Grappler Harvest Yields Frosh Bumper Crop

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Slate University of New Vork al Albany
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October 31, 1980
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Grappler Harvest Yields Frosh Bumper Crop
World Cup championships, enters
his second year as Albany head
coach. He took the reins from JoeGarcia who headed the team for 27
years, "building a strong wrestling
tradition," according to DeMeo.
DeMeo's vast experiences also include coaching the 1976 Olympic
team, the 1977 Pan American leam,
and three world teams, as well as
coaching Stanford for seven years.
Along with DeMeo comes an excellent coaching staff consisting of
a quartet of former All-Amcricans,
Chuck Wundl, John DeMeo, Mike
Paquettc, and Hal Zendcl, and a
former NCAA champion, ' John
Chakmakas. "It's a star studded
coaching staff," said DeMeo. "It
makes a big difference working
with the kids."
Last year the Danes, led by their
own All-Amcrican, Paul HornThe grapplers have been practicing over n month in preparation for the upbach, along with Vic Herman, and
coming Great Dane Classic. (Pholo: Karl Chan)
Mark Dailey, finished a difficult
future is not definite "It's up in the Herman, as a freshman, also
season at 9-10. The squad did finish
29th in a field of 68 teams in Ihc air," said DeMeo.
qualified for Nalionals lasl year and
NCAA's, though, and considering
Last year, Hombach placed placed in the lop len in the nation.
that there are about 300 teams in eighth in the 177 pound,weight class
DeMeo looks toward Herman to
Division III (most didn't compete), in the Division III Nationals to gain excel litis year on a leant that should
that puts Albany in the top ten per- Ail-American status — Albany's be vejy sirong. "Vic is looking realcent of the nation.
first wrestler to gain that honor in ly good. He's probably looking the
The team's chances for improve- five years. He was also named the besl on the leam right now. He's a
ment look good this year, but a Oulslanding Athlete 'at Albany tremendous leg wrestler — the best
severe blow was dealt when Horn- Slate in 1980.
I've ever coached," said DeMeo. "I
bach was injured in practice four
Joining Hornbach as co-captains expect a super season from him —,
Wrestling coach Joe DeMeo was picked lo coach the United Stales AAU al weeks ago. He won't be able to of ihc team are Steve Kronen at 167 he seems lo be putting it all
the World Cup Championships. (Photo: UPS)
compete lit the early going and his pounds and Vic Herman at 190.
continued on page 15
by Larry Kahn
.The Albany State wrestling team
has been blessed. Not only do they "
have one of the top head.coaches in
the country in Joe DeMeo, along
with his highly talented staff, but
they also have one of the finest
bumper crops of: top notch
freshman wrestlers, in Albany
history.
"It's been a good recruiting
year,'' said DeWeo. "This is
without question the best group of
freshman athletes I have ever
coached."
DeMeo, who was selected this
week to coach the. United States
Amateur Athletic Union at the
Danes Must Shoot Down Alfred Aerial A ttack
by Bob liellafiorc
When the Danes take the field
tomorrow against 6-1 Alfred
University, there are a few things
that will no doubt be sticking in
their minds. One is the performance
of the offense. Last week at Norwich, the Albany wishbone sputtered for its lowest output of the
year by over 100 yards (164 total offense), and its most ineffective day
since the early season 6-2 loss to
Southern Connecticut. The passing
game that has been more of a
weapon this season than in past
years faltered (Dane quarterbackswere good on one of II passes
against Norwich). Alfred's defense
can be deadly against the run, and
at times almost dares their opposition to pass. Albany will be forced
to get that throwing touch back if it
Is to win. '
•
V
" If |
complishments is his 228 yard day
against number one ranked Ithaca
in the Saxon's 41-23 defeat at the
hands of the national champs
earlier in Ihe season. In that game,
he was 20 for 28. "He has the
capability of throwing the hall 60 or
70 yards," Angelo said.
"I saw them (Alfred) .against
Ithaca. They just moved Ihe ball up
and down the field," said Albany
defensive coordinator Mike Motta.
There is another big reason
Alfred's air game is averaging 194.1
yards per game, and that is split end
Matt Sullivan. He's grabbed 36
aerials for a total of 475 yards (13.2
per catch) and four
touchdowns.
"He's got excellent speed and great
hands," Angclo said. "He's just
about everything you want in a
receiver."
When Schuster doesn't go to
Sullivan, he looks for wingback
Hob Pietrosanto. The freshman has
26 receptions for 291 yards (11.2
fCOUTING R€PORT
Another concern is Albany's
ability to bounce back after a tough
defeat. Last Saturday's contest was
an emotional one, and a difficult
one lo drop. In, 1979 when the
Danes were defeated by Ithaca in
mid-season, they hit the skids, and
Ids! three in a row. Tomorrow will
be a test for them in thai respect.
'I think we'll bounce back," said
Albany head football coach Bob
Ford. "I think we've got great
character. We did some things that
they (the team) don't feel good
about and I don't feel good: about,
but I think we'll bounce back."
I . Alfred is a leam thai can make
iiliut difficult. The Saxons boast a
•torrid passing attack led by quarter>
back Bob Schuster. Out of the
wing-t alignment, the 6-2, 210
pound signal-caller has connected
on 109 of 183 passes so far this year
for a 39.6 percent efficiency, and 10
touchdowns.
"He's the franchise," Ford said
of the All-Amcrican candidate.
"He's an excellent quarterback,"
said Albany coach Mike Angclo,
who scouted Alfred. "He's one of
the best passers in the nation."
Among
Schuster's
ac-
'l ! « • • '
III
I I I
Albany's leading receiver, Bruce Dey, breaks tackles in an earlier game this season. This week, Albany will
try lo contain Ihe wlng-T passing offense of 6-1 Alfred University (Photo: Dave Machson)
average) and four touchdowns out
of the backfield.
"They've got a great quarterback
and a great split end. Their offensive line gives good pass protection,
and he (Schuster) hangs in there,"
Motta said. "We've got to do a
great job in Ihe secondary."
Albany's deep three coverage has
given up 139.4 yards per game in
the air, but has only allowed three
touchdowns throwing. "They (Ihe
secondary) have clone a real good
j o b , " Molta said. "Bruce Collins is
coming along, and Don Bowcn had
a great game against Norwich."
The Saxon runnning game is not
quite as successful as the air attack.
Their top rusher is 5-8, 155 pound
halfback Darryl Davis, will) 77 carries, 316 yards and
four
touchdowns. Pietrosanto is nexl (79
rushes, 287 yards), with fullback
Greg Sclera third (70 carries, 231
yards).
"They're a ball-control team.
They like lo ground il out. They run
the ball well, bul Ihcir passing
aspect is the key," Angelo said.
."They run to set up the pass."
"They've got an adequate running game, but I'd say the thing
we're most concerned about is him
(Schuster) throwing the football,"
Molta continued.
The Danes haven't seen a wing-t
offense like Alfred's since their preseason scrimmage against Mid
dlebury, and the changing of
alignments and shifting could cause
the Albany 4-4 some problems.
"They have multiple formations
— a lot of shifting. We're just going
lo have (9 play our base defense,".
Motta said."They'll line up in one|
•;• • 1VB0 by Alhinr Stutlrtil prm Corporalioi
It's A Reagan Landslide
Absolutely No Contest
Washington (AP) Ronald Reagan
won the White House from President Carter Tuesday night in a
slarlling landslide thai changed the
face of American government.
Carter promised Reagan his "fullest
support and cooperation" in the
transition 10 Republican rule.
"I am no! frightened by whai lies
ahead," said ihe president-elect,
"and I don't believe ihc American
people arc frightened by what lies
ahead,"
"together, we're goinu to do
what has 10 be clone," Reagan told
a victory rally in I.os Angeles.
"We're going to pul American back
to work again."
Tlte polls were Mill open in ihc
west when Carter acknowledged
thai his presidency was finished —
an hour afler telephoning Reagan in
Los Angeles 10 congratulate him on
victory.
" H e graciously offered his
cooperation on the transition and I
acceplccl il," said prcsidenl-clcci
Reagan,
ihc
conservative
Republican who wenl from
Hollywood to two terms as governor of California, and had sought
the presidency twice before.
Lour Democratic senators fell
with Carlcr as Republicans
mounted an unexpectedly strong
push to lake control of Ihe Scnaic,
"If the trend continues, we may
very well control one house of Ihe
Congress for the firsi time In a
quarter of a century," Reagan told
his cheering supporters al Ihe Century Plaza Hotel.
Democrats limped loward renewed control of the House, bul
Republicans stood lo gain more
than twenty seals there.
As his electoral vole total soared,
Reagan said he certainly hadn't
looked for such a landslide.
"Listen, 1 was happy lo gel 270."
he said. Thai's whal it look lo win.
In electoral votes, the competillon thai counted, il was a Reagan
runaway. He had won or led for 364
electoral votes, a comfortable
cushion pasl the 270 he needed.
Carter had won or led for 74.
Then, in Ihe hotel ballroom,
before his partisans and Ihc television cameras, Reagan said: '
"There has never been a more
humbling moment in my life . . .
liven if il had been Ihe clilTlumgci
we were all expecting, il would have
been ihe same. I consider Ihe HUM
you have placed In me sacred, and I
will do my utmosl to justify your
faith."
A cliffliangcr it was not,
Reagan's margin rivaled history's
greal landslides, those of Richard
M. Nixon in L972, Lyndon B.
Johnson in 1964 and Franklin D;
Roosevelt in 1936.
So ended ihc longest campaign,
in an electoral vole runaway that
belied ihe forecasts of the prcsidenl
and the pollsters that il would be
close. 11 never was, from the moment the first polls closed.
In Senate competition, loo. CiOP
challengers ousted Democratic
1 Senators George McGovern of
South Dakola, Ihc parly's 1972
nominee; Birch Bayh of Indiana;
Warren
G. M a g n u s o n
of
Washington, the senior member of
the scnaic; and John Culver of
Iowa.
Senator Frank Church of Idaho,
chairman of ihe Foreign Relations
Committee, was far behind in his
re-election bid.
•Willi 63 percent of Ihe nation's
precincts counted, Reagan was
gaining 50 pcrccnl of ihc vole,
Curler 43 percent, indepcndeni
John U. Anderson 6 pcrccnl.
Iihtili, . n u l l . . . 11I Capital N m t p i p r n
D'Amato Victorious in Senate Race
^^^^^^conljnuedonpag^9^
I
11I.11I11 ruurin, of C'iplul N*wip»ptn
Wins by Slim Margin
Holtzman Wants Recount
New York (AP) Swepl up in a national Republican
landslide, New York Tuesday narrowly gave a U.S.
Senate seal lo Alfonse D'Amato and its 41 clccloral
voles In Ronald Reagan.
Republicans also gained four additional congressional districts.
D'Amato, who began Ihe campaign as a linle-known
local official, squeaked 0111 an extremely close victory
over Democratic Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman to oust
fellow Republican Sen. Jacob Javils from the seat he
had held for 24 years.
The 42-year-old D'Amalo comes out of Ihe Nassau
< mini v Republican organization, one of ihe most effective political machines in Ihe country. His first victory
was convincing his mentor, Nassau Republican leader
Joseph Jvlargioila, lhal he should be given a chance 10
run for the Senate.
"I am an optimist who believes with all my heart in
our moral fiber and common sense of our people and
who believes in their willingness and ability to face any
odds and overcome all adversity," he said, when he announced his candidacy Jan, 7.
' continued on page eleven
New York (AP) Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman refused to accept defeal loday in her bid for ihc U.S. Senate and obtained a court order to impound paper baliots she
believes will deliver her Ihe election.
. "The race remains loo close to call and I remain confident," the 39-year-old Democratic congresswoman
from Brooklyn declared afler obtaining Ihe order
around midnighl from Stale Supreme Court Justice
Ernst S. Rosenbcrger.
Roscnbcrger directed election officials to turn over all
paper ballots immediately 10 the nearesi police station
or county board of elections for a new lally 10 begin loday.
Holtzman aides expect to uncover an estimated
100,000 uricounled affidavit ballots which they called
"our lasl hope," along with an unknown number of
^continued on page eleven
Complete Election Results
including Congressional, State
Senate & Assembly
Text of Speeches
imimiiuniiiumii
«as
Women Gain in N. Y.S.
EIECTJON BmEfs
NEW YORK (AP) The big winners in Tuesday's races
for «he New York "state Legislature were neither the
Democrats nor the Republicans, but the women. In
Assembly races, women picked up five seals lo raise
their total to 15, of the 150 places. In the Assembly,
Brooklyn Democrats retained control of the 41st District
as Helene Weinsteln replaced her father, Murray Wcinstein, who retired after capturing the seat two years ago
following his defeat of then Assembly Speaker Stanley
Steingut in a Democratic primary. Brooklyn Democrats
also turned to a woman. Eileen Dugan, in Ihe 52nd
District to replace Assemblyman Michael Pcscc who
retired to run for a judgeship. In New York city's 71 si
District, Democratic Assemblyman George Miller ran as
a Republican after losing the Democratic primary.
However, his conquercr in the earlier contest, her
domination of Miller in the general election. In upstate
races, Democrat Gail Shaffer came out Ihe winner in a
hard-fought I05lh District campaign against incumbent
Republican Assemblyman Arlington Van Dyck lhal was
a remalch from 1978. Meanwhile in Ihe 142nd Districl,
Democratic incumbent Stephen Greco of Buffalo was
upset after 28 years in the Assembly by Republican
Carol Siwek.
iiiminii M t i i i i i i i n t i i i i i i i i i «ac
No Party for Democrats
New York (AP) The saddest party on the New York
political circuit Tuesday night was held in the Imperial
Ballroom at the Sheraton Centre under big posters
reading: "Re-elect President Carter." It wasn't sad only
because the small crowd's candidate had lost. There
were a lot of losers around, at least one for every race.
This party was so sad because nobody ever showed up to
tell the crowd in traditional fashion that they had done a
great job, or to exhort them to greater efforts next time.
It was generally assumed that at least Secretary of State
Mario Cuomo, head of Carter's New York campaign,
would show up and. take the green-and-whitc draped
podium, bearing a soon-to-be-poignant picture of»President Carter and Vice President Mondale in profile, and
try to express the feelings of them all. But nobody showed up, exepet the ever-busy tv crews, and the crowd of a
couple of hundred Carter supporters was reduced at 1st
to watching the few familiar faces of local TV personalities interviewing other woe-begone Carter supporters. The only time it even sounded like a party was
when a band of more than eighty Israeli exchange
students was led in to get a look at the American
democratic process in action and created a buzz of conversation. It was so dull, in fact, that some young people
went around asking where the Reagan headquarters
was. Nobody knew, but they took off lookng for more
excitement. Jerry the bartender reported lousy business
at the cash bar — where drinks were S3.50 each, which
could have accounted for the gathering's subdued tone.
"I feel so bad," he said. "I like Carter. I feel like going
home." Meanwhile members of the crowd, composed
mostly of young people, kepi going up and standing
behind the podium so friends could lake their pictures
under the big "Re-Elect President Carter" sign. When
the television sets around the bars ballroom showed
Carter being introduced in Washington as the "splendid
President of the United Stales," there was loud applause. But aficr the president told them that, keeping
his 1976 promise never lo lie to the people, "I won'i tell
you it doesn't hurt," there were many wet eyes.
2 Abscam Reps. Re-elected
WASHINGTON (AP) Two of Ihe five congressmen indicted on Abscam charges look leads in early election
returns Tuesday night, one was in a see-saw battle, and a
veteran former House committee chairman was losing.
Rep. Michael Myers, D-Pa., convicted of the bribery
charges in Ihe FBI's Abscam investigation and later expelled from Ihe House, look a narrow lead in early
returns. Rep. John Jenrelle, D-S.C, also convicted of
taking an Abscam bribe, was in a light battle, trailing
and later leading. Rep. Frank Thompson, D-N.J., a
24-year House veleran, was losing. Thompson stepped
aside as chairman of the House Administration Commillee after he was indicted on charges of bribery and
conspiracy in Abscam. Relurns were slow coming on
Rep. John Murphy, D-N.Y., who was indicted with
CAMPUS
OXFORD, Mass. (AP) An armed man who seized the
Ronald Reagan campaign headquarters here Monday
surrendered after holding a woman worker hostage for
almost three hours and demanding that a television staiion broadcast a message he had recorded, police said.
Officers said John F. Kellum, of Memphis, Tenn., left
he building with police after releasing his hostage,
Virginia Langen of Oxford, and surrendering two
,iistols. Assistant Chief of Police Mike Stewart said
helium was charged with kidnapping, aggravated
issault and possession of more than one ounce and
aken to Ihe Lafayette County Jail. Stewart said Kellum
appeared to be "under influence of intoxicant. He did
-.moke marijuana while we were there." Stewarl
demanded that after Kellum demanded that a message
be broadcast, officials were unable to find a recl-lo-recl
player to check the tapes. Kellum later demanded thai
the station broadcast music by the rock group Pink
Floyd.
Briefs
Urgent Notice
All students who sent for absentee ballots and did not
receive them in lime for the elcclion deadline are asked
lo contact SA attorney Jack Lester immediately. His office is in the SA offices in the Campus Center, and ihe
phone number is 7-7911. Leave your name, home address and county, and campus address.
A Cry For Help
This letter was sent lo the ASP by Jonathan Barlow in
the Regislrar's office, and is addressed to all members of
the university community:
"On Tuesday, October 28th, Mrs. Sherry Grasso
received tragic news while al work in our Regislrar's Office. I am saddened lo report thai ihe home of Sherry
and her family was totally burned to ihe ground by a fire
of unknown origin."
,
Republicans Lead Senate
[Correction
In an article in the October 24 issue of the ASP, "SA
Joins Raniada Inn Picket Line," we reported that The
College of Saint Rose had cancelled reservations for a
November 9 senior prom at the Ramada. We have since
learned thai the event is in fact a "semi-formal," that it
is planned for November 8, and that no cancellation of
^hc evenl has occurred. •
Feds. File Election Suit
ALBANY, NY (AP) The federal government riled suil
against the slate Board of Elections as voters went to the
polls Tuesday, charging that an unknown number of
residents living out of the country would be unable lo
return their absentee ballots in lime to be counted.The
show-cause order, filed in U.S. District Court here, asks
the state lo continue to accept absentee ballots from
voters out of the country until Nov. 14. State law now
sets a cutoff of 9 p.m. Election Day, when polls
close.Gcorgc Yanlis, an assistant U.S. Attorney in
Albany, said many of the ballots had been mailed too
laic by county boards of elections. Judge James T. Foley
set a hearing on the suite for Nov. 10 and county boards
of elections wcredireclcd to set aside ballots received
after the close of the polls.
Krupsak Loses House Race
WATKRTOWN, NY (AP) Mary Anne Krupsak, Guv.
Hugh Carey's first-term licutcnanl governor, lost her
political comeback bid Tuesday, falling to Republican
David O'B. Martin In the race for northern New York's
30th Congressional District. The defeat climaxed a hardfought bailie for Ihe scat being vacated by eight-term
Republican Rep. Robert McEwen, who is retiring. "1
don't know what Ihe future is or if there is an elective
future lor me or not," Ms. Krupsak said Tuesday night
as she conceded. The 30th Congressional Districl covers
seven counties in northern New. York and is the largest
geographical district cast of Ihe Mississippi River.
Women Confer at SUNYA
Man Seizes Reagan Hdqts.
WASHINGTON (AP) In Senate competition,
Republicans led for seven seals now held by Democrats;
GOP Sens. Bob Dole of Kansas and Charles McC.
Mathias of Maryland were re-elected. So were
Democrats Russell B. Long of Louisiana, Wendell Ford
of Kentucky, Herman Talmadge of Georgia, Ernest F.
Hollings of South Carolina, and John Glenn of Ohio.
Rep. Christopher Dodd, a Democrat and the son of a
late senator, won in Connecticut.Illinois Secretary of
State Alan Dixon won the seat of retiring Democratic
Sen. Adlai E. Stevenson HI. Don Nicklcs replaced
fellow Republican Henry Bellmon in Oklahoma; it was
expected that the scat would go Democratic.In South
Dakota, Rep. James Abdnor took the early lead over
Democratic Sen. George McGovern. In Alabama,
Republican Jeremiah Dcnlon, a prisoner of war in the
Vietnam years, narrowly led for a Democratic seat.
Thompson mid who stepped aside as chairman of the
House Merchant Marine Committee. Rep. Raymond F.
Lederers D-Pa., the fifth House member indicted on
Abscam bribery charges but not yet tried, took a
decisive thrce-to-onc lead in the early returns. Rep. John
Martha, D-Pa„ who was Implicated in the Abscam investigation but never charged with wrongdoing, was also
winning. Abscam was an FBI investigation of political
corruption In which FBI agents posed as wealthy Arab
businessmen willing to pay bribes in exchange for
^private Immigration legislation.
I
\
"The Grasso home, ofliside of Coblcskill where
Sherry commuted lo and from each day, had been nearing Ihe final stages of completion. Living in this house
while building it themselves, the Grasso's poured
thousands of hours of work into this, their pride and
joy, .only to have it destroyed in such a dreadful way.
Further, they were aboul lo re-insure the house at a
higher rate when ihe fire struck — catching them totally
uninsured."
"1 appeal lo you to think what you could do for a
family which lost all their material goods except the cars
Ihcy drove and clothes they wore the day of the fire.
Food, money, clothes, and supplies arc a few that cross
my mind immediately."
"The following information is known aboul Sherry's
family:
Husband (Leroy) — medium size, 32W/30I. irousers
Sherry — sizes 5 and 7
Two girls — ages 3 and 4
One boy — age 9
"We are all thankful that no one was injured
physically in the fire. With the cold weather and
holidays approaching, can you find room in your heart
lo help Ihesc people?"
"Donations of any kind may he sent or delivered to
our Registrar's Office, AD-B3, in care of Jon Barlow or
I any oilier staff member."
\^
"Thank you for caring."
Approximately 21 students representing Women's
Alliances from such SUNY schools as Oneonta, Plallsburg, Purchase, Fredonia, Old Westbury, and Cortland came lo Albany this weekend for a three-day
Women's Caucus sponsored by SA.
According to Women's Caucus Coordinator Toni
Bissessar, this fifth annual convention was held to give
feminist alliance members of other SUNY schools a
chance to get together to "discuss strategy, lend support
to one another, and exchange ideas." Bissessar added
thai she hoped caucuses like this would form a communicative, supportive network on women's issues.
The Caucus featured several workshops on subjects
such as " W o m e n and C o m m u n i c a t i o n s , "
"Reproductive Rights," and "Organizing Women
Students." In addition, Roberta Russell of the Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse
(CARASA) spoke on "Reproductive Rights and the
New Right," and Donna Wornock of Feminist
Resources on Energy and Ecology (FREE) spoke on
"Feminism as Social Ecology."
Films and musical entertainment comprised the remainder of the weekend. The SUNY delegates from out
of town stayed al Quality Inn in Albany and ate al
Dutch Quad cafeteria, courtesy of SA, Bissessar
reported.
Abbie Hoffman at Union
Barry Freid, a.k.a. Abbie Hoffman, will speak at
Union College Wednesday.
The one-time college radical and Chicago 7 member
recently surrendered to federal authorities after six years
as a fugitive from a felony indictment.
Hoffman's talk, sponsored by The College Speaker's
Forum al Union, will begin at 8:30 p.m. in the Memorial
Chapel. General admission is $1.50.
Women to Protest in D.C.
There will be an organizational Women's Pentagon
Action meeting al 7 p.m. in the Women's Center, 132
Central Avenue. The action is scheduled for November
16-17 in Washington to protest violence. All those inlercsled should attend. For more information, call Tptll
Bissessar or Janice Fine at 465-2406.
A Time For Caring
This year's Telethon theme will be "Taking Time for
Caring." The theme was chosen from among several
submitted by students. Submissions for a T-shirt design
Tor the Telethon '81 theme will be requesied al a later
date.
1 1 3 : r : I t : r." : : r t.; I::
November 5, 1980
Albany Student Press
t
J
Corning Addresses Jrl. Class
km
j^jT—~—"•*• ———-iiimi—iimanii iw i
.—r.
Mayor Erastus Corning: city doing "everything it'can " to increase security.
by Andrew Carroll
^he President deserved re-election
Albany Mayor Erastus Corning after keeping Ihe country out of
paid an election nighl visit to war, for handling the hostage situaSUNYA, speaking of Ihe elections, tion in a responsible fashion, and
student voting, and security In for being the first president to put
an energy program through ConAlbany.
The Mayor fielded questions gress.
"He's one of the few men in
from members of a journalism class
assembled in the Humanities higher office who'd rather be right
than President," the Mayor said.
Building.
Aware of the early projections,
Corning asserted his support for
President Carter, saying the Presi- Coming related the happenings of
dent had done an admirable job in the 1948 elections, when Harry
very difficult times. Corning said' Truman made a startling laic nighl
comeback lo defeat Thomas
Dewey. "No one I knew thought he
could win, though now I can't find
anyone who thought he wouldn't," »
said Corning.
The Mayor spoke,encouragingly
of Ihe recently won right of students
to vole in Albany, saying he was
"anxious and favorable" for
students who fell Albany is their
for 18 years and teaches a course on home to vote here. He said he had
" n o qualms" about sludcnls
Human Sexuality.
Norton had served on Albany possibly changing Ihe character of
County Menial Health Associa- future Albany elections. "I think it
tion's Prevention Committee in will," he said, "but that's no pro1975, and has also worked on blem. That's what makes a
democracy."
educational films for children.
Charged With Third-Degree Sodomy
Notion and Hall, who bolh
reside at 10 Eberle Road in Lalham,
arc accused of sodomizing a
runaway
youth
from
the
Vanderhcydcn Hall fosler home in
Troy. The pair was committed lo
Albany County Court House in lieu
of $5,000 bail at Colonic County
Court House on Friday.
Norton, a 62-ycar-old professor
in Ihe Educational Psychology
Department, has been with SUNYA
Research Funding Grants
for University Increased
by Ken Gordon
According to SUNYA President
Vincent O'l.cary, the university has •
had an increase in research funding
grants of 58 percent in Ihe past
year, moving ahead of Stony Brook
and Buffalo in funding received by
the university.
"The economic vitality of this
State is shaped by Ihe research institutes of the Stale," said O'Lcary.
These comments were pan of the
President's address to Ihe University Senate on Monday.
' O'Leary commented on the
status of higher education In the
state, saying that the issue we
should concern ourselves with is not
how we can save money by cutting
the SUNY system, but rather how
many students New York State
wants to educate.
According to O'Leary, enrollmenl as a whole litis year wcnl up
across the entire SUNY system.
This contradicts Stale Education
Department reports that project
significant enrollment declines in
the upcoming years. This projection
is based on figures lhal show a
decline in Ihe number of 18-21-yearolds desiring higher educalion.
O'Leary admitted that there will
be a decline in ihe number of
available applicants, but also points
up the fact that the SUNY system
has already made ils own projection
cuts for-upcoming years.
O'Leary also spoke briefly about
SUNYA's $54 million budget for
this year
He said, whereas the university
continued on page eleven
•
J> ' I
• 1
SUNYA Professor Arrested
by Mall Huddad
SUNYA Professor Dr. Joseph L.
Norton and his 26-ycar-old
housemate, Lloyd A. Holt, were arrested Friday morning on Roulc 9
in Latham on charges of third
degree sodomy.
The charges stem from an incident which allegedly occurred two
weeks ago, involving a 15-year-old
boy, according to Stale Police in
Loudonville.
"'.'p'age
age flii
three
jgrM
Woman Attacked
Near Draper Hall
by Beth Sexer
A 24-year-old woman was abducted and sexually abused at
gunpoint 8:00 p.m. Monday as she was entering her car in the
Robin Street parking near Draper between Washington and
Western Avenues, according to an Albany police report.
Police said an unknown black male allegedly approached the
woman from behind and, brandishing a long-barreled revolver,
forced her into her car. After entering the rear seat of the car,
he ordered the woman lo drive to a deserted parking lot on the
southeast corner of Rhodes and Dove Streets.
Police said he then demanded her diamond ring, valued at
$200, and the $60 she was carrying.
Nexl, the attacker reportedly ordered her into the rear set
where he forced her to commit an oral sex act on him and
sodomized her, police said.
After Ihe assailant fled the scene, the woman called the
police immediately afterwards at approximately 8:35 p.m.
The attacker is described as a black male between 20 and 25
years old and 6 feel tall. Me was wearing a brown coal and light
•pants.
A similar attack occurred on October 7 in Ihe same parking
lol when a woman was abducted as she was entering her car,
forced to drive around the city for over an hour, and was then
sodomized and robbed of $15.
Albany Police Li. H. John Damino said thai there are
" m o r e similarities than differences" between the two cases,
although it is still " t o o early to tell" whether the attacks were
committed by the same man.
':
In 1979, Norton received the
Capital District Gay Community
Council's first annual Harvey Milk
award, given in the memory of the
last San Francisco Supervisor and
alumnus of the old Albany
Teachers College. He recently appeared on Ihe Phil Donohue show
when lhal program hosted gay men
and women over sixty.
As far as Norton's standing with
the University, Vice President of
Student Affairs, David Martin has
said that Monday "he requested
and has been granted a leave of
absence." Martin declined to comment on the consequences of a conviction.
Sodomy in the third degree is, in
this case, having unnatural intercourse with a minor even with consent. The accused could be punished with a maximum sentence of
four years in prison.
Norton and Holt's hearing will be
scheduled within the next month.
The mailer of Albany politics
brought up questions concerning
Coming's power in the cily. Of
these the Mayor said, "I am no dictator, no aristocrat. I don't try to
tell people what they should do.
The myth of anyone Idling people
how lo vole is just baloney."
The Mayor addressed questions
concerning the Common Council's
proposed Security Ordinance, calling it "highly defective." The ordinance world require nvnimum
safety standards for landlords. "I
don't want Ihe responsibility lo be
put upon ilie landlords," he said.
"In a good number of attacks by
the Pine Hills Molester, (he tenant
did not lock the windows and
doors,"
Corning also said the cily was doing "everything it can" to increase
security in high risk areas. He praised the police for "giving hundreds
of volunteer hours" toward solving
the Molester case.
C o r n i n g rushed back to
Democratic Headquarters on Stale
Street after the appearance, saying
lhal elcclion nighl was the easiest of
all for the mayor.
Old Westbury Ends
Open Admissions Policy
by Susan Milligun
Due to a lack of funds and a high
attrition rate, SUC/Old Westbury
President John Maguire announced
in May an end to Old Westbury's
open admission policy. However,
on Monday Maguire announced a
compromise policy which would
mandate more selective admission
standards, as opposed to the first
proposed solution of closed admissions.
The new policy was a result of
student dissatisfaction with the
original policy and the consequent
establishment of a committee to
discuss admission standards, Student Government President Crystal
Cox said.
Maguire's first proposed policy
required all applicants to lake admissions tests; previously Old
Westbury accepted all students
regardless of skill deficiencies.
"The problem with the original
policy is thai it was a bit biased,"
Cox said. "Giving pre-admission
tests to all applicants would be
blaming the victim."
Old Westbury's mission since its
establishment in 1970 is to educate
the non-traditional student, with an
emphasis on minorities.
The new policy mandates entering freshman students lo submit an
application aimed at gauging
motivation, a personal essay, and
two letters of recommendation. The
policy applies to all students who
graduated high school within Ihe
last five years with a grade point
average of less than 75 percent.
The current policy is Ihe product
of a task force comprised of
students, faculty, and administration who suggested proposals to
Maguire, Cox said.
Administration officials said that
1
the policy of open adniissions had
to be discontinued because it caused
a drain on the budget for
developmental or remedial courses.
"We were "spending 18 percent of
o u r o p e r a t i n g budget
on
developmental c o u r s e s , " .Old
[continued on page eleven
'Experimental College"Program
to Offer Non-Credit Courses
by Wayne Peereboom
SA is planning an "Experimental
College," which will offer courses
of a "practical nature" to SUNYA
students, according to SA Vice
President Brian Levy.
Experimental College courses,
Levy said, would range from
leadership training to a u t o
mechanics. He said students may
teach the non-credit courses
themselves.
Levy said he has no idea when
photo; Will Yunnan
SUNYA will begin classes because
SA is bargaining with the administration as well as the College
of Continuing Studies.
Experimcnlal College courses
may tap into Continuing Studies
classes. In Ihis case, Levy said,
there is a possibility that "students
may get pushed out by adults" who
are enrolled in Continuing Education. Levy said they want to "make
sure that students who want it will
continued on page eleven
November 5, 1980
Help Organize the
Hills Neighborhood
Sionum Loudis
SUNYA Scholastic Honor Society *
J^l!!lU^JI?.l4^!?^.^-.!?P
8
^ °^ ^
senior
class. If you
litliJiSilik
Utilities - Security - No Nukes - Rent
Control - Landlord - Tenant
IMMEDIATELY NOTIFY US BY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Darbora Uppal
760-5272
Nell Solomon
Dr. Lonnl
404-2754
457-6000
Sign up until Fri. Nov. 7
LC3&4
r
In physics 244
Victory is a "Humbling Moment" for Reagan
3 credits-Community Service Intern for
Off Campus Association
feel that you qualify but didn't get a letter of invitation,
pholn cuurtcft) of Capital N»*»ipap*rs
" . . . there has never been a more
humbling moment in my life."
more information-
Page Five
Albany Student Press
Reagan's Victory Speech
Off Campus Association 457-4928
Here is the text of Ronald
Reagan's victory speech, delivered
Tuesday night at the Century Plaza
Hotel in Los Angeles:
Thank you, thank you very
much. Here we are. You know, we
are all here bul one now and he was
here but they just took him olT
stage. It's way past his bedtime.
Let me just say first of all this has
been — well, there has never been a
more humbling moment in my life.
1 would have been not only
humbled by the extent of what has
happened tonight — even ir it had
been the cliffhanger that all of us 1
think were expecting, it would have
been the same way — but just lo
have had the support of the people
of this country.
I consider the trust that you have
placed in me sacred and I give you
my sacred oath that I will do my utmost to justify your faith.
Together, we are going to do
what has to be done. We're going to
put America back to work again.
You know, I aim to try and tap
that great American spirit, that
opened up this completely
undeveloped continent from coast
to coast and made it a great nation,
survived several wars, survived the
Great Depression, and we'll survive
Ihc problems we face right now.
When I accepted your nomina-
tion for president, I hesitatingly but
I asked for your prayers at that moment. I won't ask them for this in
this particular moment but I will
just say that I will be very happy to
have them in the days ahead.
All I can say to all of you is thank
you, and thank you for more than
just George Bush and myself, thank
you because if the trend continues,
we may very well control one house
of Congress for the first time in a
quarter of a century.
We have already, we have picked
up some governorships and Bill
Brock told me on the phone just a
few minutes ago that it looks like in
a number of states we have turned
the state legislatures around and for
the first time they are majorities fo
us.
You did it. I have one message
that I have to give before I leave. I
have been upstairs on the phone trying to get a hold of two celebrations, two parties that are going on,
one in Tampico, III., where I was
born, and one in Dickson, III.,
where I grew up. I've got two home
towns. And finally we managed to
get the radio station in that area and
they told us that they would broadcast my message into the two parties
that are going on.
So to all of them, thank you too,
back there in the hometowns.
Carter's Concession Speech
TOWER EAST CINEMA
AMIA-WIRA Intramural Captain's
Meeting
THUItS,
NOV 6TJri
IC-24
Floor Hockey-Womens' and Mens'
Nov., 5, CC Assembly Hall 4 pm
Volleyball- Womens', Mens',& Coed
Nov., 6, CC 375 4pm
"THE ODD COUPLE"
CAPTAINS MUST BRING ROSTERS AND BOND
MONEY.ANY QUESTIONS CAN BE ANSWERED
AT PE B-74.
JACK LIEMMOM /
WALTER MATHAU
sa funded
WHEN?
ITALIAN CINEMA 3 1 8
is
TAUGHT IN ENGLISH
FILMS ARE SHOWN IN THE ORIGINAL-WITH
ENGLISH SUBTITLES
NO PREREQUISITES!
Undergradrate as well, as Graduate
students are welcome.
DIRECTORS:
FILMS:
Roberto Rossellini
O p e n city
Luchlno Visconti
L'Amore
Vittorio D e S i c a
La Terra Trema
Federico Fellinl
Senso
P.P. Pasolini
B i c y c l e Thief
Michelangelo Antonionl
Umberto D .
I Vitellonl
La D o l c e Vita
Accattone
GREAT ITALIAN FILM
The G o s p e l According
DIRECTORS
t o S a i n t Matthew
IN ITALIAN CINEMA
L
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A S LITERATURE
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Red Desert
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YOU WILL GAIN PRACTICAL
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APPLY NOW, 10-20 POSITIONS
ACROSS NY STATE, APPLICATIONS AND COMPLETE INFORMATION ARE WAITING FOR YOU
AT YOUR NY STATE JOB SERVICE CENTER (BESIDE THE
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APPLICATION DEADLINE NOV.
14. FILM AND SLIDE PRESENTATION ON "HOW TO RUN YOUR
OWN B U S I N E S S " NOV. 1 9 ,
12:30-2:00 P . M . , CAMPUS
CENTER 370.
I might say I have a deep appreciation of the system, however,
thai lets people make a free choice
aboul who will lead Ihem for the
next four years.
Aboul an hour ago, I called
#
'ITALIAN CIVILIZATION 3 1 5
no prerequisite if taken in English
Mondays 5:45-8:05 pm
Governor Reagan in California and
I have been blessed as only a few
I told him thai I congratulated him
people ever have lo help shape the
for a fine victory.
destiny of this nalion.
1 look forward lo working closely
In lhal effort, I've had your
wilh him during the next few weeks.
faithful support. In some ways, I've
We'll have a very fine transition
been Ihe most forlunalc of all
period. I told him I wanted Ihc best
presidents because I've had the dai-.
one in history, and I then scnl him
ly aid of a wise man and a good
tliis telegram and I'll read ii to you:
man al my side, in my judgment the
"It's now apparent lhal the bcsl vice president anybody ever
had. Fritz Mondale.
American people have chosen you
as the nexi president, I congratulate
I've nol achieved all I sel out to
you and pledge to you our fullest
do. Perhaps no one ever does, bul
support and cooperation in bringwe have faced Ihc lough issues.
ing aboul an orderly Iransilion of
We've stood for and we've
government in Ihe weeks ahead. My
bcsl wishes are wished to you and fought for and we have achieved
your family as you underlakc Ihe some very imporlanl goals for o u r '
responsibiliiies that lie before you." country. These efforts will not end
with ihis administration.
And I signed il Jimmy Carter.
The efforl must go on. Nor will
the progress thai we have made be
lost when we leave office.
The greal principles lhal have
guided this nalion since its very
founding will continue to guide
America lo ihc challenges of the
future.
This has been a long and hardfoughl campaign as you well know.
But we must come together as a
uniled and a unified people lo solve
the problems lhal are still before us,
lo meet ihe challenges of a new
decade. And I urge all of you lo
phulu i .mil, M ill Capital Ncntpaptn
join in wilh me in a sincere and
fruitful efforl lo support my suc- " . . . I would never lie to you, so I
cessor when he undcrlakes this can't stand here and say it doesn't
greal responsibility as president of
hurt."
Ihc grealesl nalion on Earlh.
Reagan, D'Amato Make Comeback in N.Y.
T.,5:45 to 8:35 (or beyond)-for students with Italian
language understanding.
Th., 5:45 to 8:35 (ibid.)-for students with no Italian
language understanding.
WITH COLLEGE
PROtm
PAINTERS
LTD.,AN
ORGANIZATION
OF STUDENTS RUNNING THEIR
OWN RESIDENTIAL PAINTING
BUSINESSES.
HOW?
Here is the text of President
Carter's
concession
speech,
delivered Tuesday night:
I promised you four years ago
that 1 would never lie to you, so 1
can't stand here and say it doesn't
hurt.
The people of the United Stales
have made their choice, and of
course I accept their decision, bul I
have to admit not wilh Ihc same enthusiasm thai 1 accepted the decision four years ago.
PRE-REGISTRATION?
YES!
ITALIAN CINEMA 3 1 8
UNIQUE
SUMMER OF '81
OPPORTUNITY
WHY?
President Carter Leaves Sadly, Gracefully
Photo: Will Yunnan
If Javits had dropped out of the
race, Ilollzman may have won.
New York (AP) Their own slate
Republican parly didn't support
Ihem al first. But AITonsc
D'Amato, a political upslarl, and
Ronald Reagan ended up wilh Ihcir
own sweel viclories in New York
Stale anyway.
D'Amato, a Long Island town
supervisor who billed himself as Ihc
candidate of Ihc "forgotten middle
class," Tuesday captured Ihe U.S.
Senate seal held for ihc lasi 24 years
by Jacob Javits.
He squeaked oul a narrow victory over Democratic Rep.
Elizabeth Holtzman to oust Ihc
76-ycar-old Javils in [he three-way
contest. Javils, who ran on Ihe
Liberal Party line, had been Ihe
underdog in ihc race ever since he
lost lo D'Amato in the GOP
primary.
Reagan, once considered too
conservative for New York by the
GOP political hierarchy, soundly
put lhal idea lo rcsl wilh a margin
of aboul 160,000 voles over President Carlcr. He I hereby captured
New York's 41 electoral voles.
Republicans also gained four additional congressional seals, bul
Democrats nonetheless rclained a
majority in the slate's congressional
delegation, 22 seals lo Ihe GOP's
17. Abscam defendant Rep. John
Murphy was one of Ihe Democrats
booted out.
Bul the nalional wave of discontent with President Carter had little
effect on the slate's legislative
races. Democrats retained control
of the slate Assembly, while
Republicans continued their control
of the stale Senate.
Both D'Amato and Reagan appeared lo benefil from Ihe fad their
contests were ihree-way races. And
both may have also benefilted from
apparent widespread voter apathy.
Only about 5.9 million voters went
to Ihe polls, Ihe lowest turn-out in a
continued on page eleven
Campaigners Comment on Presidential Election Results
by Susan Milligan
The mood al Albany County
Republican headquarters was
justifiably optimistic, although
somewhat restrained, when Carter
conceded at approximately 10 p.m.
last n i g h t . Albany County
Republican Committee Chair
George Scaringe remarked lhal
"(Albany) County has been solidly
Democratic since 1974 — I am encouraged by the fact that we have
elected a Republican President.
jj
NEWS FEATURE
"We have put Walergale behind
us for good," he said. "I hope the
Republicans can become encouraged again .', . rally around the
Republican Committee."
Scaringe said he thinks it is possible, given that a conservative trend
in the country was reflected in many
levels of the election, thai Albany
Republicans can "rebuild the cily
of Albany • , . and eventually break
Ihe Democratic machine.
"We jusl have lo pick il apart
spot by spot," he added.
Scaringe noted that last year's
figures stale 42,000 Republicans in
the Albany County, as opposed to
72,000 Democrats.
Scaringe said he thought
Reagan's major support came from
the "silent majority" of middle
Americans as well as "those who
arc very concerned about our national defense.
"The weakness in our defense
was clearly shown by our inability
to get the hostages oul of Iran," he
said. "People have losl faith in Jimmy Carter's ability to run the country."
The Committee Chair said he
does not think thai inner conflicts
— such as the controversy over the
ERA in the drawing up of the party's platform — will weaken the
Republican Party.
"The ERA — and other issues —
ure things that can be worked oul
among Ihe parly leaders. I don't see
a fight," he said.
Scaringe added finally that he
sees a successful future for the
Republican Party nation-wide.
"People are concerned wilh what
will happen to Ihem," he said.
"People are fed up wilh Ihe way ihe
country is being r u n . The
Republican Party is not dead; it is
alive, and it offers a viable alter I
naiivc lo the Democratic Party." -
The Mayor said that he "doesn't Party Presidential Barry Comthink Ihe hostage situation had moner made a significant effect on
anything to do wilh Carter's Ihe election in idealistic terms.
defeat," and added he "didn't
"Whatever Ihe percentage ends
think it would have made much of a up to be, ihe message is clear-cut,"
difference if the hostages had been ' h e said. "We are going to force
released before the election,"
other candidates to address the
Corning said he "doesn't even issues and we aren't going to stand
remember" the last time a for the bullshit.
Republican carried Ihe city of
"We will draw attention to the
Albany.
issues," he continued. "We will not
"I am sad to a certain degree," allow ourselves to be absorbed into
Corning admitted. "I am surprised the major parties."
The atmosphere was sullen at at the support D'Amato had. I had
Ireland said he feels .that
best at 79 Slate Street, Democratic no feeling this Reagan thing would Reagan's election will spur revolt —
Headquarters. Albany Mayor be as big as il is."
or at least opposition to various
issues, especially where students are
Erastus Corning was clearly
remorseful, remarking that he "has
Although they were never really concerned.
tremendous, respect for the Presi- in the race — or perhaps simply
"Carter has whipped up war
dent, and was very sorry lo see him because they knew they were never hysteria, Carter has pushed registradefeated." Corning admitted to in ihe race, the Citizens Party was tion, and I believe that Reagan will
voting slraight Democrat in every having quite a party as the election institute a draft," he said. "The
race.
results rolled in, Campaign Chair draft is an issue that definately hits
Corning said that "it has been an Mike Ireland, although noting that home."
interesting election, and very ex- he "was very surprised and exReagan s p o k e a g a i n s t a
citing," but added that he "was tremely disappointed" at Reagan's peacetime draft while campaigning,
very surprised by the results."
victory, seems to feel that Citizens
\continued on page eleven
E
Aspects on Wednesday
•age six
-November 5, 1980\
You Cannot Win, If You Do Not Go
Ed Pinka
Recently, this area has been flooded with'
up and coming groups. These shows (Blue
Angel, Nervous Eaters,. Fingerprintz, etc.)
are characterized by low ticket prices, low
admissions, low attendance, and great performances. At J.B.'s last Wednesday night,
this embarrassing occurrence look place
once again, and the band Polyrock was the
victim. Polyrock was to open up for new
wave cash-Ins, 3-D, who luckily cancelled,
leaving the night to Polyrock — uninterrupted.
Polyrock In Albany was a dream come
'rue (I had passed up seeing them over the
summer In New York City when the admls.lon price at Hurrah's was a hefty $10.00).
This New York City based band drew attention when contemporary classical composer,
Phil Glass was selected by mutual agreement
io produce their album, and that's when
their rhythmic, infectious music was heard.
To be honest, the band does not Include
the most talented musicians, rather, they are
six creative people with Ihe same sound in
mind. Il is simple rhythms and distracted
hooks and noises that mix perfectly to create,
one of the freshest, most energetic sounds of
the year. On the album, Polyrock, Glass and
co-producer Kurt Munkacsl are credited with
helplng'brlng out this sound, but on stage, il
is all Polyrock.
The band look Ihe stage sublley. Included
were Bill and T o m Robertson on guitar* and
vocals, Lenny Aaron on keyboard, Curt
Cosentlno on bass machine, Cathy Oblansey
on occasional vocals, anil Mike Phillips
replacing Joe Yannece on drums (Joe is
temporarily sidelined with a broken leg).
They opened with a new song "Slow" and
Ihe initial reception was of awe; Ihe song
The band closed the short, nine-song set
sounded familiar but it also sounded new.'
Then they played " N o Love Lost," a song with the tune "No. 7." The music stopped,
from their album which stirred Ihe mlnlscule the feet stopped and everybody looked al
crowd to its feet, if they weren't already stan- each other in disbelief. How could they stop
ding, and started bodies jerking. By the first so soon? The crowd rallied Io make as much
noise as was needed to bring them back oul.
bars of "Romantic M e , " this public (private)
party with Polyrock started bopping and Success. Bill Robertson apologized for havdidn't slop until the band left the stage for the ing nothing else to play and asked If the
night. Aside from another new song, the crowd would mind any repeats. The
band played such album cuts as "Green For response was unanimous and the music and
G o , " "Shut Your Face," "This Song," and movement continued.
After the show, the band expressed no
"Your Dragging Feel" (not mine, anyway).
The audience seemed spellbound, If not ad- discouragement al the poor showing, saying
most of their initial appearances outside New
dicted, to Ihe rhythmic, energetic music.
*
"he following
or*
ment
is a
York City had been the same, with the
crowds being as appreciative as this one.
They hope that their reputation will grow by
word of mouth and when they return Ihe audiences will be larger. This Is how It started in
New York City.
After a short tour across country, Ihe band
Is thinking of touring Europe, where the
album Is very popular. They hope to come
back to Albany, and 1 hope they do, loo, so
you can see them next time. You really
should.
a
- I n Xanadu did Newton-John
a movie masterpiece create
Where talent, the sacred commodity, ran'
and hers is measureless to man.
Her beauty came from her voice's sound
her song brought rumplings to the ground
Her eyes were the green of big Kosher dills
And Gh! the difference to me.
Her energy came from tiny red pills
And Oh! the tax free income for thee.
S.
Llewellen
Winthrop
e
fragspon*J n overflow of emotaneous
tion that occurred
during
a
night
oj
major
hallucinogenics,
tawdry
sex, and countless Oliuia
Newton-John
records. It
was recollected
in Ihe
tranquility
oj a lecture
center. It is a fragment
because I was interrupted
by Prof. Staley's question
about
Ihe influence
of
Morse
Peckham
and
Chomsky
on
Lawrence
Welk. He got his answer,
but Ihe world lost my
masterpiece.
WOEI
•
But Lo the dark side of Livvy dear
Betwixt th jse perfect little ears
A Savuge Place! as cheap and sleazy there
as the nol so private place of Cher.
And the waning moon grew paler
at the sight of Liv wailing for a sailor
And from her "chasm" a ceaseless
turmoil seething
as our beauty's lust became heavy breathing
A "mighty fountain" quickly was pushed
amid her milky white thighs
Liv so glad for the cover of bush
the man nearly deafened by Livvy's sighs.
To the above world she was
a virginal young thing.
Little did her public know
-how that girl could swing!
Soul Men
A Weekend Full Of Blues:
Sam
And Dave
• * ~ V O a m Moore and Dave Prater were
V MS an absolute joy Friday night at the
^J^W
Hulla Baloo. With the present
resurgence of heavy metal, and all the corporate nu wave being produced, the purity
of Sam and Dave was more than Just a
r
efreshlng change, They were electrifying
Craig Marks
' with their soul-funk-rhythm and blues blend,
and, as far as dancing goes, I've never bopped so Intensely in all my concert-going
days.
It's unfortunate, maybe even tragic, lliat
Ihe average record buyer believes that "Soul
Man" was written by the Blues Brothers.
Even If the Blues Brothers version did have
soul and did do the song Justice — which It
doesn't — It would still be a shanvi that Sam
and Dave are so unknown (when telling my
friends who 1 was seeing on Halloween, I
was constantly asked the question, "Who are
Itiey?") Aside from "Soul M a n , " they've
done the original versions of "I Thank
You,"popularized by Bonnie Raill, and "I
Can't Stand Up For Falling D o w n , " found
on Elvis Costello's Get Happy LP. It's obvious thai Sam and Dave have been
recognized by their musical peers, but for
some reason, nol by the general public, as
evidenced Dy the less Ihan full house Friday
night.
Afler a long wall, Ihe band, minus Sam
November 5, 1980-
• Aspects
on
Wednesday-
• page seven
Thoroughly Good
But The Band Played On
^ 7
never thought I would see'
\J)lhe
d a y , but t h i n g s
have
£ _ J F lust gotten ridiculous. I mean, I
SRO — that's standing-room-only —
concerts are bad enough, but what's
even worse than those are shows where the
band outnumbers the audience.
t
and Dave, look the stage and opened with
"Pick Up The Pieces," a hit In Ihe early 70's
for Ihe Average While Band. The band
jumped; a rhythm and lead guitarist, bass
player, keyboardist, drummer, and a four
piece brass section provided Ihe spirited
sound. They were exceptionally funky, and
Ihe fact that Sam and Dave had such a (irsl
rate sound says a lot about Ihe devotion and
love Ihey have (or what they do.
In order to perform against as busy a
background as a nine man band, Ihe soloists
would have lo have stirring energy and also
commanding musicianship. Sam and Dave Sam and Dave sound appeared: in "You
qualify on both counts, From the opening Don't Know Like I Know," the horns were
notes of "Hold On, I'm Comln," io the finale sweet and radiant: in " Y o u Got Mr Hum
"I Thank Y o u , " Ihe two soul men from the min'" the bass line was undeniable; and in
south weaved, danced, sang, shouted, and "Soul Man" Ihe guitars and the horns ca
poured out tremendous amounts of sweat through strong. You would think that Sam
and emotion, Their voices: Sam's higher and Dave would be tired of doing "Soul
with a gospel strain. Dave's deeper and Man" night afler night (or 15 years, bul if
huskier, blended beautifully, and with the .Ihey are, they don't make it evident. Il seem',
band pouring oul funk and rhythm and blues that they gel even more oul ol their music
rills, it was Impossible nol lo gel up and Ihan their audience does, which In turn.
move.
feeds the passion ihey already have
During each song, a special pari of Ihe
Sam and Dave's rapport witli the audleni e
was remarkable. A lead vocalist asking ihe
crowd to clap along is usually •' delerrenl lo
the desired result, bul not In tins case Nut
only was the crowd clapping, bul Ihey were
singing when Sam wauled Ihem I " . and
even bumping and grinding at the muni ol
three During the Intro lo "Sooth Me." an
old Sam Cooke tune, Sam mentioned his
poonlang and his ding-a-ling several limes,
the trumpet player blowing a bad note eai h
time, forcing Sam to stop and ask "WhatM I
say?"
Il wasn't long before Ihe audience got Into
the fun. When Sam told a female In Ihe au
dience thai "she ain't got what he's gol," she
blunlly replied " N o , bul I gol whal you
need." This broke up both Ihe crowd and t l " '
band and served as a perfect example ol the
warmth lhat these guys give off
In NYC and other hip places lln're's a soul
revival going on. Funk, rhythm and blues,
and soul are being played in'ihe clubs, ad
ding | Q the usual punk and ppsl punk
Aretha Franklin, Al Green, Motown and
Parliament-Funkadelk: are currently l ' " '
favorite things to move io, and new groups
from England such as Doxy's Midnight Run-
George Gives You More
l|h the release of his third album,
fMore,
o n Rounder Records,
George Thorogood leaves no
3oubt that he Is the front runner In recognizing and paying tribute to the great blues and
early rock ' n ' roll composers, while revitalizing their songs with more verve and spirit
than they were originally recorded.
Ellis Albright
Whether he is performing numbers
associated with John Lee Hooker, Elmore
James, Willie Dixon, and Chuck Berry
(whose songs he recorded on his two
previous albums as well), or Muddy Waters,
Hound Dog Taylor, and Carl Perkins,
Thorogood glosses over their expressive
qualities, emphasizing dynamics, timing and
sheer giddy momentum.
The powerful and steady rhythm section Is
formed by bassist Billy Blough and drummer
Jeff Simon. Thorogood handles guitar, slide
guitar, and vocals, while the newesi
member, Hank Carter, plays sax.
Thorogood usually selects lesser known
songs from the masters, and this album Is no
exception.
It opens with Willie Dixon's "I'm Wanted."
Thorogood greatly Increases the tempo of
this Chicago blues song and adds some very
cutting guitar work!
Next, the band does an instrumental with
guitar and sax exchanging licks In classic (iftles rocker style. The bass line is reminiscent
of Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog," but done In
a much more electrified manner.
"One Way Ticket," one of two slow tunes
on the album, Is performed very much In the
John Lee Hooker style of music. Billy
Blough and Jeff Simon provide a slow,
bluesy beat, punctuated by Thorogood's
stunning guitar work.
The single, "Bottom ol the Sea," taken
from a 1969 Muddy Waters' album, does
great justice to Ihe original song. Trying to
gain an audience' with the psychedelic
crowd, the original version was buried In one
of Muddy's worst albums. Thorogood gives
his all, and comes up with another up-tempo formed live, even If you have never seen
rocker, which may evolve as a crowd pleaser
him.
In shows to come.
Thorogood's sound and his original three
"Night Time," which was on Belter Than
piece band, was based somewhat on that of
The Rest (an album of materia] recorded In
Hound Dog Taylor and the House Rockers.
1 9 7 6 by M C A , r e l e a s e d ! w i t h o u t
"Just Can't Make It" attests to that fact, as he
Thorogood's permission in 1979 to capitalize
masterfully recreates and polishes the classic
on his success), Is done with more drive and
slide guitar sound of Hound Dog himself.
spirit than the first lime. It is a classic that has
The final track, "Restless," by Carl "Blue
been done by many groups before, but
Suede Shoes" Perkins, Is Thorogood's
Thorogood's version is by far the best.
tribute to this master of rockabilly. The basics
The second slow blues, "Goodbye Baby,"
are the same, but the sound Is much fuller
by Elmore James, ts handled by Thorogood
than it was 25 years ago.
with brilliant slide guitar done In true Elmore
George Thorogood has certainly establishfashion. Being one of Thorogood's Idols, this
Is the fourth time around covering one of ed himself In the past three years. With this
album, his best to date, he continues to build
Elmore James' tunes.
Dn his reputation as one of rock ' n ' roll's
The best song on the album, in my mind,
most exciting guitarists and performers. His
Is "House of Blue Lights." Taken from a
shows are usually sold out, and after hearing
lesser k n o w n C h u c k B e r r y c o v e r ,
him perform, It is easy to see why. If you
Thorogood has opened with this song for as
long as he has been louring. Though a slight- ' happen to be seeing him Saturday at J.B.
Scolt's, or if you have More handy, gel
ly shortened version on record, one can
ready lo rock your sox off and boogie 'till the
sense ihe energy II musl project when perbreak of dawn.
Riding Out The Storm
—N
This is music to miss
T h o r o g o o d glvea h l » a l l ,
yfs\Aa from ihe cover and a lew previously unreleased pictures ol Jim Morrison
rr(M and The Doors, there is absolutely nothing new or Interesting about The Doors
t^Jr
Greatest Hits. Musically, ihe album Is very solid. It lakes us from Ihe early hils
like "Light My Fire" lo later ones such as "Riders On The Slorm." Unfortunately, these
songs can all be (ound on any of the three other Door's Greatest Hits albums In addition lo
the original albums they were released on. So why a fourth Greatest Hits album? Obviously, just lo make money off of unsuspecting people.
Granted, there will be a few people who just want a lew popular Doors songs in Ihell
album library, without having lo spend large sums of money, and for Ihem, this album is
the perfect choice. For the most part, however, people would rather spend a few extra
dollars and explore the songs lhat were nol hits as well as the ones lhat were. It's really a
shame thai Elektra Records could nol be satisfied with three other greatesi hits albums that
brought In money, bul had to go oul and give us another, so they could stuff their wallets a
little more, and do damage lo Ihe name ol Ihe group that started them oil in the late sixlies. Morrison and The Doors were poels and musicians, nol the type ol people lo put up
with exploltallon.
,
II there Is any good lo be said aboul the album, II Is Ihe fact that a lyric sheet, and a very
intense plclure ol Morrison are Included In Ihe package. If you wanl to listen to The Doors
Greatest Hits, buy the original albums. If you wanl lo contribute lo greedy record companies, buy The Doors Greatest Hils.
— Douglaa'Wolf
, a n d delivers an up-tempo rocker.
B o p p i n ' To The Best
• • • Into their
. • • *new
ners are Incorporating •soul
sounds. Sam and Dave's music Is an Important part of this revival, and they are probably enjoying their greatest popularity since
Ihe late '60's. But even with this new found
popularity, ['.:"• band Isn't making money.
They play lor Ihe love of music, and not for
the love of money, and Oils Is one of Ihe
reasons why they deserve that much more
respect.
What II really all comes down to is dancing
lo this dynamic duo. You can listen lo Ihem
and sense Ihe emotion, but when you get on
•the floor and let Ihe beal, energy, and
soul lake over, you're part of the ehftotlon.
Listen to, or sec Sam and Dave and become
aware of how much soul each of you really
have.
Matt Mnrphv
(Paotoi Will V M
Shaboo
All-Stars
/rT"ne
hand name, Shaboo All-Stars,
{-*§
brings out two Interesting fads:
'-"'
(Irsl, Ihe band gels their name and
their lead singer from a Connecticut bar call
ed the Shaboo. Second, the All-Stars are
musicians extraordinaire. Playing mostly
blues, with mainstream jazz and soul mixed
In, this five-piece group constantly over
whelmed Ihe Hulla Baloo audience with
their skill and mastery of their Instruments,
The All-Stars are led by Matl "Guitar"
Murphy of Blues Brothers fame. John
Belushl refers lo Murphy as "The Champion
o l Ihe Blues," and It was easy lo see why.
Murphy's leads and solos were technically
amazing, leaving the crowd shaking their
heads In disbelief. Although Murphy is quite
a large and powerful looking man, he was
extremely gentle and light, with his flicking
eyebrows acting as his major expression ol
emotion,
The band has an Impressive list of credits:
individually, they've played for Johnny
Winter, James Cotton, The Young Rascals,
Blood, Sweat and Tears, Ike and Tina
Turner, Muddy Waters, Sly and Ihe Family
Slone, and more. Their Instrumental tended to be more effective In displaying their
talents Ihan their covers, which Included
"Slormy," "Dock of Ihe Bay," and "Soul
Man." The lead vocalist had a good, raspy
blues voice, bul he really wasn't up to-the
band's standard,
If you happen to go one night to your
(avorile
find ito'
Ihe All-Stars
playing
i.
no bar
I,.,, and
.,,,,1 fin,I
All Si.ii'. ol,,vino
there, you'd think of Ihem as an exceptional
bar band. This Is the best way lo think of and
enjoy ihe Shaboo All Stars.
Buffalo Chips
Bloogie Band
^~^ penlng l o r the Shaboo 'All-Stars
f[J
were the Buffalo Chips Bloogie
Ci/
Band, a group which has started to
gain some prominence In Ihe area. Their
music has been termed "bloogie" because of
their unique blend o l blues and boogie. The
Chips, as they are known by their followers,
have opened for such acts as Sam and Dave,
and were featured al the Rock & Roll Dance
The Buffalo Chlpai Bloogie aauelc
Party
Rafters.
Partv al
,ii the
the Rafters.
The band is led by Buffalo Bob, theh
drummer and lead vocalist. Bob's vocals are
very raspy and draining, with each word
I sounding like it might be his last. Bulfulo Bob
also wrlles the original material for the Chips,
with the themes ranging from capilal'punishmenl to the usual "I ain't got no woman, 1
ain't gol no money" sort ol blues. Bob has
also written a blues "opera" about life In
prison, and this Is a work that really should
be heard and appreciated.
The Chips love to sing the blues, but they
also play lor a more Important reason. Part
o l the receipts from each performance go to
a special program to produce concerts for
prisoner rehabilitation. The cause Is very
worthwhile, and so Is Buffalo Bob's music.
Patronize Ihe arts, and go see the Chips,
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N.Y.S. Assembly
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THE RESULTS
Dislncl
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U.S. Senate
D'Amato
Presidential
Reagan
Electoral Votes
Popular Votes
475
41,185,667
5,309,295
0
W • W w
U.S. House
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JO
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County
Sujfolk
Suffolk
Nassau,
628,277
33,261,944
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Anderson
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2,529,049
Javits
Carter
District
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2,625,476
Holtzman
WiiintM
Suffolk
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau.
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Bronx,
Queens
Kings,
Queens
Klnff*
Kings
Kings
Kings
' Kings
Richmond,
Manhattan
New York
New York
Bronx,
Manhattan
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx,
Westchester
Westchester
Dutchess, Putnam,
Columbia,
Westchester,
Ulster
Orange, Rockland,
Ulster
Broom, Sullivan,
Tioga,
Chemung, Delaware,
Tompkins,
Ulster
Albany,
Montgomery,
Schenectady
Greene, Rensselaer,
Saratoga,
Warren, Washington,
Albany,
Columbia,
Essex
Clinton,
Franklin,
Jefferson
Louis, St.
Lawrence,
Essex. Qgmmgg
Fulton,
Hamilton,
Herkimer.
Oneida,
Schoharie,
Montgomery,Otsego,
Schenectady
Chenango,
Cortland,
Madison,
Delaware, Onondaga,
Otsego
Cayuga, Scholar, Seneca,
Yates,
Onondaga, Ontario,
Oswego
Steuben,
Tompkins
Wayne, Monroe
Genesee, Livingston,
Wyoming,
Monroe,
Ontario
Niagara, Orleans, Erie, Monroe
Erie
Erie
Allegheny,
Cattaraugus,
Chautauqua, Chemung, Erie,
Steubln
N.Y.S. Senate
Dlslrlcl
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Carney (R)
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Mcllutjh (O)
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Slratton(D)
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Solomon (R)
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Martin (R)
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Wortley(ll)
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Ct)Ulll>
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk, Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau,
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens,
Kings
Kings
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Cayuga,
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St. Lawrence
Lewis, Oneida,
Herkimer
Broome, Chenango, Tioga
Delaware, Otsego,
Schoharie,
Sullivan, Herkimer, Ulster
Madison,
Onondaga
Cortland, Cayuga,
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Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben,
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Seneca, Wayne,
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Bronx
Bronx
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Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester,
Rockland
Dutchess, Putnam,
Columbia,
Westchester
Orange. Rockland, Ulster
Rensselaer,
Albany,
Columbia,
Saratoga
Greene, Albany
Clinton, Essex, Franklin,
Warren,
Washington,
Ontario,
noon
Yates,
Monroe
Monroe
Erie
Erie
Allegany,
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Chatauqua, Erie
Livingston, Wyoming, Erie
Oeneeee, Erie, Monroe
Orleans, Niagara, Erie
Cattaraugus,
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Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens,
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
Kings
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Richmond
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Richmond
Manhattan,
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Bronx
Bronx
Kings
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Putnam. Westchester
Rockland
Orange, Rockland
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County
Sullivan,
Orange
Dutchess,
Ulster
Orange,
Dutchess
Ulster
Albany, Columbia,
Greene
Albany
Albany,
Rensselaer
Schoharie, Albany,
Delaware,
Montgomery,
Schenectady
Albany,
Rensselaer.
Schenectady
Saratoga
Fulton, Montgomery,
Franklin,
Hamilton
Washington,
Rensselaer,
Warren
Clinton, Essex, Warren
St. Lawrence, Franklin
Herkimer,
Otsego
Jefferson, Lewis,
Oneida
Oneida
Oneida
Oswego,
Oneida
Onondaga
Onondaga.
Madison
Onondaga
Onondaga
Chenango, Delaware,
Madison
Broome, Tioga
Broome
Cayuga, Cortland
Chemung, Tioga
Steuben, Schuyler,
Chemung
Thompklns, Votes, S e n e c a
Ontario, Seneca,
Wayne
Wayne, Monroe
Monroe
Monroe
Monroe
Monroe
Monroe
Allegany, Livingston,
Ontario
Genesee, Orleans,
Monroe,
Wyoming
Niagara
Niagara, Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie
Erie, Wyoming
Cattaraugus, Chatauqua, Erie
Chatauqua
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Gould Eric Grutier. Matthew Maddad. Wendell I leddon, Mlchele Urael, Jnmei Jaffa, Amy Keillor, Larry Klntman. Tom Luitlk,
llr
I i v y . .lame, Maiknlcli. William O ' B r i e n , Wayne Peeiaboom, Mark Rottler, Jell Scliadoll. Barbara Schlndler, Paul Schwartr,
Sue Smllh, Laurel Solomon Zodiac a P r e v i e w Edlloret Marie Garbarlno. September Klein
D e b b i e K o p f . /tor
*
i Manager
Janet Drcilusi
Advertlelni N , n , | , i
Billing Accoaalaat
CoeepoeHlora M a n a g e r
Office C o o r d i n a t o r
Itennle Brown. Mlilam Ratpler
HaydenCanulh
Bonnie Sleveni
September Klein Coeapoaltlont I look's Chick Advertleleg Produc
Drller, Robert Kau C l a e e l f l e d
H o n M a n a g a r e : Marie Anne Colavlto, Tammy Gelger A d v e r t l a l n g P r o d u c t i o n : Planne Glacola, I
Suran Kapla
Mam Mejidelw.lui, l-aurle Schwallherg, Carolyn Sedgwick, Kallry Udell O f f i c e N i e l l i Wendy Becker, Medy Brn
i Click.
Saleer Stev
Robin Greunlieiu. Pamela Halt, Arlene Kaflowltl
H a y d e a C a r r a t h , D e a a Beta Production Mimuneit
Vertical Caatara
Tvplot E a t r a o r d l a a i r e
, , . Little Beck
. . .
. Hunk't Cluck
Peate-apr Amy Kniitor, Robin Larnilclii, Deb Reynnldt. Carina Shtpolnltky. Dave Thanntrautcr. T y p l e l e : Catol Buiy, Rotcma
Feirara. Marie Garbnilno, Seplemtrer Klein. Barbara Nolan, Dale Schneider, Laurie Waller*. C h a a r l o a r t Mark Fbchalll
Photography, Supplied pmicipully by tlnlumily Plrolo Seiulce
Chief Photographer! Hob UortOfd
DPS olafti Pay* Airhcr. Alnn Calem. Kurl Chan. Sfeue biieri. Mile Foi r.7. Maik llalnk. Marc I (crueller, llnannn Kulakajj. IXrue
MuchuM, Maik Nadtir, Sunn Stelnlump. Tony T'oticrolll, Will Vurrnoii
The Albany .Slodenl Prcti l» puliliilieil every lonelily mid (riiley iloiiog (lie icluiul yew by the Albany Sfudenl Aeii Corporation,
>, Independent not for pro/lccorporollon Ediloriall ore lerltren by lite EdHor-lfi-C/tle/j poltrv It iribtecf la reuieie by die Ldnorral
Albiioy .Sluileiil /Wi«, CC 3Z9
1400 Wntlilriglun Aye
*
Klsor(R)
Saland (R)
Warren (R)
Hlnchey(D)
Lane(R)
Hoblock(R)
Connero (D)
Shaffer (D)
Ealabllahad |aj 1 9 1 *
Connelly (D)
Vlgglano (D)
Silver (D)
Passannante (D)
Sanders (D)
Siegel (D)
Gottfried (D)
Grannls (D)
Nadler(D)
Sullivan (D) .
Daniels (D)
DelToro(D)
Murtaugh (D)
FarreU(D)
Serrano (D)
Johnson(D)
Serrano (D)
Davis (D)
Nine (D)
Velella (R)
Engel(D)
Walsh (D)
Friedman (D)
Koppell (D)
Dearie (D)
Marchlselli (D)
Spano (R)
undecided
Flnneran (D)
Burrows (R)
Perone (R)
Sullivan (R)
Fossel(R)
Stephens (H)
Levy(R)
Morahan (R)
Larkln(R)
Richmond
91
92
93
96
')
Sullivan (R)
Ferris (D)
Dugan (D)
Lewis (D)
Boyland (D)
Fortune (D)
undecided
Strelzin (D)
Lentol (D)
Robles (D)
Stranlere (II)
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
Westchester
95
*
Nassau,
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Winner
Behan(R)
Hochbrueckner (D)
Bianchl (D)
Wertz(R)
Harenberg (D)
Cochrane (R)
Flanagan (R)
,
Nassau
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
Queens
97
• * * * * •
County
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
Auer(R)
Lombard! (R)
Smith (R)
Monroe
53
54
55
56
57
* *:* * * * • * * • *
Dislricl
H
Album, iw \nn
tsisj tnim>2i:aai33m
Page Tep
— Albany Student Press —
(Classified)
c For Sale 3
FOR RENT: One, two or three
bedrooms In warm, comfortable
house on busline. Available In spring semester. 1100/month Includes
everything. Call Debbie at 457-3389
days, 438-9487 eves.
Bedroom Furniture, painted, 2 sets
(6 pc. ea.), $135/set. Double box spring, Stearns and Foster, like new,
I
Personals J
HUNK,
Three whole years I Thanks for a
great weekend of "swimming the
waters of sins of the flesh'T Too
bad about the Palace, though. Hope
our roomie feels better soon, give
Im my love. And a whopping Congrata to the AMIA Soccer League
AY RATS for a well-deserved
championship win.
Hunk's Chick
K
For Sale: 8-Track Deck & Tapes. Excellent condition, fast forward,
pause, auto stop, dual recording
meters. Call anytime, 434-6976.
Sublet, one room, in 4 bedroom
house at 535 Washington Ave. bet- - HUNK'S ROOMMATE,
w e e n O n t a r i o / Q u a i l . For 2nd So, V.D. has mono, Mono has gotsemester. 462-4746 after 7 p.m.
ten Vee Dee and Hunk actually
cleaned the room. Will wonders
never cease? Get well soon, Vee
Dee, you are missed.
SKIS FOR SALE 170 cm, Spademan
Llndlngs. Also women's boots, size
7. All good c o n d i t i o n . A l i s o n ,
HORNY If you stick It out, use It!
Easy and Kinky
KO. 439-1471 eves.
___
c
Suzanne,
It had a whole in I t . . .
The Headhunters
Passport/Application Photos $5.00
lor 2, $.50 each thereafter. Mon 1-3. Dear P.
No appointment necessary. Univer- It's true. I love the mornings. The
sity Photo Serviced. Campus Center Idea of waking up next to a
• beautiful woman I held close last
305. Bob or Suna, 7-8867.
night. The Idea of finding on my
shoulder a long black hair which I
know Is not mine.
Love, D.
, U
C A S H REGISTER
Call
Manager, Food C o o p , 7-3099,
Daytime — $400, Negotiable.
[Lost/Found J
c
Lost! Small r u s t p o c k e t b o o k .
Please call Immediately, very Import a n t l l Call Caryn, 449-1586.
Lost: Gold bracelet with diamond.
Substantial Reward if found. Sentimental value. If lound please contact Robin, 7-7799. Thank you.
Lost — Tommy Antorino, 5'-4",
Black halr.'Gulnea — lost In the
vicinity of Ryckman 201, — Reward
for any Info leading to his finding.
A l s o goes by t h e n a m e of
Moskowltz.
Wanted
J
Professional couple desires attractive apt., sublet
beginning
December for short or long term,
near University. Reply F. Ellas, M.D.,
Chestnut Hill Road, Woodstock,
N.Y.
j
c
Apartmenlmate wanted. Male or
female. Non-smoker. S. Main Ave.,
$125 & utilities. 438-7187 anytime.
438-6066
J
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE.
IBM SELECTRIC. EXPERIENCED.
273-7218, AFTER 5, WEEK-ENDS.
•134-0523.
[ Housing
Services
Jobs
J
OVERSEAS JOBS — Summer/year
round. Europe, S. Amer., Australia,
Asia. All Fields $500-$1200 monthly.
Expenses paid. Sightseeing. Free
Info. Write: MC Box 52-NY1, Corona
Del Mar, CA 92625.
Sportahoes
GA
Only 22 more months to go (or less!)
I can't wait 11 Happy Second Anniversary.
•Much love, CA
Dear Mum,
You are the best In the world, and
we're glad we have you. (Though at
times we think of trading you In.)
Love, Pops and Betty
Carole —
You've got the GREATEST eyes.
Dutch Freshman
Little One,
Hope your birthday was a big one.
Love, Chatty and Betty
Ricochet Rabbit,
Happy 18th. En|oy It now — It's a
shame it only happens once.
Love, Mushmouse
Happy 19th
Love You I
Birthday
438-6066
Special Sale for Suny students & employees
with I.D.
Now thru Sat. Nov. 8
Featuring shoes for running and basketball
every mod»' 'n stock reduced
Sporlshoes Is located 200 yds cast ot
Western A v e . S U N Y entrance o n
Isame corner as Son's Tavern.
M-F 12-8 Sat 10-4
Randll
We
The Gang
Don,
These past two months have been
great. Keep It up.
Love, Wench
November 5, 1980
Funk —
Here's to all the good things we've
experienced in a year of living
together, may the luture hold only
the brightest things for you.
" Love always, Bin
Laura,
Thanks for being the beBt roommate ever — your friendship means
a great deal to me and I hope It will
continue to grow. Stay happy!
Love, Bonnie
Katie Mae,
How can two people who have
shared so much have so little? Give
a call, you know the number — the
dime will be refunded.
Attfiai
To all those who worked on the
Children's Hour Halloween Party,
Thanks for making It the best everl
Robin & Artie
Mitch, the best RA In Irving,
Happy birthday to one hell of a guy
(one day late!). Thls'll be the best
year anyway. We gotta get out
sometime.
Rob
__
I hear It gets
Rochester.
real cold
up
In
-49
K.B.
Love of my life! Only I mean more to
me than you do!
•
R.S.
To the " C o o l " (If not frozen)
members of 1201. 2 & 4:
Thursday was definitely a "night to
remember". For the next party, let's
get an "Iceberg"!
Horny and Kinky,
Here s to many more GREAT times
In Albany! (Ar! Arl)
Love, Easy
Dear Barbara, Randl. and Kathy,
I'd rather she gained a few pounds
than got cancer.
I A M A H U M A N BEING!
f )
Dear A.F.
You mean more to me than comLove always, M.M.
Dearest David:
Here's to yet another wonderful
beautiful and happy anniversary!
Love always, Andrea
Deb ' E ' — NUTS to Canada, Pesos?
Es equal. Take . . . CORNI. Yeah,
yeah, yeah, BOOM. Hey Colonial,
recognize
us?
Wanna
be
sedated/seduced? Balls? MANY . .
you WASTY bad. Whatta loser . . .
user, bat turd, giraffe -~, antelop —,
Midnlte, redllte, allnlte, TOPLESS
STUDY! . . . another one bites the
dust . . . 'cause I want you to. but
don't want you to know that I do!
Happy Birthday, hun (Is the big one
good as
M.O.?)..
eightI as good
~~ "the •big
• ••
oqhhh, BABY
With all our love:
Andrea, Greg, Terrl
Dear Eddie,
I can't begin to thank you for all the
happiness you've given me In the
past year. I hope by now you know
how I feel about you. Remember
that always.
With much love, " K i d "
Suite 50L
I'm sorry for ruining
Thanks anyway.
Sue-Fest.
Love, Someone Special
Love, Sue
Nice face! You're giving the family a
bad name — stay off that boozel
Concerned sister, Chrlssy
P.S. Who's an alcoholic?
bear Scott,
Happy Annlversaryl It's been great
being with you these six months
and Nook forward to all our time In
Ihe future. I love you so much.
Waller —
Dear Agnes,
The last 2 months have been Incredible. You're the best and I Love
You.
Willie's Closest Friend
Dear Debbie,
What can I say? Happy birthday and
legality to a really nice kid I
Love, Rob
Tusc. 209, D Is fine; Warren, I am
NOT a pumpkin; Jeff — GFRI
Hashmen, are you DEPRESSED?
E-AWOKA-WOKA; LEE, You're such
an ITZI
Mellowchlck
ESSES
FREE SANDWICH
AJbany-WMtgata Shopping Centot
_>.'
It only takes a minute.
'
Your Hun
Cuda-72 ' puters and basketball.
(
j^o;
No more countdowns. I love you
enough to know that you need your
freedom, your life. Live and enjoy. I
will always understand, desire, and
love you.
Me
Ca7
Happy 2 months anniversary! I want
all of SUNYA to know that " I love
you" and "The Best Is Yet to
Come"!
Love always, Ga
Nell & WayhZ
You've been so considerate. I can't
thank you enough. What would I do
without you?
Love, Sue
P.S. Neil, when's Ihe wedding?
(Lisa, you can be the maid of honor
— I owe It to you)
You're my Independent
for president.
OuMntbyry-Rt. o !
Mighty flf.
XeanCte
candidate
Selth
READS o r g a n i z e
your
own
paraphernalia party. Just like tupperware, only a lot more fun. Discount prices too. Call "The Rolling
Head Shop", 8690992 Tom or Cindy.
Hey chick,
Even hicks got old! Happy 20th birthday to the best roommate ever. I
Eld
MAC,
I LOVE YOU!
G.G.
Irish beer . . . Irish coffee . . . Irish
music , . . Whaer? At the Mousetrap
Irish Nights, November 7th and 8th!
Mickey's Malt Liquor
Maybe our little one Isn't so little
anymore! Happy birthday, Elyse.
Love, your " L ' s "
Nernce —
Here's To You! I
Merg
STATE QUACI
'
Mm
Pafamounl Picture! Prosonli A Brcoksfiims Production
Anthony Hopklnj a n d John Hurt as Tho Elephant Man
Anne Bancroft JohnGtolgud WondyHillor
Musk: by John Morris Dlroctor of Photography Froddio Francis
Executive Producer Stuart CorntokJ Screenplay by Christopher Dovbro
& Eric Borgion & David Lynch Produced by Jonathan Sanger
Directed by David Lynch
BCMd Upon the life of John Morrick. tho Flophunt Man, and
not upon Ihe Broadway ploy or any other fictional account
tPOl rmmi womni WBIH €»I
A Paramount Picture
£> MCMJUX by P«(mount PcMM CdrpttNon Al h v a FtteefeJ
3rd SMASH WEEK!!
TCINEV2-3-4-5-6
1 rr;HT«2KJj:;!.i-::.ui.nr;iiKi l
Matzoh Men and Fans:
Thanks for a Super Season and a
greater birthday party. You're AllStarrs I
Love, Your Captain Selh
"soMEThiniq N E W "
THE
ElfPJWNT
Linda,
A whole month and you still can
stand me. Goddamn!
Love, Jeff
Sub Shop
POCKET PITA SANDWICHES
81
Buy two Pocket Pita
Get one free soda
valid Nov. 5-13
-
i
J
Recount Wanted
continued from front page
absentee ballots, some of which are
still uncounted.
Volers are required to sign affidavits al polling places when the
do nol have'the proper identification lo verify their, registration.
In an early morning news conference, campaign manager Linda
Davidoff said the affidavit ballots
were in urban areas which she expects lo be Holtzman territory. She
said many absentee ballots were
likely lo be from students, another
potential source of Holtzman votes.
The counting could lake up lo 10
days.
We will not concede until every
single ballot is counted," a smiling
Ms. Hollzman told optimistic supporters shortly before 1 a.m.
COMMUNITY ORGANIZERS
ACORN needs organizers lo work wllh low and moderate Income
families in 20 stales (AR, SD, T X . L A , T N , M O , FL, CO, NV, PA, IA
OK. Ml, AZ, N C , G A ; SC, CA, CT, MA) for political and economic
justice. Direct action on neighborhood deterioration, ulilily rales,
taxes, health care, redlining, elc. Tangible results and enduring
rewards — long houts and low pay. Training provided. Conlacl
Career Planing Office for Interview Tuesday, November IK oi write
Kaye Jaeger, A C O R N , 117 Spring, Syracuse, NY 13208
315-476-0162
D I R T Y NELLY
I S BACK!
We Prim T - S H I R T S
Baseball Shirts
\438- 6066
Mall-Babe. I'm thinking o/yp'. Sepl,
•
•
i
•
i
i
i
INDIAN AND COLONIAL
Q U A D STAFF
CA! L -YOUR C A M P U S REP 457-7742
ASK FOR " D I R T Y N E L L Y "
voted, and that "not since 1780 has'
a candidate won the Presidency by
an absolute majority.
"The two-party system has not
been responsive," he added.
D'Amato Win
continued from front page
After that, the campaign got
rough.
D'Amato set out to proclaim
himself a conservative and paint
Javits as a liberal out of step with an
increasingly
conservative
continued from page five
Republican Party.
But he also hit hard on what presidential election year since
came to be known as the "age and 1948.
health" issue. Javils, 76, had anIn late returns, D'Amato had 45
nounced that he was suffering from pcrccnl of the vole, compared to
a degenerative disease that would Ms. Hollzman's 44 percent, and
limit his walking.
Javils' 11 percent. Both Ms.
"You lake a look al the guy, and Hollzman and Javits appeal to
you tell me if he'll lasl six more liberal-lo-moderate voters, and
years," D' Amalo said. The poinl Javils may have drained away from
was pounded in D'Amalo's com- Ms. Hollzman support she would
mercials, which said Javits was "76 have gotten if he had dropped oul
and in failing health."
of the race as many liberal voices
After his primary victory, he urged.
lumcd away from Javils and began
Similarly, Independent John
lo allack Ms. Hollman, charging Anderson came away with 7 percent
repealcdly that she never volcd for of Ihe vole. Reagan had 47 percent,
defense appropriations.
and Carter 44 percent. Carter's supD'Amalo's background also porters ahd tried lo stop Anderson
became an issue. Charges thai he from gaining a line on Ihe ballot in
participated in iho Nassau County New York, fearing lhat he would
"1 percent" kickback scandal forc- drain enough voles from Carter to
ed him lo seek release of his 1976 give Reagan the stale.
grand jury testimony.
In il, he admitted that there was a
system of kickbacks iii Ihe country,
bul he said he was nol involved, continued from page three
although he could nol recall Wesibury Direclor of Communicawhether he had delivered some tions Robert McVeigh said. "We
were noi a liberal arls college, but a
remedial center."
438-6066
Old Wesibury officials also hope
lhat the new policy will cut down on
students &
employees.
Ihe college's attrition rale, the
I.D.
highest in the SUNY system,
GOP Comeback
Old Westbury
Sale for Suny
with
Now
Featuring
thru Sat. Nov.
shoes for running
8
and
every model in stock
basketball
reduced.
Sporlshoes Is localed 2 0 0 yds east u l
Western Ave. S U N Y entrance o n
same corner as Son's Tavern.
M-F 12-8 Sal. 10-4
How to stretch your ,«
college dollars.
•'«
We'll explain how to meet the high cost of tuition
through scholarships and student loans. We'll set
up guidelines for developing your own
personal finance s y s l e m . . . like cuslom
tailoring a b u d g e t . . . choosing and
maintaining a checking account
• . . and obtaining and using
credit wisely. And we
olfer lips on how \o
slick lo those budgets.
Wilh info on where lo
ve, and how lo g e l Ihe best
buys on food, entertainment,
clothing, travel, textbooks,
stereos, and more. Then we'll tell
you how lo be sure you're getting what
you pay for. And how lo complain when
you don't.
Check it out. You'll find some great lips on how
lo stretch your college dollars. And who knows,
you may even discover being frugal can be fun!
Also bo sure to check oul Ford's exciting new 1981
ineup, including Escort. Tho front-wheel drive car that's
buill lo lake on the worla. With Escort you'll find some great
ways lo multiply your fun.
Look for "Insider"—Ford's
continuing series of college
newspaper supplements.
Research Grants
continued from page three
requested an additional $7.5 million
lo this year's budget, $7 million
wouid already be committed lo
salaries, while Ihe remaining
amount would go for increased
ulilily fees. "Therefore," said
O'Lcary, "these are stand-still
dollars."
Courses
You don't have lo be a math genius lo figure it oul. Basic money
management and careful budgeting are two very elloclive ways lo
keep from feeling the pinch w h e n money gels light. And we'll tell Q
you how to d o just t h a i , and more, in our nexl issue ol
"Insider," Ihe free supplement lo your college
newspaper from Ford.'
r
money in one instance.
D'Amalo's campaigned as champion of what he called the forgotten
middle class, himself included. A
Syracuse University Law School
graduate, D'Amato is a member of
his local parish council and
volunteer fire department. He and
his wife, Penny, have four children.
D'Amato was elected presiding
town supervisor of Hempstead in
1977.
Sportshoes
Special
D I R T Y NELLY DESIGNS
Sultees,
So Mer doesn't get a 4.0 this
semester. What are Irlends for? I
think I'll let her work for It.
Thanks, Cindy
TOM,
The days are too short to contain
my smiles. Thank You.
Not Just Another
Pretty Face
i
DUTCH,
Dear Stud,
I could never express all my feelings In Just a few words, so I'm Just
going to wish you the Happiest Birthday ever. And remember, "You've
got MORE than a friend."
All my love, QT
Hear M i k e O o n e g a n at The
Mousetrap Friday and Saturday,
November 7th and Bthl Open 9-1:30.
2nd floor Campus Center.
Campaigners
continued from puge five
suggesting instead thai Ihe U.S.
beef up ils volunteer forces.
However, Ireland feels thai
Reagan's stance on the draft was
designed for political purposes.
Ireland feels thai Ihe slgnlficanl
presence of Ihird candidates and
third-party candidates in this year's
Presidential election is an indication
of popular altitude toward Ihe twoparly system.
Ireland noted thai in 1976, only
52% of the eligible volers actually
I
Football Shirts
MANY OF OUR JOBS YOU HAVE SEEN ON
CAMPUS, SUCH AS:
MAYIEST, CLASS OF '80, RAT, HAMILTON
HAIL, FIRESIDE THEATER, HERKIMER,
PAINE HALL,
Also,
Page Elieven
Albany Student Press
Her appearance at the Brooklyn mere 635 votes in Ihe 1972 camAcademy of Music was awaited all paign for Congress that launched
evening and came only 35 minutes her political career.
after Republican-Conservative canThe four-term representative
didate Alfonse D'Amato claimed gained her seat in the largely Jewish
victory.
Flatbush section by winning the
Sen. Jacob Javils, 76, the Democratic primary against Rep.
Republican incumbent forced onto Emanuel Cellar, a 50-year-vcteran
the Liberal Party line when he losl - many considered unbeatable.
the September GOP primary, conMs. Hollzman left exhausted
ceded defeat hours earlier.
supporters to sequester herself
Late returns showed D'Amato briefly wilh family and close aides
leading Holtzman with 45 percent before returning home.
of the vole to her 44 percent while
She refused lo discuss her plans
Javits trailed al 11 percent.
with rcporlcrs, but aides said she
"Let me slarl by saying lo you canceled press conferences schedulthat the only thing I iniend to lose ed for lalcr today in New York City
in this campaign is my voice," and upstate "because of the exdeclared Ms. Hollzman, hoarse treme closeness of ihe race."
from Ihe laryngitis she developed
"We're nol oul of it," said
during Ihe lasl day of her campaign. Carter Eskew, a Holtzman
The petite congresswoman presswoman. He said the conreminded her cheering well-wishers gresswoman tentatively planned lo
thai she squeaked lo victory by a mcel today wilh lawyers and campaign aides who were considering
asking for a re-canvas of all voling
machines.
Susie
Tho Rolling Head Shop order line Is
B690992, We Deliver. •
til,
Buy 2 — Get 1 Free
•1 A M NOT A N A N I M A L !
_
November 5,i 1980
continued front page three
gel il."
Further, Levy noted, there is a
question of whal the cost of Ihe
courses would be for students. Levy
said he would like the cost lo be
$10-$15 per course, similar to the
rales of experimental colleges al
Cornell and Buffalo Slate.
Since Continuing Studies courses
arc somewhat more expensive, Levy
said there is a question of where Ihe
funds would come from lo make up
Ihe difference. He said SA would
not be able lo handle this responsibility.
Colonial
Cleaners
Professional Dry Cleaners
10 Percent Discount •
with Student I.D.
FORD
FORD DIVISION
177 No. Allen-Street
Albany, N.Y. 12206
482-7647
1
r
November 5, 1980
LAMPPOST SPECIAL
Students for Israel & diaviura
present:
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MERA
C o m e S e e Mi% B i l l F r e e
Alfred Air Game Passes
By Slumping Danes, 24-6
Page Thirteen
Albany Student Press
"The key was our passing,"
Sanders said. "Our receivers came
up with some big catches to keep
some drives alive."
"I don't think the score was any
continued from back page
came down to Dane return indication of the closeness of the
the ensuing possession. Bob Near- specialist Don Bowcn on the
two teams," noted Ford.
jng returned the kickoff to the Dane Albany 15. Neglecting to call for a
The play was close throughout
35. On the first play, split end Jack fair catch, Bowcn was rapped by a
most of the game, and Alfred's only
Burger took a pitchout on a reverse host of Alfred players as he touched
real domination came in the second
and let loose a 40 yard strike to a the ball, and fumbled. Saxon
and fourth quarters. That's when
diving Bruce Dey on the right reserve center Dan Bates pounced
the Saxon ball-control offense took
sideline, behind Alfred safety Tim on the loose ball, giving Alfred a seI over. In the second period, Alfred
Magee, putting the ball on the Sax- cond chance. A Schuslcr-lohad the ball for 10:35, while the
on 25. Levi Louis carried for five Pictrosanto pass gained 11, putting
Danes had it for only 4:25. In the
yards on two plays, and Pratt kept the ball on the four. He then hit
final quarter, the hosts had possesfor eight more to give Albany a first Davis in the left rial for the
sion for 10:04 to Albany's 4:56.
down on the 12. Louis got two more touchdown.
This put strain on the defense
on a counter, Nearing took an out"We had a lot of good breaks," because it must spend the majority
side veer for five, and Pratt slipped Sanders said. "The breaks went our
of the game on the field, and that
by for three, to set up a first-and- way."
wears them down. "I think people
goal on the two. A Chuck Priore
"They're a good enough team started to get tired," Wierzbicki
run netted one yard, and Louis that you don't have to help them
said. Alfred had the ball a total of
took it over from there. The Danes out," Ford continued. "They got
13:14 longer than Albany and,
tried for the two-point conversion, some good breaks, but they made
besides forcing the defense into cxbut Burger fumbled the pitch. The some of them."
Ira duty, it puts the offense into a
attempt was no good, and Alfred's • "We had them scouted prctly
calch-up situation. And the Dane
lead was cut to 17-6.
well," Schuster said. "We saw the wishbone is nol geared for catch-up
The game's last score came after same defense three weeks in a row, football.
a Saxon drive stalled on the Albany and we jusl ale them up with the
But there were other statistical
W. Schuster's high-hanging punt passing."
differences that must have the
Albany Third In Dane Classic
continued from back page
ter, but the job he did was just
"I'm really happy about how the
place winner) was confused as to super."
leant did in the tournament and I'm
the location of his match with Dave
DeMco noted thai while these in- optimistic about the year," said
Vallinc (third place) and Vallinc was dividual performances were great, Herman. "1 think this year the team
awarded the match by forfeit. Phils the balance on the team — the is much improved over last year.
was allowed to rcwrestlc because of number of wrcsilcrs who won mul- We should do better in SUNYACs
the misunderstanding and he won. ches for Albany was remarkable. At this year."
Evan liramtlcy of Rhode Island 118 pounds Tim Blake won a
beat them bolh and captured the match, and Todd Fererra and War"The future looks good," agreed
heavyweight crown.
ren Wray each won two in 126. DeMco. "We still have (wo tour"It was disappointing. 1 was told Blake Marson triumphed twice in naments to get us ready for the first
I was in the top three, then they said the 134 pound class while Splro round of dual meets ihis year."
there would be a delay and they lei Theofllatos and Bill Endres bolh
The Danes will be competing in
him rcwrestlc. It was a big tourna- notched dual victories at 142.
the Colgate Open Ihis weekend and
ment and I was in the top six, so I
then the Corning Invitational on
Bruce Buchanan added two at
was pleased — I wrestled as best I 150 pounds as did Dave Slraub at November 14-15. They ihcn face
could," said Goosscns.
158. Straub came very close to win- Onconta, Union, and RPI at RPI
In the 126 pound class Zamek ning a third, but had ii snatched on November 26. Their first major
won four matches — good enough away from him in the final seconds test in dual competition comes on
for a fifth place showing. "He was on a takedown by Bill Gazon of December 6 when they take on
really tremendous this tourna- Suffolk Community College, 6-5. SUNYAC rivals Binghamton and
,ment," said DeMco. "We knew Dan Jcran also won twice as a Cortland, bolh In the top ten in the
nation lasi year, as well as Potsdam.
he's a good wrestler and getting bet- heavyweight.
Danes concerned. Alfred had 29
First downs in the ballgame (17 in
the air), and ran off a total of 91 offensive plays. Albany had 14 first
downs and only 60 plays. Although
the Danes had an adequate 235
yards' in total offense, the glaring
fact lies in their 134 yards on the
ground. Pratt was Albany's leading
rusher with 33 yards on 14 carries.
Louis was next with 23 yards in 11
attempts. Ford said before last
week that he doubted if Albany
would be able to run inside on
Alfred's 4-3 defense. He was right.
In the triple option, the quarterback
will give the ball to the fullback if
Four Named All-SUNYAC
Monday afternoon, the once playoff bound men's varsity soccer
team ended its season on a sweet note with a 6-0 shellacking of Vassar
College. The win was nice, but it was hardly the big news of the day.
The big news took place in Binghamton, where Albany men's soccer
coach Bill Schieffelin was attending a SUNYAC conference meeting.
At that meeting, one piece of business that was taken care of was the
selections of the first and second all-conference teams. For Albany,
goalkeeper Alberto Giordano, forward Afrim Ne/aj, and fullback
Luis Arange were chosen for the first team, while Jerry Isaacs made
the second team.
The rest of the squad consisted of other players from the SUNYAC
Eastern Conference to which Albany belongs. The remaining schools
in thai conference are Binghamlon, Onconta, Pittsburgh, Potsdam
and Cortland. A team comprised of players from the Western
SUNYAC Conference was also announced.
"We had three of the first 12 choices and that's 25 percent of the
votes," said a proud Schieffelin. "It's very representative."
The surprise selection had to be Giordano, who lied Oneonta's John
Byrne for the first team position. A Dane veteran, he had to miss most
of the lasl half of the season as he was sidelined with a knee injury. But
his early performances, including three shut outs against Oswego,
Plattsburgh, and Siena earned him the post-season honor.
Schieffelin had figured upon Nczaj's all-conference candidacy from
the very outsel of this season. The Dane forward, who scored twice
against Vassar in Monday's final game, led all Albany scorers with
eight goals on the year. Nczaj's aggressive style of play on both ends of
the field established him as a bonafide team leader.
At the beginning of this season, Schieffelin was somewhat skeptical
of the caliber of his defense. However, Arango, along with Keith
Falconer, effectively shut down opposing offenses. Never did Dane
oppositions score more titan four limes against Albany, and only once
did the total gel that high (against Division I Hanwick). In fact,
Falconer just missed being chosen himself but did nol receive many
votes.
— Marc Haspel
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Spikers Streak
continued from page fifteen
Slates. 1 think we have the potential
to win it. I feel a lot more confident
than in previous years, ihis team is
more confident. They're winners,"
The spikers played Skidmorc in a
late game last night. Their final
match is at home against RPI next
Wednesday at 7:00 in University
Gym.
Great Dane
vs.
Alfred
Scoring Summary
dEAdliNE FOR SiiQAitbusH dcposiTs IIAS buEEN
EXTENdcd Til FnidAy NOVEMBER 14.
THE
ROCKPILE
there is an opening inside. Priore,
Albany's money back and leading
rusher on the season, only got the
ball six times for 20 yards, indicating the strength of Alfred's interior coverage.
| The win pushed Alfred's record
to 7-1, while Albany is dropped to
an even 4-4, with two games to go.
"We know their defense and the
philosophy of it, and we just attacked the defense," Sanders concluded. "We feel we just beat a real
good team today. I think they (the
Danes) arc the best 4-4 team in the
country."
See scoring summary Below.
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STEAMbOAT, C o l o R A d o d e p o s i t s
Individual 1 • a d m :
Hushing;
•SO HURRY
Albany: Pratt 14/33; Unit 11/23; Hurger 3/21
I'tlorc 6/20; Rearing 5/19; Fiorllo 2/14.
Alfred; Pictrma»!o 13/74; Davit 11/66; FotiB/17;
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Allied: I I . Scbutler 38/26/0, 269 yards; Martin
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H reeking:
Albany; Dey 2/53; McOuirc 1/24, llurgcr 2/24,
Alfred: Sullivan 8/115; Davit 3/45; Hale 2/3B;
ctrmanio 6/33; Foil 2,4.
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THOUSAND
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OF
YOUR
HISTORYTAKE
ONE
YEAR
by Marc Haspel
How quickly things change. One
week a team can be right in the middle of playoff contention and the
next week that same team can be
totally out of it. Such was the
fateful plight of the Albany men's
varsity soccer team.
Just one week ago, Ihe Danes
were ranked third among Division
III teams in New York State. This
team seemed headed for a bid in the
upcoming NCAA playorf tournament. Then, after one loss to Ihe
4-7-1 RPI Engineers last Wednesday, those playoff chances suddenly
diminished. Still, the Danes were
hopeful that a good performance
against Kean College, the number
fifteenth-ranked Division III team
in the nation, would be enough to
send the bootcrs to the tournament.
The Danes did get a good performance, tying Kean 1-1, but it was
not enough.
On Sunday night, the NCAA's
official selections for the tournament were announced and Albany
was not one of them. The four New
York state bids (hat were awarded
went to Cortland, Binghamton,
Clarkson and Buffalo in that ranking order.
"The RPI game hurt us," said
Albany men's soccer coach Bill
Schteffelln. "If we would have won
that game, there would not have
been any problem getting in."
On Saturday, prior to the announcement of tournament participants by the NCAA, the
booiers, realizing Ihe possible consequences of their most recent
defeat against RPI, took on Kean at
home. Unlike Ihe RPI match, this
game was played just as one would ,
have expected ii to be. No surprises,
nci upsets, no unbelievable individual efforls — just one tough
battling physical soccer match.
"It was a very physical game,
when you want to win you can't sit
around and play dead," said
Schlcffclln.
During the opening minutes of
The Albany men's varsity soccer team lied nationally runked Kean St., 1-1,
play, the Danes worked well in Ihe
liui did inn make Ihe playoffs. (Photo: Marc llenschel)
midfield and penetrating Kean's
other Springfield goals were also by
Miles, at 32:50 and 39:11 lo the second half.
"The other shoi (the last goal)
was phenomenal," said Kidder.
"Miles had her back lo the goal,
and shoi the goal while tinning.
Lorl Briggs never even saw the
ball."
Kidder still feels that the Danes
have nothing to be ashamed of.
"We played well. We controlled the
ball and played a sirong defensive
g a m e . " Springfield's speed,
especially on llicir wing, was one of
I heir major weapons, Albany
fullback Fori Cohen played an excellenl game, keeping Springfield's
wing marked throughout.
Goalkeeper Briggs played a
phenomenal game, totaling 23
saves. "They were pounding Iter
with balls," said Kidder. "She did
an outstanding job, and made a lot
of fantastic saves. She also received many nice compliments from
YOUR
Springfield's coach and their
team."
"I.mi Briggs did one hell of a
job. They jusl pounded her all day
long," Kidder said.
Albany, on Ihe other hand could
manage only 12 shots-on-goal.
There were many changes made
offensively and defensively, but.il
seemed Ihe Danes jusl couldn't
finish, and pul Ihe ball in the goal.
Kidder is looking brightly to next
year. There are no seniors
graduating from lire women's soccer team Ihis year. "This year we
only had aboul seven players from
lasl year, and some of their positions were switched," said Kidder,
Considering the soccer team only
had Iwo months to play and learn lo
work together, they've had a great
season. "We controlled Ihe ball
well today," saiil Kidder, "and we
attained this by playing a lol of
games."
by Larry Kahn
MONDAY, NOV., 10, 1980
7:30-10 pm, HU 3 5 4 ( H u m a n i t i e s
Lounge)
PANEL DISCUSSION
& FILMS
ITS
The play of the second half was
nearly identical to that of the first
It was a very physical forty-five
minutes of soccer without many
shots-on-goal (seven for each
team).
The roughness turned ugly when
Steffen was kicked in the back of
the head by Kean's Paul Samson
after the keeper apparently had
possession of the ball on the
ground. A scuffle followed with a
few punches being thrown. When
things were finally restored to
order, two players were ejected.
At 20:10 of the second half, the
Dancs.cvened the score. Nezaj took
a high shot off a pass from Gus
Rakus to tie the game at one a
piece.
Albany had other chances during
the half but could not connect on
any of them. Severe was stopped on
a break and Vlado Sergovich's two
low shots were both saved by the
Kean keeper, Mark Hamulak.
Also, on Ihe other side of the
field, Steffen was continuing iiis
consistent play despite the kick to
his head. He made a save on a play
thai developed from a direct free
kick and another on a headed ball.
So at the end of regulation time
I lie score was deadlocked at one all.
After two ten-minute overtime
periods of Ihe same type of grueling
soccer were played, the score still
remained unchanged and the game
ended in a 1-1 tie.
The women booters ended their season with a loss to Springfield, 3-0, to
complete their season at 6-8. (Photo: Lois Muttabonl)
Spikers Extend Win Streak To 13
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zone. Jerry Isaacs and Leslie Severe
controlled much of the action. The
first Dane scoring opportunity of
the day came as Luis Arango shot a
bullet that hit the goal post.
On defense, the Danes played
very cohesively. Goalkeeper Billy
Steffen turned in another excellent
afternoon. Midway through the
half Steffen came up with a nice
save on .a shot off the foot or
Kean's biggest threat of the game,
Richard Searchwcll.
Other Danes also contributed to
tight defense. Afrim Nezaj was
moved back from his usual offensive role to add extra support.
Many limes during the course of the
contest, Nezaj's headers cleared the
Danes out of trouble. Forward
Dominic Cadet did a fine job coming back on defense and made some
nice plays to stifle Kean attackers
including a pretty slide to knock a
ball away from a Kean player.
Ironically, though, it was a
defensive mistake that allowed
Kean's only goal of the day. Keilh
Falconer, who otherwise had a fineday, accidcnily kicked Ihe ball off a
pass from Sleffen, onto Ihe fool of
Searchwcll who scored unassisted.
"I threw it to Keith (Falconer) and
he kicked it 16 Searchwcll, so I tried
to come out and slop it, but lie rolled it by me," said Steffen.
The goal came late in the half at
37:16, and when the clock ran out,
Kean led 1-0.
Season Ends On Sour Note For Women Booters
1RSELF
OONT MISS
FIRST-HAND
ISRAEL.
Pane Fifteen
Albany Student Press
by Anne C'avanagh
The Albany Stale women's soccer
team ended their season at 6-8 with
a losing battle against Springfield
this past Saturday, 3-0. Springfield
is ranked eighth in New England,
and llicir final dominating lead was
not loo surprising.
"We knew Springfield would be
strong. We just wanted to go out
there and play a good game," said
Albany women's soccer coach Amy
Kidder.
The first and only goal scored in
Ihe first half was by Springfield
striker Kim Miles at 37:15.
That really put us down," staled
Kidder. "We haven't won a game
unless we scored first." Even so,
Ihe firsi hair was evenly matched,
"Boih team had the opportunities,
but neither team capitalized on
them lo score," Kidder said.
During the second half, Springfield excelled. "They didn't
make mistakes," Kidder said. The
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Booter Playoff Hopes Die Despite 1-1 Kean Tie
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volleyball team won their 13th consecutive game by beating New 1
Their record stands at 21-5. (Photo: Alan Culem)
Thirteen proved lo be a lucky
number for the Albany State
women's volleyball team as they
stcamrollcd over a weak New Pallz
team on Friday night at University
Gym. The victory was their 13th in
a row, including victories over
Union, Siena, and Russell Sage on
Wednesday lo raise their record lo
21-5.
"We've been playing very well.
We should lie in Ihe Stale championships and I'm hoping to be in
Ihe Fastern Regionals," said
Albany volleyball coach Pal Dwycr.
The spikers last lost almost a
month ago, on October 9, to a very
highly ranked West Point squad.
Three of Ihe four other losses came
in the first week of the season in
llicir toughest matches of the year,
and ihe other was lo Division l_Ncw
York Tech. "We've only lost lo Iwo
Division III teams," Dwycr noted.
New Pallz gave Albany very little
trouble. "They had a lot of injuries,
they had six players exactly — but
we played almost flawlessly," said
Dwycr.
Albany look the first two games,
15-4, 15-0, and then Dwycr made
full use of his bench in the final
game which the Danes won, 15-13.
"I made a lol of substitutions in the
lasl game. I made the mistake of
putting too many people In,"
Dwyer admitted. "But they managed to pull it out."
Albany has been devastating
teams all over Ihe state on the
strength of their bench. Dwycr
noted that it has been a team effort
"all the way."
"We've been starting seven or
eight people," he said. "We jusl
have a lol of depth on this team —
we have 10 or II people who might
be starting in any other year, and
they have all done well. I trust
everybody on the team in that
clutch situation and they have come
through."
The team should be a cinch for a
spot in the State championships and
through the course of the season
have proved themselves worthy of
winning It. "We have one of the
best records In the state," Dwyer
said. "It feels nice, 1 just hope we
don't get overconfident. If we slay
relaxed we should play well in
continued on page thirteen
AUSWYAC
"^
Booters page 13
November 5, 1980
Third Place Finish Makes Danes 'DeMeo Proud
by Larry Kiihn
He could barely speak. Twelve
hours earlier Albany wrestling
coach Joe DeMeo was busy preparing for one of the largest wrestling
tournaments on (he East coast, the
Great Dane Eastern Classic, but
now his voice was gone and he was
tired. Bui he was proud. The
Albany Slate wrestling team, a
relatively young and inexperienced
Division III learn, had placed third
among 28 teams in Divisions I, II,
and HI.
"They did fantastic," said
DeMeo. "1 never thought that we
could be third — fifth would have
been a dream."
The tournament was a marathon"
event, beginning at about 11:30
Saturday morning and continuing
until about 11:00 that night in
University Gym. It was run on a
five bad mark system with each
wrestler gelling in,at least two matches, and nobody being eliminated
after a loss. The top three in each
weight class were given awards.
The overall team winner, to
nobody's surprise, was Division 1
powerhouse Syracuse University
with SO points, far outdistancing
Boston University in second place
with 37 points and Albany with l u .
DeMeo had earlier predicted that
Syracuse will be in the top three in
the nation by the year's end and
they did nothing to make anybody
doubt it.
Syracuse wrestlers won eight of
the ten weight classes and two of
them were named Outstanding
Wrestlers of the tournament. Gene
Mills, a world champion in the 126
pound class, won the award for
under 150 pounds, and Tim
Catalfo, a 158 pounder, notched it
for those over 150 pounds.
"As a team we have very good
balance and our kids arc all going
for the fall. They're very aggressive," said Syracuse wrestling
coach Ed Carlin.
Despite not winning any weight
classes, Albany turned in a tremendous performance. "So many people won matches for us, that's what
made it so great. 13 out of 19 of our
guys won matches," said DeMeo.
Top performances were given by
Andy Seras and Vic Herman, who
placed second in their weight classes
as well as by Mark Goossens and
Scth Zamek, who came in fourth
and fifth, respectively.
Herman was outstanding in the
190 pound class, but lost to John
Dougherty from Syracuse, the first
place winner. "Vic was great — he
wrestled a real tough hombrc this
John Dougherty. Vic gave it
everything," DeMeo said.
"I think I wrestled as good as I
could," said Herman. " I ' m further
ahead this year at this time than 1
was last year. I'm pretty happy."
DeMeo noted thai Herman lost a
lot of preparation time this summer
while he was recovering from an illness and that he's not at peak performance yet.
Seras, wrestling in the 142 pound
class, was Albany's other award
winner. This was Seras' first collegiate tournament after a very successful high school career and he
appears to have made the transition
well. He won six matches and his
only loss of the day came in the second round al the hands of the
eventual winner, Gary Siegal of
Syracuse, 8-6.
Seras said that he thought he
should have won the weight class,
but he made some crucial mistakes
in his match against Siegal.
"1 controlled the match for 5:30
(he was up 5-2) and then I blew it. 1
menially blew the match," Seras
admitted.
The Albany Stale wrestling learn placed a surprising third in the Great Dane Eastern Classic in University
Gym on Saturday in'a field of 28 learns in Divisions I, II, and 111. (Photo: Will Yiirman)
He added, "I'm happy. I wrestled as I expected — I thought I
would be in the top three."
There was a little controversy in
the heavyweight division where
Mark Goossens finished fourth for
Albany. He was originally slated for
the lop three, which would have involved a round robin playofr for
the top honors, but he was informed there was a change of plans.
Jim Phils of Harvard (the second
continued on page thirteen
Abbie Hoffman Changes His Tone
who once called-for the destruction River from destruction by the Army .
Corps of Engineers and his advenof the American government.
Wearing a conservative c"orduroy tures during seven years as a
jacket with a pullover sweater, Hof- fugitive.
Hoffman went underground in
fman's most radical position was an
1973 after he was arrested for at"I believe the system works. "
attack on the media as he condemnAbbie Hoffman, 1980 ed the news for being "the running tempting to sell cocaine to undercover FBI agents. Last month he
dog of the ruling press."
He blamed the press for turned himself in and his case will
£ NEWS FEATURE
be settled by Christmas.
perpetuating the American myth
Whatever the outcome of Hoff1960's Yippie leader Abbie Hofr- that things must be accepted as they
man's cocaine charges may be, it
man doesn't want to destroy the are.
will probably not receive as much
system anymore. He's given up his
He criticized the media for not
attention as his "Chicago Seven"
revolutions, bombs and monkey paying serious attention to radical
conspiracy trial of 1968.
warfare and 'wants to change the ideas such as the nationalization for
During his seven
years
world through " c o m m u n i t y the oil industry or the provision of
underground as "Barry Freed,"
organization."
free universal medical care.
Hoffman lived in upstate New York
In his appearance in Schenectady
Looking old and tired, Hoffman
with his wife Joanna.
at Union College on Wednesday, said little of his revolutionary 60's
Hoffman said he changed his apHoffman bore little resemblance to years but instead recalled his threecontinued on page thirteen
the. I960's Revolutionary leader year battle lo save the St. Lawrence
by Laura Fiorenlino
"The purpose is not to fuck the
system but to destroy it. "
Abbie Hoffman, 1971
state University of New York nt Albany
\0^
^
November 7, 1980J
by Bob Bcllufiore
ALFRED JUNCTION — The
respective situations of the teams
playing were radically different.
The Danes were playing for pride.
Having lost to Norwich a week
W<£
earlier, any chances of playoffs
under the new NCAA formal were
dashed. Albany was just in another
game.
Alfred, on the other hand, had
thoughts of'an extended season.
r
v
. *
Albany halfback I^vl Louis breaks tackles looking for room lo run in an
earlier game ink season. (Pliolo: Mark Nadlcr)
Now, two teams from each
geographic region will be chosen for
the playoffs, and the Saxons were
ranked seventh in the cast. But
more importantly, they were
number two in the Lambert Bowl —
the poll that decides who goes to the
national playoffs. If they could
defeal a respected team such as
Albany, they could keep that second spot (behind Ithaca), and stay
a contender in the eyes of the
NCAA selection committee,
As it turned out, thai motivation,
a red hot Bob Schuster al quarterback, and the ability to capitalize
on Albany miscucs led Alfred to a
convincing 24-6 victory over the
Danes here Salurday afternoon.
"We needed that one," said
Alfred head football coach Sam
Sanders. "We fell that this was the
next to the most important game lo
date," he continued, calling the
Saxons earlier contest with Ithaca
as being more important.
The main reason for Alfred's success Salurday, as it has been all
season, was the All-American candidate Schuster. The 6-2, 210 pound
signal-caller was good on 26 of 38
passes (12 or 18 in the first half) /or
a 68.4 percent efficiency, and an
impressive 269 yards. But most of
these completions were shorl dump
passes lo backs mil of the backflcld
who would cither slide through the
line of scrimmage or Hood one of
the bulside short zones. With sub
Joe Marlin, Alfred was 28 of 42 in — not an incredible amount — but
the air, for 281 yards.
they seemed to come at the worst
"He nickled and dimed us lo times for them.
death," said Albany defensive
Bui the real thorns in Albany's
coordinator Mike Motla. " H e side were turnovers. The Danes lost
always had five receivers out, and two fumbles and threw three in• he always had safety valves." "It terceptions, The Saxons wasted no
seemed as if many limes he was just lime in capitalizing.
picking us apart," added Albany
Ahead 3-0 on a 30-yard first
head football coach Bob Ford. In- quarter Doug Johnson field goal,
deed, 21 of Schuster's 26 comple- Alfred utilized the first of four
tions were for 15 yards or less.
Albany fumbles. Dane quarterback
The Saxon .strategy was lo send Tom Pralt, subbing for Mike
two receivers into a particular area, Fiorito (who was hurl in the first
forcing the defender to make a deci- quarter), kept the ball on the triple
sion on whom lo cover. Schuster option for eight yards, but coughed
would jusl hit the open man. "They it up when he hit the ground. Saxon
were running a lot of pick pat- defensive back J o e B o r l l e
terns," Motla said. "They would recovered, and Alfred had a firslsend one guy into the flat (shorl and-tcn on lite Albany 30 yard line.
outside zone), and one guy into the An illegal motion penally against
curl in the seam (between two the Saxons pushed litem back five
defenders in the zone.coverage). A yards, bin on the next play, 5-8, 115
lot of limes, I couldn't see the guy pound halfback Darryl Davis swept,
in the curl behind me," said Albany right, cut inside the corner, and
cornerback Jerry Wierzbicki. reversed field, scooting 35 yards for
"There were Iwo people over there the touchdown. Alfred had their second score in one minute, seven
(in.the flat) all day."
seconds, and a 10-0 halflime lead.
Schuster threw most of his passes
10 his backs, but the big man for
Alfred increased their lead in the
Alfred was split end Matt Sullivan, third quarter. Dario Arango, forced
who had eight catches for 115 yards inlo punting service due lo an injury
and a 14.4 yard per catch average to Dave Hardy, flubbed a 27 yardcr1
despite the double-coverage thai he from the Albany 16 to the 43, Davis
drew for a good deal of the day.
ran the right side for three yards,
"God knows, we mixed up the and Schuster hit a wide-open
coverages," Ford 'said about Sullivan on a curl pattern for 13
Albany's defensive game plan. "We more. A sweep lo Bob Pletrosauto
did just about everything I could lost one, but Sullivan's leaping grab
gave Alfred a firsl-and-goal on the
think of."
If Alfred's ball-control wing-T Dane eight. Sub fullback Gary Foil
attack wasn't doing enough then ran up-lhc-middlc three times
damage, the Danes certainly helped in a row for the touchdown, and a
them with some costly penalties and 17-0 advantage.
mistakes on offense. Infractions
Albany got on tiie scoreboard on
marked off 79 yards against Albany
continued on pane thirteen
1980 h> Albany Sludenl i'rm Cnrpnrdlim
Many SUNY Students Unable to Vote
campuses in the SUNY system lo
find oul how many students were
affected; Once the sludcnls have
been counted, Snook said legal prohim had registered late.
Lester said SA is considering ceedings will be laken.
Lesler said he had hoped a pelilitigation in the case. He said iliey
may sue on denial of voting righis, llon filed by U.S. Senate candidate
or ii may be used in a trial next spr- Li/ I loll/man, seeking a deadline
ing when SA mighi argue thai all extension for absentee ballots,
N. Y. Stale sludcnls should have the would help in his litigation,
righl to register in their college com- However, Lester said he did not
munities. In the laller case, Lester know whal would happen now since
said that i he absentee ballots would Hollzman may concede the election
continued on page thirteen
be used as evidence thai college
community registration is needed.
Snook said thai on the day after
the election "we started gelling calls
like crazy from people who said
they didn't even receive their
absentee ballots until Tuesday."
Wilkey said that the last day that
ballots were scnl oul was on October 28, and that within N.Y.
Stale, I he ballots tan reach their by Sue Smith
In response lo the recent attacks
destination in between Iwo and four
and thefts in the Alumni and
days after mailing. Wilkey admitted
Draper Hall area the Campus Safelhai this could mean some sludcnls
ty Palrol has increased security
would not have received their
measures, according lo Safety
ballots until Nov. I,
Patrol Director Jim Williams.
Snook said this was "not enough
Within the lasl week, Williams
time" to mail the ballots back lo
assigned a palrol car to cruise betmeel the Tuesday morning
ween the Alumni and Draper area.
deadline.
"The emphasis is now on the
According lo Snook, SASU is in
Draper area because of the recent
the process of contacting all the
continued on page thirteen
Never Received Absentee Ballots
Alfred Passes By Slumping Great Danes, 24-6
Saxon Air Attack Picks Defense
Apart; Albany Drops To Even 4-4
Pholn: Capltil Dblrirt Ncwipipm
Former Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman
"Change the world through community organization.'
SA Attorney Jack Lester
Considering law sail.
by Wayne Peerebooin
A number of SUNY students
were unable to vote in Tuesday's
election because they received
absentee ballots cither too late, or
not al all, according to SASU Communications Director Pain Snook.
Spokesman for the Slate Hoard
of Elections Tom Wilkey said "we
realized thai some ballots may have
gone out late because they applied
late." However, SA Attorney Jack
Lester said that none of the 23
students who have complained to
State Mandates Review of
SUNY/CUNY Donations
by Sue MUligan
The Stale Comptroller's office has called lor a "system-wide
review" of SUNY and CUNY political campaign contributions, Marv
Neclcr, a spokesperson for the Comptroller's office, said yesicrday.
According to The New York Times, Slate Senate Higher Education
Commillce Chair Kenneth P.. LaValle and Assembly Higher Eduealion Committee Chair Mark Alan Sicgcl have both been recipients of
contributions from CUNY funds. SUNY administrators were present
al a Manhattan fundraiser for LaValle, but it is not clear whether they
donated personal or university funds.
Deputy Stale Comptroller R. Wayne Diesel wrote lo the Chancellors
of both university systems Friday that "a number of significant questions have arisen as to the propriety if not the legality of such
payments."
Diesel released a preliminary report of his Investigation which slated
that both LaValle and Siegel had received a total of $2,450 from 10 of,
the 18 CUNY schools', and suggested thai CUNY Chancellor Robert J . '
Kibbcc "determine and disclose" whether the remaining eight schools
had made similar contributions from university funds.
The repori concluded that "ii is questionable as lo whether political
contributions to state legislators involved in formulating siatuies on
higher education matters meet such criteria or are appropriate
disbursements from any college-related funding source."
Diesel's report urged Kibbee and SUNY Chancellor Clifton R.
Wharton to "fix responsibility for the contributions."
Neclcr said it appears that some of the contributions were taken'
from "a couple of the (president's) discretionary funds of individual
colleges."
ll is illegal lo use tax-supported university funds for political contributions. However, according to NYPlRCi attorney Arthur Malkiu,
it Is noi illegal lo make contributions from the president's discretionary funds of individual schools, which are supported mainly by
, alumni contributions.
Fr-lniui: Mlkf
SASU in dowiilown Albany
Getting culls "like crazy,"
SUNYA Campus Patrol
Added to Downtown Area
Photot Mlkr t'Knrll
Itraiur Hall, the scene ol two recent attacks.
Security Chief Jim Williams (inset, right)
dtiacks there," Williams said.
In addition, two police officers
now replace the night watchman inside the Draper complex. They arc
also available lo cscorl the stream
of sludcnls leaving the building
after the last 10:15 night class.
Williams said these police officers
arc paid $11 an hour on overtime
out of the university budget.
The student response to the additional safely palrol has been highly
favorable. Williams said, "I've
talked to people In the area and they
arc pleased with the additional officers."
Additional safety features arc being installed by the plant department, Williams added. "They are
vastly increasing the amounl of
lighting in the Draper area. Within
two weeks the amounl of light will
be doubled."
Emergency campus .phones are
also being installed in the Draper
>rea." The Plant Department has
ihem on order now and will install
them as they come in," Williams
confirmed. "The phones will allow
Itudents to reach the safely patrol if
they arc in need of it."
The Campus Safely Palrol is now
investigating the recent rape incilent. Williams refrained from menloning the progress of the investigations.
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