Bad Luck Booters Search for Some Answers

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'Athlete of
the>
. Week page 15.
Tuesday
October 16, 19811
Bad Luck Booters Search for Some Answers
^^^^^^^
State University of New York at Albany
by Marc Haspel
How do you explain it7 A team
seemingly full of good talent that
just can't get the lucky breaks. A
team set back so many times this
fall by misfortune. A team whose
preseason prospects were once so
rosy but now have all but faded.
How do you explain that? According to men's varsity soccer coach
Bill Schlieffelln it's just been one of
those years.
The booters suffered another loss
on Wednesday at University Field half the Danes played the 7-1-3 Bears. Schlieffelln described the against Union in very rainy condiagainst a very tough Keene State Owls very evenly. But problems Bears as perhaps the "worst team" tions the Danes played to their only
College team. The Danes played were evident in the Dane offense. the Danes have faced all season.Yet, tie so far this season at 0-0. Neither
them close the entire game and even Albany was able to move the ball up these are the unlucky Danes and squad could do much as both teams
the 3-0 score was deceiving. The the middle of the field and well into they dropped the match 3-1.
struggled the elements more than
first goal came at 11:34 as Joe Owl territory, but what was missing
"We should Iflve, had eight one another.
Bourassa got the credit for the score was that last good shot on goal.
goals," said Schiclfclin. "It was 1-0
Now that the season is over half
on a play originated from his own
"We know what we're doing but at halftime."
through, the tale has been pretty
corner kick. Bourassa then scored the last touch doesn't click," said
But one second-half goal by the much told. Looking for some exagain at 19:03 as he knocked in a Dane veteran Jorge Ferero. "We
Bears spurred them on and planation of this season, Schliefdeflected ball by Dane keeper Billy made a couple of mistakes at the
Potsdam went on to win.
felln just commented, "we're just
Stcffcn.
beginning. We gave up two goals,
The Wednesday before then having bad luck."
The rest of the way in the : st but these guys are pretty good."
We're not taking the shots on
goal," he added. "The open shots
we're not taking."
*Fr.,m,
Albany opened the second half
with some good set ups as they
threatened a few times early. Ferero
passed the ball to Afrim Nezaj,
whose strong kick just missed the
net. Ne/aj also teamed up with
junior Paul Aspland but their efforts came up short and Ihc Danes
remained scoreless.
The Owls netted the final goal of
the contest at 13:49 of the second
half as Chris Pangalos booted the
ball in on a play thai continued
after Albany defenders fell that a
Keene hand ball should have been
called.
For Ihc Danes, it was their third
•^i--»*»ju^-.-..»-..;-^.'v.
'•
^ ^ ^
straight defeat, lowering their
r<
overall season record to 3-6-1, with
just five games remaining in the
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ " , Saturday, 10-17 at Binnhantion, 2:00
campaign.
Women's varsity volleyball vs. Slenn/Nurlh Adams
• Saturday, Albany traveled up Jerry Isaacs waits for a pass In the Albany Stale soccer team's losing effort
*w.
'
Monday, 10-19 at Siena, 7:00
against Keene Stale. (Photo: Sherry Cohen)
north to lake on the Potsdam
Question Mark Returns as Danes Face Cortland
by Larry Kahn
Davis Field. The Red Dragons sport
Quarlcrback Jay Cicply, a three week wiili a bad ankle, hut he is ex- feature of Ihc Dragon offense is
When Ihc season began the a 3-2 record, including a 24-3 poun- year starter, leads I he Red Dragons. pected to return tomorrow. Dave
their front line. "They have a huge
Albany Slate football team had one ding of Broekpoit. last weekend.
After four games Cicply had only Cook, a 5-11, 175 pound freshman, offensive line," said Loehlc.
big question mark—could an inexLast year Albany rushed for an completed 38.8 percent of his eat tied for over 160 yards last week "They're aggressive—they like lo
perienced quarterback, Tom Pratt, incredible 522 yards, including 182 passes, but he is a proven leader.
in only 21 carries.
hit people."
step in and guide the Dune .by fullback Chuck Prime, and
"He's a great field general," said
"He's like a little bowling ball,"
At the tackles Rich Ryan and
wishbone successfully?
whipped ihc lowly Dragons 41-7.
l.oehlc."Hc keeps his poise and he Loehlc joked.
Paul Alexander weigli in al 280 and
In 1980 Pratt saw limited duly as The Danes lead the series 4-0, but
has confidence In himself."
250, respectively, and the guards
Albany's backup quarterback and
this year Cortland is bigger, belter
Joining Cicply in the baekfield is
Cortland also boasis an excellent ' are two 240-pound bookcntls; Greg
was nol impressive, completing on- and more experienced,
a capable set of running backs. receiving corps. None of the Vain, and Bill Pinoiiiio. John
ly six of 24 passes. But in 1981 the
In general, the Cortland offense Mike Bowe returns al'iet entering receivers have o u t s t a n d i n g Irion, al 240 pounds, snaps die ball
question mark began to fade. In
is hard to pin down. Through the the Cortland record books in 148(1 statistics, bin the passing attack on ai center.
the starting role Pralt was rapidly
first four games -they threw an
by rushing for over 9(K) yards in the
"They should lest out defense,"
becoming the best to ever run the average of 19 passes and rushed 45 season and 244 yards in one game. Ihc whole is very well balanced.
Cicply likes Io throw to Howe oul of said Loehlc.
triple-option at Albany, completing
limes per game.
He was the team's leading scorer the baekfield and lo Tom Lee, Mike
But the Dane defense has nol fail35 of 65 passes and rushing lor 170
"They mix it up pretty well," with II touchdowns and he was Milliard and Pete Sell wan
ed loo many tesis lately. I ast week
yards.
ranked 17th in Division III rushing.
said Dane assistant coach Davt
dowtil'ield.
they shutout one of the top ruled
Loehlc, "They show no tendenSo fat this season Rich Falasca is
"They all have great catching offenses in Division III in Albany's
cies—they'll
take
what
the
defense
ihc Dragons' leading rusher, ability.They all possess good speed 32-0 win over Buffalo, riirotlgh ihc
I SCOUTING RCPORT
gives them. They'll pass on first averaging 85 yards per game and 5.3
and good agility," Loehlc noted.
first five games the Danes have
down, run on third down."
yards per carry. He was oul last
Maybe the most outstanding given u)i only 36 points, bui seven
But last Saturday against Buffalo
of those were the result of an inPrdtt was forced oul of the lineup
terception return so the defense is
with a knee injury and he is not exallowing an average of under six
pected IO return until the end of the
points per game.
season, if at all.
So now, six weeks into the
Last week the defensive line
season, Ihc Danes have come full
manhandled Buffalo up front,
circle. They again face that same
allowing only -5 yards on the
question mark—can an Inexperiencground and sacking tlie quarterback
ed quarterback, Tom Roth, step in
13 limes,.
and guide the wishbone?
Defensively, * Cortland lias only
Bob Ford hopes the answer is the
an average seeoiulaiy, but their insame.
terior linemen are hie and their
linebackers are solid.
"Torn Pratt was developing into
the best quarterback we've had in
"They have a line set of
the program. We did some things to
l i n e b a c k e r s , " said I o e h l c .
"They're all good nthlcles thej
exploit his ability," said Ford, the
inn well, they're hie and strong,"
Albany head coach. "Now we'll do
Ihe Dragons should be psyched
things Tom iRnih) can do. He's
up I'm the game tomornot us good a thrower, but he's
row'—Albany is iheii toughest comquick, he's agile and he's got a hell
petition lo dale and "they're comof.a head on Ins shoulders,"
ing off an emotional high," I oehlc
Tomorrow Kotli has the opporimled about ihe Hiockpoit game.
tunity to erase the question mark
Bui ihe Danes should be psyched
when the Danes lake on an improvThe Albany Slate foulhull team's defense has limited opposing teams lo an average of under six points per
up, loo. They have a question to
ed Cortland squad on Cortland's
name. Against lluffulo last week they held Ihc Bulls lo -5 yards rushing. (Photo: Murk Nudler)
answer.
October 20,1981
copyright © 1981 by THE ALBANY STUDENT PRESS CORPORATION
Volume LXVIII Number 31
Senate Tuition Tax Credit Bill Pending
phnlo! UPS
Financial Aids Director WliHIock
"77ie program « . . . not efficient"
by Susan Mllligan
and Frank Gil
A bill under consideration by the
U.S. Senate might help financing
for those who can already afford
college, but the Reagan administration's cuts in education aid make
the proposal irrelevant to lowerincome students, according to
SUNYA Financial Aids Director
Whitlock.
Pending in the Senate Finance
Committee is a bill sponsored by
Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
and Bob Packwood (R-Ore.) that
would allow a tax credit to offset
tuition costs of private elementary
and secondary schools as well as of
colleges, Moynihan staffer Jim
Moors said.
The policy would allow for the
deduction of up to $250 per year of
taxes owed although the credit may
not exceed one half of tuition costs,
Moors explained.
Moynihan's office estimates the
cost of the proposal, if fully instituted, to be $2.7 billion the first
year, fiscal 1983, and upwards of $6
billion by 1985.
with such proposals.
A special group of federal officers from Five agencies, including
the Departments of Education and
Treasury, has been established to
study the proposal's "feasibility
and specifics."
to education aid based on income,
such as Pell Grants.
But Moors said there is "no connection whatsoever" between the
Moynihan-Packwood bill and the
current and pending aid cuts.
Whitlock is opposed to such proposals.
Paradoxically, the Reagan administration — although trying to
reduce federal spending and subsidies — is expected to support the
proposal. Assistant Treasury
Secretary for tax policy John E.
Chapoton testified before a Senate
Committee that the Reagan administration docs support tax
credits for tuition, and said its cost
was "probably the most significant
matter" being considered by Administration members concerned
"The tuition tax credits will help
the wealthy subsidize private
schools for their children,"
Whitlock said. "Also, the middle
class will seek this as an opportunity
to grab a price of the pie . . . both
at the expense of the poor."
Moors explained that the bill was
introduced during the Carter administration and said " the cuts that
have been enacted would have occurred regardless of whether the
tax credit bill was passed." He
noted that Moynihan voted against
the education cuts.
Whitlock stated in addition that
the program "is not an efficient
way to provide educational
benefits. Students don't receive
money when it's needed at the
beginning of the semester, but at
the end,"
Many higher education institutions are concerned that the bill if
passed/ would justify in Congress a
proposal by the Reagan adminstration for an additional 12% in > ,s
OCA Director Dunlea Questioned
by Judie Elsenberg
Questions concerning the relationship between Mark Dunlea's
roles as SA's Off-Campus Association (OCA) Director and New York
State Citizen's Party Co-Chair, as
well as his reported use of SA
resources to engage in political activities, have been raised as the
result of an article recently printed
in the Schnectady Gazette.
In Ihe October 16 issue, Gazette
reporter Phil Blanchard reported
that SUNYA administrators were
currently investigating Dunlea's activities to determine whether they
were in violation of state regulations.
Specifically, the SUNY Board of
Trustees mandate that student activity fees may be . used in,
"Assistance to recognized student
organizations, provided that the
purpose and aciivitcs of the
organization are of educational,
cultural, recreational or social
nature," thereby implying fees
should nol be used in support of
political panics.
However, Dean of Sn lent Affairs Neil Hiown said no lu trial investigation in respect 10 ilii-. issue is
now underway.
According to Student Activities
Director Jim Dollefeld, "We're
basically in ihe information gather-
ing siage. At this point in lime we
have no evidence that Dunlea is
engaging in any inappropriate activity."
The Schnectady Gazette article
was based on a Citizen's Party
leaflet whlch>>gave Dunlea's name
and the OCA phone number for
further information, according lo
SA Vice-President Woody Popper.
Popper noted it is SA's responsibility to determine if action is
necessary.
Bui he added, "Wc don't have
reason to believe thai Mark
(Dunlea) is using OCA funds lo
support the Citizen's Parly."
"As far as resources are concerned," Popper continued, "he's ad- .
mined to using the phone. I don't
think there's anything particularly
wrong with his receiving calls on a
once in awhile basis."
If Dunlea received phone calls to
a degree dial hampered his ability
to do his job, it would be wrong,
Popper said. But, al ibis point Popper doesn't perceive il to be a problem.
Dunlea said the only relationship
between OCA and the Citizen's
Parly "is me, obviously. It's obvious thai benusc I am in Ihe
Citizen's Party people questioned
the relationship.
Resignations Leave
New Paltz SA in Doubt
by Fcllciu Bcrgcr
All Ihe officers of Ihe SUNY College at New Paltz Student Association (SA) have resigned over academic and personal concerns, accor
ding to their SA Manager Nadine Spies.
Presently the only SA officer left is President Brenda Lewis, whose
resignation will become effective with Ihe election of a new SA president this week.
New Paltz students will vole for new government officers, as well as
for revisions made on their SA constitution, said Spies.
The revisions, written by an ad hoc student assembly, create a student senate to represent the needs and concerns of Ihe student body.
This senate is to be separate from the already existing Student Council, which is made up of SA'member organizations and concerns itself
primarily witli monetary matters.
"I'm not too worried," Dunlea
added. "I'm nol stupid — I don't
spend OCA money for the Citizen's
Parly."
Dunlea added thai the four
community service interns working
in OCA were instructed not lo promote Citizen Parly candidates and
to otherwise keep the two groups
separate.
As for printing the OCA phone
number on Ihe Citizen's Parly
leaflet, Dunlea said he "didn't
think it through. II was a mistake —
it won't happen in Ihc future."
However, he sees nothing wrong
in accepting Citizen Parly calls in
the OCA office. "I work here from
10 lo 4. It's where the press can
reach me during the day," he said,
adding llial he did a loi of his OCA
work al night.
"They're going to call mc here
anyway," Dunlea added. "I'll
discourage llieni bin . . . . "
pfiiiln: Bob Leonard
Off-Campus Association Director Mark Dunlea
"I don't spent OCA money for Ihe Citizen's Party"
SA President Dave Pologe said,
"Wc don't want him to use the
OCA number as a contact point"'
but if someone calls in il would
seem ridiculous nol to answer ihe
phone.
As far as SA can tell, Pologe
said, Dunlea did not misuse student
activity fees. But Pologe has told
Dunlea he did not want Ihe OCA
number lo appear on further
Citizen Party leaflets.
Police Ponder Pine Hills Assault
by Susan Smith
A recent sexual abuse incident occuring in the Pine Hills area has
reopened the case of the Pine Hills
Molester, according to Albany
Police Captain John Dale.
On Monday, October 12, at 4:45
a.m., an assailant broke a window
and entered the Willct St. apartment of a 34-year-old Albany
woman. Dale said the assailant,
described as a black male between
17 and 20 years of age, "went to the
woman's bed . . . and knell down
on one knee at the foot of her bed.
He then put his hand under the
covers and was reaching to touch
her when she screamed." Dale said
the suspect then fled.
The suspect was described as
5'8", 140 lbs. and wearing blue
jeans, a sweat shirt, and sneakers.
The woman said she was able to see
the attacker because her apartment
was lit.
"We just don't know if it is the
same guy," said Dale, referring to
the Pine Hills Molester.
A rash of incidents involving the
molester look place over a year ago
in the Pine Hills area where many
students live. In those cases the
assailant slipped through unlocked
doors or windows into apartments
occupied by young females. The intruders fondled the women and fled
when they screamed.
"There arc similarities and differences between this crime and the
approximately 40 reports of the
past molester," Dale said.
The similiarities include the
physical make-up of the assailant
and the nature of the crime.
However, several differences
have lead Albany police to believe
the Willct St. attack may be an
/
l
isolated incident. The intruder in
this ease was described as having a
light compaction and freckles,
while Ihe Pine Hills Molcslcr was
believed lo havew a darker complcciion and no freckles.
Further, while the latest assailant
broke a window to enter the apartment, the Molester did not force entry.
Another difference is that women
attacked by the Pine Hills Molester
were somewhat younger than the
Willet St. victim.
Dale refused to comment on
whether Albany "Police would increase patrol cars in the Pine Hills
area.
_ _ _ _ _ _ ^ ^ _ ^
Garland Rocks J.B.'s
S e e Aspects Page 7
•aHMMaMMMM
October 20, 1981
Would
CAPSDIES
New Chair Takes Control
WAKSAW, P o i n d (AP) Premier Wojciech Jaruzelski,
taking over Ihe ruling Communis! Party after the ouster
of Stanislaw Kania. warned the Solidarity labor movement that the regime's "possibilities for retreat have
been exhausted."
The 200-member Central Committee that elected
Jaruzelski Sunday demanded the independent trade
union stop strikes, obey the law and help restore the nation's shattered economy. It also demanded negotiation
of worker rights won during last summer's strikes and
threatened to impose martial law.
Kania, who after 14 chaotic months failed to contain
Solidarity's bold challenge to the regime, resigned during a stormy committee session. After being tapped to
succeed him, Jaruzelski said the committee would meet
later this week with the Sejm. Poland's Parliament, lo
make more policy changes.
The 58-year-old Jaruzelski, who is also defense
minister and a Soviet-trained army general, became Ihe
first Polish leader to run the military, the government
and the Communist Party at the same time.
Nobel Prize Awarded
STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP) Two American.', and a
Swede won the 1981 Nobel Prize for Physics for their
development of Iwo types of spectroscopes vital in
nuclear studies.
Professor Kai Sicgbahn of Uppsala Univcrsily got one
half of rhe S180.000 award, the other half was shared by
professors Nicolaas Bloembcrgcn of Harvard and Arthur Schawlow of California's Stanford University.
Bloembcrgcn, Ihe ihird Harvard professor lo receive a
Nobel Prize [his year, and Schawlow were tiled by Ihe
Swedish Academy of Sciences for Iheir conlribuiion lo
"Ihe development of laser spectroscopy."
Sicgbahn was cited "for his conlribuiion to Ihe
development of high-rcsolulion clcclron spectroscopy."
The laser speclroscopc, developed by Bloembcrgcn
and Shawlow, is used to study atoms with laser light
bearps.
Socialists Win Greek Vote
ATHENS, Greece (AP) Andreas Papandreou and his
left-leaning Panhellcnic Socialisl Movement swepl Ihe
Greek elections on a plaiform calling for withdrawal
from NATO, the closure of American bases and a
referendum on continued membership in ihe European
Common Market. Premier George Rallis conceded the
defeat of his conservative New Democracy Parly Sunday evening as returns from Ihe day's balloting signaled
a radical shifi in Ihe nation's pro-Wcslcrn policy. Wilh
nearly two-lhirds of Ihe vole counted, the charismatic
Papandriou's Panhellcnic Socialisl Movement — Pasok
— had 47.7 percent of ihe popular vote, more than
enough lo control ihe 300 seal unicameral Parliament
Reagan Concedes Recession
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) President Reagan, saying
whai administration officials have carefully avoided, is
acknowledging for ihe first lime that ihe nation's
economy is in a recession.
Bui Reagan says it's mild, and his chief economic adviser says "forces already are in moiion" lo reverse it.
"1 think there's a slight recession and I hope a short
recession," Reagan said Sunday on Ihe While Houselawn before leaving by hclicopier lo meet wilh French
President Francois Miuerrand ai Williamsburg Va. "I
think everyone agrees on thai."
Laier Sunday, Murray Wcidenbaum, chairman of
Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, said in a stalcment "[here are increasing signs thai ihe economy has
entered what can be called a recession," including a
drop in industrial productivity, rising unemployment
claims and the weak housing market.
Mexico Hosts Summit
CANCUN, Meiko (AP) Bangladesh is desperately poor
and needs foreign food aid. The Philippines is growing
rapidly and seeks larger export markets. Saudi Arabia is
rolling in oil money bui wants lo diversify its economy.
Despite vastly different needs and stages of development, these and other Third World countries are bringing a common program to the Cancun summit here this
week: They want a new imernational economic order.
Developing countries, represented as Ihe south in the
so-called north-south dialogue, say the current structure
of world economic relations is unfair to them and in the
long run, not even beneficial lo the rich countries of the
north.
President Reagan set the lone for the likely U.S.
response to Third World demands in a speech last week
to the World Affairs Council in Philadelphia. He said
critics "flirt with fantasy" when they suggest the International economic system is unfair.
He also reaffirmed his administration's belief that
private investment is the key tool for developing the
underdeveloped world.
The developing nations hope to reach a breakthrough
on global negotiations on trade and money issues at the
two-day summit opening here Thursday.
UJSL Detects Soviet Test
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) An apparent underground
nuclear test by the Soviet Union has been detected by the
United States Atomic Detection System, the Department of Energy reports. The detonation occurred al
11:57 p.m. Saturday in a test area at Scmipalatinsk in
Siberia, the departmenl announced Sunday.
Navy to Aid in Drug Busts
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) Navy officials and an aide
of Attorney General William French Smith will meet
soon to determine how the Navy can besl be used in the
fight against drug smugglers, Sen. Lloyd Bcniscn has
announced.
Bcniscn released a letter from Smith on Saturday in
which the attorney general agreed wilh the Texas
Democrat thai the Coast Guard needs help in Irying lo
apprehend drug traffickers.
Bcniscn, who had complained lasl June about "an
alarming increase in drug traffic," asked Smith to accept the rccommcndaiion of the attorney general's
"Task Force on Violent Crime" that the Navy might be
utilized.
Baker Sees Budget Changes
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) Wilh Ihe White House saying Ihe next move is up to Congress, Senate Majority
Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. is predicting "a lot of juggling" in President Reagan's latest budget plans. A
growing possibility, sources said, is more selective lax increases and fewer budgcl cuts ihan Reagan has proposed.
Baker mel Sunday ai ihe While House wilh presidential counselor Edwin Mcc.sc III, chid of staff James A.
Maker III and budgcl director David A. Stockman lo
discuss mounting opposition In Reagan's package.
Baker refused to reveal details of the session but was expeeled lo have an announcement on how Senate
Republicans intend lo proceed.
Reagan Meets Mitterrand
by Lisa Mlrabella
^^^^^^^_
Nearly a monlh aflcr her arrest
on the morning of the South AfricaEastern Rugby Union rugby game,
Coalition Against Apartheid (CAA)
activist Vera Michelson is still
angry,
Hinckley's Lawyers Protest
"I consider (the arrest) a frameup of Ihe Coalition and myself,"
she said in a recent interview.
I
NEWS FEATURE
WASHINGTON D.C.(AP) Lawyers for John W. Hincklcy Jr. argued in federal court today thai documents
written by the accused presidential assailant were laken
from his cell illegally and should not be used in his trial.
Wilh Hinckley watching intently, one of his lawyers,
Gregory B. Craig, questioned a federal official about
seizure of the documents from Hinckley's quarters al
ihe federal correctional institution in Butner, N.C., July
24 and July 27.
Judge Barringlon D. Parker agreed wilh ihe request
of Hinckley's lawyers that the contenls of ihe handwritten papers not be revealed.
Oil Cleanup to Begin
MORRISBURG, Ontario (AP) The cleanup of a
30-mile-lon'( oil slick on Ihe Si. Lawrence River will take
about two -vceks, a Transport Canada official says.
The official reported Sunday lhal the slick of aboul
1,000 gallons of heavy bunker C oil stretches
downsiream from ihe Ontario locks al Iroquois to Morrisburg, a section of ihe river between Ogdcn-biui!,
N.Y., and Masscna, N.Y. Il was discovered Saturday
afternoon and is worse on the Canadian side of the
river, he said.
U.S. and Canadian coast guards inspected the site and
will lake samples from ihe slick and ships that passed
through the area lo determine who is responsible. If
samples match, charges would be laid under the Canada
Shipping Acl.
The official said the ship which caused the spill will
receive a bill for ihe cleanup, which could cost the Canadian coast guard $15,000.
The Chance of a Lifetime
Playboy may have covered ihe Southern Conference
and Ihe Ivy League schools, but Graham Silliman has
his phoiographic eye focused on SUNYA.
A SUNYA sludenl, Silliman plans lo photograph ihe
12 bcsl-looking male students and the 12 best-looking
female students for publication in two (his and hers)
1982 calendars.
Interviews will be held during November. Silliman
said, wilh the 24 SUNYA students chosen for his calendars to receive S50 for a half hour photo session.
Silliman promises his calendar shots will be
"fashionable." University Bookstore Manager Hank
Gil, who has agreed lo sell ihe calendars early next
semester, has said he will pull ihe calendars from the
shelves if there is any problem concerning taste.
"It's noi thai important," Gil said of ihe ealctulai
idea.
Silliman said he "conducted surveys on campus and
the response lo ihe idea was positive. Surprisingly,
women were more enthusiastic than men, so I plan to
put together the calendar of men first."
Silliman will advertise the limes and dales of future
interviews.
Physics for Fun
•
*
•
The Department of Physics has scheduled u miiuhci
of shorl interest lectures for litis seinesiet.
T.P. Das of ihe SUNYA Physics Department will
speak on Ihe study of Elementaly Particle mul Nucleni
Physics on October 23 al 3:30 p.m. I'm Ihose collect tied
wilh Electron Diffraction, K.C1. Weil ol leehnlsclie
Hochschulc, will discuss ihe topic on Oclohei 30, tilsu al
3:30 p.m.
• To starl off Ihe new mouth, C I 1 , Scholes of Ihe
SUNYA Physics Departmenl will give Insight lo ilio I'm.
bing Ligand Binding Sites III Heme I'tolcliu mi
November 6 al 2 p.m. All colloquium me held In Hie (',,
Luther Andrews Seminar Room, I'liv. 12V,
If you are interested in climbing Haiti's fabled
Ciladel, scuba diving in the reefs off San Salvador and
investigating Ihe ecology of the Morion salt work- in
Great Inaqua, you're jusi in lime to regisier for
Southhampton College's next SEAmester.
Capiain, crew and iwo faculty members join students
in an eighi-week sea voyage on a fully-rigged 100 foot
schooner. Courses are offered in American Maritime
History, Natural History, Literature of ihe Sea, Coastal
Ecology, Ichthyology and Navigation and Seamanship
while Ihe Tall Ship sails on open oceans and to sheltered
harbors.
The Tall Ship sails from the Florida keys on April 4
and disembarking al a New England port ai journey's
end on June 5.
For information on SEAmester, contact Elizabeth
DcBarto Skinner ai the Office of Continuing Education,
Southhampton College of Long Island Univcrsily,
Southhampton, New York 11968, or call al (516)
283-4000, Extension 117.
Michelson explained she fclt.t
- Michelson was charged with
"Anytime people rally in a racial possession of marijuana and
struggle the authorities leel firecrackers. A controversy perthreatened and try lo weaken any vades not only Ihe search warrant
strong organization of Ihe people." lhat led to her arrest but also the
She feels the police as well as other police handling of the matter.
authoriliesand the media/were guilMichelson has been active in Ihe
ty of violence-bailing Ihe September Albany community for some 12 lo
22 Rally Against Apartheid before 15 years. Among the issues she has
it was held. "The CAA was on Ihe worked on are welfare rights and
defensive, Irying lo answer lo anti-draft, anti-war, and U.S.
charges of violence thai were un- hands off Iran campaigns. She has
founded," Michelson said.
also been involved in organizations
such as youth groups, an anli-Klan
network and her own labor union.
Throughout her career as an aclivisl, Michelson said, she has seen
"racism and classism as primary
contradictions in ihe United
Stales." She feels that until recently
racism has been a background
issue. "This is Ihe firsl time in a
long lime lhal people of different
political perspectives have come
together lo organize against
racism," Michelson said.
One of Michclson's concerns al
litis point is the continuance of a
strong force against racism in
Albany, and around the world. She
said she sees Ihe CAA as " a strong,
mulli-racial organization thai learned lo work together very quickly in
a very positive way, and will continue to struggle against racism."
Michelson feels that the fact that
the rugby game was played shows
how important it is for the government to protect U.S. financial interests in South Africa. She said,
"they would protect the South
African racist at all costs (to protect
financial interests)."
Michclson's attorney Anita
Thayer is now questioning the
validity of the search warrant,
which Michelson called " a lotal
police departmenl fantasy." Two
oT Ihe sources quoted in the search
warrant have stated dial the information in Ihe warrant pertaining lo
them is false. Oilier information is
attributed lo a confidential informant who, Thayer noted, may not
have had first hand information.
Thayer is also planning lo file a
complaint wilh the Albany police
aboul the way Ihe arresl was handled. Al Ihe lime of Ihe arresl, police
confiscated from Michclson's
apartment iwo personal phone
books, a recent phone bill, community address lists and a list of
members of the CAA.
Captain John Dale, spokesperson
for Ihe Albany police, said lhal
Activist Vera Michelson
" / consider the arresl a frame-up"
some of the items seized by police
were nol included in the sworn inventory filed with Ihe search warrant. He had no further comment
on the search warrant.
Michelson said that she was not
allowed to make a phone call until
after her arraignment, seven hours
after her arrest. And she said she
was held without bail for 48'hours
for less lhan misdemeanor charges.
She feels both of Ihcsc arc in violalion of her civil rights.
Michclson's reaction lo Ihe way
she feels the police treated her was
in some ways positive. "It just
makes you stronger, and clarifies
things for you poliiically," she
remarked of Ihe incident.
However, she said she is very
continued on page five
"Legal Stimulants" Sales Are Up
ph
SamTcrllll
An allocution from Ihe Plant Department budgcl has bought SUNYA
two new buses. According In University Senator Rob Rulhman, a
"new buses" bill was passed in the Senate last year to secure adequate,
well-running buses. The new buses — which replace three old green
machines — have u seating capacity uf 90 passengers Instead of Ihe old
buses' 60.
@k
State University of New York at Albany
cordially invites you lo attend its
Wed., October 21,1981
10 AM-4 PM
Campus Center Ballroom
Came and talk with representatives
from graduate schools in the
Northeast who will provide
information on degree programs,
admission requirements,
financial aid, etc.
[
\
,
Q
lege campuses in popularity the lihistamine) and ephedrinc sulfate.
past year or so. The product, which They provide users wilh enough of
by and large are quite legal, usually a "high" lo satisfy Ihem as being
lake Ihe form eilher of "look alike" the genuine article, (hough the
capsules and tablets designed lo bogus pills cost dealers far less lhan
resemble amphetamines, Quaaludes do genuine amphetamines. The pills
or cocaine; or bulyl nilrilc, an ox-. provide Ihe stimulant equivalent of
idiWn;! aucnt marketed us "liquid, "Perhaps- two cups of coffee,1' acincense" lhal buyers inhuieoul of a cording lo a Food and Drug Adsmall botllc.
ministration spokesperson.
The capsules and tablets usually
Inhaling butyl nitrite, or "liquid
contain a combination of caffeine, incense," triggcrsa brief increase in
phynylpropanolmine (an an- blood pressure and hcarlbeat, causing Ihe user lo feel giddy and
euphoric for aboul Iwo minutes
before returning to normal.
MEDICAL SCHOOL OPENINGS
Fly-by-night pharmaceutical
1
• — • —
companies reporlcdly have been
springing up like wild fire during Ihe
past year, flooding Ihe college
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS AVAILABLE IN
market with pills and incense, often
FOREIGN MEDICAL SCHOOL. NO FOREIGN
advertising openly in campus
newspapers with promos for large
LANGUAGE REQUIRED. FULLY AChelpings
of stimulants.
CREDITED. SOME OPENINGS ALSO
(CPS) "They sell like .crazy," say
an cdilor at High Times maga/.inc.
"They're some of ihe mosl
dangerous drugs on the market today," say an Illinois public health
official.
"We're givrng-ihc public foods,
nol drugs," claims a company
president.
The controversial objects in question arc so-called "legal body
stimulants," psuedo-drugs which
have reporlcdly been sweeping col-
ANNUAL GRADUATE SCHOOL
INFORMATION DAY
INFACT's Latest Impact
The Recreation and Parks Departmenl of While
Plains agreed today lo gram use of Tibbeis Patk foi a
Halloween Day anli-Nesile demonstration, reversing .i
previous statement by Parks Commissioner Joseph
Davidson lhal no citj paik would be usesl foi such
gatherings. The Infant Formula Action Coalition,
(INTACT), which called foi a boycott of all Nestle products in 1977, is sponsoring its first national rally here
because of ihe location of Nestle's U.S. headquarters in
White Plains.
"Wc wondcied if ihe initial refusal by the city hud
anything to do with Nestle." said Edward Baer, a
inemhei of INFACT's national Board of Directors.
"We're pleased lhat Ihe eily changed iis tune bill we
deeply icgiei lhal we had lo bring about the spectre ol
legal action lo force ihis change."
The mat diets will assemble al Nestle Headquarters at
100 lllooniingdiile Road ai 11 a.m. on October 31 for active plckeling and will ihen proceed 10 Tibbeis Park
where speakers and live music are scheduled.
In addition, 1NFACT National Chair Doug Johnson
will be speaking in 1 C 19 this Tlnusday, October 22, al
H p.m. Ihe film Boillt Habits will also be shown, with
III Iniiodiicilon by Dr. Zwana of ihe African and AfroAnieilciiii Depiiiimcill,
„
Page Three
Angry Local CAA Activist Speaks Out
WILLIAMSBURG, V». (AP) President Reagan and
France's President Francois Mitterrand arc ushering in a
third century of French-American alliance amid frank
differences over helping the world's poor but a prediction of "concrete steps" after this week's summit in
Mexico.
The two leaders — one a socialist favoring massive
foreign aid, the other a conservative advocating private
enterprise for the Third World — spent more than five
hours together here Sunday, Ihe eve of the 200th anniversary of the French-aided Revolutionary War victory over the British al nearby Yorktown.
Sail Away the SEAmester
CAMPUS BR.EFS
Albany Student Press
AVAILABLE FOR DENTAL AND VERTINARY
SCHOOLS. LOANS AVAILABLE. INTERVIEWS BEGINNING IMMEDIATELY, FOR
FURTHER DETAILS AND/ OR APPOINTMENTCALL:
DR. MANLEY (716) 882-2803
2 4 hour
swlrcliboord
services
Schuyler
dutch quod
sutrynlbnny
olbany newyorh
12222
BIB 4577588
J
Fuerzo Latino
lulling our campus," says student
counselor Kent Poey of the Umver^ ^ - - ^ • ^ • ^ ^ • w - ^ - > ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ w > ^ > .
continued on page nine
m w i m i m m m u u m m M t M . t m i i i m •'"•"•*•
Middle Earth is sponsoring a support
group for new students, international
and returning students.
drug education
counseling
Il is questionable for the moment
jusl how prcvalenl student use of
Ihe legal stimulants and look-alikes
has become, or how dangerous — if
at all — such products actually are.
"I haven't heard of these drugs
Group goals will focus on personal
Issues related to living and-or student
problems as experienced by the "new"
student, ongoing participation is required.
Starting Date: Sunday, Oct. 25 - Six sessions
Time: 7pm 8:30pm
HHHI
Location: Genesis, 105 Schuyler Hall, Dutch
Quad.
For more information and sign-up, contact Mid
die Earth at 457-7588.
- Invites you To Our Community Day
Celebration
Oct. 24th 1:00 - 5:00 pm
Lecture Centers
Food, Music, & Fun
For info. Yvette 458-9741
Zaida 457-5155
«»»»»»»»»»»«»»»»-»-.»»»»•• ^ " - "
•rim - ;
-H.*«***H,M.l
AtlllU
October 20, 1981
Would CApsuUs
New Chair Takes Control
WARSAW, Poland (AP) Premier Wojciech Jaruzclski,
taking over (he ruling Communist Party after the ouster
of Stanislaw Kania, warned the Solidarity labor movement that the regime's "possibilities for retreat have
been exhausted."
The 200-member Central Committee that elected
Jaruzclski Sunday demanded the independent trade
union stop strikes, obey the law and help restore the nation's shattered economy. It also demanded negotiation
of worker rights won during last summer's strikes and
threatened to impose martial law.
Kania, who after 14 chaotic months failed to contain
Solidarity's bold challenge to the regime, resigned during a stormy committee session. After being tapped to
succeed him, Jaruzelski said the committee would meet
later this week with the Sejm, Poland's Parliament, to
make more policy changes.
The 58-year-old Jaruzelski, who is also defense
minister and a Soviet-trained army general, became Ihc
first Polish leader to run the military, the govcrnmenl
and the Communist Party at the same lime.
Nobel Prize Awarded
STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP) Two Americans and a
Swede won the 1981 Nobel Prize for Physics for llieir
development of two types of spectroscopes vital in
nuclear studies.
Professor Kai Siegbahn of Uppsala University got one
half of the $180,000 award, Ihc other half was shared by
professors Nicolaas Bloembcrgcn of Harvard and Arthur Schawlow of California's Stanford University.
Bloembcrgcn, the third Harvard professor to receive a
Nobel Prize this year, and Schawlow were cited by Ihc
Swedish Academy of Sciences for their contribution lo
"the development of laser spectroscopy."
Siegbahn was cited "for his contribution to the
development of high-resolution electron spectroscopy."
The laser spectroscope, developed by Bloembcrgcn
and Shawlow, is used lo study atoms with laser light
beams.
Socialists Win Greek Vote
ATHENS, Greece (AP) Andreas Papandrcou and his
left-leaning Panhellcnic Socialist Movement swept the
Greek elections on a platform calling for withdrawal
from NATO, the closure of American bases and a
referendum on continued membership in the European
Common Market. Premier George Rallis conceded the
defeat of his conservative New Democracy Parly Sunday evening as returns from the day's balloting signaled
a radical shift in the nation's pro-Western policy. With
nearly two-thirds of the vote counted, the charismalie
Papandriou's Panhellcnic Socialist Movement — Pasok
— had 47.7 percent of the popular vole, more than
enough lo control the 300 scat unicameral Parliament.
Reagan Concedes Recession
WASHINGTON O.C. (AP) President Reagan, saying
what administration officials have carefully avoided, is
acknowledging for Ihc first time that the nation's
economy is in a recession.
But Reagan says it's mild, and his chief economic adviser says "forces already arc in motion" to reverse it.
"I think there's a slight recession and 1 hope a short
recession," Reagan said Sunday on the While House
lawn before leaving by helicopter to meet with French
President Francois Mitterrand al Williamsburg Va. "I
think everyone agrees on that."
Later Sunday, Murray Weidenbaum, chairman of
Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, said in a statement "there are increasing signs that the economy has
entered what can be called a recession," including a
drop in industrial productivity, rising unemployment
claims and the weak housing market.
Mexico Hosts Summit
CANCUN, Mexico (AP) Bangladesh is desperately poor
and needs foreign food aid. The Philippines is growing
rapidly and seeks larger export markets. Saudi Arabia is
rolling in oil money but wants lo diversify its economy.
Despite vastly different needs and stages of development, these and other Third World countries arc bringing a common program to the Cancun summit here this
week: They want a new International economic order.
Developing countries, represented as the south in the
so-called north-south dialogue, say Ihe current structure
of world economic relations is unfair to them and in the
long run, not even beneficial to the rich countries of the
north.
President Reagan set the tone for the likely U.S.
response to Third World demands in a speech last week
to the World Affairs Council In Philadelphia. He said
critics "flirt with fantasy" when they suggest the international economic system is unfair.
He also reaffirmed his administration's belief that
private investment is the key tool for developing the
underdeveloped world.
The developing nations hope to reach a breakthrough
on global negotiations on trade and money issues at the
two-day summit opening here Thursday.
U.S. Detects Soviet Test
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) An apparent underground
nuclear test by the Soviet Union has been detected by the
United States Atomic Detection System, the Department of Energy reports. The detonation occurred at
11:57 p.m. Saturday in a test area at Scmipalatinsk in
Siberia, the department announced Sunday.
Navy to Aid in Drug Busts
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) Navy officials and an aide
of Attorney General William French Smith will meel
soon to determine how the Navy can best be used in the
fight against drug smugglers, Sen. Lloyd Bcnlscn has
announced.
Bcnlscn released a letter from Smith on Saturday in
which Ihc attorney general agreed with Ihc Texas
Democrat that the Coast Guard needs help in trying to
apprehend drug traffickers.
Bcnlscn, who had complained lasl June about "an
alarming increase in drug traffic," asked Smith to accept the recommendation of the attorney general's
"Task Force on Violent Crime" that the Navy might be
utilized.
Baker Sees Budget Changes
WASHINGTON D.C. (AP) With Ihc While House saying the next move is up lo Congress, Senate Majority
Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. is predicting "a lot of ,uggling" in President Reagan's lalcsl budget plans. A
growing possibility, sources said, is more selective tax increases and fewer budget cuts than Reagan has proposed.
Baker met Sunday at Ihc While House with presidential counselor Edwin Meesc III, chief of staff James A.
Baker 111 and budget director David A. Stockman to
discuss mourning opposition lo Reagan's package.
Baker refused lo reveal details of Ihe session bin was expected In have an announcemcni on bow Senate
Republicans Intend to proceed.
The Chance of a Lifetime
Playboy may have covered Ihc Southern Conference
and Ihe Ivy League schools, but Graham Silliman has
his photographic eye focused on SUNYA.
A SUNYA student, Silliman plans to photograph the
12 best-looking male students and the 12 best-looking
female students for publication in two (his and hers)
1982 calendars.
Interviews will be held during November, Silliman
said, wilh the 24 SUNYA students chosen for his calendars lo receive $50 for a half hour photo session.
Silliman promises his calendar shots will be
"fashionable." University Bookstore Manager Hank
Gil, who has agreed lo sell the calendars early next
semester, has said lie will pull the calendars from lite
shelves if there is any problem concerning laslc.
"It's not that important," Gil said of the calendar
idea.
Silliman said he "conducted surveys on campus and
Ihe response to the idea was positive. Surprisingly,
women were more enthusiastic than men, so I plan lo
put together the calendar of men first." .
Silliman will advertise ihe times anil dales of future
interviews.
Physics for Fun
•+
The Department of Physics has scheduled a number
of short interest lectures for (his semester.
T.P. Das of the SUNYA Physics Department will
speak on Ihe study of Elementary Particle and Nuclear
Physics on October 23 al 3:30 p.m. For those concerned
wilh Electron Diffraction, K.G. Weil of Technischc
Hochschulc, will discuss Ihe topic on October 30, also at
3:30 p.m.
' To start off Ihe new month, C.P. Scholes of the
SUNYA Physics Department will give insight to the Probing Ligand Binding Sites in Heme Proteins on
November 6 at 2 p.m. All colloquium are held in the C. ;
Luther Andrews Seminar Room, Phy. 129.
Reagan Meets Mitterrand
Albany Student Press
Angry Local CAA Activist Speaks Out
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) President Reagan and
France's President Francois Mitterrand are ushering in a
third century of French-American alliance amid frank
differences over helping the world's poor but a prediction of "concrete steps" after this week's summit in
Mexico.
The two leaders — one a socialist favoring massive
foreign aid, the other a conservative advocating private
enterprise for the Third World — spent more Ihan five
hours together here Sunday, the eve of the 200th anniversary of the French-aided Revolutionary War victory over the British at nearby Yorktown.
by Lisa Mlrabclla
) ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ _
Nearly a month after her arrest
oh the morning of the South AfricaEastern Rugby Union rugby game,
Coalition Against Apartheid (CAA)
activist Vera Michelson is still
angry.
Hinckley's Lawyers Protest
"I consider (the arrest) a frameup of the Coalition and myself,"
she said in a recent interview.
£ NEWS FEATURE
Michelson explained she felt,!
"Anytime people rally in a racial
struggle the authorities leel
threatened and try to weaken any
strong organization of the people."
She feels the police as well as other
authoriticsand the media^wercguilty of violence-bailing the September
22 Rally Against Apartheid before
it was held. "The CAA was on the
defensive, trying to answer to
charges of violence lhat were unfounded," Michelson said.
WASHINGTON D.C.(AP) Lawyers for John W. Hinckley Jr. argued in federal court today that documents
written by the accused presidential assailant were taken
from his cell illegally and should not be used in his trial.
With Hinckley watching intently, one of his lawyers,
Gregory B. Craig, questioned a federal official aboul
seizure of the documents from Hinckley's quarters al
the federal correctional institution in Butncr, N.C., July
24 and July 27.
Judge Barrington D. Parker agreed with the request
of Hinckley's lawyers that the contenls of the handwritten papers not be revealed.
Oil Cleanup to Begin
MORRISBURG, Ontario (AP) The cleanup. oi a
30-milc-long oil slick on the St. Lawrence River will lake
about two weeks, a Transport Canada official says.
The official reported Sunday thai the slick of about
1,000 gallons of heavy bunker C oil stretches
downstream from the Ontario locks at Iroquois lo Morrisburg, a section of the river between Ogdcnsburg,
N.Y., and Massena, N.Y. It was discovered Saturday
afternoon and is worse on the Canadian side of ihc
river, he said.
U.S. and Canadian coast guards inspected the site and
will take samples from the slick and ships thai passed
through the area to determine who is responsible. If
samples match, charges would be laid under the Canada
Shipping Acl.
The official said the ship which caused the spill will
receive a bill for Ihe cleanup, which could cost the Canadian coast guard $15,000.
If you are interested in climbing Haiti's fabled
Citadel, scuba diving in the reefs off San Salvador and
investigating the ecology of Ihe Morion sail works in
Great Inaqua, you're just in time to register for
Southhampton College's next SEAmcsler.
Captain, crew and two faculty members join students
in an eight-week sea voyage on a fully-rigged 100 fool
schooner. Courses arc offered in American Maritime
History, Natural History, Literature of Ihe Sea, Coastal
Ecology, Ichthyology and Navigation and Seamanship
while Ihe Tall Ship sails on open oceans and lo sheltered
harbors.
The Tall Ship sails from Ihe Florida keys on April 4
and disembarking al a New England port at journey's
end on June 5.
For information on SEAtncster, contact Elizabeth
DcBarlo Skinner at the Office of Continuing Education,
Southhampton College of Long Island University,
Southhampton, New York 11968, or call al (516)
283-4000, Extension 117.
• Michelson was charged with
possession of marijuana and
firecrackers. A controversy pervades not only the search warrant
that led to her arrest but also Ihc
police handling of the matter.
Michelson has been active in the
Albany community for some 12 to
15 years. Among the issues she has
worked on arc welfare rights and
anti-draft, anti-war, and U.S.
hands off Iran campaigns. She has'
also been involved in organizations
such as youlh groups, an anli-Klan
network and her own labor union.
Throughout her career as an actlvlst, Michelson said, she has seen
"racism and classism as primary
contradictions in the United
States." She feels that until recently
racism has been a background
issue. "This is Ihe first lime in a
long lime lhat people of different
political perspectives have come
together to organize against
racism," Michelson said.
One of Michelson's concerns al
litis point is ihe continuance of a
strong force against racism In
Albany, and around lite world. She
said she sees the CAA us "a strong,
multi-racial organization that learned lo work together very quickly in
a
a very positive way, and will continue to struggle against racism."
Michelson feels that the fact that
the rugby game was played "shows
how important It is for the government to protect U.S. financial interests in South Africa. She said,
"they would protect the South
African racist at all costs (to protect
financial interests)."
Michelson's attorney Anita
Thayer is now questioning the
validity of the search warrant,
which Michelson called "a total
police department fantasy." Two
of the sources quoted in the search
warrant have slated tliat the information in the warrant pertaining to
them is false. Other information is
attributed to a confidential informant who, Thayer noted, may not
have had first hand information.
Thayer is also planning to file a
complaint wilh Ihe Albany police
aboul the way Ihe arrest was handled. Al Ihe lime of the arrest, police
confiscated from Michelson's
apartment two personal phone
books, a recent phone bill, community address lists and a list of
members of Ihe CAA.
Captain John Dale, spokesperson
for Ihc Albany police, said thai
Activist Vera Michelson
" / consider the arrest a frame-up"
some of Ihe items seized by police
were not included in the sworn inventory filed with the search warrant. He had no further comment
on the search warrant.
Michelson said lhat she was not
allowed to make a phone call until
after her arraignment, seven hours
after her arrest. And she said she
was held without bail for 48 hours
for less than misdemeanor charges.
She feels both of these are in violalion of her civil rights.
Michelson's reaction to Ihe way
she feels ihc police treated her was
in some ways positive. "It just
makes you stronger, and clarifies
things for you politically," she
remarked of Ihe incident.
However, she said she is very
continued on page five
Legal Stimulants" Sales Are Up
lili.no: Sam Iirilli
An allocation from the Plant Department budget has bought SUNYA
two new buses. According lo University Senator Rnn Rothman, a
"new buses" bill was passed in Ihc Senate last year to secure adequate,
well-running buses. The new buses — which replace three old green
machines — have u seating capacity of 90 passengers instead uf Ihc old
buses' 60.
Hh
State University of New York at Albany
cordially invites yon to attend its
ANNUAL GRADUATE SCHOOL
INFORMATION DAY
Wed., October 21,1981
10 A M - 4 PM
Campus Center Ballroom
Come and talk with representatives
from graduate schools in the
Northeast who will provide
information on degree programs,
admission requirements,
financial aid, etc.
(CPS) "They sell like crazy," say
an editor at High Times magazine.
"They're some of the most
dangerous drugs on the market today," say an Illinois public health
official.
"We're givrng'the public foods,
nol drugs," claims n company
president.
The controversial objects in question are so-called "legal body
stimulants," psucdo-drugs which
have reportedly been sweeping col-
lege campuses In popularity Ihc
past year or so. The product, which
by and large are quite legal, usually
lake the form cither of "look alike"
capsules and tablets designed to
resemble amphetamines, Quaaludcs
or cocaine; or butyl nilrile, an ox-.
Idi/.inu agent marketed as "liquid
incense" that buyers inhale out oTa
small bottle.
The capsules and lablcis usually
contain a combination of caffeine,
phynylpropanolmine (an an-
lihistaminc) and cphedrinc sulfate.
They provide users wilh enough of
a "high" to satisfy them as being
the genuine article, though Ihe
bogus pills cost dealers Tar less than
do genuine amphetamines. The pills
provide the stimulant equivalent of
"Perhaps two cups of coffee," according lo a Food and Drug Administration spokesperson.
Inhaling butyl nitrite, or "liquid
incense," triggers a brief increase in
blood pressure and heartbeat, causf ~~ 1-^»-~T|rrEi^i rriirriiiTi '->ir>ir%Ml|ir>iiHii'%«^ig%ir%irlir>ir% r%rrfci ing ihc user lo feel giddy and
euphoric lor aboul two minutes
before returning lo normal.
MEDICAL SCHOOL OPENINGS
Fly-by-night pharmaceutical
companies reportedly have been
springing up like wildfire during Ihe
past year, flooding Ihe college
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS AVAILABLE IN
mnrkei with pills and incense, often
FOREIGN MEDICAL SCHOOL. NO FOREIGN
advertising openly in campus
newspapers with promos for large
LANGUAGE REQUIRED. FULLY AChelpings of stimulants.
CREDITED. SOME OPENINGS ALSO
It is questionable for Ihe moment
AVAILABLE FOR DENTAL AND VERTINARY
just how prevalent student use of
SCHOOLS. LOANS AVAILABLE. INTERthe legal stimulants and look-alikes
has become, or how dangerous — if
VIEWS BEGINNING IMMEDIATELY. FOR
al all — such products actually are.
FURTHER DETAILS AND/ OR APPOINT"I haven't heard of these drugs
MENT CALL:
hilling our campus," says student
counselor Kent Pocy of Ihe UnlverDR. MANLEY (716) 882-2803
continued on page nine
» m u m i i i i i i i i m m m » u m n » m i l n m » H i m
MFACT's Latest Impact
The Recreation and Parks Department of While
Plains agreed today lo gram use of Tibbets Park fot a
Halloween Day anii-Ncsilc demonstration, reversing a
previous statement by Parks Commissioner Joseph
Davidson iliat no city park would be used fot such
gatherings. The Infant Formula Action Coalition,
(INFACT), which called lor a boycott of all Nestle produels in 1977, is sponsoring its first national rally here
because of the location of Nesile's U.S. headquarters In
While Plains.
"We wondered'ir the initial refusal by Ihe city had
anything to do with Nestle," said Edward llaei, a
member of INFACT's national Board of Directors,
"We're pleased that the city changed iis tune but we
deeply regret that we had lo bring aboul ihe spectre ol
legal action to force this change."
The marchers will assemble at Nestle Headquarters al
100 Bloomingdale Road at 11 a.m. on October 31 for active picketing and will then proceed to Tibbets Park
where speakers and live music arc scheduled.
In addition, INFACT National Chair Doug Johnson
will be speaking in LC 19 this Thursday, October 22, at
8 p.m. The film Bottle Babies will ulso be shown, with
an introduction by Dr. Zwana of the African and AfroAmerican Department.
Page Three
ZTT3DDLE
E^KTTj
drug education
counaellna
2 * hour
switchboard.
services
Schuyler
dutch quad
iunyolonny
nlbarry. newyorh
18222
Middle Earth is sponsoring a support
group for new students, international
and returning students.
Group goals will focus on personal
Issues related to living and-or student
problems as experienced by the "new"
student, ongoing participation is required.
Starting Date: Sunday, Oct. 25 - Six sessions
Time: 7pm - 8:30pm
Location: Genesis, 105 Schuyler Hall, Dutch
Quad.
BJB 4577388
.Kz^
For more information and sign-up, contact Mid
die Earth at 457-7588.
Fuerzo Latino
- Invites you To Our Community Day
Celebration
Oct. 24th 1:00 - 5:00 pm
Lecture Centers
Food, Music, & Fun
For info. Yvette 458-9741
Zaida 457-5155
i k . » i i i . » i i . i . i . i i m i » i i i i i n n )
kn\m*i\nv\\via;
October 20, 1981
Albany Student Press
—\« '
will be holding an
interview clinic
ra
on Wednesday, October 21st
at 8:00 in LC 1.
Dr. Cermak (on admission
committee from Albany Med.
Col.) will speak on various
aspects of the interview process.
sasU-B-»l=U=4V-U-U=3E3EaE3g
Norman, OK (CPS) More college
students soon might have to pass
competency tests before they get
their degrees.
Just as the controversial proficiency tests have spread on the high
school level — a movement largely
fueled by parental and college admissions officers' complaints that
high schools grads aren't well
educated — they now appear to be
making inroads on the college level
as well.
Most recently, a University of
Oklahoma faculty committee
recommended two weeks ago that
undergraduates
pass
a
"comprehensive" final exam in
their majors before being allowed
to graduate.
Individual departments within
Hie university — not semiindependent testing companies like
Educational Testing Service —
would write and administer the
tests.
The Oklahoma committee also
urged a "strict grading policy" to
combat a feared slip in the university's academic standards.
"There's been a general feeling
that our undergrads are just not
Friday Midnight
THE
PRE-HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS
^
~
ROLLERDALL
adequately educated in a liberal arts
sense," says Faculty Senate Chairman Gary Thompson. "Many
students are coming (to Oklahoma)
with such low competency levels we
have been forced to simply ease
them through the system. As a
result, our academic standards have
visibly declined."
There remains some confusion
about how many other schools require such tests. The University of
Colorado last year decided to allow
— but not require — individual
departments to.give them. But Arts
and Sciences Dean Everly Fleischer
notes, "I don't think (the option)
has been exercised at all. It would
take a huge amount of work to formulate and grade such exams."
Harvard and Yale have required
comprehensive exams of graduating
seniors since the 1920's, although
Yale now allows "approved
Return to Basic Skills is Emphasized
by Frank Gil
An emphasis on basic skills such
as reading and writing is the longrange goal of the College Hoard's
10-ycar-progrum to improve the
preparedness of high school
students, according to SUNYA
Director of Admissions Rodney
Hart.
According to The Chronicle of
Higher Education, the board,
which sponsors the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the College Scholarship Service, "hopes that improving
secondary education generally will
have the added benefit of increasing
minority-group students' access to
higher education."
Coined "Project Equality," the
program's goal, the article slated,
"is lo develop a national standard
of achievement for students who
plan lo attend college, as well as a
national definition of academic
competency."
Colleges and universities will be
encouraged to adopt the competency and academic curriculum slan-
dards as a preference, if not an absolute standard. High schools will
also be asked to review their programs in light of the board's competency standards.
' .
Areas such as reading, writing,
speaking, listening, mathematics,
reasoning and studying are all being
considered for improvement.
"There is no doubt students are
not as prepared as (they were) years
ago," said Hart. "Students today
are much more aware socially and
politically, but their basics are not
and friends In
IF LOOKS COULD KILL.
THE
CONCERT FOR
BANGLADESH
$1.00 w/tax
$1.50 w/o
SA Funded
n
-
"
"
'
-
"
"
"
"
"
*
"
"
ALBANY
STATE
CINEMA
« « " " ' • " "
m ' "
mmmm
- 1
SENIORS
The "CLASS OF 1 * 8 1 " w a n t s y o u !
Senior Week Suggestions
Senior Week Organizers
Senior T-shirts Designers
as sharp. Hopefully getting back to
traditional measures will not take
away from student awareness,"
Hart added.
Hart felt the changes will not
have an effect on the standards for
admission to SUNYA, even though
he thought the program will probably improve on the skills of the
college bound students.
"The college board is trying to
revitalize itself," Hart said.
"Assuring students success in college is an aim of the program."
Bell Predicts
More Cuts
to Education
(CPS) At a meeting with educators,
U.S. Secretary of Education Terrcl
Hell predicted the Reagan ' administration would soon ask Congress to shave another SI .5 billion
off the federal education budget for
this year, and to approve a plan that
wouM (cave federal funding two
years from now ar a bare 40 percent
of the current budget.
In various speeches around the
country. Bell has warned of further
cuts for the October I, I9SI to
.September 30. 1982 fiscal year as
part of the administration's efforts
lo balance the federal budgci by
1984.
Lost year. Congress authorized
federal education spending of $15.7
billion. The Reagan ndminstrnlion
earlier asked for cms that would bring the- budgci clown to $13.1
billion. The additional cuts Bell announced would further cut the
budget to $11.53 billion.
Hell added that even more drastic
cuts would be requested soon. He
said he aims to cut another $9
billion from the programs by 1984.
If he succeeds, the 1984 federal
education budgci would amount to
less than 40 percent of the total
1981 budgci of $14.9 billion.
Bell did not specify how much of
those cuts would be from college
programs (us opposed lo the
primary and secondary education
programs administered by the
federal government), ,
Michelson
continued from page three
angry and very upset that "police
can take whatever they want in a
search." According lo Michelson,
"The police clearly acted in an illegal fashion and considered
themselves above the law."
Michelson is scheduled to appear
in court on October 29 for a Suppression Hearing, where Thayer
said she will attempt to "quash the
search warrant."
The Albany C.'.A has set up a
Defense Fund for Michelson.
Help in making your
Senior Year Unforgettable
Meeting TONIGHT at 8:00pm
Campus Center Assembly Hall (adjoins the Fireside Lounge)
__z_
substitutes" like senior theses or 'I went to Oklahoma' and be profield work. Administrators at both ud."
schools were unsure if any other
Dr. Robert Calfee of Stanford's
colleges required competency tests,
Scjhool of Education offers a dimhowever.
mer view. "It makes even less sense
The Oklahoma proposal seems to than does high school testing."
have raised surprisingly few student
Any such exam would cither be
protests. Student paper reporter
"much too little or much too late,"
Gary Smith observes that, "a lot of
Calfee asserts. "You'd be imposing
students seem to favor it because
a standard that's impossible to use
it'll add more prestige to the univerfairy. As a yardstick for competensity. In years to come, you can say
cy, it's just plain dumb.'
GEORGE HARRISON
Thursday and
Friday
7:30-10:00
Page Five
~
College "Competency Tests"Are on Increase
FEMINIST ALLIANCE
MEETING
a^sawi^MMfa»M»=av^u-a-apai>MBawgaMpa-ahJws»
•• '
OPENS OCTOBER 30thAT A THEATRE NEAR YOU!
Whisper It In
Our Classifieds
M •• '
wm
October 2d,' 1981/page 7
page 6/Oclober 20, 1981
Jeffreys Plots His Latest Escape
It Isn't And It Won't Be
seem especially thrilled with the sexual
phony and romanticized he almost makes
liberation the screenwriter has given her.
the last hour of the film laughable.
While she never says she wishes she had a
From a director of George Cukor's exhusband, she makes It known lhat she Is
perience,.this movie Is Incredibly badly pacmuch happier during a more permanent
ed. The first hour barrels along at a
relationship. This would be a fine, almost adbreakneck pace covering sixteen years In
mirable portrait of the conflicts facing a
three segments. The second hour Is far too
modern woman if that were as far as It wenl.
slow. It should not take the entire second
bul Ayres has lo introduce the distasteful
half of the film to tell the relatively banal
idea lhat Liz. who suffers writer's block at
stories of Blsset's affair with the previously
The story follows two women from their
various points In the film, can only wrlle
mentioned
reporter
and
Bergen's
domestic
days as roommates at Smith through their
when she Is "wllh a man." Apparently, lo
trouble wllh Ihe daughter. Had Cukor paced
careers as successful though vastly different
Ayres way of thinking Ihere has lo be a "man
things
a
Utile
more
evenly
and
concentrated
writers. Jacqueline Blsset plays Liz
behind Ihe woman" for either of their sucon developing character and plot In Ihe firsl
cesses lo be entirely satisfying.
flashes this mlghl have been a more enWbal helps lo save the film from itself are
joyable effort,
the excellent performances from Bissel and
Much of the blame for Ibis must also go to
Bergen. Bergen has the less demanding role.
Ayres whose screenplay, aside Irom being
Merry Is not especially complicated, bul
full of holes and baldy timed. Is vague and
Bergen makes her and her drive (or and ensexist as hell. Liz and Merry Noel (her name
joyinenl of her success believable She also
Is explained by saving she was a "holiday
surprise") are stereotypes, bul Ihey are well
developed. That seems like a contradiction,
bul IK jusl ihal Ayres lias laken a iiiiinhei of
stereotypes and rolled them Inlo two
Characters Therefore they have a lot more
depth than one mlghl expect He also goes
rue Confessions has mote loose
" i l l of Ins way to give litem brains so that
ends than a plate of spaghetti. To
ihey appeal i redlble as wrileis
go inlo them In detail would spoil
No. the problem is not with Liz and Merry , what llllle suspense and surprise this project
Noel, bul wllh everyone around them. The
already has; let me say though that by the
supporting characters are nothing more than
end o l Ihe movie you'll know less about, the
Jackie is dandy . . •
cardboard cutouts. They barely even func
solution of the mystery than you will al the
Hamilton, an Independent. Intellectual
beginning.
critically acclaimed writer til essays and
Screenwriters John Gregory Dunne and
in vels that "attempt lo be serious a r l . " CanJoan Didlon rigorously detail the corrupt
Lll'-e Bergen Is cast against type as Merry
professional" lives of Iwo brothers —
i\ .el Blake, a Southerner who drops out of'
Thomas, a cop. and Desmond, a priest.
-rliool in her last semester to gel married and
Aside from the obvious, the brothers are
ends up wriling Jacqueline Susann-like putconnected In one major way; apparently
boilers. We follow Ihe rocky road of their
everyone In the Los Angeles archdiocese,
Itlendship to its eventual conclusion. All w r y
where Desmond is-a Monslgnor, has been
basic and pal. until you begin I llilnk aboiil
screwing a girl whose murder Tom Is Init. '
vestigating. Every scene reveals more and
Even If they were roommates, one doubts
more people who knew her or met her or
t/iat U?. and Merry wou/d be best friends.
had sex with her: virtually the entire cast has
The]/ are so ci>ntpletely opposite, their inhad some contact with this girl. This Is fine,
teiesls so different, their views of life so op
even interesting, as far as it goes. However,
posed Ihal one appears lo represent
Ihe problem wllh True Conjessions is lhat
everything the other dislikes (this, of course,
this is where it stops.
providing one can accept that someone like
. . .and Candy plays a hack.
After drawing these increasingly strained
Merry would want to go to Smith — much lion as simple plol devices because the plol Is
less gel In). However. I am as willing as so thin to start with. It's as if Ayres were able connections. Dunne and Didlon never
anyone lo suspend my disbelief for dramatic li come up wllh Iwo relatively strong bother to resolve them. We're never told
who the killer is or how any of the endless list
purpose1.. s<- lor the sake of Ihe movie I can women, but lacked Ihe imagination to think
of people who knew her are involved. A
accept that ngalnsl all the odds these Iwo <•( a .world they til into or people they can
Iheory Is half-heartedly thrown out. but since
became Iriemls
react to.
II only lakes inlo account a minlscule number
Unfortunately, ihere are other plol conThis lack of Imagination leads Ayres inlo
of the (acts II is essentially useless.
tiivnnces thai push even the most suspended putting his heroines Inlo a series of offensive
There are those who will claim lhat Ihe
I'ifbelief lo its (units. Prom the first lime we !v sexlsl situations. Neither Liz nor Merry is
storyline of a film should be secondary lo the
-el' Menw Noel's husband we know' Ihal hi' Is
parlicularly happy with her life and the
emotional. Intellectual, or sociological
• I.I.'A i> love with Liz, Then why does he
cause, quite simply, is lhat Ihey don't have a
revelations the filmmaker Is able lo make. In
•lartv V. " . ' W e ' r e never Intel, Wbal we are
man. In the second segment Merry is the
Iheory at least I would agree; plol is not
'old i' . .11 thou had "a lew" blind dales in
perfect llllle wife, yel as soon as she has hei
everything. Murder mysteries, however, are
college Well, if lie Is so in love Willi lu'i and
firsl success her husband loses his |oh. begins
a different story. This is one of Ihe most plot- .
her feeli *is foi him are more llian friendly
drinking, and divorces her. She has pro
bound genres and lo shirk the conventions al
Ihen must be more of a relationship then
litems wllh her rebellious daughfei and the
Ihe very end is as Irritating as it is pointless. It
writer Gerald Ayres is letllng on
message is clear: Ihe price for liet success
must also be staled that True Confessions
One also doubts Ihal after years of writing
has been her family
makes no emotional. Intellectual, or
uashy bestsellers Merry suddenly gels in
Aflei the divorce Merry becomes comsociological revelations to justify Its
spired enough lo write a novel Ihal ci mid gel
pletely sexless Just the opposite is true ol
deliberately vague structure.
ii' mlnaled (or a National Book Award-type
L i / , naturally. She is rather loud ol puking
honor. Finally, Ihe young Rolling Stone
Every scene builds lo what we expeel will
up men and hoys virtually anywhere, from
reporter played by Hart Buchnei is so
be a powerful climax. This is done parity by
Ihe street (ii airplanes However, shednesn'l
' underplaying all of them. The scenes are all
uch lo my chagrin. Rich and
Famous falls on almost every
count. Us plot Is full of contradictions and Inconsistencies, its characters are
vague, and the logic behind It Is offensively
sexist.
•
M
<
Mark Rossier
provides this suprlslngly humorless film with
Ihe charm and laughs It desperately needs
Blsset gives one of her very best performances. For once she Is able lo transcend
her stunning looks and present a woman
who Is as real as the scripl allows her to be
Usually In movies we can tell which character
Is the wrller because he or she drinks a lot
and quotes poetry. Well, Bissel does both ol
these, but she also exposes the anguish and
struggle that a serious artist goes through. I|
Is an impressive piece of work.
• Going in I expected Rich and Famous In
be either good, bitchy fun or a fairly serious
look at Ihe problems facing career women
Unfortunately, what I gol was ,, M . Sh ,
draggy, unenjoyable movie Willi two |int.
performances from women whose latent, intelligence, arurl indepedence oil screen wily
serves lo point out the (law* hi i|H;ir
characters on-screen.
Breach Of Faith
T
surprisinglycalm and. being trusting souls, ire
assume all Ihe repressed thoughts and emo
lions will come out. Wrong. The lack of a
forceful ending forces us lo reevaluate much
of what has gone before II and what we
mistook for subtle repression is actually
shown to be bad acting.
Bad is really too strong a word; bored is
better. Robert Duvall, and especially Robert
DeNiro, Just walk through their parts as ilthis
was something they were doing between re.il
jobs. DeNiro has never been one ol my
favorite actors, but I'll admit that in the fits of
overacting that characterized Taxi Driuer and
Neui York, Neui York he al least seemed interested. Here he looks like he'd father be
anywhere else. We get no sense of guilt ot
exhaustion, both of which the character
should feel — In fact we don't gel the sense
that there's any character at all. DeNiro jusl
seems to have come In, said the lines, got his
paycheck, and left.
Duvall fares slightly belter, but only
because he gets to make jokes. His Is ihe
more outgoing of Ihe brothers so lie gels lo
vary his range a bit more. Bul even he
doesn't seem too Involved nor does he feel
Ihe sense of guilt or regret thai ihe end
(which, like the beginning, inexplicably lakes
place twenty years after the resl of the story)
Implies.
Burgess Meredith and Cyrul Cusak do
more to Illustrate the conflict between the
morality and the business of Ihe church in
their few scenes than DeNiro does in the
whole movie. And Rose Gregorlo as an .i;l
Ing hooker Is Ihe only one who manages lo
compell our attention when she's on screen
Owen Rolzman's cinematography and
Steven Grimes' sets are both lirsl rale
visually this Is a great looking movie
Nonetheless, seeing True Confessions is like
driving down a dark mounlaln road Willi""
ly your low beams. You've got enough light
to see safely to the end of the |ourney bul
never enough lo see the whole panaroma
- M u r k Hossler_
G
arland Jeffreys has been knocking
around the rock 'n' roll scene since
Ihe early seventies when he released two critically praised but unsuccessful
albums. Jeffreys never quit though, and now
is a star in Europe with a good chance for a
lilt record In America.
emotion on ' T o o l Down Boy," a ten-minute
song that starts out fast and rocking, only to
be slowed down almost to a complete stop
— "I'm gonna tell you the whole story n o w , "
he said. "Cool Down Boy" is a compelling
tale concerning the painful memories of Jeffreys' youth, and while enunciating how his
step-father used to hit htm, he hit himself, —
until he knocked himself down on the stage.
The crowd cheered.
Ray Caligiure
Jeffreys, a 37 year-old black slngersongwrlter born and raised In Sheepshead
Bay, New York, has always had a promising
career since his first release In 1973. Jeffreys
had his firsl big breakthrough wllh Ihe release
of his 1979 LP, American Boy and Girl,
which entered Ihe American charts and
quickly disappeared. Success was to be
found, however. "Matador," a 45 from the
album, became a huge hit in cities
throughout Europe, leading lo a lour In
which Jeffreys played to millions of Europeans, live and on television.
On' Ihe strength of this success, Jeffreys
returned lo ihe Stales and assembled an allstar band (or his next album, Escape Artist,
featuring The Rumour, one of Ihe best support bands In England, led by guitarists
Brlnsley Schwarz and Martin Belmont. The
Rumour had recently parted company with
Graham Parker, whom Ihey played wllh for
(our years, and joined Jeffreys on a U.S.
lour earlier this year.
The new tour Is being promoted as "The
Mature Tour," and Jeffreys set oul to hrove
Stopping at nothing to excite the crowd,
Jeffreys jumped off the stage and walked
through the middle of the crowd as a path Instantly cleared, all the while singing the song.
"When I'm onstage, I like to make as much
contact with the audience as possible," he
said about performing live
Garland Jeffreys R-O-C-K's: The Escape Artist's Success
Is more than a rumour.
this at J.B. Scott's Saturday night. The club
was overflowing with people who had paid
$9.50 at the dpor to witness Jeffreys' first
Albany appearance In two years.
Jeffreys was not out to disappoint them.
He played a mixture of rock ' n ' roll and
Jamaican influenced reggae, delighting the
audience more with each song. Backed by
half The Rumour, (Brlnsley Schwarz and
drummer Stephen Gouldingl with a bass
and an organ/guitar player, Jeffreys Ignited
the crowd wllh his soulful singing style patterned after his idol, Frankie Lymon. The
band produced a simple beat, superbly timed
and executed. Jeffreys sang many crowd
favorites such as "Wild In the Streets," his
most famous song, "R.O.C.K.," sung along
with .by many In the audience, and an Inspired cover, "96 Tears," utilizing the Farflsa
organ.
Jeffreys displayed an unusual amount of
The music was basic, stripped of any
pretentions, giving off a clean, enjoyable
sound; not loud and overpowering, and
always danceable. And Jeffreys couldn't
have hoped for a better response from an
ecstatic J.B. Scott's crowd.
Jeffreys' appealing live sound has caught
the attention of the executives at Epic
Records. Epic is banking on the success of
Jeffreys' concert sound and has released an
eight song live LP recorded In New York and
France, called Rock & Roll Adult. If the
record receives enough airplay from the major FM stations, It could catch on fast, and
Garland Jeffreys will have the star-status he
deserves But, if Garland makes It big, will he
still come back to Albany? He has a loyal
following In any case.
C
Marley's Legacy: Black Uhuru In N.Y, ..•
W
hen music and life become so interconnected that they are one and
the same, the chance of commercial recognition greatly decreases, especially
here In the United States. The punk scene in
Craig Marks
7 7 was just that — kids who lived for their
music, dressed for their music, and violently
acted out their music. Punk did not become
a successful business venture in the U.S. un-
til it was homogenized Into new wave, and
the elements of danger and social unacceptablllty were eliminated.'
Reggae Is a similar type of music that in
terms of Its purity, stands unequaled. The
late Bob Marley was alone in the fact that he
magically crossed over seemingly uncrossable boundaries, and white staying true
to his rastamen roots, was able to write songs
that communicated with all of humanity.
Since Marley died of cancer less than a year
ago, one band has stood out, both artistically
•••And Blacksheep
In Albany
he message of Rastafari comes to S.U.N.Y.! Blacksheep. a fine young reggae
band played in Ihe box'-like Campus Center Ballroom on Friday night to a small
yet very appreciative audience of students and others from the Albany
community. The rhythm and sway cif the West Indies (via Philadelphia) and fine performances by all six members of Blacksheep combined to create a happy, hearty and spirited
posilive vibration on the dance floor.
Whereas reggae music is nol overly popular on campus, there are always folks who will
come out to hear the sounds Ihal Ihey love. With Ihe zealous efforts of the Pan Carribean
Association, this concert has served to spread the rhythms and harmonies of reggae to
ninny more eager ears. Two recent performances given ny Blacksheep at J.B. Scott's were
attended by many local reggae fans who were searching (or the "real" reggae sounds.
Ishmael Selassie, the drummer and spokesman, believes thai Blacksheep has been handpicked by Ihe Rasla lord J A H lo perform a specific duly: lo spread Ihe word of Raslafari and
One Love, Listening to the band play and watching the people move are proof that their
tlulies are being carried out.
The group played into ihe wee hours and never were shorlhanded for material, which
consists mostly of originals with a few cover songs. Cover song usually implies a shoddy
version of a well-known tune but the Blacksheep magic on "All Along the Walchlower"and
"Natural Mystic" will help to redefine thai terminology.
T
The fine vocal harmonies delivered by the band on "Gathering" atul "Every Dread" filled
Ihe acoustically awful Ballroom with beautiful sounds.
is a very lall man wllh long
Aylnde Olanlyan. keyboardist, vocalist and writer
has loured wllh different dance
dreadlocks Aside from his exper
with Blacksheep,
A highly religious man. Aylnde
tn tupes as a dancel ,\nt\ African drummer as far as Nigei
Is committed ,o spreading " J A H truths" across the glo'" He Is from Panama Jelani, ihe
lead vocalist ami guiituisi. emu
wmo
Alexander, the percussionist and vocalist, are both
id Wiusli
Irom Trinidad Moala Len. Ihe bassist and songwriter, is from Barbados and together wllh
Ishmael the rhythmic backbone of Blacksheep. The bass and drums are crucial lo a fine regMoata are continuing a tradition of rhythm sections ihal I:
id Ishmael and
ime uana
mil Robbie Shakespeare, the "Rhythm Twins" of reggae, lsa
ill, Sly Dunbai
Philadelphia, plays keyboards, sings, and applies his creative
mi and raised ii
Abdullah
[.imposing In Philadelphia lie played wilh such notables as
, lo arranging and
i 'ii'igie
;l Ihe King James Band. Blacksheep was 'born' In February In
C„ ,vei Washington Ji •«
residence at Ihe Creative Music Sludio In Woodstock, N.Y.
Philadelphia and Is now Ii
and Willi a new record on the way, everything Ihal Ihey do
Blacksheep has arrived
as Ihe messages of Rastafari, transmuted through Roots, Rock,
should be as lull MH\ rlghl
— Steven Popper
Fjeggae,
and commercially, as Ihe leader of the next
wave of reggae.
Black Uhuru has everything going for
them: an uplifting and penetrating vocalist
and songwriter In Michael Rose, contrasting
but yet visually enthralling, frontpeople.
Puma and Duckle Simpson, and a rhythm
section that lays down the best groove In all
of music, The Taxi All-Stars. Their show last
Tuesday night at the Rltz in NYC was a true
expression of hope, and it exemplified just
what makes reggae music such a powerful
medium.
Performing material from all three of their
albums. Black Uhuru constantly entranced
the capaclly crowd, both visually and aurally. "Sponji Reggae," from their most recent
album Red and "Happiness," off o( the
Sinsemllla LP, are the band's most well
known songs, and accordingly brought out
the greatest reaction from the crowd. Older
material, such as "Abortion" and the sing-along, "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Natty Dreadlock," were also received with great
fervor, and It was nearly Impossible nol lo be
swept away by the emotionality and
spirituality of this group and their music.
Rhythm Is intrinsic lo all reggae music,
and rhythm is what sets Black Uhuru apart
from all other bands. The bass-drum com--
blnatlon of Sly Dunbar and Robbie
Shakespeare are world-renowned, and the
Incomparable "Rhythm twins," who usually
do not tour with the groups they produce,
have chosen to do a select tew shows with
Black Uhuru. Their dance pulsations are
undeniable; Robbie's bass line sneaks
around Sly's drum pattern, first taking lead
then letting Sly take over with a double or triple time rhythm. The rhythmic variations
these two produce turn each song Into an
adventure, and at times it's hard to believe
how just two Instruments can make you want
to move your feet so much,
Hopefully Black Uhuru will tour a bit more
extensively In the future so everyone can get
a chance to see them.-The.only possible problem forseeable for this group Is too much
popularity and critical acclaim being placed
on them; It could be a tremendous burden,
especially when comparisons to Bob Marley
and the Wallers are Inevitable. It seems,
though, that Michael Rose has the type-of
personality necessary to handle all the
praise, and there is no real reason why Black
Uhuru should not only be at the top of the
reggae world for many years to come, but
should also be able to transcend those seemingly uncrossable boundaries.
Q
•
.
HB9 BIMMMP
October 20, 1981
Rosalind N e w m a n
And Dancers
FUERZA LATIN A
Dancing so stunning
that you can't believe
what you're seeing"
General Assembly Meeting
Tues. Oct. 20
8:00 prompt
Room
Friday, October 23
Saturday, October 24
to be
announced
monticello jam
When Thomas Jefferson wrote
the First Amendment to protect free
speech, he was also striking a blow
for outdoor rock concerts. So says
ZODIAC NEWS
prices. Xerox has offered the buyouts before, but never had many
lakers — in the words o f a company
official " a good performer looks at
the orfer and throws it in the
wastcbasket." But this time things
may be different: the company says
one way or anolher the work force
will drop, and i f employees d o n ' l
acccnl the extra money they could
be rired.
IF
*
Deborah jowltt |
Village Voice
8 PM
Performing Arts Center, M a i n Theatre
State University of New York at Albany
Tickets
Oct. 2 0 - 2 2
Masterclasses
$6.00 General Public
Beg. Int. Modern
$4.00 Students and
Senior Citizens
Composition/Improvisation
$3.00 SUNYA Tax Cards
Lecture Demonstration
an Ohio judge, denying a move to
cancel an REO Speedwagon appearance at the Toledo Speedway.
Prosecutor Anthony Pizza claims
concerts are " a criminal nuisance,"
because o f the amount o f illegal
drugs usually available. But Judge
Reno Riley says constitutional
guarantees o f free speech also
guarantee rock fans the right " t o
hear such speech."
hey, sucker
One o f the newest advances In
science sounds as i f it was taken
from a medieval medical text: doctors arc Heating their patients with
bloodsucking leeches. The Icchnique is used on people who've had
fingertips surgically reattached —
over and out
Most companies don't like to
lose workers, but Xerox is so anxious to get rid o f some employees,
it's offering them up to a year's
salary to quit. It's pari o f a costculling plan: Xerox says it's caught
in an Inflation squeeze — eosls are
lising, bin because o f competition
from Japan it's afraid l o raise
Lark St. at Madison
Schedule Information: 4 5 7 - 4 5 3 2
Welcomes Back
THE 81 SUNYA CLASS
Presented by Dance Council
Serving:
Lunch - 11:30 to 5
Dinner • 5 to 11; Late night menu till closing
j I n t e r v i e w - T h e Police
j),..,,„„,,„ti„„
SA Funded
JB SCOTT PRODUCTIONS AND0104
Friday, October 23
8 P.I
^T>lTIo,v
'*>
METROLAND ANNIVERSARY PARTY
at JB Scott's following the Devo shovv.
featuring two sets by the UNITS
BRING YOUR DEVO TICKET STUB AND:
• Get 50C OFF admission
• Pay O N I Y 50C for your first
domestic beer, wine or
house mixed drink
vv
T
An Evening
*
W i t h DEVO
kj.
(For This Performance only,
No opening Act)
JB SCOTT'S
3 2 1 CENTRAL
ALBANY
Sunday
October 25
8 P.
DEVQ
1981 TOUR
ALL RESERVED
SEATING
$10.50
Australian scientists have frozen
a dozen human embryos which they
believe can be thawed and Implanted in infertile women to produce healthy children.
THE
TUBES
. • i i i L i m i i n i m i n m n n n w g
PilotThe
pens you
hovefchold ^
ontowith „ '
two hands?
-Rodney Dangertie
"Get your claws off my
Pilot pen. See... I don't
get no respect!"
TICKETS: Alb.-Palace, and JB Scott s BOX Offices, Just A song, Drome sound; Schen.-strawberrles,
Drome sound
37
1
rk
eaa^*^^^*"\
If'
c\\ /
1hi
J
rtt-B-nriWin-fftt
(JEAN PAUL
f~Y^\|F"p| l O I - " ^
V—WII | U K L j J
People have
ohungeiloi
| ^ L ^ _ ^ ^
my Pilot Flnelinet be~~:
cause they're always
fishing lor o line point pen
thai writes through carbons. Ami
Pilot chaiges only 79« loi II.
People gel theli hands on II and
target it's my pen. So I don'l gel no respecll I don'l moke»it any belter
with my Pilot Razor Point II writes whip-cream smoo'1., ^
with an exim line line, lis metal collar helps keep
.^
the point Irom going squlsh-so people
-^
lovu n For only B9' i h e y J ^ n " " * *
should buy Ihelr own ponand show some resped lor my
property"
EPILOF]
fine point marker pens
People lake to a Pilot like it's Ihelr own.
rtrrnnm
• • . Ihe nation's saggn.' mJusirv. He's put hfs
'. • lerscv h o m e on the
•!• an a i l i n g price o f
. •
i,all mill' HI dollars, l o i
•;i'. fical 1 .'iiii'liuver rc'^
n t-iccnluHisv, uaskribal
• ' Miilar-shnnr-d swlnihilfijj
V V ' I V ' S Kilshnci selli'i.. ' In
, • fit- ' M l wil'i iinb w.i.tied a
Drugs
" " o n ' v G«naln« French
S.lon In ALBANY
clEAN PAUL
~^-rJJJ''^J[^G C j u l~ U P L j ^
dj?
J.C. rind Paul worked (or 8
years In Manhattan - wc undet .-
CJEAN
PAUL silence
'"""* ln In"ndln
3 ,hc son"! °*"
^^TJiJL.r^^.'r
Hair Slyllng Ihoy ore
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15 per cent discount with student ID till
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The selenl Isls say two frozen embryos were I hawed and resumed
growing outside Ihe womb. They
were implanted in their mothers'
wombs, but failed l o result in
pregnancy, the scientists said.
However, thai doesn't mean the
technique is a failure, they report,
because the success rate for implantation o f embryos I hat have nol |,
been frozen is only aboul 5 percent.
SUNYA Special
40<& Draft Friday, Saturday, & Sunday
Special Guest—BLOTTO
natural spirits. She claims her doctor gave the material to K i n g , and
she's asking f o r 75 million dollars
f r o m the author, his publisher and
Warner Brothers, which last year
turned the story into a motion picture.
a house by any other name
Carl W o o d , leader or the scientific learn at the Queen Victoria
Medical Center, however, says the
technique
raises a host o f
" f r i g h l e n i n g " legal and ethical
questions thai would have to be
resolved before its use could
become widespread.
PRESENT
50th Anniversary celebration a t the Palace
the suing
A California woman is suing
" T h e Shining" author Stephen
King, claiming he based his hit horror novel on her life. June Pritchard
says she was treated by a U C L A
therapist for problems similar to
those in " T h e S h i n i n g " — the story
o f a family tormented by super-
frozen babies
the leeches improve bioocl flow and
act as a sort o f temporary vein. But
Dr. Jane Petro, at New York's
Albert, Einstein Medical School,
says the animals could theoretically
be used to treat any part o f the body
afflicted by clogged veins.
Ticket Information: 4 5 7 - 8 6 0 6
Thursday
Page Nine
_ Albany Student Press
»^n:«»in»»nw«t"t"«ra '
• in-class practice exams
• audio tape library
• GUARANTEE: If you don't score
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NOW offered in A L B A N Y
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at The Best Western-Thruway House
Free Question & Answer session concerning Ihe LSAT
and the law school admission process lo be held at
the Best Western-Thruway House, 1375 Washington
Ave., Albany at 6:30 P.M. on October 22.
For further Information, to attend a Q & A session
or t o e n r o l l in t h e n e x t c o u r s e ,
C a l l COLLECT: (212) 6 7 9 - 2 7 7 3
or write: LSAT Preparation Course, Adelphi Urban
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Contact locally: S t u a r t S c h w a r t z (518) 4 8 9 - 5 6 6 0
In cooperation wlllt The National Center lot Educational letting, Inc.
continued from page three
sity o f M a s s a c h u s e t t s . " W e
haven't really seen anything around
h e r e , " says William C . W h i t e ,
director o f psychological services at
Cornell. " I t couldn't be very big
among our students."
" I ' v e heard no mention o r i t , "
agrees University o f Michigan staff
psychologist
Evic
Gauthier,
" t h o u g h maybe it's just that we're
nol asking about it. Maybe kids
who arc into ii aren't coming l o
us."
O n Ihe other hand, Bill Olson o f
the University o f Colorado counseling service saw an increase in usage
during Ihe pasl year. " T h e y were
pretty popular last s p r i n g , " he
notes, although we haven't had
anyone come in experiencing problems, strung out on the s t u f f . "
" T h e r e have been at least five
deaths nationwide as a result o f caffeine drugs," contends Dr. John
Spikes, chief loxicologist at the I I linios public health department,
whose state recently initiated legal
action to prohibit sales o f lookalikes. " A n d there arc others that
probably haven't been reported,
simply because people didn't realize
what had triggered the victim's
reaction."
" T h e r e have been some deaths
c o n f i r m e d , " agrees Chris Smith o f
I the Food and Drug administration,
"although some o f those may have
been deliberate suicides."
" Y o u ' d have to be cautious o f
'repeated usage o f (butyl n i t r i t e ) , "
warns D r . Charles Sharp o f the National Institute on Drug Abuse,
citing evidence o f a number o f
deaths among homosexuals who, he
says, are the most frequent incense
indulgcrs. By and large, though, he
concedes, " M o s t people can p t n bably gel b.- without problems.'
" O u r product is among the most
benign substances you could f i n d ,
as benign as tap water," exults W .
Jay Freezer, San Francisco-based
manufacturer o f Rush, the most
popular butyl nitrite, inhalant. " T h e
continued on page twelve
stoHv QommMtib
[email protected]
Third World Development;
American Stance Viewed
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ B , '
Hubert-Kenneth Dickey
change and
m i -o ,n , ^ o_f
The issues which are so dear to us are tcooperating
understanding
with It.
^^^^^^^^^^^^
such that they must, would, and indeed do
The change of our time, the basic
transcend both the candidates for office
and the partisan party lines put before us dynamic of our time is the quest to be hapand tne partisan
a n ; unu
,,... a«»nartv to
.. py with vision and wisdom, and to master
..« p,..,„..„
i n hotnn
now. There Is no sense in being a party to our own inner life. Poverty of the spirit is
the installation of the next slave master of an obstacle to the realization of human
the world. If the draft comes, 1 want them rights in a world gone "insane" with the
to draft the rich, old white men who send "madness of mega-buck«7"
Talk of ending inflation and balancing
young, poor, black and white men to die. A
major obstacle to freedom today is the budgets is pointless dribble. It. is impossible
willful ignorance of both the people and the to speak of a world order as long as political
intrigue manipulates the world economy.
leadership class of America.
We must develop, prosper and be free. "Paper" inflation generated by InternaWe must firmly believe there should and tional financial forces is what must be
can be an end to the deprivation of human brought to heel.
The oil-price spiral is a political as well as
dignity and fundamental rights of all people
on planet Earth. In addition, the last an economic phenomenon. The United
vestiges of colonialism, imperialism, States still maintains the pretense that the
racism, and sexism must give way to discussion of monetary stability and
freedom and independence as based upon development facilities arc unrelated. And
the creative and willful insight of the peo- yet one third of American exports go to the
ple. The crisis of the modern world is inter- Third World, over one million jobs depend
national in scope and this crisis involves the on such exports, and every third acre in
poor, the dispossessed and the exploited America today produces food for export.
What is needed then is a redeclaration of
people of this world.
Americans have betrayed the revolu- the individual in terms which have realistic
tionary title. The terms and the articles of meaning in this time.
faith have long since been made the
That a people cannot think itself through
catechism of faithless and heartless problems such as these: that to ask an entire
materialism. The dignity of the individual nation by an act of choice, and act of will,
has grown cancerous, swollen to its present to make freedom a reality under Ihc condistate of. morbidity, a malignant figure tions of contemporary life is to talk in
grasping for power. Hope has been rhetoric, not reason.
betrayed and forgotten. The seed of revoluIf one defines revolution as a scries of
tion, however, remains and grows. Within events that trigger abrupt social, political
this seed, is the influence, the force, the
and economic change, then Americans arc
force of the revolution. Wc have been
in the midst of a revolution. Revolutions
'wrong and fainthearted in our thinking and
arc destructive to societies that are not flexiwc shall be blamed by those who come after
ble, lack imagination and have little
us. They shall blame us,because of the
negative and defensive attitude or mind to discipline.
The dialectic or history demands that wc
which the Republic has been committed.
We have deprived the world of a positive, conduct ourselves with compassion, rabelievable alternative to the grim choice the tionalization and dedication — so that wc
are not merely swept along or trampled
authoritarians now hold before us.
America was to actualize human underfoot by events. The Ayatollah and the
freedom, provide a republican model for a Soviets have awakened us from our narcissisistic stupor, where we were bemused
universal aspiration.
The turning away from the sense of (he by Ihc illusion that there were such things as
American mission has been one of the great purely domestic issues on which we could
focus our attention and our politics. Such
spiritual occlusions of modern times.
The process of change entails certain matters as energy, inflation, taxes and
risks. Change, however, is inevitable as the pollution are not contained neatly within
falling rain. Just as the man who is not lord our national borders. Wc arc part of the
of his soul has become his own enemy, so world and the world increasingly is part of
t o can fear of change overwhelm us all. It us. This is one facl of modern life, that we
is not a question of being able to withstand seem to have a hard time grasping, even al
" " ^ ^
change or even of directing it. It is a qucs- this late date
AWACs Reviewed
parallel responsibility of knowing the issues
and voting as members of the Albany community and, not as a single, separate voting
bloc.
— Louis Trotla
To the Editor:
The recent letter by Larry Friedman opppsing the AW ACs sale illustrates what I \
believe to be the major problem with our
newly attained voting rights in the Albany To the Editor!
area.
Now I'm all for everyone having an opiThough I disagree with Mr, Friedman's nion and all that crap, but sometimes peoopinion of the AWACs situation, and ple can go too far. What I'm talking aboul
found his reasoning to be slightly simplistic is the, quote unquote, ASP Top Ten.
and faulty, my main point of contention is Granted, the ASP is a relatively credible
his suggestion that students use their voting hunk of newsprint with some almost valid
power to oust Sam Stratton should he journalistic worth, but when four
maintain his current stand on the AWACs bonchcads living in a tower or a run down
sale.
student apartment somewhere think they
This type of single-issue voting is very can tell me who the top teams in the nation
narrow-minded and ignores the fact that are, 1 just want to double over.
Mr. Stratton has served this area for quite
Now listen. The guys that make up the
some time and seems to receive a great deal real rankings — they are experts — arc just
of support from his constituents. Though a bit more knowledgeable than some
there is no question that writing to Mr. Italian, two "editors" and a guy named
Stratton and expressing one's opinion is "Biff." Come to think about it, how can a
totally acceptable, it seems that the native fellow who would willingly be called "Biff"
voters of this district would be short- ever think he would be listened to?
changed by a single-issue oriented student
Anyway, I'd wager that all these so-called
voting bloc, regardless of the strength of ASP "experts" probably just look al the
the student turnout.
real rankings and switch numbers eight and
Personally, I found myself obligated to nine. Maybe someone slips a weird team
refuse the opportunity to vole in Albany for like Clemson way up high just to make it inseveral reasons. Each year thousands of teresting. But basically I think the top ten is
students invade this community, but how just a vehicle for these guys to tell
many of us actually know the names, faces themselves that their word means
and policies of the local politicians? How something. 1 hope they like it. I think it's
can any student who lias not made a
stupid.
thorough survey of the local Issues and pro— Name Withheld by Request
posals cast an educated and fair vote? Most
of us arc only here for four or five years; yet
the way we vote in local elections may have
effects that extend far beyond our limited
To the'Editor:
period of concern.
Solidarity Day in Washington D.C. on
1 honestly believe thai students have no
Sept. 19 was also a big day for Socialist
true light to vote in this community.
Labor Party members as wc gave away over
However, since that right has now been ex10,000 free copies of the Labor Day issue of
tended to us, wc must also take on the
Top Ten Tested
Solidarity Day Reply"
Telethon Plans For 1982
To the Editor:
Dance Marathon, SA Used Book Exchange, a trip to Boston, Afternoon at the
In ihc straightened and abject conditions
that this world now faces, il is very unlikely
that freedom will endure among an affluent
l(Wb or less of the world's population.
Wc need to commit ourselves to the
serious effort of restructuring the world's
economy. It is time to face that, we need the
Third world. We cannot live without it. Wc
need its peoples as allies, wc need its raw
materials and wc need its cooperation in
tackling those global problems which
threaten, rich and poor alike.
Bars, parties, and Run for the Gold. These
and many other events are run by one of the
most active student organizations on campus —Telethon.
And as Spring approaches, most students
are ready for the 24-hour talent show that is
held in the Campus Center Ballroom annually.
However, before Telethon '82 T-shirts
are out, students shoud be aware of what
Telethon is, and who we serve.
Telethon raises money to benefit local
children's organizations. We sponsor
events year round to raise money . Wc also
try to develop close relationships with the
children we serve through visits to the
organizations, parties and outini'.s.
The highlight of Telethon is the 24-hour
ialent show that will be held in the
Ballroom on April 2 and 3. The first hour
of Telethon is covered on all three major
. local television networks.
Telethon '82's recipients are the Charlcc
Family Care Program (Children Have All
Rights, Legal, .Educational, Emotional)
and Project Equinox.
• Charlce, which will receive the major
portion of Telethon's funds is a nol-forprofil organization licensed by New York
to care for abused, neglected, pre-deliqucnt
and deliqucnt children ages 6 through 17.
The children are housed in group homes
under the care of surrogate parents, social
workers and other staff where they can
work out their problems in a stable, structured environment.
Project Equinox is a temporary shelter
for runaway children ages 13 to 18. The
shelter is located in downtown Albany near
the bus terminals.
These children need all Ihc care and support that we can give them. Telethon is a
fun and rewarding way 10 meet friends ami
help the community In which we live. We
would love to have everybody join 'is.
For futhor Information eontacl Gres
(457-3318) or Belli (434-0940)
' —(ireg Kill'
—Belli Sexer
the SLP paper The People and close to toss some of that tax dough around for a"
10,000. new leaflets with the title change.
We've tried all the' rest — now wc want
" R e a g a n o m i c s and the American
the best.
Worker." .
—Jay Lustgarten.
There was such a terrific demand for the
Reaganomics leaflets, I had my hands full
trying to keep up with the people taking
more to pass on.
I met people from Woodstock and To the Editor:
JCingston who know me as an active
I have to say that all those years in the
member of the Socialist Labor party. I was closet haven't been easy. I estimate that 1
also interviewed by Cable TV New York.
have spent nearly 400 hours watching the
Driving home, I gave a lift to a truck Giants over the last 13 years. I've even wrildriver who like so many workers, was not . ten letters to the local TV stations when the
aware or the SLP and that it's the third games weren't televised. What has all this,
oldest party in this country.
gotten me?...the frustration of watching
After briefly explaining what the SLP the Giants blow another one. This frustraprogram is to him, he gladly took copies of tion has led me to kick my dog, yell at my
The People and leaflets to distribute to col- mother and seriously damage three televilege student friends and others.
sion sets.
He gave me his name and address to keep
Although 1 may be suffering from deluhim informed of SLP activities in this area. sions (J hear it happens to Giant fans over
The time and effort spent in Washington the years), I think I heard Roger Staubach
was well worth it and made my day! Thank use the term "playoff contender" when
referring to the Giants during last Sunday's
you.
— Nathan Pressman game. However, 1 remember one season
Hudson Valley SLP when the Giant's record was 9-4 and they
only needed to win their last game to make
It to the playoffs. Unfortunately thai game
was against the Los Angeles Rams who
To the Editor:
quickly terminated any glimmer of hope.
Janice Kimmich's reply to Chris Wilson's
No, I'm still not ready to come out of the
letter about Alumni, the forgotten quad, closet,
seemed to convey the impression that the
—Name Withheld by Request
only alternative for those of us who live on
Alumni and feel wc are being neglected is to
move uptown. Her implication is that
Alumni students make the choice to live To the Editor:
downtown, and should therefore bear the
After having completed nearly 4 years of
resulting inconveniences quietly, without college education — being so close to
graduation
that I can smell the onion skin,
complaining.
Let me point out that Alumni houses why should it be that the University still
many freshmen, most of whom do not ask serves to dazzle and confuse me?
I attended an orientation yesterday for
to live downtown, and who are rather upset
when they find out where they have been career placement and the woman in charge
placed. But they soon realize that Alumni nearly blew me away. For a solid hour she
offers a unique living experience, and spoke about career development, career
planning, career searching and career
return overwhelmingly the next year.
Yes, there arc inconveniences to counseling. At such a vulnerable and sendowntown life. But the advantages to living sitive time, why should they throw
in a situation such as the one that Alumni euphemistic jargon around when all I wnal
offers outweigh the minor hassles that exist. is a goddamned job!
Someone please tell this wonderful
Because wc arc separated from the uptown
campus, wc arc forced to create our own university service to get the knack.
—Name Witheld by Request
activities. A sense of community is fostered,
Giant Fan Talk&
Alumni Response"
Career Complaint ~
one that cannot be found on any uptown
quad.
Too often uptowners tend to forgel that
there is a world outside our campus. But the
noise of the children in the Pierce Hall Day
Care Center or the sound of horns honking
on Western Avenue reminds us that we are
people, not only students. Most of the
students on Alumni love it, and would not
move uptown for anything. While those
who have lived both uptown and downtown
say that there is no comparison—it. is
downtown all the way. So instead of telling
us to move uptown, how about recognizing
us for what we arc—a valuable and integral
part of SUNYA.
—Lisa Thomas, President
Alumni Quad Board
Why Not Us
To the Editor:
They have one at Penn; they have one at
Union, and Cornell, and Maryland.
Why is it, on this campus of fifteen thousand students, can there not be a legitimate
pizza parlor? I'm nol talking about those
$1.80 a shot round jobs the Rat sells this
year, nor the wedges of cardboard they sold
last year. 1 mean good All-American pies,
served up in nice big white boxes by someone who knows what he or she is doing.
Is it too much to ask that UAS hire a
licensed pic maker (if there is such a thing)
and a professional oven? Let's see them
Robin Hood Is Dead
Check it out. The new tax credit proposal is here. Believe it
when we say we're not just looking for something to pick on, but
when something good comes along we can't resist.
This tax credit, introduced by Senators Moynihan (D-NY) and
Packwood (R-OR) will provide a maximum $250 tax credit to
families whose children are enrolled in private elementary and
secondary schools, or public and private post-secondary schools.
What's strange here is the balance of the cost involved. President Reagan has vowed to balance the federal budget. At the
same time he has come out in favor of this tax credit.
By the year 1984, this program may cost up to $6 billion.
Where will this money come from? Financial aid programs? It's
certainly a possibility.
The most predictable thing about this proposal is that it is
useless to the poor and benefits the rich. In order to be eligible for
the program, families have to be in or above a lower-middle class
tax bracket.
If all goes through the way wc think it will, Robin Hood will be
turning over in his grave.
The Warriors
The Middle East has recently experienced the traumatic deaths
of two great leaders. Anwar el-Sadat was felled by assassins''
bullets on October 6 and Moshc Dayan died from a heart attack
last Friday. Both men, whether right or wrong, worked for what
they believed in, with each seeking the betterment of the world
situation. They were very different but, in many ways, very
similar. Their losses arc important not only in a political way but
in a spiritual way as well. The world will miss them.
II
unJ id
Established In TST6
Robert E. Qrubman, Editor in Chief
Steven A. Qreenberg, D u n Beti, Managing Editors
Rob EdeWleln, Senior Editor
Ideas For UAS
To the Editor:
An idea for UAS whose lime has come:
the commuter $2.00 special. 1 have the campus center option on my meal plan, but Find
I'm rarely able to eat enough and still stay
below the $2.00 limit. Even the specials
(sandwich, soup, Coke) nearly always exceed the $2.00 mark (unless it's baloney, in
which case who really cares?).
What I propose is a daily $2.00 (no tax)
special that would allow the commuter to
hand over his meal card without digging into his pocket for change. Granted, UAS
might take a "beating" on some of the
more expensive meals, but would be able to
compensate with cheaper dishes on alternate days.
The renovation of the commuter
cafeteria was admirable; let's apply the
same thinking to the food itself.
—Larry O. Jersey
Now* Editor
Associate Nawa Edllora
ASPects Editor*
Ataoclate ASPtctt Editor
Sound Editor
Vlalon Editor
Sportt Editor
Associate Sports Editors
Editorial Pages Editor
Copy Editor
To the Editor:
Commenting on the recent controversy
over Alumni Quad, 1 would like to say that
being a resident there for two years 1 found
the downtown campus a very instrumental
part of SUNYA. I sec no reason for it to be
anything but that in the near future.
—Andrew P. Horn
„„„„„„ ,„ ,„,« £M•gz'z* £*#&*
tripe about any concern? Write a tuiti «
Opinion be heard. Your voice does count.
4
Susan Mllllgan
Judle Elsenborg, Wayne Poereboam
Andrew Carroll, Joanne Weiner
Michael Brandos
Ray Callglure
Mark Roaster
Larry Kahn
Marc Haspel, Michael Carmen
Frank J. Gil. Jr.
Bruce J, Lleber
Stall writers: Bob Bollalloro, Ken Cantor, Hubert-Kenneth Dickey, Michael Dlnowltz, Jim Dixon, Maik Flscheltl,
Mark Gosnor, Dobble Judge, Kalhy Klssano, Eric Koll, Jill Langella, Bruce J. Levy, Llaa Mlrabella, John Moran,
Barbara Schlndlor, Both Soxor, Susan Smith, Jessica Treadway, Zodiac and Preview Editor Marie Garbarlno
Future For Quad ~
WE NEED YOUR LETTERS
ASPECTS
cu.ttliut naqaJt'U
Bonnie Stevens, Business Manager
Janet Drelluss, Advertising Manager
Billing Accountants
Payroll Supervisor
Classified Manager
Composition Manager
Hody Broder, Judy B. Santo, Karen Sardofl
>
Arlene Kaflowllz
September Klein
David Bock
Sales: Bonnie Slovens, Janet Drelluss, David Nelll Yapko Advertising Production Managers: Sue Kaplan, Dlanne
Glacola Advertising Production: Michelle Horowitz, Mara Mondolsohn, Melieaa Wasserman OHIcs stall: Jenmint Bloch, Ellon Epateln, Anno Fried, Jessica Trachter
Dave Thanhauaer, Production Manager
David Bock, Associate Production Manager
Chief Computer Phototypesettlng Technician
Carol Bury
Vertical Camera
Ellasa Beck
Pasteup: Dabble Barnett, Janice Klmmich, Eden Lovino, Elizabeth Valentino, Typists: Judy Amodel, Lynda
Benvenuto, Mary Burke, Konnoih B. Dornbaum, Mario Garbarlno, September Klein, Saralyh Levlno, Cathie Ryan,
Zarl si,.iii Chauffeur: Martha Halnor
Photography, Supplied principally by University Photo Service
Chlaf Photographer: Marc Hensctiet
UPS Stafl; Davo Ashei, Alan Calem, Carl Chan, Shorry Coltun, Mlko Fuller, Bill Krauss, Davtr Maah&on, Lois Matlabonl, Sue Mlndlch, Mark Nudler, Mark Nelson, Suna Sleinkump. Will Yurman
The Albany Student ProBU is published every Tuesday and Friday mi.inrj the school yoar by the Albany Student
Press Corporation, art Independent nol .for-profit corporation. t:>i<" aid are wrltlon by the Editor In Chief vJlh
members of the Editorial Board; policy Is subject to review by tho Editorial Boaid. Advertising policy doos not
noccessa'lly reflect editorial policy.
Mailing address:
Albany Student Press, CC 320
1400 Washington Ave,
Albany, NY 12822
(51B) 457-8U02/3322/33Bt)
Page Twelve
Albany Student Press
Classified
Passport/Application Photos. $5 for
2, $1 for each 2 thereafter.
Tuesdays 1-3 p.m. No appointment
necessary. University Photo Service, CC 305. Any questions? Call
Will or Karl, 7-8867,
Haircuts by Darlln' Deb now at
Ramada Inn Shop. By appointment.
899-4309.
Lead vocalist, tenor, looking to loin
or form top 40 rock bnd. Into
Journey, Boston, Starshlp, Bowie
etc. I nave ability, presence and
some equipment. Serious only call
Adam, 455-6744.
Overseas Jobs — Summer/year
round. Europe. S. Amer.. Australia,
Asia. All fields. $500-$1200 monthly.
Sightseeing. Free Info. Write IJC,
box 52-NY-1, Corona Del Mar, CA
92625.
^ P e r s o n a l s J)
The Rose Man now delivers. Campus Center, M-F.
Freshman
for a strong class governDeadlines:
ment, elect the team of Vlnce CapoTuesdays at 3:30 p.m. for Fribianco, Arlene Katsafouros, Jeff
day
Issues;
Schneider, Vllma Suapengco and
Larry Friedman for freshman class
Fridays at 3:30 p.m. for Tuescouncil.
i
day Issues.
Dear Seth,
Rates:
Congratulations on you know whatl
10 cents per regular word;
With Love, Your Sisters
20 cents per bold word.
Hey guysl How about some roses
for that special someone this
Minimum charge $1.00
Lofts lor sale. Experienced
Class ads are aoepted at the carpenter will custom make lofts for weekend. Campus Center, M-F.
Shotgun,
Contact
Office,
(CC
Lobby your room. All lofts are delivered
This year Is going to be great and so
under the stairs) from 9 a.m. to 4 and assembled In your room at no will all the years after. Happy Birthextra oost. Call Dave, 7-3091 or
p.m.
weekdays.
day. We'll always be a team.
Brian, 7-4504.
Love ya, Trigger
No ads will be printed
without
To Tweely,
name, address or phone
number
Happy Birthday to the bird that flew
on the Advertising
Form. Credit
the cuckoo's nest I We miss ya
may
be extended
but NO
(except Dr. Beanhead). Hope you
nave a happy legal.
refunds will be given.
Editorial
Freelance photographer seeking
Love, Pony, Pig and Bull
policy will not permit ads to be
female to pose. No experience
I'LL SAY GOODBYE TO LOVE!
printed
which contain
blatant
necessary. Write L.C. PO Box 102,
Albany, N.Y. 12201.
Are there any real men on this camprofanity.
Drummer wanted for rock/blues pus? We're still waiting to hear from
If you have any questions or proband. Play dorm parties, etc. We're you. Send resumes (list of exblems
concerning
classified
In It for music, not money. Rob, periences) to: State Quad, Box 1399.
463-5638 or Pete, 455-6884.
advertising,
please
contact
Marie,
Ueptember at 7-3322 or stop by
Models, photographic. PR, portfolio I guess the evidence Is conclusive
now!
and centerfold Hourly rate. If you
lr,r ASP Office In CC 332.
Sept.
;an cut It, contact Cole Productions, PO Box 199, Rensselaer, N.Y. Sharon,
12144-0199. Include name and Happy 20th birthday you screwball
phone number.
you. Here's to graham crackers and
Wanted: Models for top fashion hair grape Jolly! (How was that?)
Love always, Susan
ityllng, men and women. Les
Clseaux Ltd. 1568 Central Ave., Pa~L
Happy 18th. I hope It's the best
Lost: Peace necklace. Sentimental Albany, N.Y. 456-4121.
ever.
value. Please call, Lily, 7-8953.
Big Brother wanted for special 12
Love, A
year
old
boy.
Details,
438-7570
after
Lost: Gold""A.S." Initial ring. Great
P.S.
From
now
on
It's all legal.
5 p.m.
sentlmontal value. Reward offered.
The Rose Man now delivers! Cam.
Please call Amy at 434-4141, extenpus Center, M-F.
sion 366
Andrea and Caryn,
Lost: 3-sub|ect notebook and
Happy Birthday to two of our best
Human Sexuality textbook In LC 23.
sultemates.
If found, please call 7-5096 or rnlurn Electronic Earring and Pin—Hot.
Love, Amy and Pam
to Colonial Tower 1504.
red Love Lite comes complete with
—
a Mini-battery. Guaranteed to lite up Hey Iris,
~
your nlte tlte. Send $6 tor one or $10 Have you heard about the massive
lor two to: Trading, Box 1007-A,
SUNYA women's meeting?
Warwick, R.I. 02888.
Dear JIM,
Never used dish set for 4: dinner
Happy 19th Birthday to my favorite
Ellin
Rider wanted to Buffalo/Hamburg plates, <breakfast plates, bowls,
Love, Vicky
area. Leaving Saturday, Oct. 24 and cups and saucers. Nice design, $15.
returning "unday evening. Call
On the horizon, Widgets are comSeptemb. at 458-B3S9.
Ing. Widgets are coming.
Hey Guys! How about some roses
tor that special someone this
weekendl Campus Center, M-F.
Wrltersl Interested In sports or
publicity? An athletic team will pay To the fun guys,
stipend to someone as You can sleep at my place any time,
Professional Typing Service. IBM a small director.
II interested con- but stop scanning; my cat blew up.
Selectric Typewriter. Call 273-7218 publicity
tact Coach DeMeo at 374-4717 evenSarah
evenings, week-ends.
ings.
To my great f-lends In Cooper 206,
Thanks for making my eighteenth
the best. I love you all.
DJE
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
c
Wanted
y
( F o r S a5«L)
le
jRi<f«es
Services
c
•Jobs
J
$ 1.50 A TUCK
October 20, 1981
Dave and Dov,
Steve Z.,
You've been part of our best and Here's your goddamn fucking permost" unusuartlmes this year. Let's aonall Take IT easy,
keep It upl Happy 19th. We love you
S&M
A ndrea
Love, Diana, Lois, Donna and Sue
,
'„, . . .
, „
-ZZZZLZ:
'.
!
Happy Birthday to the best roomBrian,
-,,.,
.
mate everll Stay wild and peppy
Happy Blrthdayl
and enjoy your dayl
Stanley
'
Lovt)| C a r y n
THE FIRST ANNUAL, INTERNAWidgets, Widgets, Widgets
TIONAL. FIGHTING GATOR CANWatch and Wonder
DID MICROPHONE CONTESTII All
Dearest Lynn,
are eligible. Hide your tape recorder
Happy Birthday to the sweetest grll on your person, in your locker,
In Albany. Thanks for making me so behind the cour'i, (under the pillow)
very happy. I hope to share more at work, anywhere. Then secretly
great times with, you cutle.
record, for eternity, a great moment
Love, Steve In time. Send us that tape and enter
P.S. Please feed the dog.
it in our contest!! All entrants will
,,_„,„„„„
,
receive a T-shirt, and cash prizes of
i-JJft £ i l . . « . . k n . m,„.h i innn for up to $100 will bs awarded to the
a
e
U
m
hi
Si
ih^n
nn^t»
ronr««
2nri
"«»«
tape In these categories;
girl
u
the day when quarter courses end
,g|k ^
| a | k | s m o o t h e s t M n e ' ,JJn.
" u e 3 8 w n o nlest, meanest, most educaStereo Equipment—Wholesale tlonal/lnsplratlonal, goodbye, trash,
Prices. Call for pric i on any compo- and misc. Selected tapes from the
nent.
__— Campus delivered.
x-„
J ,7-7544.
1.....
C a n a d a , New
U S | AUStra||af
Zealand and Europe will be producFreshmen:
Elect an effective, active classmate ed Into a tape entitled, "The
to the Freshmsn Council: Larry G r e a t e s t S e c r e t l y R e c o r d e d
Moments of the 80's, volume I." For
Friedman.
further infor, to submit a tape, or to
Jellybean,
order "Greatest Moments ($6.50)
Happy 6 months! I love you.
write Candid Mike, PO Box 12384,
Teresa University of Florida Station
Passport Photos, B&W or Color. 50 Gainesville, Florida 32601.
cents off with this ad. Act One
This Is getting so redundant!
Studio, 434-3093 for appointment.
Chris, Mary, Sue,
You're the greatestl I can't tell you
how much I love living with you.
Thanks for the wild times.
Love, Kathy continued from page nine
chemical eels nowhere near Ihe
TDK MA-C90's metal tapes, box of
brain."
ten - $45. John, 462-0330.
"Ahoui iwenly Males have conDltler,
Happy 10-month anniversary! I love ceded (In court cases) there's no
you!
Always, Kathy problem with Rush," says Frcc/cr,
who claims his produel Is now legal
Jay,
every
slate
cxcepl
Hey, thanks tor getting me out ot in
the house last night. The wine was Massachusselts and Georgia.
nice, the steak was great, but the
" I n c r i e d , " Frcc/ci proclaims
bench was pretty
uncomfortable.
I'm getting too old lor this "we're ihe third legr' hedonistic^
Computer Club meeting tonite, produel in America, c long with
Tuesday, October 20, LC 21, 8:00 lohacco and alchohol."
p.m. Guest speaker, discussing
Marc Bernslein, whose M-S-B
computing center services. All are
welcome. Refreshments will be Associates manufacture .stimulants .
served.
such as Tool, Zoom and Rclax-U,
Kalrlna,
lakes almost a Guru's attitude
G.I. Joe and I love you very much.
toward his products. "Zoom was
Is Rich really pregnant?
first extracted from exotic plants by
The Rose Man now delivers. CamSouth American Indians," lie
pus Center, M-F.
Four Directions: (That's you East claims, while "Relax-U is a synthesis of foods used in ancient
and West),
I miss you both a lot. Please have a limes. Its ingredients are similiar to
drink at W.T.'s for me. Good luck
dietary ptcpara'lons laken by
and write oftenl
Love ya, North millions of people."
"It's difficult to prove a new
Todd,
We hope you didn't mean what you drug is dangerous," admits FDA's
said. Good friends should forgive
Chris Smith, "hut there are other
and forget.
Hedy and Jennifer measures we can lake." Generally
P.S. Please don't whiten us outl
unable in make a case on drug
abuse ground, Ihe agency is now
pursuing a different angle —
counterfeiting.
"Tile phony drugs are designed
In look exactly like Ihe real thing,"
says Smith, whose agency seized the
products o f nine d i f f e r e n t
stimulant manufacturers in a surprise raid Scplembci .10th. Mosi of
the companies were located i lie New
Ynr|> and Pennsylvania, Willi lite
lowtt of Milloy. Pa. fingered as
"(he cenlet I'oi most naiion-wide
sllimilam activity," by Smith,
Smith iraees stlmulam mntuil'neuirning to around 1975, selling
nlmosi exclusively to truck drivers.
" I i wasn't until Ihe past ycai ot so
these things caught on around college campuses, partly due to ihe
general dici pill crave among college
kids."
Dean I aiimei, associate editor of
High Tillies iiKign/inc, is skeptical
iihoul lite stimulants' value. "These
iliiugs will keep you awake, impair
your d i d , and you'd build up a
total tolerance within two weeks,"
lie scoffs. " I Hied to be a spect[
freaki and taking this new stuff is
like taking two oi three cups of
Turkish coffee. It doesn't do much
Of anything."
Drugs
[email protected] A (§©®P TPCK CAtLb
Michael Schwartz 457-4744
Larry Adolf 457-8691
•
All proceeds to Telethon '82 ]
2:00 - 5:00
fiioitiaj! Oriubrr 20th
r u m p u s Center Room 3,H2
EAGLE ST. PUB
42Eap>St.
Thursday, October 22
V. GRAY
Ri-;ck and Roll Star al Larqe
I HEK DRINK WITH THIS ADD
Good 1 0 / 2 2 tt.111 1 0 / 2 1
—•^•'-'••n-'—•«-—««^W-laW
Have you been at SUNYA
for 4 yrs?
Do you have a 3.0?
Are you a Jr. or Sr.?
Need Extra
Money?
If so Apply
Peer
Now to be a
Advisor
Call Lisa Orgera at 457-8087
for Appt.
I WINK
SI'I'IMS
9pm - M f D J V f G ' i i
P M T I i r . H O I ttl N N V $ 2 . i . i
•SIN A N D V O D K A P R I N K S . 8 5 t
WEDSESDAY
TUESDAY
l 8'Br.AT JAZ7 WITH
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H
DOWNTIME
THURSDAY.
FRIDAY.
SATURDAY
"TAPS"
I O R D O N (ilsA'.
' ' in 1 -
Page Thirteen
Albany'Student Press ' '
Elections will b e held for 1 State
Board Representative for the New
York Public Interest Research Group,
Inc. (NYPIRG)
Visit The Mousetrap for a mellow at- To all those murderers In Bleecker:
mosphere and great entertanment. D eath Is Imminent, so get out there
2nd floor, Campus Center. (Closed and kill kill kill'
this weekend.)
laumm^^mi^^^maiiaimiuuiiaaiui^^^^^^^^^^
Hey Guysl How about some roses
Hey Punkln,
for that special someone this
Happy 2 yearsl
weekendl
Campus Center, M-F.
ILY, Loretta
Hey Guysl How about some roses The Mousetrap — It's the wine and
for that special someone this cheese place on campus. Open Friday and Saturdya nights.
weekend? Campus Center, M-F.
iI
Includes milk & cookies
jober20, 1981
Mill
i tni<Mil S l I N V I D Oil T h u r s d a y s
SUNDAY
"1 H I : M O R O N S A N D T H E E X T R A S "
I i l l (I K D l i l i l
Si|»tM I.lis
1-10 dully
WEDNESDAYS.
FRIDAYS
Clams $ I . 9 P M n w i
MADISON AVE * ONTARIO Sff • ALBA.MY.
40Z-or&r
|Preview]
Outing Club — There will be an interest meeting on
Wednesday al 8:00 p.m.in LC 5. For Info, call
458-8678.
Association for Computing Machinery — Computing
club meeting tonight (Oct.20) in LC 22 at 8:00 p.m.
French Conversation Club — Mcsdamcs et Messieurs,
Naus avons leplalsir dc vuus proposer uiic soiree cntrc
gens de la communaaic qui sintcrcsscnt a parlcr franeais. Come to die Downtown Campus, Saylcs Ballroom
Tuesday Oct 20, 7:30-10:00. For Info (or a translation
of this message) call 455-6974.
Class of 1982 — Senior Meeting — Oct Involved in
Senior Week planning. Tucs. Oct. 20, at 8:00 p.m. in
Campus Center Assembly Hall.
Chapel House — The services arc open to the public.
The mass schedule is as follows:
Gay and Lesbian Alliance — Come to our weekly
meeting in campus center 333 on Tuesday, October 20,
at 8:30. All arc welcome.
Society of Physics Students — presents a slide show and
lecture by Charles Stevens from the Fusion Energy
Foundation al 8:00 p.m. Thurs. Oct. 22. Location to be
announced. Conlact Kathy Wcsscr al 438-4083.
Women's Studies Program / University Seminars Program — Research on Women Colloquium. Dr. Linda
Nicholson presents "The Private and the Public:
Women and the Emergence of Class Society".
Humanities Lounge (HU354) Wednesday, Oct. 21
at!2:15-l:30. For more Info: Judith Hudson 457-7595.
Answer Me That Club — more info on this newly formed club coming soon.
Anthropology Club — An Interest meeting will be held
on Wed. Ocl. 21 in SS 388 al 4:00p.m. to discuss future
club cvenls. All invited. For Info call Alicia Rudin at
482-0473.
Sal., 6:30pm — Chapel House. Sun. 12:30pm —
Chapel House. Daily 11:15am — CC 361. Sun.
Lutheran Campus Ministry protcslant community —
Holy
Communion
— Chapel
House.
Students who want to VOLUNTEER at
ALBANY MEDICAL
CENTER HOSPITAL
for community service
M U S T C A L L 4 4 5 - 3 4 9 1 to make an
appointment for an interview during the week
of October 19th.
JSC-Hillel
presents:
ROLLER SKATING
Have a Gripe?
Pissed Off?
Is Something
Being Done in
the Right
Direction?
Voice your
opinion.
Write a letter to
the editor.
Go to sea
and earn credit
this Spring
Sail the Caribbean and Atlantic on a 100
loot schooner as part ot Southampton
College's 1982 SEAmesleri" program.
Study Ihe coastline, barrier and
coral reels, plus marine lite. Visit major
seaports and points of interest
Accredited courses In- "Ecology, Ichthyology. Navlg
and Seamanship, Literaturo
lha Sat, American Maritime
History, Natural History, '
Sailing.
April 4. 1982 10
June 5, 1982.
m m )
mini
Page Fourteen
Albany Student Press
m m
The p r i c e
©ffsrtyle
ha* j u s t c o m e
down!
Sports
October 20, 1981
Lions Down
Bears 47-17
P O N T I A C , M i c h . (AP) Secondyear quarterback Eric Hippie, making his first National
Football
League start, passed for 336 yards
and four touchdowns and rait for
t w o other scores, leading the
Detroit Lions to a 48-17 victory
over the Chicago Bears Monday
night.
Hippie, a fourth-round
draft
choice out of Utah Slate who
started ihe season as Detroit's
number three quarterback, goi the
call after second-stringer
Jeff
Komlo faltered for two straigbl
weeks in relief of injured regular
Gary Daniclsnn.
Save J*30 or more on S ^ t M ™ *
College Rings ...now only*»*.»» .
SILADIUM rings produce the
brilliant lustre of a fine jeweler's
stainless.
Men's and women's Siladium
rings are on sale this week
only through your
ArtCarved representative.
A visit to the ArtCarved
H
College Ring table will give you
the chance to see the full
collection of rings for the fall.
But hurry on over... this sale
runs for a limited
time only.
Hippie hud louchdown runs of I
and 4 yards, and tossed a 2-yard
louchdown pass to Rick Kane as
Del roil stormed to a 27-14 halfiimc
lead.
Hippie, who completed 14 o f 25
passes, hit David Hill with a 10-yard
louchdown pass in ihe third quarter
and connected with Freddie Scoll
on a 44-yard T D pass play in lite
fourth quarter. Late In ihe game, lie
hil
Leonard T h o m p s o n
on a
94-yard play, the ihiid-longcst scoring pass in club history.
Eddie Murray hooted field goals
of 49 and 53 yards for Ihe Lions,
who improved Iheir record lo 3-4.
" ^
/IRTQIRVED
X.CLASSRINGS.INC.
DATE
October 21st,22nd,23rd.
TIME
10:00 am to 3:00 pm
PLACE BARNES AND NOBLE BOOKSTORE
Deposit required. MuMlLTClmrgi' cir Yisii UCCC|||C(I.
r
1
i
©HIBI ArtCiirvcil CllfflS Kinds
tBgmggiBmigggggmgiggBgB
un.i.v.:iimumrrnTmtmv.i.i!
Chicago wide receiver
Marcus
Anderson
scored
an
85-yard
touchdown after taking a short pass
from quarterback
Vinec
Evans,
Waller Paylon dove 1 yard for
anolher score and John Rooyeto
kicked a 22-yard field goal as ihe
Bears' record fell IO 1-6.
Hippie threw only four passes in
the second half, bin completed all
four and eorfneered mr touchdowns
on his lasi three,
„
Ihe 48 poinls were Ihe most for a
Detroit team in a regular-season
game since Ihe Lions heal San Francisco 48-7 in 1954.
The Lions won Ihe loss and H i p pie sci Ihe lone for die entire ball
game on ihe very first play as he
lofted a perfect pass io Scon for a
48-yard gain.
Page Fifteen
CAPITOL
CHAMBER
p, Albany Student Cress
Sports
iUHLTk
October 20,1981
AT ALBANY ACADEMY
Monday's Blast
continued from page seventeen
pitches outside the strike zone. Parris fouled off the next pitch. Then
Parrish walked on a high pitch.
Sunday, 2 5 Oct '81 at 3pm
R P K H Mm/pi
Harasirhorrl
Mary Lou haet'ta, Violin
Irvlri Gllman, Flule
Helen Annas. Cello
ALL
SHOES'
f I • IW
SUNYA STUDENT SPECIAL
2 TisUoAK.
$ 3 . 0 0 per ticket,
f o r ll><» n r i r o . o f o n e !
VALUES T O
W U
1
A PAIR
'NFUTWNnOHTMPjjei
j . JSJ&§\
Ill
i
Leather Boots From $ 2 7 . 9 0
Alhr/nv
Ar.r/riip.nni
Aendrwy
Auditorium
Vtoad- off Neti)
Scotland
ALBANY
STORE
DAILY AND SATURDAY I H , SUNDAY 12-5
'OPEN
THREE DOORS DOWN FROM GRAND UNION
SCHENECTADY
STORE
Across tro'Ti Weitgatc Shopping Center
OPEN D A I L Y 10-5:30, T h u r v T I L ••
"V&eds'strength
wuz a real ocm^brt
to us the night the
izzan dint!"
Pappy McCoy, Railroad Surveyor, Chicago & Ouray Railroad.
Uhtil you needed it,
Jeremiah's strength wasn't
that obvious. But his spirit
and might were always
there, ready to help dig a
friend out of whatever trouble he was in. Just woe
betide the body who took
him lightly. —***~~
Jeremiah Weed is more
than a legacy. It's a tribute
to a 100 proof maverick.
(3.00 each)
9:00am
9:45 am
10:30am
in the gym on Saturday night(sP°nsore^ bySpeakers
Forum)
to be followed by a pizza and Jazz Band party
(sponsored by the Dean of Student Affairs)
iaii**ai
I ^ ^ P I ^
\tikmmmi
f
c
£ £ £
'.I ' ' l l i >nlu
IK.KI . 1 ' , A I M i l . DOOR
BarBIrEffiatefl
m
y/£
A
NEVER
Parentis Weekend B r ^
A^
• •
^
UNDERSOLD
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October 25th
Tickets on sale in Contact Office
Breakfast
Times: Patroon Room
1
rtcJ
CC Cafeteria
Ofi
0
CC Ballroom
I H
A N D
IOO Proof' Jeremmi
Jeremiah Weed* Bourbon liqueur. ® 1981 Heublein, Inc., Hartford, Conn.
Lasorda bounced out of. the
dugout and called on Welch. Welch
came in and got White to bounce
out to end the game.
The Expos jumped on Valenzuela
in the first inning.
Tim Raines fought off a 0-2
count and doubled to right center
on a 3-2 pitch. Raines advanced to
third when Valenzuela fielded
Rodney Scotl's bunt and threw too
late to third to get Raines. Scott was
safe at first on the fielder's choice
sacrifice.
Raines then scored when Andre
Dawson grounded into a double
play. Carter filed lo center, ending
the inning.
The Dodgers had threatened
against Burris in the first When Bill
Russell tripled into the right field
corner, but the Expos right-hander
retired Dusty Baker and Oarvcy to
work out of trouble. In the rourth,
Ihe Dodgers again got a runner to
third, but couldn't get him home.
Russell then singled to left the
Dodgers' second hit of the game.
He took second when Baker tapped
in front of the plate and was thrown
out. Garvey's long fly to left advanced Russell to third, but Cey
then fouled out to first baseman
Warren Cromartie.
Los Angeles tied it 1-1' in the
fifth, with their first run in 14 innings off Burris, who shut them out
in the second game of the series.
Monday opened the inning with a
single and raced to third on a single
by Pedro Guerrero. The Expos'
bullpen stirred, as Sun Bahnsen
began loosening up.
Burris, however, retired Mike
Scioscia on a line drive to Scott at
second for the first out. But Valenzuela, one of baseball's better hitting pitchers, grounded to the right
side scoring Monday.
Now Rogers, the Expos' ace,
joined Bahnsen throwing in the
bullpen. Davey Lopes got a life and
Guerrero moved to third when
shortstop Chris Speier threw high to
first for an error. Burris, however,
worked out of the jam, by retiring
Russell on an infield out.
Meanwhile, after Scott's fielder's
choice sacrifice in the first, only
three Expos reached base against
Valenzuela through the seventh.
Carter singled with two out in the
fourth; Parrish doubled with two
down in the seventh, and Cromartie
received an intentional walk after a
2-2 count, also in ihe seventh.
At the start of the Dodgers' sixth,
Jeff Rcardon began warming up.
His relief work through the
September stretch and in the intradivision scries victory over
Philadelphia helped win the league
championship scries. He was joined
by left-hander Woodie Fryman. But
Burris retired ihe Dodgers In order,
and the Montreal bullpen relaxed.
Valenzuela, who had retired 19 of
20 batters through the first two
Monlreal outs in the seventh, then
ran into trouble.
Parrish doubled to left on a J I
count, ana White was then purposely walked. But Valenzuela gol
out of the jam by retiring Cromartie
on a foul to the catcher.
Montreal Manager Jim Fanning
sent outfielder Tim Wallach to bat
for Burris in the eighth, but he was
just the second out as Valenzuela
struck out one and walked .one in
eight innings.
I . . . I 1 I I I . . . . . U I M < . < - > L U
HLI1I11II I I !••»•••*
i m i m i n » » l l ^ » i
• 1.1 . » « « T 1. U T r a T T
Albany Student Press
Spoils October 20, 1981,
Page Seventeen
Netters Volley Mann To 20th Winning Season
by Sharon Cole
Peggy Mann moved one step
closer Saturday to her twentieth
consecutive winning season, as the
Albany State women's tennis team
defeated Union, 5-2.
The win was played at Union and
boosted the Danes' record to 4-3.
Mann said, "the weather was
beautiful; the best we've ever had."
Nancy Light started the day off
right for the Danes by winning her
match 6-2, 6-4. Carl Solomon
quickly followed suit by winning In
strong style, 6-0, 6-1, as did Pam
Duchin, 6-2, 6-3.
The Danes' only two losses on the
day were by Lauren Isaacs, 2-6,4-6,
and Ellen Yun, 6-2, 5-7, 0-6, the
team's only freshman.
In doubles action Sandra Borclle
and Karen O'Connor won 6-2, 6-1,
and Nancy Levine and Cathy Comerford teamed up to win 6-2, 6-1.
Great Dane
Sports This Week
.Women's varsity soccer vs. Hartwick
Tuesday, 10-20 on field behind Dutch, 3:30
Women's varsity tennis vs. Amherst
Wednesday, 10-21 at Amherst, 3:30
Men's Junior varsity soccer vs. Vassar
Wednesday, 10-21 on field behind Dutch, 3:30
Women's varsity volleyball vs. Onconta
Thursday, 10-22 in University Gym, 7:00
Women's varsity soccer vs. Plattsburgh
Friday, 10-23 on field behind Dutch, 3:00
Men's Junior varsity football vs. Nassau Community College
Friday, 10-23 on University Field, 3:30
Mann is confident that wins will
be scored Monday at Oneonta and
Wednesday at Amherst. If the
Danes are successful this will mark
20 years of winning seasons. Mann
has not yet had a losing season in
her 19 years as tennis coach at
Albany.
Mann will be taking her two top
singles players and doubles teams to
Rochester this weekend for the
State Championships. Making the
trip will be singles players Cari
Solomon and Duchin, and doubles
teams Light and Joan Phillips, and
Borclle and O'Connor.
Phillips didn't play in the Union
match because of a hurt knee, but
Mann is hoping she will be complctcy recovered for the Rochester
trip.
Top colleges from Divisions I and
II will jojH division III Albany in
the states. Mann is sending the
Danes lo the higher level contest
because she "likes the competition
these schools offer."
Mann knows the competition will
be tough but said, "I think we're
going lo do well."
A 5-2 win over Union puts Coach Peggy Mann well on the way to her twentieth winning season as coach. (Photo: Mike Fuller)
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HOMECOMING «
MONTREAL (AP) Outfielder Rick
Monday slammed a two-out home
run in the ninth inning and rookie
Fernando Valcnzuela allowed only
three hits in 8 2/3 innings as the Los
Angeles Dodgers beat the Montreal
Expos 2-1 Monday for the National
League pennant.
Reliever Bob Welch got the final
out on one pitch.
The Dodgers, winning their
fourth league championship scries,
qualified lo meet the American
League champion New York
Yankees in the World Series beginning Tuesday night at New York.
Los Angeles won the NL scries
3-2, splitting the first two games at
home,, falling behind by losing the
third game here, then rallying to
win the final two.
The deciding game was postponed because of rain aftci more than a
four-hour wait Sunday and was
delayed 26 minutes because of rain
Monday.
It was the first home run of the
series for Monday, who was put into the lineup in the third game for
slumping Ken Landreaux.
Monday, who had 11 home runs
during the regular season, homered
off Montreal ace Steve Rogers, who
made his first relief appearance
since July 3, 1978.
I Rogers retired Steve Oarvey and
Ron Cey in the ninth before Monday drove a 3-1 pitqh over the center
field fence about 400 feet away.
Valenzuela then retired the first two
Expos in the ninth, then walked catcher Oary Carter.
M FRIDAY
FNDIAN QUAD LAKE
F e p Rally 7 : 3 0 p m
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Meet the Danes,
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That brought Los Angeles
Manager Tom Lasorda to the
mound for a quick word with the
20-year-old Mexican left-hander.
Jerry Manuel ran for Carter, as
, Larry.Parrlsh came to bat. ValenI zuela got two quick strikes on Pari J rish, but then fell behind with three
continued on page fifteen
FOOTBALL GAME 1:30PM
VICTORY PARTY TO BE ANNOUNCED
FUNDED BY STUDENT ASSOCIATION, OFFICE OF DEAN
OF STUDENT AFFAIRS AND U.A.S.
Monday's Blast
Sends Dodgers
To World Series
DISCOVER THE CHOCOLATE MINT FLAVOR OF IRISH
M
°
^
^
Athlete of Week
Nominations Due
Monday 1 PM
inCC329
mmm
wmm
Presents
r ^
Page Eighteen
Albany Student Press', "
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Sports
O c t o b e r 20, li.81
continued from page twenty
swept outside, but he only gained
one and Cortland took over.
After being set back by a delay of
game penalty, the Dragons moved
downfield from their own 20 yard
line to the Albany 23, including a
38-yard gain by Cook. On fourthand-ninc, Armstrong's field goal attempt of 41 yards was no good, giving the Danes another chance.
But Albany could do little as on
third-and-nlne at tlieir own 24,
Brien threw a split-end option pass
on a reverse from Roth that was intercepted at the Albany 36 by Armstrong playing in the defensive
secondary.
Albany had one more chance in
the game to score when with under
a minute remaining, the Danes took
over al their own 20 yard line. After
a Priore handoff gained only one
yard, Roth connected with Ennls
for a 25-yard pass completion putting the Danes very near midfield.
But lime ran out on Albany
before the Danes could go any further. Rolh overthrew' an open
Priore downfield, then a quarterback keeper moved the ball just six
yards. On the final play of the game
Roth threw an Incomplete pass.
On the day, Roth was 10 for 19
for 106 yards and, in the final
quarter, he proved thai he could
lead the offense. But on lliis day
time ran out too soon.
As co-captain Priore said afterwards, "It's funny, we played one
quarter of football and they played
three and we almost beat them."
But' for Albany the loss has to
have mote immediate effect on their
playoff chances. "I'd have to say
that our playoff chances have been
disasterously crushed afler this
one," said Ford.
«*5E£»
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13
COM—Clink 3 run (pais failed)
Corl—Howe n tun (Armstrong kick)
Carl—Schwon 56 paw from Cieply (Armsttnng
kickl
Alh—Urien 3 pass from Until (Lincoln kick)
All,—Rolh 6 run (Lincoln kick)
Albany
*«*>^
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111
I'u : ilix
Rushes-yards
Massing yards
I'nsses
Fumblcs-lost
I'cnnlties-yaids
I'unts-a rage
5-41
5-34.4
Cortland
13
44-210
113
J.11-1
l-l
3-37
4-33.4
Sports October 2 0 , 1 9 8 1 ,
by Mark Gesner
by Michael. Carmen
There are many topics to discuss in a column, but the conversation
always returns to apathy, to lack of school spirit. I'm not going to
harp on this issue telling you how great the Albany teams are and write
that I just can't understand why the student body is like they are. No!
' I'm sure you read the newspaper and realize the Danes are doing
well. I know we all have a lot of work to do on Saturday afternoons.
Or maybe you're just too strung out from Friday night to walk over to
the football field.
Of course, the students at the University of Michigan have the same
problems and 105,000 Tans turn out at Michigan Stadium to watch the
Wolverines.
Okay, it's cool. But this weekend is Homecoming Weekend — a
special event at SUN YA. It's also Parents' Weekend and many or your
parents will be on campus. How about this for an idea: since you're
not going to be doing any work and will be wide awake, why not try a
Danes vs. Norwich football game.
I'll guarantee that you will not be bored by the great Albany defense
and the running exploits of Chuck Priore. If you are put to sleep by
this great rivalry then send your letters lo me.
However, there is something that has stumped me. Intramurals are
taken seriously by many people al SUNYA. In softball alone, over 100
teams are competing for the shirts. In the pasl, there has been criticism
concerning the ASP'i coverage of the inlramural sports scene. We're
doing our best to improve the situation, One of the new innovations is
the/ISP Intramural Athlete of the Week. We thought we advertised its
start very well. The winner receives a Budweiser jackei worth 23 bucks
— a pretty fair deal.
Interestingly, I walk in here to the office Monday and expect lo
find 20, maybe 30, nominations from inlramural coaches. I found
two! Give me a break. Lei's go to the videotape. 1 told Larry Kahn,
the Sports Editor, that the contest jusl began and people need lime lo
catch on. Please — prove me right. I can'l possibly understand why
there would be no Interest in this feature,
To conclude, I urn simply trying lo say participate in the Homecoming Weekend festivities, take in the football game, and show some interest in the ASP Athlete of the Week contest.
The women's varsity soccer team
ended its streak of nine victories
after suffering a 5-0 defeat this past
Saturday against the University of
Rochester. The highly ranked opponent displayed pinpoint accuracy as
"they made no mistakes — and
capitalized on all of ours," explained Dane Coach Amy Kidder.
Difficulties began for Albany
during the first period when
Rochester converted on a penalty
kick, and then went on to score
three more times before the
halftlme break. Albany came out
with a strong second half — giving
up only one goal. However, as was
the problem the entire contest, the
Dane offense was completely shut
down.
In spite of the fact that five balls
found their way to the net,
goalkeeper Laurie Briggs put forth
an outstanding effort. Totaling an
impressive 15 saves for the day, the
senior was "able to save the first
shots, but not the second or the
third," according to Kidder.
Now, with only four games remaining, the booters look forward
to participating in the State Tourna-
'PREPARE
The Albany Stale women's soccer team suffered their first loss on Saturday when they ran into a very
tough University of Rochester squad. The booters play Hartwlck today at home. (Photo: Will Yurman)
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rit-ffir-irffiTffirrt^^
'ii
Rushing—Albany. Priore 19-94, Rolh 13-40, Ncuting l-l IN, Dricn 2-19, Corlland, Cook 24-111 llovvc
13-73.
Passing-Albany, Roll) 10-19-0-106, Nupp
1-1-0-22, Dricn 0-1-I-O. Cortlund, Cicply 3-10-0-113,
llowcO-l-l-U,
Receiving—Albany, Ennis 3*33, Ncaring 4-43,
I'riorc 2-21, McOulre 1-12, iiilen 1-3. Cotlland,
Milliard 3-47, Schwan 2-26.
32
32
31
30
24
17
1
9
9
10.
8
P
awarded
on a
10,9, 6,5,4,3,3,2,1 basis. ASP
Top Ten compiled by Bob
Bellqfiore, Mike Carmen, Bifj
Fischer, and Larry Kahn,
ment taking place at the end of the
month. The major factor in the
minds of the players now Is as to
what placement the team will
receive in the States.
The higher Albany is ranked, the
better chance the women will have
in drawing a lesser opponent in the
first round of the playoffs.
A big obstacle the squad faces at
this point is in today's game against
Hartwlck. Co-Captain Briggs comments that "it could be the best ,%
game of the season as far as a matching up of skills goes." The game
will be played home at 3:00.
•*
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Successfully competing on this test qualifies you for consideration by the National Security Agency. NSA is currently seeking top
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If you qualify on the PQT, you will be contacted regarding an
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So pick up a PQT bulletin at your college placement office. Fill
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All NSA career positionsrequireU.S. citizenship, a thorough
background investigation, and a medical examination.
Page Nineteen
gPBBtfg Gm^MM Women Booters Kicked Back 4 4
Give Me a Break
Run Out of Time
Albany
Corllind
, Albany Student Press
THE ROSE MAM
DELIVERS
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l
CAMPUS CENTER MON-FRI
by Madeline Poscuccl
Frustration is the key thought
right now," said Coach Bill Schieffelin, commenting on his Albany
Stale men's soccer team's 4-1 loss to
Binghamlon Saturday.
Schieffelin said he thought it was
a "well played game", but the team
had problems "not being able to get
the ball in the net" as well as playing with an inexperienced defense.
Binghamton scored the first goal
of the game al 4:20 off a direct free
kick. Binghamton's Nate Gcorgio
made the second goal 20 minutes into the first half. Albany's only goal
was made about 30 minutes into the
first half by Afram Neraj.
Sixteen minutes into the second
half a shot by Oeorgio slipped out
of gbaltender Bill Steffen's hands
for Binghamton's third goal. A
defense change could not stop
Binghamton from scoring again
with 15 minutes left in the game.
Binghamton out shot Albany
•13-8, but the Colonial goalie had
only four saves to Steffen's seven.
Schieffelin felt that injuries as
well as a need to rebuild the team
more than he thought he would
contributed to this loss and the unsuccessful season.
"Normally at this time of year we
are in contention for the NCAAs,"
said the disappointed coach, adding
that al this point in the season he is
concentrating in trying to build up
the team for next year.
Participate in
Homecoming
Week Events
Women Netters
Win
page 17
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
October 20, 1981
es Run Out of Time; Cortland Wins, 20-14
by Marc Haspel
CORTLAND — Usually 60
minutes of football is more than
ample time for a team to answer
any lingering pre-game questions.'
Normally those questions left
unanswered by game time get
answered by game's end. But the i
question facing the Albany State.
Great Danes prior to Saturday's
game with the Cortland Red'
Dragons at Carl "Chugger" Davis
Field wasn't just a normal question.
P
Rather, considering the time of
the season, it was quite an extraordinary one: whether or not an inexperienced sophomore quarterback,
Tom Roth, could lead the wishbone
offense in place of the injured Tom
Pratt? For a good part of the game,
it appeared maybe not right away.
It looked as if Roth needed more
time to adjust. Then as the game
wore on, the answer began to look
increasingly yes. However, time ran
out on Albany before it could suc-
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Rob Ncaring displayed his versatility out of the hackfii-ld, catching four
pusses in Saturday's loss. (Photo: Mark Nadlcr)
cessfully qualify that positive ver- the bat.
"With a new quarterback in, we
dict as the Danes fell to Cortland
had to get field position out of our
20-14.
"Tommy's (Roth) not as good a kicking game and immediately they
thrower as Pratt," assessed Albany got the long kick off return," said
State head coach Bob Ford. "But Ford.
he moved the ball as well as we
The Dragons took full advantage
could have expected."
of the golden opportunity by proBut in the first half ball move- mptly 'marching down the field in
ment was almost non-existent as the ten plays and capitalizing on
Dane offense just couldn't seem to Cook's 3-yard run Into the end zone
get it going. With the relatively at 11:03.
untested arm of Roth, Ford was
On the ensuing extra point atreluctant to put the ball in the air tempt, Dragon placekicker Steve
during the opening half. Albany Armstrong missed but the Danes
relied heavily on its ground game to were called off-side. On fhe second
compensate for the loss of Pratt's chance Dragon head coach Ed
throwing ability. . As a result, Decker, elected to try for the two
Albany had possession six times point conversion, but Cieply's pass
over the opening thirty minutes of intended for Frank Burm was inplay, but got no further than the complete and Cortland led 6-0.
Cortland 36 yard line the one time
Both teams traded a pair of
they penetrated Dragon territory.
punts, and on the Danes' third
On the other side of the coin, all possession of the first quarter, they
the offensive fireworks were turned took over at their own 4 yard line.
in by Dragon quarterback Jay Ciep- Roth gave the ball to fullback
ly (five for 10 for 113 yards passing) Chuck Priorc and Rob Ncaring for
and his two strong backs, Mike short gains, but on third-and-six
Bowe who rushed for 73 yards and Jay Ennis fumbled and the ball was
Dave Cook, a' 175 pound fullback, recovered by Cortland's Brian
Moran very deep in Dane territory.
who netted 111 yards on the day.
On Cortland's first play Bowe
"The backs ran with a tremendous amount of ability," said Ford legged into the end zone on an eight
yard run. Armstrong's extra point
of the Dragon backfield.
was good and Cortland opened a
But the big difference in the first
13-0 lead.
half as Cortland took a 13-0 lead
was the play of the Dragons' huge
In the second quarter, neither
offensive line. Weighing in at an team was able to put points on the
average of over 250 pounds, board. Cortland threatened but
linetpen Paul Alexander, Greg Armstrong's 46-yard field goal atVairo, center John Irion, Bill Pll- tempt was not good.
torlno and Rich Ryan provided
On their final possession of the
Cie'ply with plenty of time to work half, Albany at last started to move.
while opening up many holes for A drive that originated from the
the Dragon power backs.
Danes' 29 yard line penetrated the
"They were big up front," said Dragon end for the first time in the
Ford. "We thought they were not game and was highlighted by a surcapable of manhandling us but they prising 22 yard pass completion to
did. When they had to, they popped back Rob Nearing, but the Danes
were stifled at the Cortland 36.
a couple of long ones."
And those long ones started early
Cortland increased their lead to
for the Red Dragons. Cortland's 20-0 on a 56 yard pass to wide
Tom Lee returned Tom Lincoln's receiver Pete Schwan with 4:00 reopening kick off 40 yards to the
Albany 48. Again uncertain of
Roth's aim at quarterback, the
Danes had hoped' to pin the
Dragon's back with their kicking
game. So, Lee's return was a blow
to the Albany game plan right off
maining in the third quarter.
Schwan was wide open down the
right sideline as Dane cornerback
Bruce Collins tripped while coming
over to cover him. Collins went
down and had to be taken off the
field with a stretcher.
At this point, nothing seemed to
be going right for Albany. But on
their next possession things started
changing and Roth looked very
poised as the Danes drove 84 yards,
scoring on a 3-yard pass from Roth
to receiver Bob Brien. Brien was"
isolated on the right side and then
ran a crossing pattern in the end
zone with 10:39 left in the game.
Lincoln's kick was good and
Albany cut the lead to 20-7.
On the following kick off, the
Danes successfully retained possession by pulling off a beautiful onside kick.
"The onsidc kick was a beautiful
execution," commented Ford.
NJw with excellent field position
on the Cortland 43, the Danes went
to work again. A 28-yard Priorc run
brought Albany to the 15, then
after three short runs by Ennis,
Priore and Nearing, Roth bootlegged it in from six yards out with just
8:35 to go in the fourth quarter.
Again Lincoln was good on the conversion and Albany trailed only
20-14.
Cortland's tight end Mike
Milliard fumbled on the Dragons'
next possession after he was crunched by Dane John DiBari. Albany
reebvered on the 45 yard line with a
great opportunity to even the score.
On thr first play from scrimmage,
Nearing ran for 10 yards and
another first down. Priore went up
the middle for another four yards to
put Albany on the Dragon 31.
Roth's next pass attempt intended
for Ennis fell incomplete and on
third-and-six Priore added three
more yards. But then on fourthand-two, Roth kept the ball as he
continued on page eighteen
Harriers Third in SVNYACMeet
by Ken Cantor
The Albany State men's cross
country team placed third in the
SUNYACs at Fredonia on Saturday, while the women's team finished eighth in the ten team Hartwick
College Invitational tournament.
The men's squad came in third
behind Fredonia and Binghamton.
Fredonia had 27 point], while
Binghamton finished with 76
points. Albany finished with 88
points, and Cortland followed with
115 points.
"Fredonia had a very lough
learn. We really didn't expect to
beat them," said Albany State
men's coach Bob Munscy;
Scott James and Bruce Shapiro
excelled for Albany on Fredonia's
8000-meter course. James1 came in
second for the Danes with a time of
25:41. Shapiro came in ninth with a
time of 26:16. Jim Roth came in
19th, Chris I.ant finished 24th, and
first year runner Jim Erwin came in
40th place in the field of 90 runners.,
"The competition was tough, but host the Albany mutationals on the
I think that our team did a good 31st.
job," said Shapiro.
The women's cross country team
The Danes are off until next did not fare that well at Hartwick.
Saturday when they compete in the The harriers finished with 250
Capital District meet at Central points, which left them in eighth
Park in Schenectady. Munscy com- place in the ten team meet. Cormented on his team's chances after tland came in first with 33 points,
Saturday's meet, "We're hopeful and Syracuse finished second with
that we'll do well next weekend. I 58 points.
was very happy with our perforAlbany's Sara Cawley finished
mance in Trenlon last week, and in 39th with a time or 23:43. Erma
Fredonia this week," he said. "The George clocked in with a time of
Capital District meet is very impor- 24:16, and Kim Bloomer came in
tant."
52nd with a time of 24:34.
Albany State women's cross
"I think that our team will be country coach Ron White comready," Munsey continued. "Our mented on his team's performance:
experienced runners are starting to "We did not fare that well on the
come into their top form. In addi- overall completition. However, Ertion, our rookies are starting to ex- ma George and Sara Cawley had
cel. Winston Johnson and Jim Er- fine individual performances for
win ran very well on Saturday. I our team,"
think that we should fare well on
,v
Saturday."
The harriers compete in the The Albany Slate men's cross country learn placed third In the
competitive
After Saturday's meet the Danes I Capital Districts this Saturday in
SUNYAC meet at Fredonia. (Photo: UPS)
face Siena on the 26th, and then . Schenectady.
State University of New York at Albany
Friday
October 23, 1981
copyright © 1981 by the ALBANY STUDENT PRESS CORPORATION
Volume LXVIII Number 32
State Official Charged in Assault of Dusenbury
However, when he had not heated arguments and fistfights. I
received the apology or the repri- don't do cither.
mand by last Tuesday, Dusenbury
I didn't touch him at any point,
by Wayne Peereboom
formation Act and threatened to go held a new conference at the state There was no fight. The charges will
A state public information of- to the press.
Legilalivc Office Building and an- not be dropped. Now I have to have
ficer has been arrested and charged
At this point Dusenbury said nounced he had rcinstitutcd pro- him correct what he said to the
with assaulting Albany Citizens Rivett "pointed his finger at me and ceedings to have Rivett arrested.
press."
Party mayoral candidate Fred said, 'You can shove the media up
Reached for comment, Rivett
Dusenbury.
your —'." Dusenbury said a few said, "My version differs from his
However, Dusenbury said if three
Francis Rivett, a public infor- words followed and Rivett "slugged (Dusehbury's) but I'm not going in- conditions arc met, he will negotiate
mationbfficerwith the state Public me hard with his fist three times in to detail because it's in court."
with Gioia. First, Rivett would have
Service Commission, was arraigned my head."
Rivett "pointed hisfingerat me and to call a news conference and say
in Albany Police Court last TuesDusenbury said the Capital ed the reprimand from Gioia and that a fight did not take place. Seday and charged with third degree Police were called and Rivett was the apology had been mailed out on cond, Gioia must take away the imassault.
taken to police headquarters where Friday. Wednesday night Dusen- plication in Rivett's reprimand that
The arrest stemmed from an inci- Dusenbury said he wanted to press bury said he had yet to receive the there was a heated argument
dent at Rivett's office at the Empire^ charges. He said that state Public apology although he had received a before the alleged assault. The third
Service Commissioner Paul Gioia copy of the reprimand at that time. demand, Dusenbury said, is in reacState Mall on October 14.
Shortly after 9a.m. that morning, "came to the police station and
However, Dusenbury says, "an tion to statements of other office
Dusenbury said, he went to Rivett's pleaded with me to drop the apology is not now sufficient." He workers who witnessed the event,
office and requested some informa- charges."
said Rivett told a local reporter, "It that "if the police come, we'll tell
tion concerning the recently signed
Finally, after Gioia promised a was like a baseball fight.' There then that we didn't see anything."
Home Energy Fair Practices Act. written apology and a reprimand of was an incorrect impression that Dusenbury said Gioia must issue a
Dusenbury said Rivett told him the Rivett, a copy of which was to be there was a fight. I can't have that memorandum stating that this
information "may be ready." sent to Dusenbury, the mayoral — I'm a mayoral candidate. My behavior is not acceptable.
In reaction to the latest demand,
Dusenbury said the documents were candidate agreed to drop the credibility as a candidate is
destroyed if it looks like I get in Rivett said, "He asked for an
covered under the Freedom of In- charges.
Incident Occured in State Office
apology which he got. Now he says
something else."
Gioia could not be reached f«w
comment.
Further, Dusenbury said he is
discussing the possibility of a civil
damage suit against the state Public
Service Commisssion, and attorneys are advising him to sue the
Times-Union.
He said the possibility of the
Times-Union suit arose from a Sunday article which referred to the incident as a fight. Dusenbury called
the statement "libelous."
77me.f-c/m'onExecutive City
Editor Joe Sharkey said, "We tried
to get hold of Fred Dusenbury for
three days but he doesn't have a
home phone." Sharkey said Dusenbury did not get hold of the TimesUnion. "Fred Dusenbury did not
choose to give his side of it,"
Sharkey said.
Rivett is scheduled to reappear in
Police Court on October 27.
Mayoral Candidates Clash
On Local Issues In Debate
by Charlie Perrillo
enacted and enfoced in light of the
recent case of sexual abuse on
and Durrow Gershnwltz
Incumbent Mayor Erastus Corn- Willcl Street. Corning, however,
ing II stressed his past record and felt Albany's habitability laws,
experience while opponents Charles whichstatethat everyone has a right
Touhey and Fred Dusenbury at- 'to a well-secured home, were protacked Corning for creating a tection enough, adding that he
"40-Year Tragedy" in Albany dur- hadn't heard one complaint about it
ing a mayoral debate held last night these past four months. Additionally, he blamed individuals for lack of
in the Albany Public Library.
The candidates spoke on topics safety precautions.
continued on page thirteen
concerning Albany's budgetary
process, lax assesments. the proposed security ordinance and student
voting rights in the 90-minute
debate sponsored by the League of
Women Voters.
Dusenbury, running as a
Citizen's Party candidate, felt by Susan Mllligan
The Reagan administration last
public hearings should be held
week proposed new restrictions on
before the budget is made, and
the Freedom of Information Act
stressed input by outside agencies
(FOIA) on the premise that "the
and groups in budgetary, as well as
Act was being used in ways Conother, matters. Corning said he also
gress never intended," according to
welcomes outside ideas and input, U.S. Justice Department spokesperbut Touhey negated this assertion, son Mark Sheehan.
saying Albany's budget process
Testifying before a Congressional
should be brought up to date.
committee, assistant Attorney
"This is 1981, not 1941," said
General for legal policy Jonathan
Touhey.
Rose pushed for six major revisions
A registered Democrat running
of the 1974 amendment which is inwith independent and Republican
tended to make governmental
endorsements, Touhey denounced records public.
the political favoritism he Tell was
Rose said the act needs a
involved in the assessment of proof
cerperties, calling the present system "clarification
"a game." Corning denied any tain . . . exemptions and propolitical favoritism, although he ad- cedures." Sheehan explained this
would prevent "unwarranted invamitted there arc "some inequities"
sion of personal privacy . . . law
In the system. Coming also felt
enforcement . . . and the effective
some of the blame fell on the stale
collection of intelligence."
government
for "fiddling
Sheehan said the administration
around."
was concerned about the availabiliTouhey fell that Albany's proty of certain information in
posed security ordinance should be
Albany mayoral candidates Corning, Dusenbury and Touhey
Covered budget, security ordinance and student voting issues
Freedom of Information Challenged
Flip 'em, Trade 'em, Swap 'em.
Bus Driver Trading Cards Are
Here
See Aspects
"foreign terrorists and organized
crime."
Rose also prepared to "preclude
the FOIA as a means to circumvent
the discovery rules by parties in
litigation." Legally, Sheehan said,
lawyers cannot present "surprises"
in court; they rflust demand relevant
information from the adversary
party before trial. Sheehan said the
FOIA is often used to skirt that
rule.
Further, the Assistant Attorney
General asked for "a more
reasonable time limit" for agencies
to respond to FOI requests. The
current deadline for initial response
is ten days.
In addition, the proposal would
establish a procedure by which parties submitting classified material
may object to the release of that
material, If the revisions are approved, a person or agency who
submitted sensitive material would
be notified beforehand each time
that material is requested, thus
allowing the submitter to argue the
case in court.
The Reagan administration proposal would also permit the government to charge requisition fees that
"more closely resemble the cost to
research and find a document,"
Sheehan said. Currently, the
government . may charge for
photocopy costs, but not for
research.
Lastly, the proposal would provide for two new exemptions from
the act: records generated in legal
settlements and records containing
"highly technical information the
export of which is controlled by
law," Rose testified.
Sheehan said the Reagan administration is worried that a
foreign government might set up an
agency in the United States for the
purpose of obtaining national
security information through the
FOIA.
Sheehan said the outright exclusion of the CIA from the act was
not directly proposed, but the exclusion of "informant records" was
provided for in the new revisions.
Sheehan said, however, he expects
the administration will eventually
propose a bill completely excluding
the CIA from FOIA compliance.
The most vehement opposition to
the proposal has come from journalists; Reporter's Committee for
Freedom of the Press President
Jack Landau described the action as
"a frontal assault."
A spokesperson for FEN, an
association of writers, said ther
organization "is definitely against
ihc new guidelines.
"They close resources for journalists . . . close the FBI and the
CIA . . . and set a precedent for
other agencies," she' said. "We
have protested (such attempts) constantly throughout the years."
Bob Freeman, who directs FOIA
requests in New York State, said he
"tends to think that many reacting
to the federal FOIA have lost sight
of the original intention of the
act . . . (and it's) very simple: make
all government records available
unless it would hurt the agency.
"I prefer to see exemptions made
that are potentially harmful than
exemptions that remove rights of
access," he said, "for the CIA or
any other agency."
• •" , wnur -
John Rosenberg, a spokesperson
lor the Nation Institute, said the
FOIA "is an effective tool for finding out what's going on in government." He added, "I find it ironic
that an administration presumably
:ommitted to getting government
}ff our backs doesn't want to tell us
what it's doing."
The proposal is pending in committee.
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