinals
heal Ihc Bruise Brothers 42-40. In the oilier semifinals
by healing Penetration. In Ihc quarlerfinals, again
game,
Nice A Easy beat Cash Money 47-38. The finals
there was another lopsided victory as Ba-Va's ran all
will match Nice & Easy against the Untouchables,
over Mina, Shall We Dance, 65-41.
Thursday at 10:15 in Ihc gym,
The semifinal game pilled the Bishops vs. the Ba* •*
Va's. This game was played late lasl night.
In Ihc A M I A hockey League 2 playoffs, eight teams
In the oilier division in League 4, Ihc number Iwo
remain out of the original 20 learns.
ranked Big Monsters advanced lo the quarterfinals by
Marcl-Haters will play Kasy's Bar-n-Cirill; T u f f
bcaling Ihc New Sixly Nincrs, while number six B o m
Darls will play 12th precinct; Milk will play Silencers
lo Dribble gol by Death Squad. Ill the quarlerfinals,
Born lo Dribble gave Ihc Big Monsters a scare, but Ihc and Push Down and Turn will play Waslc Product
Hockey.
I I
Big Monslers hung on lo win 39-36 and advanced lo
STAFF
ttnm.lt
There arc many clubs on this campus lhat students
never seem to hear about. One of these groups is llie
Albany Slate volleyball club.
The club is funded solely by the student Association
ind compcles against moslly Division I learns. A n y
ri Albany State student is welcome l o j o i n , bul as captain
Bryan Salicrlec warned, " i t helps to be experienced as
the play is eompetilivc and there is a chance for
injury."
The squad compcles under iwo headings. It partakes
in an N C A A season which begins in January and llie
Uniicd Slalcs Volleyball Association (USVBA) season
which is continuous throughout llie entire year. Listed
among Albany's N C A A rivals arc Springfield, West
Point, RP1, Harvard and Yale. Currently, Ihc team's
record in 2-4 wilh six matches remaining. Equally competitive are the USVBA tournaments In which ine-
At 7:30 Tonight, the bar opens. At 8pi.
the comedy begins.
Now that midterms are over & vacation's
approaching...
Come to t h e CC Ballroom. (There's a FREE
DRINK waiting for you!)
•fc
*$& SUNY Student Special
Precision Cut and Blow Dry
$12.00
HillK
By M a r k Wilgard
A night of real comic entertainment
with Rita Rudner, Albert Owens, and
Ron Darian.
Th^Tine''?^ Tonight
II
•
Sculptured Nails $25
J Manicure
• Pedicure
•% • • * • • • • • • • u s t a c h e T r l m &3
Stuyvesant Plaza
Mohawk Mall
438-6668
374-3589
Special $50 Perm*
$35 "Long Hair Extra
quality of play is very high.
A major problem for the club team is thai Ihey have
no priorily for gym lime. " W e gel only four hours of
practice a week and then we have lo go up against someone lhat has practices for 14 hours," said Salierlec.
•" Si ill, our play is pretty rigorous and exciting,"
" T h e only Ihing lhat we gel (from SA) is gas and loll
money on our trips," lie said about his team which used 10 enjoy varsily slants al Albany until Ihrcc years
ago. " T h e SA has been very nice. We couldn't have a
team without i h e m . "
However, being on llie club level has not hindered
iheir success. Lasl year, the team made il l o the
playoffs before losing lo George Mason in addilion lo
being ralcd among llie lop 10 in llie Lasl.
The future o f the club is less certain, Nexl year,
there will be only three or four players returning. I f
you have volleyball experience or jusl are Interested in
Ihc sport, llie Albany Slate Volleyball club may be jusl
II
for you. Conlacl Salicrlec al 783-7474.
Netmen prepare for season with four seniors
•«15
Tickets on sale in CC Lobby for
$4 w-tax card, $5 W-OUt.
SA f u n d e d
•!
Poking lo deteal Colgate for the
first lime in Albany Siulc history.
The Danes will also be Irying l o
seek revenge against Vermont, who
upended Ihc team in the fall, 6-3.
" I n order for us to be very successful this season, we will have to
l«l help from Ihc double spots, who
" I t ' s considered a tremendous
fullered for us ill Ihc f a l l , " staled
Lewis, "There arc six clubs on Ihc honor l o host this year's N C A A
schedule that could conceivably Tournament," said Lewis. " I feel
bcal us i f we don't play up lo poten- thai we have the facilities to make!
this tournament a success. Il should
tial,"
For Ihc first lime in Albany be quite an event on campus."
The squad will travel lo Virginia
history the Great Danes will be host
to Ihc N C A A Division I I National during Ihc Easier break lo compete
in three exhibition matches.
II
Tournament from May9-I5.
i
ICELANDER IS STILL
YOUR REST VALUE
TO EUROPE
LUXEMBOURG
ROUNDTRIP
s
489 '499 539
$
FROM
NEW YORK
FROM
BALTIMORE/
WASHINGTON
FROM
CHICAGO
ALSO LOW COST SERVICE TO PARIS, FRANKFURT, AMSTERDAM AND
NICE. AND. REMEMBER, ONLY ICELANDAIR FLIES YOU TO THE
BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF ICELAND. AND INCLUDES ALL THESE EXTRAS:
Ft n deluxe in InrenBch (rum Luxembourg in Frankfurt, Dusseldorf,
III', till ll.ll I' Mannheim, WunperlalanaKehl, Germany. • Bargain
mils front $9u7w ek in Luxembourg. • Free wine with dinner,
•after.
II
Uu
kl.,
ICELANDAIR
iMrhHiimiViiwi.-iiutvwii/.innirn
Volleyball club spikes top teams
L A F F - OFF !
T h e P l a c e : CC B a l l r o o m
£ T h e R e a s o n : to LAFF-OFF!
HAIR
DESIGNERS
Intramural hoop playoffs near end
By Barry Ceffncr
T H £ H E & A PLACE YOV
CAN CO FOR HELP
Mon.-Thurs.Evo.: 7:00-10:00p.m.
Monl'hurs:
2:00-4:OOp.m.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS S p O k i S 1 3
Summer
at Adelphi
takes the heat
off school
in the fall.
There are so many good reasons lo be part of Adelphi's Summer
Session. Maybe you need to give more time to a really demanding course.
Or want to take a business elective to round out a liberal arts degree.
Or hope to lighten your fall schedule so you can put more effort into
career planning. Maybe you simply want to learn... for the fun of i l .
Summer at Adelphi lets undergraduates and graduates accomplish
all these things and more. In a setting that's relaxed. Removed from
the pressures of the regular school year.. .but close to the pleasures
of the season.
Our vast choice of courses focuses on everything from business and
computers to liberal arts and the sciences. We have special interest
workshops for educators, and highly regarded pre-professional programs
for students preparing for careers in medicine, dentistry, law and
business.
Summer at Adelphi. It's learning, in a brand new light. Call (516)
663-1120 or (212) 347-9460 for complete information. Or use the
coupon below.
Our students succeed.
A
ADELPHI
UNIVERSITY
Please send more information on Adelphi
University's Summer sessions.
Name
Address
City
-ZipState-J
TelephoneAdelphi Univcrsitv, Inquiry Room Garden City, New
York 11530
Adelphi Univtfilty i* committed lo I'ltrmJinu tuual rducatluntl
opportunity In all Ihoie who gualiry atadtmkally.
m&smiimSMX.
MARCH 22, 1983 \ : ALBANY STUDENT PRESS g p o r t S
J'
•seniors*
SUNY night
pick up your 'senior cards'
campus center 343 (ticket window)
MONDAY • FRIDAY MARCH 14 • 18
XENON'S
MM • 3 p,M,
MONDAY • WEDNESDAY MARCH 21 • 23
TUESDAY NIGHT 7 P.M. • 10 P.M.
P l i r p O S C You must have a 'SENIOR CARD '
^6~purchase 'SENIOR TICKETS' this APRIL!
e l i g i b i l i t y Those seniors who have paid class dues for
the past 4 semesters. The payment of past
class dues is possible at this time.
124 West 43rd st. New York, N.Y.
Wednesday, March 30th
Tickets on sale at the
Delta Sigma Pi
donut table starting
Monday, March 21st
FOR
1983-84
until
MARCH 21,1983
When asked to make a pre-scason
prediction about how well they expect their team to perform in the
upcoming season, most coaches will
be somewhat reluctant to go out on
a limb and boldly say that they have
high hopes for success. However,
head coach Mike M o l l a docs not
seem apprehensive when asked
how he foresees his Albany Slate
varsily lacrosse team's I983 campaign.
" I think this is the best team I've
had since i've been here," said
Molta, who is beginning his seventh
year as head coach,
Molla seems lo have good reason
lo be optimistic, as he will field a
team that has depth at virtually
every position and lias four key
players reluming from last year's
6-7 squad that finished third in the
SIAII
HL
UAS
PROGRAM FUNDS
By Mark I.evine
1:1)1 TORIAl. ASSISTANT
By M u r e B e r i n u n
Sponsored by Dolta Sigma PI pledge class
UNIVERSITY
AUXILIARY
SERVICES
COMMITTEE
IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR
Stickmen look strong for upcoming campaign
SUNY Conference and failed lo
qualify for Ihe playoffs.
Heading Ihe list is 2nd Team A l l Conference
atlacker
f)on
Casadonte, who led Ihe team in
scoring lasl year as a sophomore.
Junior midfielder Jon Rcilly and
senior defenscinan Bill Watson also
represented Albany on Ihe 2nd
Team All-Conference unit lasl year.
Watson is returning for his fourth
year as a varsily starter,
Molla sees depth as one of his
team's biggest assels. " W c have a
deep, solid inidl'ield and are four
deep at attack, liui we do have a
few standouts at each position-thai
wc can't afford to lose," he said.
One of these standouts Is
sophomore gonlicndcr Alan Coinfield. A s a freshman last year Cornfield finished ninth in ihe country in
save percentage, and this is one area
where Albany can't rely on depth.
" A l a n is an outstanding goalie, hut
he is really the only goalie we have.
This is one position where wc have
lo depend on only one person,"
Molta noted.
Molla is presently preparing his
team for a long journey lo Virginia,
where they will open their season
against Randolph Macon. Aside
from that the schedule is virtually
the same as lasl year, according lo
M o l l a . Along with conference
rivals Cortland, Cicneseo, Oswego,
B u f f a l o Slate, O n e o n l a and
Potsdam, Albany will face Vermont, RIT, Colgate and Hurlwlck
as well as local rivals RIM. Siena,
Union and Skldmore, who will be
Albany's opponent in lhe home
opener April 2.
Willi depth and talent at every
position Molta anticipates a season
full of promise. When asked if he
thought his team would Improve
over lasi year's 6-7 record, he emphatically replied, " D e f i n i t e l y . "
Four seniors key netmen attack
$8 per person all night
$15 at the door
NOTICE
15
(Each semester owed is $3.00 which should
be paid In cash only.)
THIRD ANNUAL ROTARY CLUB
CAREER DAY
T h e A l b a n y R o t a r y C l u b has o f f e r e d l o sponsor the " T h i r d A n n u a l
A l b a n y R o t a r y C l u b Career D u y . " T h i s is a w o r t h w h i l e o p p o r t u n i t y
f o r S U N Y - A students t o participate i n a one clay o n - t h e - j o b
experience. Here are just a few o f the responses C U E received in
reaction t o last year's event:
" a n excellent learning e x p e r i e n c e "
" l i was. real ' H a n d s o n ' experience rather than 'show and t e l l ' . "
"Fantastic"
" T h e kind uf knuwlcclgo we goi you w o a ' l nci in a book 01 from
l i lends anil advisers''
" l i allowed me in make some valuable contacts in tl\c f i e l d . ' '
" I nevei learned so much in just a lew h o u r s ! "
" 11 a I s o i l lo Career H a y ! "
l i t i s year a p p r o x i m a t e l y .1.1 urea professionals and members o f Hie
A Mm i n Rotary C h i l i have agreed lo donate the m o r i i i i l u o f A p r i l
21st to the career development o f A l b a n y students. Tills h a l f - d a y
venture w i l l lake students o f f the campus and into Hie e o n i m u n i l y .
Students w i l l spend the mnruiii|> w i t h their assigned professional
contact at his place o f hiisiues. A wide riiii|u> of occupations w i l l he
represented Includine,:
Business
Bunking
Com m unica lions
Dentistry
Law
Distribution
M mi a tic in cnl
Public Sctvicu/At 1 tn inisii ni inn
Real Estutc
M un u I'nclu ciny
Mbrkcijng
After a busy morning students will be treated to lunch at the
Albany Thruway House • courtesy of the Albany Rotary Club.
The Center for Undergraduate Education (CUE) Is cosponsoring this event with the Rotary Club. CUE will
coordinate the selection of students. Individuals interested In
participating may pick up an application at CUE, fill it out
and return It to CUE no later than March 25. At least 58
students (possibly more) will be selected. Selections will be
made according to designated areas of interest. Selections
will be made on April 7. For more Information contact Dlna
Melltl at CUE (457-8331).
Ulllllll
11 was four years ago when
Albany Stale men's tennis head
touch Hob Lewis and his recruiting
stuff were able lo coax lour high
school tennis players to bring llielr
racquets lo Albany. It Is by no coincidence that the tennis team has
dominated collegiate tenuis at the
SUNY level during thai span, winning lour straight S U N Y A C Championships including their flrsl place
finish lasl fall.
The six singles spots will basically
remain the same, with ihe align
mem being: Lcviue, Ciabcr, junior
Rob Karen, junior Dave Ulrlcll,
Lichen and Lerner. Spot duty will
be shared by freshmen
lorn
Shnildls, David Grossman, lay
Liscnhctg and Mike Dermansky.
The Danes incorporate Ihe
double-duly system at the three
doubles positions, with all six of Ihe
stalling singles players filling in ihe
six double spots. The pairings are.
Lcviue.Ciabcr, Uliich-Lcrncr and
Kuieu-Lichcn.
Ihe Danes will compete in 13
dual meets this spring; opening up
al Siena oil A p i i l 7. Ibis year's
schedule sizes up to lie one of the
tougliei ones iii a few years, according to I ewis. The team will be
13»-
The Albany State varsity lacrosse team appears to be very solid as
It enters the 1983 s e a s o n under the d i r e c t i o n of c o a c h Mike M o l t a .
So il is by no great surprise, that
there is sonic remorse as these four
(flrsl sinjles Harry I.evine, second
singles Fred Claber, fil'ih singles
Lawrence Lichen and sixth singles
David Lerner) head into their final
season as Circa! Dane lennis
players.
"Sure I'm disappointed that this
upcoming season will be my lasl
because I've really enjoyed my four
year stay here," said Gabcr, who is
lied for Mosi S U N Y A C Championships In Albany history with four.
" W e ' v e become such a closely knll
team, However, I don't lliink Ihe
dynasty will just die after the season
cuds. I still think we'll have enough
good people still l e f t . "
"I'm
looking forward
lo
graduating but naturally I'm disapolntcd lo be ui\ inc. up my competitive tennis career," said I.evine,
whose career record is 57,12.
"We've all had four really good
years here so il will be lough for us
lo just seperale and leave. I don't
know if a dynasty is ending when
the season is over but it sure will put
a lot more pressure on Coach Lewis
and Ills recruiting staff to try to
replace u s . "
Don't think Lewis isn'l a hit worried about Ihe future.
"Sure, I'm concerned about next
year," said Lewis, who is in his
twelfth year as lennis coach.
"We've contacted a lot of good
prospects but wc havcn'i heard any
final decisions. My main concern
now Is gelling prepared for this upcoming spring season."
The Danes, who are coming o f f a
5-3 fall record In dual meets, will
look lo Improve I hat mark this spring.
" O u r main goal in the fall was to
win ihe SUNYACs and we did
that," commented Lewis, " l i v e n
I hough our record wasn't as impressive as in previous years, we
were competitive ill all the meets we
lost,''
A critical factor lasi fall was the
loss of Claber, who missed half Ihe
season due lo a knee injury. His
knee has healed and he is expected
io be at full capacity for'the spring
season,
This T-shirt offer can
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•••••
PUBLISHED
1983 Danes come to bat sporting youthful look
By Marc Schwarz
ASSOCIATe SPORTS EDITOR
The Albany Stale Oreat Danes baseball
team enters the I983 season with a youthful
look in the field and on the bench. The Danes
lineup will feature live new starters and a
rookie manager.
"My goal is always to have a better record
than the year before," Albany Slate baseball
head coach Dave Haighl said. "Improvement over the year before Is-always Important."
Haight in his first year as pilot of the
Danes, will be Irying to improve on last spring's 9-I0 season. An assistant coach for the
football leam, llaighl will be leading a young
and somewhat inexperienced Albany leam.
"I figure we will have a comparable season
(lo lasl year)," he said.
Haight is the offensive coordinator for the
football leam and was an assistant to last
year's head baseball coach Mark Collins.
When Collins lefl Albany this summer,
Haight was given Ihe job of baseball conch.
He will be Ihe fourth coach for the leam in
Ihe pasl two years. Prior lo Collins, who
managed Ihe leam for the spring season lasl
year, Vince Carncvale coached ihe leam during Ihe I98I fall season. Rick Skecl was Ihe
skipper of Ihe Danes for Ihe previous iwo
years.
The Dunes'will look for strength and support from the pitching staff. "We have a lot
of depth in this area, especially with three
returning starters from lasl year," Haight
commented.
Seniors Mike Garlmcnt, Ron Massaroni
and Ralph Volk combined for a 6-9 record
last year and will be instrumental to this
year's success. Massaroni led Ihe team in
complete games and Innings pitched while
compiling an impressive 2.55 era. Volk was
second on the leam in complete games and
led Ihe team In victories with three. His 4. II
era was second best on Ihe squad. Carlman
was third in both era and innings pitched
while recording a 1.2 record.
Albany will probably go with a five-man
staring rotation because of Ihe many
doublchcaders they will play this season. The
other two spots will be shared among Tom
MeCarlhy, Sieve Dolen and Chris Fletcher.
McCarthy saw limited action lasl year and
will be used as a long reliever and spot
starler. Dolen, a junior transfer from Nassau
Community College, "looks excellent," according to llaighl. Fletcher, a freshman, is
the other possible starter and is one of ihe
hardest throwers on the staff. He has been
clocked at 89 miles-per-hour. The Danes will
get relief help from Joel Aulogia and Glenn
Bradburry.
All-SUNYAC conference leam member
Albany's lineup will feature several
new starters and a rookie manager
SUNA STEINKAMP UPS
Sophomore Hugh Davis Is the starting centerflelder lor the 1983 edition of the
Albany State varsity baseball team.
Jerry Rosen will be behind the plate for
Albany. The senior is coming off a banner
season in which he balled .467, led Ihe team
in rbi's with 32 and total hits. "He's a very
clinch hitter. He makes contact all the lime,"
llaighl snld. "He is a good leader on ihe field
from behind ihe plate. He will be Ihe main
strength of the team! we will look to him a lot
in Ihe early going." Rosen will be the
designaicd hitler in the games he docs not
catch.
Backing Rosen up behind the plale arc
sophomore Ted Dicks and freshman Mike
Murphy. Both arc strong defensively, according lo Haight. Since Rosen will not make
Ihe trip lo Florida with Ihe leam during spring break, these two will sec a lot of action.
"Hopefully his will get ihem some needed experience," Haight said.
Haight is hoping to platoon Rich Wander
and Jack Ticrney at first base. Wander, who
.struggled at the plate last year hilling .140, is
looking lo improve on thai mark. Both
Wander and Ticrney are good with Ihe glove
and should provide Ihe Danes with stability
at first base.
Three players arc fighting for the starling
job at second base, left vacant by Frank
Rivera. Tony Torres, Rob Schullis and Dave
Thclcman arc all in contention. Torres, who
saw some playing time on varsity lasl year, is
an excellent all-around ballplayer, according
to Haight. Thclman, a freshman, has surprised everyone. "He is probably one of the best
ull-around players on the learn," Haight
said. He will also backup shortstop and third
base.
Dave Vogel Is the expected starter at shorlslop. He will be replacing Bruce Rowlands,
who graduated last year. He has a good arm
and has looked strong in the early going.
Third base will be tended by Bob Conklin.
An all-conference player last year, he balled
.380 and is probably Ihe best overall
ballplayer on the team, according lo Haight.
From what I've seen, we should have a
better team defensively litis year," Haighl
said. Lnst^car, defense was a major factor in
the Danes' sub .500 record, Albany committed 53 errors in 19 games, 28 of Ihem coming
from Ihe starling infield leading lo 42 unearned runs.
The outfield will be anchored by Hugh
Davis, the lone returning starler. The
sophomore centerflelder balled .292, led the
leam in runs scored with 25 and stole 14
bases. Mike Vosburgh will fill one of the two
remaining spots and sophomore transfer
Greg Marshall from Salsbury Stale In
Maryland is expected to round out the outfield starling position. Also expected to sec
action arc Mike Milano, Aulogia and Bradburry. The latter two are also pitchers, Bradburry batted .405 last year. Junior Gene Torranto will DH and pinch hit for Albany.
The Danes will not be able to rely upon offensive firepower to win them games this
year, Last year, Albany hit .318 as a leam
and averaged almost eight- runs a game. "1
don't think we will be as strong around the
plale this year. We have to have strong
defense and pitching to win us ball games,"
Haighl said.
"Every good leam has surprises; young
players develop. We have a of of talent and
capability on this team. Hopefully we can
perform well on the field," he added.
The Danes will travel lo Florida for six exhibition games during Easter break. Albany
will play two games against the New York
Mets rookies, two with Dvision 1 Canisus
College and a pair with Division I Rider College. The Danes then relurn home lo open
Ihe season by hosting Hartwick on Monday
April 4 at 3:30 on University Field.
I I
Men's indoor track team takes eighth at States
By Tom Kucnndcs
STAIT WHITER
The Albany Stale men's indoor track team ended their
season with an eighlh place finish at the NY Stale Championships held lasl Friday and Saturday at Fredonia.
Fredonia Stale look first place followed by Cortland,
Brockporl, and the University of Rochester. Twentythree teams competed In all.
Albany's finish was somewhat disappointing according
lo head coach Bob Mttnsey. "We aren't a big mccl team,
but we didn't have a great day cither," Mttnsey said. He
cited the long trip, Ihe loss of sprinter Mitch Harvard, and
several sub-par performances as reasons.
There were, however, quite a few bright spots for
Albany during the rainy weekend, First among these was
sophomore Marc Mcrcurlo, who took second place in the
35-pound weight throw and broke his own school record
for the sixth lime this season. Mcrcurio's throw of 15.83
meters was nearly three feet more than last week's record.
"Marc has improved all season, he's definitely the best
wcighlman in Albany history," said Munscy.
Another outstanding performance came when
freshman Bruce Van Tassel nabbed fourth place in Ihe
50-mclcr high hurdle final. His time of 7.0 seconds equals
his best all season.
Captain Eric Newton also scored big points for Ihe
Danes with his fourth place finish in the 500-mctcr run.
Also In the 500, Pal Saccoclo ran a season-best time of
1:08.6, but did not make it lo Ihe very competitive finals,
Other Albany scorers were Bill Nason, who took sixth
place in the shot put, and captain Paul Mance, who leapt
13.27 mclcrs for sixth place in the triple jump. Mance also
recorded a best ever mark of 6.47 meters In the long jump,
but did not score.
Both Ihe 4x400-mctcr and the 4x800-mcler relays peaked at Slates with season-best limes. The 4x800-mc|cr
relay of Jim Erwin, Tom Kacandcs, Noel Woodburn, and
Winston Johnson ran 8:03.5 lo win their section and place
fifth overall. Early on, the team lagged behind the
leaders, but Woodburn passed five runners to give Ihe
Danes a big lead, running an outstanding split of 1:56.9 in
the process.
The slow track surface at Fredonia hurt Albany's
4x400-metcr relay, who ran their best race all season, but
only slightly bettered their lime. The learn of Tony Rizzo,
Mike Rigglns, Darren Pralt and Newton ran 3:29.1 to
finish fifth overall.
In the team scoring, the Danes finished behind area
rivals Union and RPI for the first time all season. This
was mostly due lo Ihe nature of the Slate meet where runners must win in the trials and semi-finals in order to score
in Ihe finals. The '83 Danes have a great deal of depth
and competitive talent, but are sorely lacking the
"superstar" type or talent that scores against statc-meel
level competition. Only Mercurio, Newton, and Van
Tassel could be considered such. Senior Milch Harvard,
who scored big lasl year, missed most of the posl-season
competition because of a hip injury, but will hopefully
return for outdoor. The season ended before marly of the
younger Danes had time to develop Ihe potential they
showed in Ihe dual meets.
In those early meets (he indoor Irackslcrs showed grcal
promise. Albany beat Springfield for Ihe first lime al their
Williams opener in January. They also lost lo host
Williams, but went on lo trounce RPI, Union, Wcstfield,
and Plallsburgh. The Danes entered the post season 7-1,
their best record ever. Yet, the depth that helped Albany
' in the dual meets was of too low a level to allow the Danes
lo dominate big meets as they did single opponents.
Albany continued lo score well and improve, but as Ihe
leam moved into higher levels of competition ihe momentum faded. Despite (his, the '83 season was one of the
most successful in the history of Ihe indoor Irack program.
| |
AT
THE STATE
UNIVERSITY
OF NEW
YORK AT ALBANY
BY THE ALBANY
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
VOLUME
L X X
STUDENT
PRESS
CORPORATION
Friday
April 8, 1983
NUMBER
16
Budget alleviates cuts, but funds remain tight
By l.nri Van Auken
Fears of extensive universily-widc layoffs
and (he closing or cerlain SUN Y college campuses were temporarily quelled by the March
27 passage of the stale budget, in which stale
lawmakers added $13.7 million to the SUNY
budget, bringing il to a $39.5 million total.
Layoffs or SUNY employees, 35 or which
were scheduled ror Albany, will most likely
be rescinded, according to Vice Chancellor
I'or University Affairs Robert I'crrln.
Nevertheless, Pcrrin said other SUNY
budget cuts will create a wave of after-shocks
in ihe university system, indicating that
SUNY's fiscal problems arc far from over.
"Legislative actions have only alleviated,
but not eliminated the problem at SUNY,"
Perrin warned. "There will still be difficulties
and there will still be cuts."
SUNY students will be facing a $300 increase in in tuition. A projected $1.6 million
will be raised from an increase in application
fees. Other university fees have not been ruled out, but their exact nature is yet unknown.
Also, in un effort to avert university
layoffs, Perrin explained thai approximately
$26 million was shifted from other program
areas Into the personnel portion of the
budget. This money was derived from $12
million savings in energy, the result of a mild
winter and lower fuel costs, $1.6 million from
increased application lees, a $5.4 million
reduction in supplies, n $1.5 million reduction in building repairs, und a $900,000
reduction In SUNY Central Administration
and Computing Center expenses.
An unesllmated amount of added revenue
from bonding surpluses was also included to
prevent faculty and staff reductions, according to Director or the SUNYA Office of
Financial Management Eugene Gilchrist.
Despite these cuts and the $300 lotion hike,
SASU Legislative Director Steve Cox said he
was "extremely pleased" with the final
budget.
"We had to come up with money
somewhere," Cox explained, adding dial Ihe
state and SASU had lo make a priorily decision to "politically choose between raising
tuition or saving programs."
According to SASU President Jim Ticrney
SUNY conducted the "blggesl lobbying day
In Ihe history of the New York Stale
Legislature."
"Everything clicked," Ticrney said, adding thai SASU and lobbying university
students successfully restored 2,500 proposed
university-wide luyoffs und received an extra
$10 million lo prevent a tuition increase of
$50, thus bringing the tuition hike lo iis current $300 level.
In addition, Ticrney said, the Slate University lobbying effort eliminated a proposed
$150 room and board hike, a $2O0-$250 mandatory health fee, n $50 athletic Ice, a common area fee and bus fee,
Although plans for many ol' these fees
were not completely eliminated, Ticrney said
students will at least not be paying them during the 1983-84 fiscal year.
"Stanley Fink is lite hero in Ihe campaign
for SUNY," Ticrney observed. "He pushed
and wouldn't lei the university system be cut.
Somebody should write him a (hank you
nolc."
However, SUNY may still have a layoff
problem if individual campuses use layoffs lo
save other cut program areas, said Steve Allinger, program analyst for the Assemlby
Higher Education Committee.
According lo Perrin, more than l,(MX)
faculty and staff positions may still be losl
through attrition and ihe elimination of
vacancies in university personnel. Furthermore, many employees may lake advantage
of the slate's new curly retirement benefits
plan, creating new vacancies which may also
remain unfilled or cut.
Two hundred university employees, excluding faculty, are eligible for early retirement, o r those, 45 have chosen Ihe plan and
more may be added before the May 2
deadline, explained Holly Hawkcs of Ihe
SUNY-Albany Personnel Office!
Because faculty members are under a different union retirement system, special
legislation is needed lo include Ihem under a
slate employee early retirement program.
Such legislation is currently being discussed,
Hawkcs said.
Personnel Director Leon J. Calhoun said
that the official number of layoffs will be
determined by the number of university
employees who will opi for the slate early
retirement plan. While the university has
received no official notice to rescind its
layoffs, Calhoun said the 35 layoffs have
been deferred lo May 5 from their original
April 7 date.
"This is a tough situation to manage,"
said Albany President Vincent O'l.eury.
"The whole campus will feel the cuts in programs and we will have lo live With the conse-
SUNY Central Administration; Inset: President O'Leary
Legislative actions have only alleviated but not eliminated the problem al SUNY.
quchces of early retirement vacancies, but
hopefully, wc will be able to keep some positions," he added.
There are currently 96 vacancies al Albany
which could be targeted for elimination.
These include 12 faculty positions, 40 finance
and business administration positions, 18
research and educational development positions, and seven full time leaching and
graduate assistanlships.The remaining 26
vacancies are spread throughout the offices
of university, student and academic affairs,
as well as ihe president's office.
The exact number of program and position
cuts for individual SUNY campuses will not
be known until later next week when SUNY
Central Administration and the State Division of Budget agree on the specific school
allocations. Once this plan is revealed,
O'Leary and the sice presidents will agree on
specific program of allocations at SUNYA.
17»-
State commission supports dorm damage fees
By Tim Shell
STATE PRESSSERVICk
The dormitory common area damage fee
was recently endorsed by a stale commission
which cites alcohol and a general lack of
respect for properly as the major reasons for
vandalism damage "lo Ihe tune of an
estimated $600,000 a year" in the SUNY
dorms.
The Legislative Commission on Expenditure Review, "a reliable arm of the
legislature" as its co-chairman, Senator John
Marchi(R-Stalen Island) believes, released a
report which says SUNY "has denied campuses authorization for a common area
charge to recover vandalism costs," which
range between $630,00 to $652,000 at
SUNY's 26 dormitory campuses.
The report surveyed 11 campuses and
estimated Ihe costs due to vandalism range
between $186,068 to $507,348, with costs per
resident running from $5.47 lo $14.93.
The report lists 2,350 instances or vandalism in the 94 dorms (at Ihe II campuses
surveyed) "wilh graffiti and damage lo electrical fixtures, ceilings and walls comprising
70 percent of that number."
Five hundred fifty-six fires at the eight "
"Vandalism deterrence at SUNY campuses
does not receive the attention it deserves. "
— Slate Sen. John
Marchi
reporting campuses occurred between 1978 — $65,700. SUNY Albany was not included
and 1981, according lo the report. Seventeen In ihe sludy.
arsons were reported at [he eight campuses
The commission lambasted SUNY Central
although FBI statistics, listed in Crime in Ihe I'or denying campuses "the authorization for
United States says that no arsons were corn- a common area charge lo recover vandalism
milled at any SUNY campus in 1981.
costs." Il also accused SUNY of not having
The commission surveyed 1,150' SUNY "undertaken or centrally coordinated vanstudents who had lived in dorms in the spring dalism deterrence efl'orts," to which Marchi
of 1982, and "round that almost two-thirds added al a press conference Wednesday,
or the 410 responding students thought van- "vandalism deterrence al SUNY campuses
dalism a 'significant problem' on their cam- does nol received the attention il deserves."
puses." o r those 246 students, about 85 perSUNY was further berated for its inability
cent thought that lack of respect for property to "identity and segregate damage costs in
was the major cause of vandalism.
residence halls," as well as "individual camAccording to the report, SUNY Buffalo puses' Inability to provide accurate expenhad the highest estimated vandalism damage ditures for repairing vandalism damage."
The commission stated that its efforts were
"hampered" by these shortfalls, The commission referred to private colleges and other
slate public schools in comparing vandalism
occurrences.
"SUNY should carefully consider
authorizing the campuses to assess residents
for damage to common or group areas,
especially in view of the common area churge
as a weapon against vandalism In private colleges," Marchi said.
The report said, however, thai due to
SUNY's damage cost determination system,
"these cosls arc unbillable, either all dormilory residents pay for Ihem through higher
room rentals or the slide's laxpayers absorb
Ihem through increased subsidy to the SUNY
dormitory program.
Counicring SUNY Central contention thai
without proof of an individual's culpability,
a common area damage charge might be
deemed by a court as a "penally," and
therefore illegal. The report and Marclii say,
"treat il as an administrative charge, nol a
penalty.''
In a Idler dated February 28 Chancellor
Wharlon counterattacked commission findings. "National studies of vandalism in col15*-
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