sports Stickmen Trounce Oswego 17-3 in Opener

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sports
Stat* University of New York at Albany
Friday, April 11,197S
/ was in the golf department at Sears looking over a set of irons.
He came in blowing on his hands, snapping hisfingerr and smiling as ifhe knew me. He wore a
baseball cap, a light house-painter's type jacket, sneakers and a pair of khaki trousers.
I was holding an eight-iron. He look my elbow.
"George, you really look like a golfer."
He'd been drinking something like an after-shave lotion. He took the Club from me. He hadu
singsong in his voice and a Utile two-beat rhythm.
"This is perhaps the finest set of Irons made."
Hegrippedtheilubienderly.asjfitwerereveallngsomesecrellohimilhadwilhhetdfromme.
He kissed the Jack Mcklaus incription.
He addressed an imaginary ball and looked out across the aisle at some phantom green . . .
"Champion of a Phantom Course" by Michael Smith on Page 7P in ASPECTS.
Stickmen Trounce Oswego 17-3 in Opener
by Craig Bel
The Albany Great Dane lacrosse
team continued their dominance
over Oswego State with a powerful
17-3 victory over the visiting Great
Lakers Wednesday in their season
opener.
The fifty or so people who braved
the cold to see the game saw Albany,
who has never lost to Oswego in
lacrosse, open the scoring in the first
quarter on goals by Steve Schaus
and Dan Goggin. After Oswego closed the gap to 2-1, Jay Kianka and
Pete Connor added goals to make it
4-1 after one quarter. Terry Brady
picked up two of his six assists in this
quarter as he fed midfielders Schaus
and Connor on their goals.
From that point on it was all
State, as both Goggin and Brady
went to work. Brady from behind the
cage twice hit Goggin, who was
breaking in on the cage, for scores.
Goggin later added another off a
nice pass from Schaus. Arnie Will
and Brady also hit the nets for State
as they built up a 9-1 half time lead.
The second half was much the
same as Albany continued to .
dominate. The Danes defense of Bill
Jonat, Dave Ahoncn, and Joe Mullen completely neutralized Oswego's
attack.
Meanwhile, the State offensive
machine kept right on rolling, adding two goals in the third quarter
and then bombarding Oswego's
goalie Larry Trogcl lor six more
scores in the fourth quarter. Brady
led the second half charge as he added two goals and two more assists.
He was joined by Dan Goggin who
bagged his fifth, Bob Williams who
scored twice, Craig Roberts, and
Steve Schaus and Pete Connor both
getting their second goals of the
game.
Coach Armstrong was "pleased
with the way the kids played and
later commented that "it was some
way to start the season."
Indeed it was. Albany successfully
cleared the ball SO percent of the
time, scored while beinga man up six
of nine times and did not give up a
goal on any of. its nine man down
situations. The Danes controlled the
ground ball, scooping up 80 of 122
loose balls and took 17 of 24
lehmon
The lacrosse team in their home opener Wednesday. Albany won 17-3.
faceoffs.
before the first quarter was over and
In addition, the play of goalies by the half it was Albany 9, Georgia
Bob Wulkiewicz and Kenny Alver- Tech 3. Tech was held to one other
son was encouraging. Bob played the game goal, as Albany won 18-4,
first three quarters and made three
Middie Pete Connor and Dan
saves. But he was responsible for the Goggin were leading scorers with
success of the clears as he played a four goals each. Sophomore Terry
"very intelligent" game out of the Brady, attack, was assist leader with
goal. Ken played the final quarter, seven.
and turned in a commendable job,
SeniorgoalieBob Wulkiewiczwus
yielding but one goal while making credited with seven saves while being
two saves.
scored on three times. Freshman
Taking advantage of the recent Ken Alvcrson, seeing action in his
spring recess, Albany's team spent a first collegiate lacrosse contest,
week on the Tech campus working blocked the net eight times against
out in the balmy 75 degree Georgia the Tech attack and shutout the
weather and trying to forget the chill Ycllowjackets.
winds and frozen turf back at
Prior to departing for Albany, the
Albany.
Danes took on the Atlantu Lacrosse
"We had the opportunity," said Club, a group of businessmen and
coach Dave Armstrong, "lo work on college students, who are avid
our riding and clearing, something lacrosse supporters. The Danes won
14-8.
that is hard to do. and do well in cold
weather. We're most pleased at this
Senior attack Kevin Hilly was the
point in the results of that work.
leading Albany scorer with live
"We've also made," he continued, goals, and again Brady led in assists
"what I feel are good strides on our with two.
Wulkiewicz blocked ten ALC
defensive work, both individually
shots at Hie net and AI verson knockand as a team."
The game against Tech resembled, ed away nine. Both goalies were
at the beginning, the first Battle of scored on lour times.
Summing up the results of the trip
Bull Run, when after 5:24 of the first
quarter the Ycllowjackets had Armstrong said, "Defensively, il
proved thai we're coming along. II
Albany down 3-0.
"We were playing in Grant Field, we play solid defense, that will
which seals about 60,000 people," motivate the offense."
Armstrong said, "and there were
State's next game scheduled for
maybe 150-200 people watching us Saturday against Hamilton college
in that cavernous stadium. Our kids has been postponed due to had
were just too tight. I called time out weather, Ilic "stickmen" will be
and told them to cool it."
home Thursday, April 17, against
Not exactly cooling it, the Danes the Brockport Golden Eagles. Game
heated up and pumped in five goals time is 3:30.
Milne School To Cease Operations
by Michael Sena
The Milne School, which has served as a sort of training ground for
S U N Y A prospective teachers will be
phased out by 1977 because of the
rising trend toward sending Albany
children lo public schools.
Hurry Charlton, a spokesman for
Chancellor Erncsl Boycr. said thai
because of Ihe upgrade in the Albany
public school system, parents are
sending their children to public
schools over private ones. He noted
that enrollment at Milne has declined over the years.
The Milne School, which has been
in existence for over one hundred
years, has been a laboratory and
demonstration school fortheSchool
of Education. "At one lime much of
Ihc student leaching was done
there," said Dean of ihc School of
Education Gilbert Moore. "It
provided experience for student
teachers and a laboratory for curiecula." Moore said.
"SUNY Central also fell that the
program should be more geared to
our own student body instead of
leaching students in the secondary
school." said Moore. This was
another reason Ihe Milne school was
cancelled, he explained.
There are ten such special schools
throughout ihe SUNY system,
though Milne is Ihe only secondary
school. The others are elementary
schools. The Bugbce School at
of the few veterans in the event. "He
was out a couple of years ago," the
coach stated, "and did a fine job for
us. If he can whip the injury
problem, he could be heard from."
Concerning the 440 relays, he
feels, "our team could be a good one
before the season isover. If everyone
we have out develops, including
junior lorn Ryan,sophomores Marly Jelson and Pete Reinhartz. and
freshman Bob Collctti, we'll definitely have a good relay group."
In all of the track events the
biggest problem facing Munsey is
the lack of depth, with the exception
of the sprints. "We huve the people
here thai we lack in the other running events," he said.
"We haven't got nny9.5 men in the
I00, or 22 men for the 220, but I
think we'll be represented in those
events. Freshman Alan Zubi,
sophomore Birun Donovan, senior
Harvey Sobcl.and sophomore lorn
I'ardini have ail worked during ihe
indoor season, and with a little more
work and some luck. I think they'll
develop and help usoul. Sophomore
Billy Brown, who was out last year
and looked real good in the events he
ran. is very eager this year and could
give us the extra punch when weclasl
expect it."
On Ihe hurdles junior Glenn Hohg
is the only returning veteran. "He
was a fairly good hurdler last year,"
the coach said, "and we're hoping he
can develop even more this year.
"Dave Cole has had tremendous
indoor seasons for the past two
years. He wasn't out last spring, hut
will be this year and I think he'll be
very, very good.
"We have a freshman, Mike
Tetkoski, who had good credentials
in the 330-yard intermediate hurdles
in high school. If he can add that
other 110 yards and still do it. he can
help us out. He's a real tough kid,
and we expect a good job from him
before the year's out."
pressure. He'll have lo score high in
every jump lo help us out, but he did
thai last year."
"We'll be strong in the long and
triple jumps. Freshman Hiram
Febles has an indoor season of experience and right now, he's our
leader in the triple jump. Pardini is
certainly pressing him, and may sur-
another sophomore, who possess experience and knowledge of the event
can get together, we'll have a pretty
good one-two punch."
Senior Rudy Vido. an AllAmerican shotputler last year, will
return to ihe circle again this year, us
will Jim Holloway. "We have a solid
shot team." Munsey said, '"with
Holloway and Vido."
"Holloway," he continued, "was
also our number one man in the discus event, and he should continue in
thai capacity this year.
In Ihe javelin, sophomore loin
Cleary, who as a freshman participated in the nationals lasl year, ,.s
expected lo be number one man.
Senior Perry Hoeltzctl, a solid
number two man in '74 is expected to
fill thai slot.
New Event
halu
The track team is home tomorrow, lacing Queens College.
The high hurdles pose another pass him. certainly in Ihe long jump.
problem. "We have only two people Mel Moore is our only returning
out, including Cole with his indoor letterman from lasl year and he did a
experience. He's the best high splendid job for us. I think our long
hurdler we've ever had here. Bob and triple jump team will gel
Malone, may help us out there, but stronger as Ihe season progresses."
we certainly need one or two more
In the other field events, nil but the
men.
pole vault shows strength and depth
"In the high jump, it's Malone, at this lime.
and that's it," Munsey continued.
"We only have two kids out for it.
He's a 6'4" jumper and will have the Hill Mayer, a sophomore, was our
burden of that event on his leading man lasl year, Munsey said.
shoulders, Bob will be under a lot of "If Mayer and Pierre Beauvoir,
A new event in the schedule isihe
hanimerlhrow. Munsey is hoping he
can count on Vido. Cleary, and
Hoeltzell, hut he says. "We're going
lo play this one by ear ['he hummer
throw, like the six-mile run. is not
scheduled in every meet."
Summing up prospects for the
season, Munsey said, "We have a
nucleus of about Id reluming men
from lasl ycar'i learn which gives us
something lo work with. It's a pretty
good nucleus, hut we're extremely
weak in several evenls, und some of
these are evenls in which we'venever
had a problem before. This will be a
new experience for us so we're going
lo have lo lap other areas of our
track and field team lo gain Ihe majority of our points."
classes will be accepted at Milne, but
students currently enrolled in the
school will continue until graduation. The school has enrollment of
271 in grades nine through twelve.
Under the faculty contract Undisplaced professors will, "have first
crack at compatible jobs in the next
two years at SUNYA," said Moore.
He added that ihe closing of Milne
"won't have much effect on the ongoing educational process."
"The budget for these special
schools has been cul by ten per ccnl
the last two years, thus no one was
really surprised when Boyer announced the rejtcUCtuHg of the
schools, Professor Green said it was
"inevitable."
Housing Director Welty
Institutes Lottery Motion
by Edward Moscr
anil Eliot Weinman
Lasl niglil Housing Administration head John Welly approved a
February 12th Central Council
' proposal lo institute a lottery for the
selection of on campus housing.
Thus, the first-come.
first serve
system of the past will not apply this
semester.
Field Events Hold Key for Tracksters
State University at Albany's track
and field team will, according to
coach Bob Munsey. "Be dominated
by the field events to a larger degree
than ever before."
With the loss of 18 solid scorers
Irom last year's I3-0 squad, the
Greal Danes will be, "wanting in
those events in which we have been
most formidable in the past."
Munsey said.
The distance events have been
decimated with the loss of Jim
Shrader, Vince Reda, Herb Hasan,
and Rich Langford. Munsey will be
relying upon returning veterans
Carlo Cherubino, an All-American
in 1974, and Chris Burns.
Cherubino, a junior, will be used lor
the three and six mile events, while
soph Burns will run the mile and occasionally the two and three mile
runs.
"We're hoping." said Munsey.
who has led the Albany learn since it
attained varsity status in I969. "that
freshman Fred Kitzrow, sophomore
Eric Jackson, and senior Gary
Furlong, can give us a little more zap
in the distance events.
"Another freshman," he continued, "who could help us is Brian
Davis, who has run a 4:18 mile in
high school, but didn't show much in
the indoor season this winter. The indoor, however, provided him more
of a speed workout than anything
else."
"The 880 poses a question at this
lime," Munseynoled, "becausewe're
not sure of the number of quality
people we have out at this time."
Tom Crowley, a junior, will be one
Oneonta will close by 1975; similar desirable alternative than city
programs at Gcnesco. Oswego, and schools" He noled thai Albany High
Potsdam will he reduced by 1976
is perceived by somepu rents as havand programsal Buffalo. Brockport, ing difficulties between students
C o r t l a n d . New P a l t z . and while Milne is without those tenI'lattshurgh will continue at their sions.
prescnl levels.
"When we (ihe Education Depart"The Albany public schools have ment) moved on to this campus the
improved considerably," said relationship disintegrated a hit
Moore, "There are more schools between!))e two schools." said Dean
available, and (hey give a broader M o o r e . "Laboratory schools
spectrum in their education.1' he ex- couldn't keep up with public
plincd.
schools."
John Green, u SUNYA adTraditionally, Milne teachers
ministrator and Assistant Director havealso been professors at Ihe Unand Research Director at Milne, iversity. At leasl 22 faculty positions
speculated as to why parents would at Milne will be retained, bul there
wanl to send their kids lo Milne: "II may be five leaching positions lost
has a reputation for being a more both ihis year and next, No new
Director of Housing John Welty has instituted Central Council's
proposal for a lottery in the selection ol on-campus housing rooms.
came. Dutch Quad Coordinator
Paul Doyle, no! relishing Ihe
thought of such a large number ol
people crowding into the registration room,decided to give priority to
those already wailing and apply a
lottery for everyone else.
Anticipating a similar hassle
elsewhere.a group including Doyle.
Bob O'Brien. Rick Mekler, Andy
Goldstein and Lew t-idlur asked
Lottery For All
Welly unapproved a lottery for other
Under the new method, priority Quads. Welly at first refused, then
for students remainslhe same. On the sanctioned a loltcry later that Sundesignated day, however, students • day evening. (According to sources
randomly select numbers deter- in Student Association. Welly's
mining the order of room registra- superior. Dean Brown, overruled Ihc •
tion.
housing superintendent).
The lottery came about because of
Rick Mekler of SA blamed Ihe
evenls at Dutch Quad on Sunday. confusion at Dutch on Welty. who
There 65 groups had signed up by did noi immediately acl on the
evening and were prepared lo camp- February Central Council resoluout until their turn lor registration tion. "And Welly at ihe lime didn't
even offer us an argument against
the lottery," said Mekler. Welly, on
die othei hand,says that by. the lime
he heard of Ihe lottery idea, he was
already committed lo ihe old
method.
Many approve of the new system.
As Fidler said. "Now no one lias lo
worry about running down to wait
on line because of a minority of
fanatics who would campoui for a
week. And there will be no more
worry about missed school work."
Others disagree. "I was willing to
wait on line for Led Zeppelin tickets
for three days. Why shouldn't
someone be allowed lo wait for
something as important as where
you are going to live." said Russ
Daum, of Indian Quad.
The lottery will not apply lo
Alumni Quad, where a light registration tuni-oul is expected.
ACT Selects Top SUNYA Professors
by Mark Grcenberg
Just as students began thinking
about next semester's courses and
teachers, ACT II arrived on campus.
Over 2,200 copies of ihe 185 page
course and teacher evaluation book
were distributed on campus lasl
week to students, faculty and administration. Additional books will
be available at Colonial Quad, the
ACT office, and the S.A. office
throughout the preregisiralion
period.
Assessment of Courses and
Teachers, ihe group responsible lor
ACT II, appears lo have joined Ihc
ranks of the ASP, Viewpoints and
the Torch, as a permanent publication al SUNYA. The group hasbcen
working on its next publication ACT
The best teachers as picked by students In ACT. From left to right:
111 for the past several months and
plans to survey til is semester's classes
during Ihe week of April 28.
The normal interest in grades once
again has swepl our campus. In
response, ACT has released some of
Ihe book's statistics as well as the
names of the lop teachers. Ihe book
represents the results of over 19,000
completed questionnaires. Of 688
courses included within the book,
103 received grades of A or A- on Ihc
question dealing with the overall
rating of the instructor. Only 86
courses received Ihe grade A or Aon Ihe overall "ACT Grade". The
AC I Grade assigned represents Ihe
evaluation of a particular class and
teacher.
ACT has also released iwo listsuf
Peter Cocks, James Symons, Helen Staflord, and Clifford Brown.
"superior" leachcrs. In order to be
included on either list, the course
had lo be an undergraduate class
with al least live students responding
lo the survey. Ihe first list includes
those professors teaching courses
with small enrollments 25 or less,
while ihc second category includes
only professors leaching large
classes with over 25 students,
The fact that ACT II was entirely
produced by ihc computer, made it
very easy lo calculate Ihe top
teachers in an objective manner. The
results of Question 19, "In comparison lo oihei instructors you have
had at this University, how would
rale the instructor'/", were used to
determine the top teachers. This
question was used because il was the
most direct representation of the
students' opinions of the instructors
alone.
ACT is not attempting to make
toucher evaluations a contest.
However, il feels that professors disivniitiued on page lime
Anti-War Figure Attacks Ford Tactic*;
Demand* End to Viet Nam Involvement
from the Food for Peace Program,
In a speech given here last Friday. and that o s Jamary 7.1973 thecorD o s Luce, national ehairjserncn of porauue of Raymond. Morrisoa,
C t a j j and Laity Concerned, op- Knudsea-Srown, Root and Jones
posed President Fold's recent rewas awarded a M00.0W contract to
quest to Congicnformore aid to In- build 3*4 new "isolation cells" which
dochina. During his Talk, sponsored
were lb be more confining and unby Peace Project. Luce emphamied
comfortable tana the original tiger
the fact that then: appears to be little cages. This move came after the
real support from either civilians »r Saigon government had announced
soldiersforthe existing government that they were eliminating them. The
of Nguyen Van Thieu in Saigon,
result of his investigative reporting
predicting that i additional aid were was the nook, Husiaget of Wan
given t h e n would he at least fifty to Saigon's Political frixmrrs, coone hundred thousand more authored wall Holmes Browndeaths"
Muck of Lace's speech was conDon Luce hat been recognized as cerned with the recent "Operation
a leading figure in the anti-srar habyuft" to transport Sooth Vietmovement for mam years and a namese orphans to the United States
decided opponent of all American lor adoption. Luce stated that he did
involvement in Indochina, in J97U believe Americans' motives for
he led a group of Congress peopkto adopting were good* but feared that
South Vietnam to imes'jgate the once they have grown up in the Untreatment of prisoners held in the ited States, these native Vietnamese
"tiger cages"' on Con Son island. Ad- children will be disturbed by antidressing this issue, he pointed out Asian sentiments here and a lack of
that a substantial portion of the cultural identity or national roots.
money thai wai used in constructing He also pointed out that the Minister
trie tiger cages was actual!) diverted of Social Welfare in South Vietnam
NEWS BRIEFS
opposed A h action taken by Ford,
remarking that the first airlift of
children was one that was never consented to by Sooth Vietnamese officials. When asked if be thought
these actions could be considered
- "kidnapping" in effect, he quoted a
Vietnamese friend as saying to
Americans, "You've bombed our
villages, defoliated our rice fields,
and now you're taking our children."
Responding to a question put
forth by Rev. Paul Smith of Chapel
House concerning the role of the
media in the last four years and their
treatment of the Vietnam situation.
Luce noted that many journalists
have been kept out of the country by
Thieu's government and that if the
networks should "raise hard
questions" concerning our involvement there, they would likely be
blamed by President Ford for an
"American loss" in Vietnam.
Closing with a poem by Alan
Ginsberg. Luce encouraged students
to openly demonstrate their anti-war
or anti-aid sentiments as they had in
the past.
C — f l i d by Cberyl Wagner at
MANILA (AP)- U.S. Ambassador William Sullivan gave assurances that
the Philippines' Trest foreign friend is still the United Stales." This came one
day after the Philippines announced a review of its mutual defense agreement
with America.
PHNOM PENH,' C—aniia (AP) - Heavy fighting broke out early
Monday as Khmer Rouge rebels drove to within a mile of the highway from
Phnom Penh to the airport that is this city's only link with the outside w orld.
Government reinforcements fought rebel troops hand-to-hand Monday in a
hut-ditch effort to stem the insurgent drive that has penetrated into the
outskirts of Phnom Penh, field reports said.
DUBLIN, hfnsad(AP) - The United States' major European allies are
worried about recent setbacks to U.S. foreign policy -especially in Southeast
Asia and the Middle East -but they indicated ' at a weekend meeting of
Common Market foreign ministers that Europe is their first concern
The two-day European meeting reviewed the Cambodian debacle, what
Europeans see as the imminent collapse in South Vietnam, the failure of
Secretary of Stale Henry A. Kissinger's recent peace shuttle between Egypt
and Israel and the move to the left by Portugal's military government
SAIGON (AP) - South Vietnamese forces, inflicted damaging blows on
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces at Xuan Loc, gateway to the capital.
and on other fronts, the Saigon command says.
Few Referrals Made by Infirmary
b> Marts Abrams
While the Student Health Service
has several specialists on its stall
(including
cardiologists,
gynecologists and psychologists),
students must be referred to doctors
in the community for such services as
/.•rays, dental and eye care,
neurology or suigery.
Dr. Janet Hood, director of Student Health Service, states that
"there is a very low patient referral
rate ol two percent (not including xrays) and these cases arc sent to only
highly qualified doctors in the community." She added that all of these
doctors associated with the university arc on the stall of the Albany
Medical Center, although many
have their own private offices.
According to Dr. Hood, the infirmary will treat certain emergency
cases, such as eye problems, and will
You Asked for It
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WASHINGTON, N.C. (AP)- Attorneys for Joanne Little, a black woman
inmate accused of killing a white jailer she said was trying to rape her, argued
for dismissal of charges Monday on grounds that the jury selection process in
Beaufort County excludes blacks. Miss Little's attorneys said at a pretrial
hearing that the grand jury which indicted her for first-degree murder was
defective because blacks are excluded from serving in this eastern North
Carolina county where whites are in the majority.
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - The state comptroller's office said Monday that
nonprofit nursing homes, favored by some as the answer to abuses in the
state's nursing home industry, actually cost more to operate and appear to be
less efficient than the highly criticized privately owned facilities. Most of the
controversy over the industry, which receives hundreds of millions of dollars
of public support each year, has revolved around alleged financial and
patient-service abuses by operators of private nursing homes, the audit
report noted,
another
Thursday, April 17th at 7:30 pm
A
ft
WASHINGTON (AP) - Former Treasury Secretary John B. Connally
denied emphatically and categorically Monday that heever took a payoff lor
helping get an increase in mild price supports.
"It did not," said Connally to the question of whether such a bribe ever
took place. Connally's chief accuser, Jake Jacobsen, has testified that the
three-time Texas governor asked him for the money in return for help in
getting the price supports hiked in 1971.
©@im®§©© CiTMiffi) AD® Nllghtf
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SAIGON (AP)
- Premier Nguyen Ba Can named a new
government and said it would receive cooperation from foes of President
Nguyen Van Thieu. However, some Thieu opponents immediate!;,
denounced the new cabinet.
There was no immediate reaction to the new government in broadcasts
from the Communist side. However, the Viet Cong havedeclared repeatedly
they will not take part in moves aimed at ending the fighting by negotiations
unless Thieu quits or is removed from office. Thieu has replied that he will
never accept a coalition that would include the Viet Cong, and has \ ow cd he
will stay on as president.
make sure a "student receives
Most referrals are for Gl series
speciali/ed care within a twenty-four ( x-rays for ulcers), orthopedics,
hour period. The individual physi- routine dental and eye care, head incian at the infirmary usually selects juries and other major injuries or ilthe specialist, unless the patient has lness, according to Dr. Hood. The
established contact with an Albany Student Health Service "urges
doctor, as in the case of commuter students to carry Student Health Instudents."
surance, which is designed to cover
"The infirmary will make all the costs of outside medical conreferral appointments for patients," sultations, major surgery and
says Dr. Hood, to provide treatment medicine." Dr. Hood estimates that
as soon as possible. In addition to "only half of the student population
the problems of getting an appoint- carries this policy."
ment, she comments that "many
The Pre-Law Society plans to
doctors in the community will not
show the same interest in student }ffer a LSAT review course starpatients (who are often considered ting this fall. Similar to commercial
'transient') as in their regular courses costing S7S and more, the
patients. In contrast, outside course will cost $20 to those with
specialists affiliated with the Student lax cards, S2S without.
Students can register today from
Health Service have expressed a
genuine interest in the studenlsat the 130 to 3 m p.m. in the CC lobby,
ior through the Pre-Law Society.
university."
small $.15
large $.25
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PAGE TWO
Students Seeking Reform Encounter Frustration
merely okay what happened
Wednesday; they'll probably be no
reforms this year. . .I'm sick with
Beh'ezct's illegal ruling, I'm willing to
see
extra-legal
action,
demonstrations, taken against FSA.
Others saw it differently. Hartley
believes equal representation
(undcrgrud and graduate students
presently make up half the
membership) has worked well in
helping to erase FSA's once huge
deficit. And Dean Brown denied the
new committee was a stalling
maneuver, adding "we shouldn't
stampede change. A committee
needs lour weeks to do a thorough
job."
Attitudes toward Norhert Znhrri,
the l-'SA Director, seem basic to understanding how members view
Wednesday's events. Some students
like Howie Grossman, who backed
Hartley and Hcne/ct in the voting,
praise austerity measures Zahm has
already instituted and perhaps don't
believe further change is all thai
urgent or necessary. Student and
Board member Rick Mecklcr,
however, fails to see how some like
Zahm can refuse to accept what
Mecklcr considers to be obviously
just reforms. And he blasts the
Director for failing to invrove the
main lunctioi. of l-'SA. nanu'ly loud
service."Zahm claims he's never
eaten a bad caleleria meal.' said
Mecklcr SH rciistically.
Mcckler and others are also exFidlcr Outraged
asperated by the so-called stalling
Lew Fidlcr was outraged with the tactics. "At the prior meeting we
reached agreement on the student
meeting's results;
"Wc came into the meeting willing to majority issue. Then Wednesday
compromise, and they just walked they come in and say they want lo
all over us.. .this new committee will think it over!"
by Edward Moser
It's often lamented that students,
faculty and administration are hard
put to cooperate with each other. An
illustration of this took place last
Wednesduy at the FSA Board of
Directors meeting.
Previously Central Council
Chairperson Lew Fidlcr and FSA
Hoard Member Rick Mcckler had
suggested! reforms, among which
were:
Closure of the barbershop if it
continues to lose money
- Giving students hiring priority
in FSA operations
—Either raise prices or cut services in the Patroon Room to
eliminate losses
Amend FSA by-laws to provide
for an undergrad majority on the
ISA Hoard of Directors
The last item was to be discussed
at Wednesday's meeting, where
Vice-President Hartley proposed
setting up a committee to discuss bylaw changes in general. Lew Fuller
saw this as a bureaucratic device of
neatly evading the issue, and
coiinlcrproposed a committee to
outline specific changes in the
membership board. President
Henezct ruled the latter suggestion
out of order, saying it would cause a
de facto illegal alteration of the bylaws,
Ucnc/ct's ruling was upheld and
Hartley's motion passed.
Mug-A-Thug Spurs Student Interest
mmm
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
APRIL 15,1975
If IIP «
individuals -one must view his
Allen Center."
. Joseph Roach
ATHR207 students as people and interact with
them accordingly. 3. Dedicated com(Theater)
"A university constitutes a com- mitment to all aspects of Ihe responmunity the members of which are sibilities of teaching one must be
bound by delicate ties of reciprocal willing lo really work inoidertoprecuriosity, A teacher's profession is :'C11t the course context during each
the conveyance of thought, like an class session in such a mariner that
electric current, from the repository students will learn, understand and
of his own mind, continuously develop concepts and skills as a
replenished by study and reflection, result of teaching."
James Symuns\ I IIR.14I (Theater)
to a destination in the minds of
"My approach to leaching is not
others. A teacher must first nulurc
curiosity, founded on a love ol his based on a eonscientously forsubject, in himself. A lapse ol mulated philosophy. However, it is
curiosity, ti fullering ol intellectual my belief that the hesi leaching is
energy, or an accidental outburst of thai which stimulates student inindifference will interrupt the flow of terest in the subject well beyond the
thought from mind lo mind and, at immediate requirements of tin
least momentarily, sever the bonds course. To this end. I feel it is more
of learning. On days when any one ol important to pose the right questions
the above calamities befall me and then to provide Ihe acceptable
there arc such days I have tailed. answers."
On days when I manage lo avoid
Donald Prakken CI.GKII (Greek
such calamities lhavc done my
Classics)
job."
Some years ago Gilbert Highet of
' Helen Safford
EBUS40I Columbia University wrote a book
entitled 77/e Art til 'Teaching • It
(Business Education')
"Several factors ol prime impor- was translated into modern Greek.
Its (ireek title, translated back into
tance in my philosophy of tcachin
1. Genuine interest and enthusiasm English, is //on- tii Tench- . The
for teaching and the subject matter original English title is better,
leaching is an art that is not to be
being taught one must want to
leach, lo work with and guide others. mastered by following : i n v one
2. R e c o g n i z e students as prescription. Teachers in all fields
share certain 'desirable qualities
which burgeon with age and experience
and a little luck. •-:
tttiult'tl
'"•' J d ^ A [email protected]!8 €@©iffi®ln) OS §p>@!»[email protected] <a§
l
h\ MlHh'IU tf.V.WN
Trip to MQiratautififu to see
"GUM!
§m<[email protected]„ hp$°i ^©
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - A legislative committee investigating the
operations of the state Correction Commission, which has been accused of
"toning down" critical reports of jail conditions, has subpoenaed confidential
commission reports on several county jails. The state Senate Committee cm
Crime and Correction opens public hearings next Monday on the activities ol
the Correction Commission, the state agency responsible for inspecting state
and local correctional facilities throughout New York.
LOS ANGKI.KS (AP) - Frcdric March, who gave up a career in banking
lo become one of America's greatest actors, died Monday ut 77. For more
than half a century, March pursued a career of extraordinary distinction on
stage and screen.
ACT: Computerized Objectivity
continued from /xifie one
playing "superior teaching skills"
deserve recognition and congratulations from the University
Community. In order to understand
why stud cuts rale these professors so
highly, the top live professors from
each of the two lists were asked the
question. "What is your leaching
philosophy'.'" The top teachers and
their responses appear below in
alphabetical order:
Peter Cocks M MA 1255 (Allen
Center)
"My principle aim is the same as
that of a good artist: lo make the
familiar unfamiliar, and there by to
increase our understanding ol
ourselves and our relationship with
(CI'S) A school in Maryland has found a new incentive to spur students on thcworld around us. Thus. 1 want to
to higher grades: beating up the professor. Mug-a-Thug 101 is a sclf-defcsne leach students the art of critical
course in Towson State College's phys ed department, especially popular thinking, not simply lor the sake of
criticism, but for Ihc sake ol producwith women students.
"The reason we're here is to learn to hurt someon," said one student in the ing a decent world in which to live. I
class. The instructor, 28-year-old ex-Green lleret Murk Snyder, explained take it that in this effort thestudents.
that the midterm only takes live minutes and involvesa student droppingby, although they do not always believe
lighting the professor and gelling graded on how effectively he or she it. leach me something as well, so
that we are mutually transformed in
assaulted him.
Despite protests from anti-violent faculty members, the only casualty since the process of education."
1
George I'rangos
MMAI250
the course began three years ago has been Snyder himself. An overzcalous
(Allen Center)
female student once broke his toes.
"My philosophy of teaching? A
In the final exam students must attempt to overcome two attackers at the
same time. Punching, as well as gouging, kicking and hair-pulling is not only strong mix of respect and critical unallowed but expected. Snyder, once a judo and karate instructor, has run the derstanding of my subject and my
class as informally as possible. Rather than teaching the complexities of students set within a democratic and
human place like SUNY Albany's
Oriental martial arts, he said he sticks to the basics of street fighting.
ALBANY, (AP) - Gov. Hugh Carey urged more lower-income New
Yorkers to apply for food stamps Monday, and ordered the establishment ol
a telephone "hot line" to help them find out if they areeligiblc. The governor
said us many as a million residents of the state are eligible for the food stamp
assistance, which is funded by the federal government, but have not applied
for it.
The eligibility requirements for food stamps vary with such factors as
income, housing costs and medical costs. Depending on those factors, and
eligible family could pay anywhere from nothing to $ 130a month to buy food
stamps with a cash value of SI54.
BUFFALO (AP) - A defense lawyer charged Monday that government
spying on the defense was prejudicial to his client, Bernard Stroble, accused
of killing u fellow prisoner during the 1971 Attica prison revolt. Justice
Joseph S. Maiiina ol Statu Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments
Wednesday on the motion by Haywood Burns, one of Stroblc's lawyers.
The suggested reforms of Central Council Chairperson Lew Fidler and Council member RIcK '
Meckler (left) lor FSA turn l o naught.
nu
(matinee show)
Maria Zyeh POLI0I (PolishLibra rv)
I respect my studen.s as individuals. The theory of grammar,
'sually viewed as dull and
monotonous can turn out to"; be
delightful with maximum efforts by
both students and the instructor,interwoven with laughter and humor
all used towards the learning of u
language. One cannot be afraid of
vernacular, slang or colloquialism in
the classroom. Students can be extraordinarily perceptive. %he
brilliant ones flatter mv professional
continued on page fii'ttr
Lunch provided
®m leave at 9:45 am from the Circle (between Colonial and State)
Costs
(includes ticket, lunch, and round trip transportation)
JSC- $5.00
APRIL 15,1975
w/tax- $7.00
wo/tax- $9.00
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
TM Secret Ceremony Revealed by Meditators
bjrDtahlGWMS
Students o f Transcendental
Meditation most sign a statement
lint they will not repeat their personal m i d (their "mantra") or
describe the secret ceremony in
which they barn how to meditate.
The mantras sounds assigned to each
student one that may be spelt Efegne
(pushed together into one sound)
and Etdla. These mantras were told
to the ASP by former meditators.
Transcendental Meditation is, accord ingto the International Meditation Society, an effective and practical technique for self-development.
It is being spread throughout the
Western world by the Marharishi
Mahesh Yogi. The number of people
knowing bow to meditate continues
to increase, but the drop-out rate
afterwards is not known.
The secret learning ceremony is
the fourth step after two introductory lectures and a quick personal interview where the student must sign
the promise not to reveal the details
of the ceremony. At that lime the
course fee is paid. SI25 for adults.
S65 for college students, still fc« for
younger people. The ceremony is
over within fifteen minutes. The student brings fruit, flowers and a white
handkerchief to the teacher as part
of the students show of thanks for
being imparted the knowledge of the
TM technique.
The student enters the room with
his teacher w h o may remind him that
the ceremony's details and the mantra he will receive are secret, hi the
room is a tab k with an incense bowl
(or slicks)," a picture of the
Marbarishi's teacherJnGuru Der,a
bowl of water, a vase and possibly a
few other beads and trinkets. The
student is given a flower, which he
must hold, and the teacher takes
another one. Then the teacher recites
a series of chants in some Indian
language, while he places the
handkerchief on the table and puts
somericeand brown substance in it.
Then be dips the flowers in some liquid and shakes it on the rice. Next
the teacher kneels, indicating to the
student that he should also. Apparently this is when the mantra
comes to the teacher, a skill learned
under the Marharishi. and soon the
teacher begins to chant it. The student is asked to join in and the
teacher then slowly lowers the
volume of the chant, with the student, until neither are saving
anything. The teacher tells the student to close his eyes and continue
chanting it "in hishead."The student
is meditating, and after a while is
told to open his eyes. The teacher
will ask some questions about it, like
"was it peacefuir which are close to
impossible to answer 'no* to. The student then goes into another room
and meditates atone.
There are group meetings for the
next few days where problems are
aired and discussed and method is
explained further and in more detail.
For example, thereleaseof stress as
bubbles coming to the surface of the
mind and popping.
A meditation group has received
recognition from Student Association, and indeed there are many
practitioners at SUNYA. SIMSIMS claims that anyone can team
and successfully practice TM. but
many meditators disagree. Some
people have likened TM to the soma
drug that kept the people satisfied in
spite of their oppression in Huxley's
Brave Sew World. Others, including
businessmen, politicians and
housewives, say that TM has improved their lives a great deal, increasing their efficiency, raising
grades, endingabusivedrug use, and
generally increasing life satisfaction.
••••••••••••••a*
George Stein, the third candidate
for the Dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences will be at an open
meeting with students on Thursday.
April 17 between five and six p.m. in
Humanities 354. AH students are
welcome to come and ask questions
of the candidate.
A Boston astronomer is
suggesting that scientists on the
earth should aim their powerful
radio telescopes toward the star
"Zeta Reticuli I" in an effort to make
contact with a super-civilization in
space.
Walter Webb, the Assistant Director of the Charles llavden
Planetarium in Boston. sa>s there is
persuasive evidence thai advanced
beings from he star "Zeta Riticuli"
may have visited the canh
Top Teachers Tell Philosophies
continued from page four
students. A teacher must have a
achievements, while the poor ones or good sense of humor with the ability
to laugh at himself. No questions
difficult ones, have my whole
pedagogic effort. I do not believe should be ignored and a student
there are bad students, for I do not should never be embarrassed by the
believe in failures. I try to give my teacher.
students the maximum benefit of the
Students should be informed of
doubt.
exactly what is expected of them.
Any special teaching methods? The teacher should set high, yet
No. On the contrary, I believe in reasonable, standards, and should
homework and exams. In other have sufficient evidence upon which
words, I accept and apply standard to base a grade. A sufficient number
teaching methods provided they are of office hours should be scheduled
carefully worked out and their pur- to meet the netds of students. The inpose is not only to prove the students structor's actions and attitude
ability but to prove that 1 did not fail should be such that students know
either.
the teac.r is a person they can talk
John Therrien MAT2I4/362 to.
Large Classes - over 25
(Mathematics)
William Brax MSI 330 (ManageI find it virtually impossible to
separate philosophy from teaching ment Science)
As an undergraduate instructor
techniques,
personality
characteristics, and the particular
discipline that is involved. A
teacher's main responsibility is to
impart knowledge and to stimulate
intellectual growth.
The most important ingredient is
to create a classroom atmosphere
that gives the student the desire to
learn. It should be a relaxed and informal atmosphere, yet controlled.
The teacher should convey to the
student that he wants questions. The
learning process should be a
dialogue between teacher and
within the School of Business, my
major teaching techniques are to
create an atmosphere of interaction
in the classroom, to give my students
an extensive set of lecture notes, and
to spend as much time as possible
with students in scheduled review
sessions and during office hours.
There is nothing unusual about these
methods. I feel the main reason I
have been succssful is because of the
added contact time I have with my
students.
Clifford Brown POS 370 (Political
Science)
I have no philosophy of education. I try to teach what I am interested in and hope that the interest
catches on. I try to teach what is important and hope that the sense of
importance catches on.
lAIHAM • ?8i 3388
f
Cinema One's
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NEW ART POLICY % i FNEW ADULT POLICY
featuring
featuring (starting wed.) V
IEL BROOKS FESTIVALS
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International Students
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invites all to k"
CALCULATORS!
Ttxas InstiunMnta
SR51 -$155.00
8R50- 92.00
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3R11- 56.00
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For Information:
Call Carol
457-7786
The Federal Government has been
quietly training and financing hundreds of para-military SWAT teams
attached to local police agencies
across the United States.
The actual number of these F.B.I.traincd "Special Weapons And Tactics" teams may run into the
thousands. The figure cannot be obtained because the F.B.I, in
Washington states it will not divulge
the number of domestic police forces
which currently maintain bureautrained SWAT units.
Are you ready for sootburgers or
linestonc sandwiches'.'
A Nova University chemist in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida, says that artificial diets may provide us with
most of our future foods.
Doctor Murry Tamers reports
that he fed his laboratory rats for
two years on almost nothing but
recycled industrial waste and
limestone. Doctor Tamers says that
the animals thrived on the stuff.
How is the artificial food made?
The doctor's recipe is to heat the soot
(o about 10(10 degrees Centigrade,
then to mix it with Lithium and
water. The result, he says, is a
human-made carbohydrate - a food
substance packed with calories and
bulk.
As for taste. Doctor Tamers says
that flavorings will make it tasty. Hesays: "We could make it taste like
lobster if we wanted lo."
I INDOCHINA SUPPORT
COMMITTEE DEMANDS:
Saturday. April 19,1975
Alumni Quad
Brubacher Dining Hall
7:30 PM
ADMISSIONS: $2.50 with tax card
I
I
1
$3.00 without tax card
No promises are made for tickets at the door, so please call
I
|
A P R I L 1 S ,1975
a M P presentation BCP a sorvico ol CON Broadcaaling Corporation
GLENVIEW1-2
5
(ilt'iiridgi' Kind
Kasl i
APRIL 15,1975
•'»"
"»'"'
'"""
SCIENTISTS BAFFLED
Scientists at Duke University are
studying!! six-sided hexagon-shaped
area off the coast of North Carolina
thai is as mysterious ul ihe Bermuda
I linngle.
Ihe small area, known as ihe
"lliltteras Hexagon." has been the
scene of no less than 697 shipwrecks.
I he "Halterns Hexagon" is only one
one-hundreih the si/e ol the more
famous Bermuda I riangle. bul il too
has an abnormally high number of
missing ships.
Perhaps the most famous case was
that ol the Carroll A. Deering: Ihe
Maine-built schooner was discovered adrift in the hexagon in 1921
with sails set on her live masts, bul
not a living soul aboard. I he Coast
Guardsmen who boarded her found
two cats alive, and the galley stove
preparing food
but no oilier signs
Maimoiudes Residential Center has
child care vuirker-cuutiscloi positions
HMiilnhlc ilns summer, and
opportunities for year-round
tfinpioynienl in unique programs for
emotionally disturbed and menially
retarded children and adolescents.
|
|
£
12 noon - 1:00 pm - Rally & Speakers =
on Capitol Steps
|
Mil
Delegates to an international conference on nuclear testing have come
out with alarming statistics on the
long-term effects of radiation.
M icronesian representatives
slated that since 1954. when the United Stales dropped the Hydrogen
bomb near the island of Rongelap in
the South Pacific. 16 of 17 children
born on the island have undergone
surgery for thyroid tumors.
Between 1954 and 1958. the United Stales conducted 96 nuclear
lests in Micronesia. The representatives also staled that the rate of
stillbirths on Kongclap is more than
double the rate for the rest of the
islands.
Ihe death rales of Rongelap. the
conference was told, are almost 40
percent higher than any of the surrounding islands.
Ihe delegates to the international
conference are calling for a
moratorium on all future nuclear
testing in the Pacific.
Exceptional
Employment
Opportunity
! 1:30 am - Meet at Townsend Park
(Central & Wash. Ave.)
March down Washington Ave.
SUNYA co-sponsors:
Peace Pro|ect, People lor Socialism, U ,S.-Chlna People s
RADIATION RAVAGES
Duke University is working under
a National Science Foundation
grant in an attempt to solve the Ilexagon's mystery.
Friday, April 18
I
The Government of South
America has taken a major step
toward developing its own atomic
weapons.
South Africa's Prime Minister
John Vorster announced in Parliament this week that his country has
successfully designed a system
capable of enriching uranium.
Enriched uranium can be converted by nuclear reactors into
plutonium fuel for atomic weapons.
In recent years. South Africa has
been one of the world's largest
suppliers of raw uranium. However,
until its development of the enrichment system, the country did not
possess the capability of producing
nuclear fuel lor weapons.
ol .ik'.
| DEMONSTRATE!
Tickets are available In Campus Center 329 and in CC 335 or
call 457-4918 or 472-8763 for reservations.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
GUERRILLAS CHARGE
PANTHERS
A revolutionary California inmate
organization— The Black Guerrilla
Family—has issued a communique
accusing the Black Panther Party of
being partially responsible lor the
death of George Jackson.
Jackson, a black inmate leader,
was shot to death during an alleged
escape attempt at San Quentin
prison in 1971.
Prior to his death. Jackson was
the leaderand organizer of the Balck
Guerrilla Family-an organization
which is believed to have members
throughout the California prison
system.
In a live-page communique, the
Black Guerrilla Family charges that
the Oakland branch of the Black
Panther Party under the direction
of its former chairman lltlcy
Newton was involved in setting up
Cieorge Jackson lo be murdered.
The communique alleges that
George Jackson became convinced
that the Black Panthers had caused
the death of his brother. Jonathan.
SUPER FLEET
Jonathan Jackson was killed during
However, spot checks by
If you liked the B-l bomber, the
the 1970 courthouse shootout as he
newspapers in the Washington. D.C.
Air Force has an even belter idea.
attempted to take inmates and
and San Francisco areas indicate
The Air Force has asked Congress
ATTICA COVER-UP
hostages from the Marin County
that each of these areas alone main- for $476 million in fiscal 1976 to
An assistant special prosecutor in
Courthouse.
tains at least 30 separate Federally- remodel six Hoeing 707's into what it
the Altica Prison trials has resigned
trained SWAT teams. If the calls the "Airborne Warning And
his post in protest over an alleged
Washington and San Francisco Control System" -or the "AWAC."
"cover-up" in the Attica investigafigures are any indication, there
As the Air Force describes its new
tion,
could be as many as 1000 SWAT un- system, AWAC is a super Heel of
Former prosecutor Malcomb Bell
its in existence n'utiormijjrX B
•'((SiTnlnaml- Miters which would
resigned' liis?"December, charging
SWAT loams are military-like un- enable the U.fCTu direct an overseas that his efforts lo investigate crimes,
its of riflemen trained to handle so- air strike against the "Enemy."
on the part of guards and other
called "sniper situations" in urban
Each Hoeing 707 would be
police were being blocked by stale
ureas. It was a Los Angeles SWAT
modified with super sophisticated
officials.
team which wiped out six members equipment and would come with a
Hell's letter of resignation which
of the Symbionese Liberation Army
hefty price tag of SI 11 million.
details alleged cover-up activities has
lasl May.
The Sill million per plane price
been obtained by the New York
A typical SWAT unit is armed
tag lor the AWAC makes it the most
Times. In that letter, sent to the New
with tear gas grenades, long range costly piece of aircraft in history:
York State Attorney General lasl
sniper rifles, semi-automatic M-16
The B-l bomber, whose fate is being
December. Hell alleges thai a full and
rifles and bullet proof helmets and
debated by Congress, costs a mere
fair investigation into the Attica
vests. Most units are trained lit
$80 million per plane.
rebellion would result in the indictF.B.I, academics, although a few
The communique charges that the
ment of law enforcement officers on
have been trained directly by the
murder, manslaughter and assault Black Panthers were supposed lo
WONDER GIRL
Military at U.S. Marine bases.
supply Jonathan Jackson with supStevie Wonder and Yolanda Sim- charges.
I he Federal Government's Law monds became the parents this week
Hell, who headed the investigation port during the kidnapping, but that
1-; n I o r c c m c n t
A s s i s t a n c e (April 7th) of an 8-pound baby girl.
into police activities at Attica, says Jonathan was "deserted" and left lo
Administration the I..Li.A.A. is
Stevie and Yolanda named the thai Chief Prosecutor Anthony die by the Hlnek Panthers.
Hie communique slates that
funding many SWAT training probaby Aisha Zakin, which means Simonelli prevented him from
jects, but the L.F.A.A. has declined
presenting evidence which was George Jackson became consinced
strength and intelligence in African.
thai his brother had been
to release any figures. The L.E.A.A.
damaging to police agencies.
slates simply that cost figures for the
Following the Attica uprising, 62 douhlcctosscd. and intended lo get
SPIES
SIP
SOUP
nationwide SWAT programs arc
persons all of them inmates were even with fluey Newton and the
The Soviet Press is charging that
"unavailable."
indicted on various murder and con- Panthers if and when he ever gained
his freedom from prison.
iinillllllllll
Illl
IIH
•
lllllllllllllllllllll
|| spiracy charges.
t,
LmlMMM'iMMmLHHHIMro
PAGE FOUR
the People's Republic of China is using Chinese restaurants in foreign
countries as a worldwide spy
network.
The S o v i e t
publication
Moskovsky Komsonidlets says that
American C.I.A. agents are compelled lo spend their time in these
restaurants "chewing Bambay duck
or gulping birdnest soup while trying
to decide which of the waiters is being used by Peking for illegal activity"
The newspaper points out thai
while there arc Chinese reslaurants
in just about every nation on earth,
there are none in Moscow.
SOOTBURGERS
ANYONE?
An end to all U.S. support ol the Thleu regime
Immediate reparation lor the people ol Indochina
No U S . military aid lo ot Intervention In Indochina
US live up lo Paris Peace accord
INTERNATIONAL
DINNER '75
tmkthm*mmmm^
ANOTHER ATOMIC
POWER -V
SWAT SQUAD
Starts
Frl.
<t-<UM
CINE 1-2-3-4
Northway Mall
C'olonle 45D-M1I0
For inliiiiminon and application
please write:
Malmonides Residential Center
Personnel Department
34-01 Moll Avenue
Far Bockaway, Nnw York 11681
'"I
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
New
Count:
Hermann
i^H^Hrk
lit i|
The
World
of
in English. N o prerequisites. O p e n to
German 240.—
discussion.
student
Community
Service
to
MAJORS ft MINORS
Racism
***
Against
A n y o n e interested in C o m m u n i f y
for M a r c h on Boston in CC
3 7 0 , W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 16, 7:30 p.m.
Pro-law
Society
will
meet
For i n f o g o to CC 3 0 8 .
** *
W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 1 6 , 1 9 7 5 a t 8 : 0 0 in
Lc-11. Topics: (1) Registration f o r next
f a l l ' s LSAT p r e p course (2) Lecture
a n d discussion w i t h M r . T. Tippins, of
Ihe b w
firm of M c G i n n , Muderry,
a n d Buckley • S u b j e c t : g e t t i n g
Reminder,
•* *
Senior
Week
of
Rhetoric
8:00
organizational
in
April
LC-4. A l l
15
at
interested
majors o r p o t e n t i a l majors in RCO a r e
will
be
a
meeting
There
of
w i l l be
t a k i n g k a y a k i n g , rafting a n d other
water
join
trips. Don't delay.
us
on
our
many
a d v e n t u r e s . W e meet W e d . CC 315
OtFICIAL NOTICE
A t t e n t i o n . ' Theatre
incorrectly listed
be held
Bu»ine$s
Seminar
f o r a l l interested
will
people,
Schedule
listing
of
of
Courses o r e
in the
Classes.
theatre
fall
For
courses
Electric
and
Davids o f C o l o n i e . S p o n s o r e d f o r you
sheets
b y Phi G a m m a N u a n d D e l t a S i g m a
Assistants,
P i — t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l business sorority
and fraternity.
CLUBS & M E E T I N G S
for
Assistants,
and
Summer
and Student
O n W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 16 a t 4:00
lounge,
the
English
first
meeting
StudentsForum
floor
of
student
in
employment
the
for
Office
the
of
Peoples
Friendship
constitution
postponed
of
to
on
Peoples
Thursday,
new
China
April
17,
7:30 p . m . 727 M a d i s o n A v e n u e . All
i n v i t e d — it's
free.
More
Tommy—472-8761,
info:
Mickey—465-
6874.
Anthropology
hold
a
Club, Na-Dene
meeting
and
will
program
on
evenings
relevant
i» u e i
6-10 p.m. Col
WHAT K T D C T "
p.m.
Series
Learn
for
3. Q u a d Assistants
applicants
immediately
to
should
the
for
apply
quadrangle
further
and
application
Folkdancing
people
Present
Insights
on the
Stop
dances will be taught te, ,(
Ten
at
Any
U.S.
Military
In Indochina!
March
Washington
Avenue
1975.
Capital
Hall presenU "Con
Co-sponsored
w e l c o m e to a t t e n d ! !
1975
Program
Summer
in Israel
meeting
Yonah
People for
Socialism,
and U.S.-China
Peoples
Friendship
Association.
Planning
w i l l b e c o n d u c t e d b y Dr.
Director
of
the
summer p r o g r a m in Israel, o n A p r i l
15. Dr. A l e x a n d e r will b e a v a i l a b l e
between
the
hours
of
2-4
in
H u m a n i t i e s 2 9 0 . Students w h o cannot
uttend
this
meeting
may
obtain
i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t the p r o g r a m f r o m
Ihe O f f i c e of I n t e r n a t i o n a l Programs
8 SS 3 2 2 .
** *
A n y o n e interested
Orthodox
urged
Christian
to
attend
in joining
Fellowship
our
Thursdays 7 : 0 0 , E d u c a t i o n
Room 2 2 . For f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n call
Terry W a s i e l e w s k i 7 5 3 - 4 9 5 8 .
There w i l l b e a n i n t r o d u c t o r y talk
and
discussion
on
Cckankar
on
M o n d a y , A p r i l 2 1 a t 7 : 3 0 p . m . a t 'The
B a n k , ' University B r a n c h , corners of
W e s t e r n A v e . a n d Tryon St.
Summer
kitchen, bathroom. Big—completely
'65 C o r v a i r ,
runs g o o d , g o o d
buy
$225. Call Owen. 482-7051.
S.F. books. Ken 3 7 7 - 9 3 3 1 .
DIAMOND
ENGAGEMENT
RINGS.
and
SAVE: W ct. $ 1 9 9 ; % ct. $ 3 9 5 ; 1 ct.
$ 5 9 5 . For c a t a l o g send $1 t o SMA
Importers,
Box
students. $ 2 6 0 mo. 81 W i n t h r o p A v e .
4 3 9 - 9 2 4 1 , 8 6 9 - 8 2 4 8 , or 4 7 7 - 7 3 8 4 .
f o u r-mon
4th
summer.
su ite
male
on
We
p r e s e n t s a n o t h e r DeSico classic The
of Naples"
--• it s pure gold1
W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 16, IC 1S at 8:15
Admission $.30 with to* card.
have
occupant.
Up-
quality
three-way
S u b l e t one room in three b e d r o o m
M a y t h r o u g h mid-August. C a l l Sue:
m o r e than c o m p a r a b l e to speakers
489-1391.
very
twice t h e size a n d price. D o n ' t f a l l for
speakers
We
bectiuse
wide
S u m m e r sublet off busline $60 m o .
offer
indisputable
L a r g e m o d e r n a p a r t m e n t . W a l l to
Applicants must have W.S.I.
carpeting, 3 bedrooms,
for
summer
sublet.
on
Fur-
Lecture: A p r i l 16 2:00-3:00 p.m.
Fine Arts B l d g . Room 126. Prof A.
BOOKS. MUSIC, RECORDS, PRIMS
ALL HALF PRICE
Harris: " f i e r n j n e a s D i c t a t o r " .
BRYNMAWR BOOKSTORE
State University of N e w York
used and rare books
£ Bryn Mawr Bookshop open: Wed. A pi i
~ one arcadia at Western 10:30-4:30
o
10:30(just beyond Dunkin Thurs, Apri
z
9:00
Fri A r i l , 8
>• Do nuts
482-3549
- P
10:30-4:30
Sat. April 19 10:30-4:30
announces
1975 Ninth Summer Academic Program
In Israel
9 Undergraduate or (iraduate Credits
lor information write to:Dlrector,
SUNY Israel Summer Program
State University College
Oneonta, New York 13820
benefit
LITERATURE
Bryn
SCIENCE
Mawr
College
WOMEN'S
Scholarships
RIGHTS
PHILOSOPHY
£•>>>>>>:•:•:•»»:
Indian Quad Association presents:
55SLB
w/Pickering
liwtle<l by simian uauflaiiun
"foreign"
Specializing
Auto
Repair,
In Volvos, 5 0 1
guitar
lessons.
Passport/Application
Monday
7-9
p.m.
Returned
Thursdays. Sign u p o n c a m p u s center
forgettable birthday.
A girl who arrived early
4
bedrooms
on
ST-80
and
PAT-4
C o m b i n a t i o n — w i l l sell s e p a r a t e l y —
asking $225 l o r the two — D u a l 1218
w i l h Shure V I 5 - t y p e l l l — $ 1 2 5 — c a l l
apt.,
carpeting,
To Mike & Barry,
SUNYA.
HOW
$2.00.
m o n t h . Janet 4 8 9 - 2 7 9 3 .
Washington
Rob—7-4752.
W a n t e d . To find or share a n a p a r t -
TO
Over
P r e f e r r a b l y upperclassmen & g r a d
college
students. C a l l Beth, 7-7745.
stamped
m a d e w o r l d w i d e ! Less t h a n o n e year
old.. Still undor o r i g i n a l w a r r a n t y . Ex-
465-9656.
One
C a l l Steve 4 6 5 - 2 8 7 7 .
wanted
Cabinet,
iwo
12"
speakers,
$80. C a l l Todd 439-2267 evenings.
deal
on
used
manual
apartmentmates.
One
Bedroom,
bedroom
in
apt.
vicinity
$120
125
companies
grads.
return
Send
now
John at 7 8 3 - 8 0 1 9 .
Summer S u b l e t — 2 l a r g e b e d r o o m s
a v a i l a b l e June-August, close to bus.
W e ' v e g o t w h a t it takes. Just let
envelope
MARKET, Box 3 8 1 3 8 2 ,
D e b b i e , Bina, B a r b a r a , H e l e n
to
and
JOB
Little River,
I hear the W a y s i d e M o t e l is back a n d
g i v i n g f r e e tours as 10 a . m . Satur-
the finest b u n c h of guys I've ever h a d
the p r i v i l e g e of w o r k i n g w i t h .
Apartment-mates
wanted.
A l b a n y Slate Hockey Club in 1974-75
489-8894.
d i s p l a y e d n o t only t e a m spirit, deter-
Bass player a n d d r u m m e r w a n t e d .
472-6478.
wanled
lo
share
lour
m i n a t i o n , g o o d sportsmanship but a
w i n n i n g a t t i t u d e t h a t m a d e them not
n u m b e r one in the standings but cer-
Sensitive or e m o t i o n a l p e o p l e n e e d -
tainly in the hearts of their d e v o t e d
ed
fans.
for
state-of-the-art
research
in
Sincere
gratitude
psychology. C a l l M a r y A n n at 438-
flawless g o a l i e s , the tight
4683.
a n d the g r e a t linos.
r o o m , a n d near busline. C a l l D e b b i e
or Joyce. 482-3265 (keep t r y i n g )
The
R u b b e r b o a t a n d motor. A f t e r 7 p . m .
G r e e n t h u m b for professor's o r g a n i c
to
the
defense
" C o a c h Don
N e w Paltz S.G.A. Pop-concert Com-
use in e x c h a n g e for t e n d i n g w h o l d
A p r i l 2 9 , Elting G y m . $3 for students
$50 pe< month plus utilities. C a l l 462-
g a r d e n . W i l l p a y for m a t e r i a l s , etc.
with I.D., $5 g e n e r a l admission.
465-7931.
4749.
Must
O n e oi Iwo females n e e d e d to find or
necessities. C a l l 7-8417 o r 4 3 8 - 1 2 3 3 .
share a p a r t m e n t on busline. A p r i l or
W a n t e d : Used Sociology books. C a l l
bdrm.
furnished
venient
Rent
location.
con-
negotiable.
457 7 9 7 4 .
bedioom
apartment
near
Beth 4 5 7 - 5 0 6 4 .
Summer
and
4
bedroom
fu w i s h e d ,
busline.
apartments,
4
Reasonable rate. 4 5 7 - 4 6 5 6 .
apt.
near
park,
W a s h e r / d r y e r . 465-1314.
Summer S u b l e t — l a r g e
apartment—near
4
SUNYA
Two
bedroom
bus-line.
people
''tremendous"
needed
to
share
room in white house
directly across from W e s t e r n A v e . e n t r a n c e to S U N Y A — f o r Fall 7 5 a n d
C a l l 7-4033.
S p r i n g 7 6 semesters. C a l l Larry or
Apt. for t w o to sublet this summer.
Furnished,
near busline. C a l l
The p e r s o n w h o I really w a n t to see
have
car
lor
Classified
Ads
Dead Line
Sunday
3p.m.
transporting
B a b y — G e t a job in A l b a n y so w e ' l l
live h a p p i l y ever a t t o r l
forTuesday ASP
Donna 4 8 2 - 2 1 0 6 .
Sublet-3
Summer Sublet Furnished, b e a u t i f u l
bedroom
RE: Elections—
Nemcik"
campus.
b e d r o o m a p a r t m e n t on busline. Call
Ave. S u p e r
To; A n d y , Bob, D a v e , Ken, Kim
Big J
mittee w i l l present Hot Tuna, 9 p.m.
Sublet-3
Jill
win i s — M E .
days!
W i l l offer g a r d e n spaco f o r p e r s o n a l
a p t . on M a d i s o n
Edgar
Mahican Hall,
C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s on g e t t i n g into Nur-
Rent n e g o t i a b l e . C a l l D e b b i e 457-
Room-mate
beautiful 4
H e a r d it's a steal.
e v e r y o n e know it!
Margie,
busline.
for
Fortunato,
on t h e Whiskey Bar from 11 p . m . — 3 .
Dutch.
hiring
$2.00
v e g e t a b l e g a r d e n jusl off
463 7183. G a y P r e f e i r e d
Sub letters w a n t e d
signing the p e t i t i o n .
P.A.L./P.A.M.
Ohio
Coxsackie-
B e a u t i f u l Furnished A p a r t m e n t . O w n
Heat
well
of y o u r f a v o r i t e a l b u m s this S u n d a y
Love
Willabar,
(unfurnished)
of
Atliens a r e a a n d near Route 9 W . C a l l
Female
Unfurnished,
Su m a m a
For g o o d g o v e r n m e n t , a n d a
M i a m i , Fla. 3 3 1 3 8 .
4 0 6 6 or Beth 457-4684.
and Hot W a t e r , Range, Refrigerator,
respondencia con u n e s t u d i a n t e a l t o ,
Thanks for a g r e a t hockey season to
cellent condition. Price: n e g o t i a b l e
Sunn
female
muchly
W a n n a room cheap?
EXAMINATIONS,
Courthouse,
anos, m a d r e amoroso d e tres hljos y
sing. W e ' r e really p r o u d of y o u l
m e n t w i t h o t h e r girls f o r next y e a r .
Wanted:
were
'S'
experience
657X
Senora p u e r ' o r r i q u e n a d e cincuenta
missed.
43160.
Shoe, Soligar 2X converter, h o o d ,
lOOih anniversary m o d e l . O n l y 1500
PASS
Swank,
Konica T3 w i t h 1.4 Hex., case, Hot
Skylight 1A filter. C a m e r a is o r i g i n a l
Back—You
W o o d s t o c k II h a p p e n s this Friday o n
m e n t o n b u s l i n e . Females only. $65 a
Is Pat S. a freshman or a junior? A n d
if not, w h y ?
I h e a r d t h e y ' r e g i v i n g a w a y some
3336.
S u m m e r sublet. Beautiful 2 br. a p a r t -
Did you d o the sheets yet?
son o n the b a l l o t f o r student associa-
P.K.T.M.G.—
you l e a r n . Ask for M r . G e r a c e , 456-
from
Climb
spent student t a x , help g e t Jon Leven-
tuneups.
ed.
minutes
helm.
tion Vice-President. You can h e l p by
Welcome
P i c k u p / D e l i v e r y , C a l l Pat, 7 6 5 - 3 6 5 5 .
necessary. G u a r a n t e e d i n c o m e w h i l e
A v a i l a b l e M a y 1st. O n l y $ 1 9 0 .
the
cuyas inicialessean A . C . A . F i r m a d o . . .
BENNETT f o r you in S.A.S.U.
TYPING, Reasonable, my home. Ltd.
TRAINEES-INo
at
b i e n p a r e c i d o ; p e l o riso y simpatico y
Your f a n club
a p p l i a n c e s , h e a t , h o t w a t e r , includJust 4
78
traits, A l b u m s , etc. . . W h a t e v e r y o u r
3SALES
KT"
aboard, mate!
sintiendo la soledad por la ausencia
438-7019.
bedroom
from T G ' s — t h i s w e e k f e a t u r e s " C o o l
Hand
d e dos d e e l l o s ; d e s e a establecercor-
3GREAT COFFEEHOUSE!
p h o t o g r a p h i c needs, call Joe; 4 5 7 -
KT's M a s s a g e P a r l o r — o n e f l i g h t u p
coming this F r i d a y , d o n ' t miss it.
1 W i t h love,
Weddings,
that's a start.
The p a r t y y o u ' v e b e e n w a i t i n g f o r is
Por-
PHOTOGRAPHER.
So y o u f o u n d o u t who n u m b e r f o u r is
Y O U ! . . . W h a t can 1 say?
Class of
Bicycle mechanic. Repairs, tune-ups,
Q u a d . D o n ' t let him sell y o u a n y t h i n g !
All o v e r town? I'd r a t h e r b e a l l over
Suite 204 C o o p e r a n d friends:
taken
F r e d — 3 4 M a i n A v e . S. 4 8 2 - 2 7 2 8 .
carpeting,
Up-
Love,
photos
Bicycle r e p a i r s , o v e r h a l l s ,
438-7019.
occupant.
3002.
Beginner-
b u s l i n e , for summer sublet. C a l l : 4 8 2 -
2
State
Thanks for a w o n d e r f u l a n d unCalssical
8 5 4 6 or 4 3 8 - 1 2 6 5 .
H o n d a 7 5 0 , 1971 (Kl), $ 9 0 0 , coll Russ
male
on
W h a t a surprise!
G i b s o n ES 335 G u i t a r , $ 3 0 0 , call Russ
Dynaco
4th
suite
Yates
wall
HOUSING
.25 w/IQcard|
.50 w/tax
|
1.S6 w/o tax |
Righteous
Jeff 457-7977.
Summer
Thursday, April 17th
LC-3
7:00 and 9:30 PM
needs
four-man
perclassman o r g r a d p r o f f e r e d . 457-
2 l a r g e m o d e r n a p a r t m e n t s , w a l l to
2190.
(PLUS SHORTS)
Studious
Maria,
V-
typewriters. Call Dan G a i n e s , 457-
starring Jane Fonda
and Donald Sutherland
94925.
1 5 / A C E - 3 , Base, Dust C o v e r . $40.
Excellent
KLUTE
Sha
3002.
nished. Call 438-1265.
FIRE SALE
Return it.
etc. Reasonable rotes. 4 4 9 - 1 3 9 4 .
^ r r l d l e ' p V e f e r r e d . Call 465-1276.
A p p l i c a n t s w h o i n d i c a t e d interest in
Garrard
TRANSWORLD RESEARCH C O . D e p t .
305 d o o r . K a r y n 7-2116.
c o v e r a g e a d v e r t i s i n g gives them o
busline,
BLACK STUDIES MUSIC
d o n ' t f e a r the d e a d , f e a r his killer.
Advanced, 456-1201.
p r i c e . O u r Syn-Tronic M a r k ll's a r e
speakers a t o
"name."
t i m e , sightseeing. Free i n f o r m a t i o n .
r o o m m a t e t o share t h r e e -
a p a r t m e n t . Rent $58+ Ready end of
inferior
M y cross a t the lake is g o n e . If y o u
Street, n e a r corner of M a d i s o n & O n -
low
bookshelf
A h a p p y 20 y e a r o l d
t a r i o . Phone 4 3 8 - 5 5 4 6 .
high
Little B.
selling records somewhere on Dutch
Love,
$ 3 0 0 0 m o n t h l y . Expenses p a i d , over-
State
o n busline.
Everyone
The more...I love youl
C o n r a d Jarvis is a l i v e a n d w e l l a n d
I wish someone h a d sung
Eu-
T y p i n g d o n e in m y h o m e — 8 6 9 - 2 4 7 4 .
S t u d ious
wall
%m*mmvw*mmMMirm™
for
216,
tion call 4 5 7 - 8 7 9 1 . Ask f o r N e a l o r A l .
A p r i l 18, 1 9 7 5 .
sublet
1171.
8 pm
JOBS—Australia,
G r e a t location. Call 457-6897.
F a n w o o d , N.J. 07023 (indicate n a m e
spend
D e a r Ed, F r a n , M i k e , Sue a n d T o m ,
B5, P.O. Box 6 0 3 , C o r t e M a d e r a , C A
Hall
at
OVERSEAS
r o p e , S. A m e r i c a , A f r i c a . S t u d e n t s a l l
to
we
But I guess t h a t is t h e w a y it goes.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to met
professions a n d occupations $700 t o
q u a l i t y . To a r r a n g e for d e m o n s t r a -
deadline:
Very
465-1051.
Apartment
time
Faithless love like a river f l o w s . . .
M a n u s c r i p t T y p i n g Service 8 6 9 - 5 2 2 5 .
r e a s o n a b l e . C a l l eves. Rich or M i k e .
the PEC (first f l o o r ) a n d must b e filed
Applications
included.
b e d r o o m a p a r t m e n t starting July 1 ;
Gold
LANGUAGE HISTORY
Utilities
3 b e d r o o m a p t . S u i t a b l e f o r 3 or 4
Buy direct f r o m m a n u f a c t u r e r
Diamond
bdrms—mdrn
Female
I t a l i a n - A m e r i c a n Student Alliance
meeting
Sublet—2
furnished.
more
Honesty is a g i f t I'll a l w a y s g i v e y o u .
Kurt 4 5 7 - 5 2 5 3 .
there
Residence.
have
T u r n t a b l e , Thorens 160-C, best o f f e r .
Residence, Fulton 105. Fall 1975 RA
are
Building,
63105.
a r e n o w a v a i l a b l e in the O f f i c e of
an
meetings,
or
The
together...
C a n it b e t h a t it was so different then.
PERSONALS
opening? 438-3886.
$ 4 0 0 . W ill to Ik. Contact M a urice 356-
Looking for Christian Fellowship?
ART
457-7763.
MK-50
Y A M A H A ('67) 350ROADBIKE. Asking
$.75 w i t h o u t .
S u m m e r , 1975, n e e d not r e a p p l y , but
1975 classes, b u t w i t h o u t success so
DoKorder
house
Stuyvesant
value. R e w a r d . If f o u n d c a l l D e b b y a t
f a r ? P e r h a p s w e can h e l p y o u g e t a n
your
between
P l a z a a n d campus. M u c h sentimental
a c c e p t a n c e . Box 1 6 1 4 0 , S t . L o u i s , M o .
Does
Road
along
SCHOOL
m u n e / c o l l e c t i v e t o live In f o r summer
fall.
O p a l Ring-3/15
APPLICANTS: H a v e y o u a p p l i e d f o r
Utilities—$600.
movies shown A p r i l 17 in Ten Broeck
p.m.
23rd.
MEDICAL.DENTAL & LAW
Advent
deck—
finding
The m o r e w e sing;..
Lost: G o l d
Fuller
Pioneer PL-12D t u r n t a b l e W / M 9 1 E D ,
cassette
in
her g reatest moments in concert. Both
starting
Honey,
The more w e laugh...
com-
Also,
interested
3002.
Welcome!
LOST&FOUND
weekends.
Am
nearest y o u .
a t Bar-Han, H a i f a
Alexander,
receiver,
consisting of 20 minuleiof
Academic
a n d H e b r e w Universities. A n interest
SX-828
perclassman o r g r a d p r e f e r r e d . 4 5 7 -
Tuesday, A p r i l 1 5, at 8:00 in CC 315.
S p e a k e r w i l l b e a n n o u n c e d . A l l are
F e m a l e s to c o m p l e t e suite. C a l l Patty
o l school). O r , to see rings call 2 1 2 -
by
Lifeguard
April
Locally
N e e d e d o b n o x i o u s , slightly sarcastic
6 8 2 - 3 3 9 0 (or location of showroom
f e a t u r i n g Frank Sinatra ond
Franklin"
M o n d a y a t 7:30 p . m . in D r a p e r 2 4 9 .
by Wednesday,
moves.
Typing: Professional q u a l i t y , q u i c k
or J a n e t 7 - 7 5 5 4 .
Stereo—Pioneer
Nothing u p my sleeve a n d nothing
lev. You guys vote right?
f l a t , suitable 3 girls. 5 5 P a r t r i d g e .
Microscope—S30,
For University Senate vofeOtevTuri.
Olev you're e n drugslBe mellow. V e t o
service, r e a s o n a b l e rates. 2 3 7 - 0 8 5 8 .
Lomb
So how o r * you? So what's t h e story?
under the rugs if y o u don't v o t t for
G o r y 7-7938.
SERVICES
needs
Can"
and
Northern B l v d , for 12 noon rally o n
steps.
Broeck
S h t r l e y M a c L a i n e along wiih Aretha
the M a n a g e m e n t Office by A p r i l 18,
p o s i t i o n s a v a i l a b l e in M a i n O f f i c e of
e v e r y Thursday evening
levels Breakup Iheboredomol yovr
week and come on down and have a
good time. For mlormotion sail Jetl
at 457-5187.
Church
and Future."Wednesday
Involvement
for
fnfernnlionol
d a n c e studio. Beginners are welcome
8 p.m., C h a p e l House.
be h i r i n g a limited of M a n a g e m e n t
Applications
enjoy
Father H o w a r d Russell will speak
on " N e w
FOR SALE
a t 6 : 0 0 in the t h i r d floor gymnasium
f o r m a r r i a g e held e a c h
Christian Awakening weekend:
April 24-27. Call Rose Malinowski or
Jim Campbell for more info,
Assistants to work in t h e M a n a g e m e n t
INTERESTED FOLK
and
18 Returning April 2 0 . P l o a w call
Karon or Su« a t 4 6 5 - 1 0 1 8 .
Cheap. 438-0697.
Bausch &
M a u r e e n 7-7894.
1. M a i l Clerks
2. Receptionists
Department o f E d u c a t i o n and C u l t u r e
Study group
Tuesday
and
in c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h T h e Jewish A g e n c y
U.S.-China
students
R i d . w a n t t d to Buffalo. U a v k i g April
F u r n i s h e d , u n h e a l e d three bedroom
call Billy 4 5 7 - 7 8 6 9 .
poll
3
$180
Typing d o n e i n t n y h o m e . 482-8432.
Prayer—10:30
Pre-Cona
preparing
will be held.
welcomed.
Undergraduol!
ASP n e e d s telephono solicitors to
S u n d a y a t 11:15 a . m . , C h a p e l House.
Resident
Assistants
ond
Ave.
R i d * needed toBinghamton. April IB.
Light
People fo,
History Society.
Room.—Chapel House.
1975-76
CLASSIFIED
Sunday at 8 pm
by
for
20.
Toni.
19|? ,,
you
tub-letting
Ist-Aug.
p e r month. C a l l 4 5 9 - 2 1 3 7 a t k for
Room 349
M o n d a y thru Thursday, in the U p p e r
the
Please C o m e . You a n d your t d e a s a r e
Association,
Evening
Peace Project,
Resident
Socialism
L
for
June
bedrooms, Washington
$165. C a l l Brian 465-5349 a f t e r 6 p . m .
a n d rally, Friday. Assemble at 11:30
w i l l b e contacted by the O f f i c e of
p.m. i n t h e H u m a n i t i e s t h i r d
of
opportunities
All
to
about
ol
Hall,
and
Brought
...
types
coming...
film
Revolution
Draper
Saturday
Quad
a.m.,
information
Graduate
Dutch
jobs c a n b e o b t a i n e d by contacting
consult
Russia.
Penthouse. Learn the C h a c h a , t h e
The following is a listing o f the
* * * i
Applications
the
O f f i c e . Further information for these
Theatre D e p t . O f f i c e , PAC 2 6 6 .
General
in
1975
t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r Assembly H a l l .
S p e a k e r s w i l l include representatives
p.m.
Eisenstein
Bolshevik
Be Social! Learn Sociaf D a n c i n g a t '
10
Apartment
AftL
plants")
correct
t h e a t r e d e p t . b u l l e t i n b o a r d or ask in
IBM,
one
1975. The Residence Office will also
W e d n e s d a y A p r i l 16th a t 7:30 p . m . i n
from
have
instructions no later than A p r i l 18,
suggestions a n d questions t h a t y o u
A Women
Sessions
"dorm
315.
Lindy, the W a l t z , etc.
information
u n d e r g r a d u a t e s on Thursday, A p r i l
may have!
Eva luation
Students:
b e g u n . Everyone must a t t e n d
offices
at 7:30 p . m .
all
17 a t 7 : 0 0 p . m . in ED 3 3 5 . Bring a n y
Group
Service
(or
CC
l O O a y s T h o t S h o o k The World-.
Classic
Dutch Q u a d Presents: Liz R a d k o of
Plants
in
The Green Machine i
... * -
t o d a y , 7 p . m . , Dutch Q u a d f l a g r o o m .
room w a i v e r only.
a r e h i g h . The O u r frig Club
Quad
House
p.m.
summer.
Seniors: W e n e e d your h e l p In
semester,
a c a d e m i c year. All jobs receive a
W i t h the s p r i n g w e a t h e r the rivers
Come
A t t e n t i o n all SAU majors:
Campus
Dutch
from 10 a . m . to 4 p . m . b e t w e e n LC-3
Residences
assorted
encouraged to a t t e n d .
the
*• •
Communications
Tuesday,
of
the
7
ByongWira/Chrisrions-lnrerViiriir,
Christian
fellowship.
and
and IC-4.
tomorrow,
Center.
undergraduate
and
p.m.
Lounge
In
singing
the O f f i c e of Residences w i l l speak o n
Community
of
m a k i n g f i n a l p l a n s f o r Senior W e e k
7 5 (ticket sales, p u b l i c i t y . ) W a t c h
next Tuesday's Asp f o r details o n t h e
next Class o f 7 5 s h i n d i g . . .
Programming
meet
W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 16 at 8:00 in the
the
Association
will
next
session.
*•#
Patroon
There w i l l b e a n
meet
for
time o f
Registration begins A p r i l 9 to A p r i l 16
laudis
will
t o n i g h t a t 6 : 3 0 in the Fireside Lounge.
Committee
school; a n d c o u r t r o o m strategies.
S'tgnum
Committee
in,
staying i n , a n d g e t t i n g out o f l a w
meeting
the
Scholarship
Service
Praise G o d w i t h us every Fridoyni,ln
it
***
Evaluation
Afbony
Community
informal
the
p.m. will be acknowledged.
Student
loth.
Flagroom a t 5 : 3 0 .
w h o came
Session o n Tuesday, A p r i l 8 , 7:00
for
April
Mbiltfrtes,
presenting the group Serendipity, for
an
•* *
meeting
Student
all undergraduates. Prof.: U. M a c h e .
Any
Pbnning
W.dnttday,
On
Hesse. Lectures a n d teats
Dennis 489-7985.
This Friday
Wanted:
pay
FM
converter. W i l l i n g
reasonable ' p r i c e .
Mine
to
night the action is o n
Dutch.
was
r i p p e d off in Brooklyn. C a l l M i k e Z.
The New York Islanders a r e to the
472-9843. L e a v e m o s s a g e a n d p h o n e
m a x ! Let's h e a r it for Potvin, Porise
number.
Nystrom,
Hart,
Howatt,
Gillies, Resch, Smith,
RIDE/RIDER5====
WANTED
St.
Henning,
Wednesday
6p.m.
Laurent,
Drouin, Lewis, Fortier, W e s t p h a l , D.
Potvin
and
Stewart! IMHKill
Pittsburgh, Parise your $50 is in the
for Friday ASP
m a i l . W h y 11 seconds?
Mi,
434-0691.
PAGE SIX
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"~~"™
APRIL 15,1975
APRIL IS.1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVEN
^ S g X ^ ' a r
'ditoribl/corrtment
M
cannot and must not be resumed Without the express consent or t „ 4
S r i S S . s— "<*"'"uader-commen,ing mfume us- """"7'™ 4
Vietnam.'
tteMtnwStiMlaitPfEssnaQazme
Input Equals Fairness
Students have long clamored for input in the tenure process, and here they have been
more successful than in most universities. But student votes on tenure committees
were negotiated out of existence last fall when the contract with the American
Association of Professors (AAP) included a clause banning student votes. The union
demand (and the State's agreement to it) bypassed not only Student Association but
also SUN Y A's governance system, the University Senate. The union also bypassed the
Senate's position oh parking privileges after that body had discussed, analyzed and
debated for months to come to that decision.
Tenure review, however, suffers without sufficient student input. An appointment or
tenure renewal based soley on research, publication, and faculty relationships will fail
to properly judge candidates. Research and publication are important, especially at a
university, and a professor in an unneeded specialty or who is so different from others
in the department as to cause serious problems with the program would primarily be
judged in these areas by other faculty. But teaching is also an important part of the
university's purpose, and no faculty member can evaluate a teacher's performance like
students can.
Some claim that students who receive good grades will like a professor, and students
who receive poor grades will not. To the extent that one believes that students arc not
able to view teachingobjectively, this claim has some merit. But is it any different to say
that a professor who plays tennis with the candidate will like him and that one who
resented his good looks won't? To say that faculty are significantly more mature in
their judgement than students is, alas, a difficult position to support.
Though a few departments at SUNYA are still not convinced, student evaluations
present faculty with invaluable assistance in making tenure and renewal decisions. The
Student Association's Assessment
of Courses and Teachers (ACT), and the
departmental evaluations have the ability to channel the full import of student
evaluations to the decision making levels of appointment rcnewalspincl|tcnure. If ACT
can develop to a point where it can satisfy all departments with objective and or
subjective (written) evaluations it can be an invaluable tool to students and to other
faculty and administrators as well. It is already serving all parts of the university
community with valuable information.
Students should sit on tenre committees too because there is such a difference in
perspective between faculty and students that detailed opinions from the other side of KOVST ANOTHER
the classroom are essential to judge how well the professor teaches and how much his
published material and research is reflected iivwhat the students are gaining from that
professor. There are many students qualified to discussin detail a professors'teaching
ability and their presence on the committee permits other faculty to investigate other
qualites (like advisement capabilities or openness) more thoroughly.
State University ol New York at Albany
11
Tuesday, April 15, 197S
J
VlUJON, dUSTANOWER BIMON, <JVST-
Focus
Dr. Emmctt Fields, SUNYA's next President, said he wasin favor of student input
and against students voting on tenure cases, but he felt overall that it was a peer
evaluation. Tenure is a peer evaluation but to be a fair evaluation, it needs extensive
student input and to insure that fairness, students shouldbe able to vote on tenure
committees.
The End of the American Century
; ; by David Tr(ieger:;;.:;.,.:.....;x.;.:.::::;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
One thins which differentiates man fromnll
otheranlmalsishisabltliy to question both the
meaning of his existence and the purpose
behind his actions. When faced with a tragic
turn of events which negate all our previous
efforts we seem to ask one fundamental
All weekend it lookedv/arm, but winds leftover from March pushed the wind-chilled qltesti n: "What was it all forT' More
temperature to a wintery level. Then, yesterday, the ideal became the real and students specifically in t h e spring of 1975: "What was
took part in the yearly ritual of spring. Now, in spite of upcoming finals and the our commitment in Vietnam all forT'
Smiling In the Sun
uncertainties of summer, we can warm ourselves and smile in the sun.
,. JDENT
RESS
EDITOR IN CM i n
DANIEL QAINES
BUSINESS MANAGER
LBS ZUCKERMAN
NIWS u n i o n
MiniAKi. SENA
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITORS
ASPECTS EDITORS
STBM18N I.JZINANKA, HETTY STEIN
ALAN ABBEY, PAUL I'EI.AOALLI
PRODUCTION MANAGER
PATRICK MCGI.YNN
ASSOCIATE MOWUCTION MANAGER
MAUREEN CLKIESS
I ECHMCAI. UIIIOR
DONALD NBMCIK
ASSOCIATE TECHNICAL EDITORS
LOUISE MAKKS. CAHOI. MCPHEIISON,
JULIE D Y L O N
KDITDRIAI. PAGE EDITOR
MARC WEIGER
SPORTS EDITOR
BRUCE MAGGIN
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
HILLARY KELIIICK
ADVERTISING MANAGER
LINDA DESMOND
Assoc IA n. ADVERTISING MANAGER
-I'LL PLUCK
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER
JOANNE ANDREWS
( i « A i n n EDITOR
WENDY ASHER
PREVIEW EDITOR
LISA IIIUNDO
ERIC LIP.IIP.S, ERIC KUBHN
ADDRESS MAIL HI: ALBANY STUDENT PRESS, CAMPUS CENTER 326, 1400 WASHINGTON A U N U E
ALBANY, N.Y. 12222. OUR TELE
Hut all those mistakes and misdeeds which
have come to be known as "Vietnam" are past
history. After the long night of Watergate the
one thing this country does not need now is
another period ol division, polarization, and
recrimination over a sensitive political issue.
The tusk of this country now is t o heal its
wounds and look toward the future. No
amount of effort will ever change the events of
the past.
NATHAN SALAMI
AKIS EIIIIOR
STATE PHOTOGRAPHERS
With the virtual collapse of a viable, noncommunist South Vietnam it seems as if most
A m e r i c a n s g e n u i n e l y feel t h a t o u r
involvement over there was lor naught. Fiftysix thousand American lives, SI50 billion in
American money, ten years of national debate
and energy all in vain. W h o , back in 1965 or
1970, would believe that the only saving grace
alter sending o n e million men to Southeast
Asia would be an airlift of Vietnamese
orphans'.'
NES ARE (51B) 457-2190 AND 457-2194.
WE ARE PAR HALEY EUNDIU) IIV STUDENT IAS
One thing should be remembered: lilty-six
thousand men made the greatest sacrifice any
one country could ever ask of a p e r s o n - the
giving of life on the battlefield. That shame we
leel from the meaninglessness 0 f Vietnam
comes not from our soldiers who fought but
rather from those men who chartered o u r
course there: Robert McNiimaru, Walt
Kostow, McGeorge Dundy, Maxwell Taylor
and others, No shume should he felt by any
individual who served his country with honor.
Above all else, to paraphrase President,
Lord, we must not let our adversaries use
Vietnam as a wedge, pitting American against
American. O u r greatest asset is oui unit) as a
nation a n d , in o n e sense, never has u been
m o r e important for us to present a unit™
front to the world. Not only in Vietnanic hut in
most every o t h e r phase of our loicign H"-'-v
we have become a w a k e n to mn sudden
inability to influence events positneb in »»'
favor. O n e begins to feel like Jonathan Stub's
Gulliver in the land of l.illiptil a gram
hemmed in by a n overwhelming '"•'^ "'
smaller forces.
The dilemma is, even if we do hau-naliui.al
unity how can we hope to misscii " m
influence in the world? President h u d has
said, and reiterated last I'hursda) evening.
that we will h o n o r o u r cnmmmnerits and
stand by o u r allies. Unfortunuleh Ins » " l J s
have a rather hollow ring. What could he dune
if C o m m u n i s t forces launched a » a i against
Thailand'/ Legislation now presents le-ciiuj
of American ground troops into Suinheasl
Asia. T h e fact is that Gerald Lord limcu«n» a!
a virtually b a n k r u p t commandcr-in-cluelThis is so, because o n e of his predecessors,
Lyndon J o h n s o n , in sending so main <ib '"
Vietnam with so little in return ou-idicu on
his account as a military leader.
Subsequently, Congress saw In t" K '^'" H
some ol its w a r m a k i n g powcis whn.h lit
imperial presidency had taken H»n> ' " " ' '
the President is unable to act spoiuanc.nislwn
emergencies w h e r e military force is I"*" 1 ' 1 '
We should he exerting a littlemihlais muscle
at the present t o threaten our udversaiics nut
we have to take events sitting down. All we
really seem to be offering o u r allies lire mir
w o r d s - e m p t y rcassurances.empty iliet"" 1
it a n y wonder t h a t countries like Thailand an
the Philippines a r e reassessing their security
relationships with the United Stales'.'
I
I
I
I
Vietnam: Post-Peace Talks
While Brian's away, vacationing in Europe, pinching asses along
the Champs Elysees, we're here working on ASPECTS for him.
There's no single theme to this issue but we feel that these stories
are appropriate at this time. The article on the I.F.K. assassination is
the result of a great deal of research on the part of the author. The
project was slated to be published in theWashingtonParkSpirit,
but this unfortunately, is no longer with us. We are proud to be able
to present it to you in its entirety. We'll be with you for the remainder
ot the semester, having left the Arts Section in extremely capable
hands.
-AA and PP
Photo Credits
IP—Associated Press Wireplwlu; 31'
Associated Press Wirephotos; 7P—Km'lm
Some Vietnamese orphans made it to the U.S. to begin new lives. Somedidn't.
What a piece ol work is man! How noble in reason! How infinite in laculties! In
lorrn and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel! In
apprehension how like a god! The beauty ol the world! The paragon of animals!
Hamlet Act II Scene II
The Children Always «*WSuffer
Most
•-"-'
HS Z
-JS8 •
3P
Twelve YEARS Later...
4P
Champion of a Fantasy Course
7P
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The Children Always Suffer Most
As a child, your most traumatic experience may have been the first three days
ol Kindergaren.or the timeyou had the chicken pox in July. In Vietnam, children
just old enough lor school have known death and destruction their whole lives, as
have their parents. An entire generation has never known peace, and
experienced only war and suffering.
Will this go on for many more years, or will it come to an end in the near future?
II it does end will it bring an end to the sullering ol the people?
THey
tAia^p
AT MP.
WR& 10 AIP TO
" 9*rT?
JLO0P PATH-1
urwwe& RK THC
WEWT TO
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'dwrjetWi© 2 PAGE 2P
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
APRIL 15,1975
PAGE 3P
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
APRIL 15,1975
by Larry Luongo
n November of 1963 John
Kennedy was murdered in
Dallas, in the years that
followed black leaders Malcolm X and
Medger Evers were murdered, in April
of 1968 Dr. Martin Luther King was
assassinated, and a few months later,
on- the eve of his victory in the
California Primary, Robert Kennedy
joined his brother, a martyr to the
cause of peace and freedom. The
official version is that each of these
leaders was struck down by a lone,
crazy assassin. The mass media is
currently acknowledging the fact that
thereisseriousdoubtthatSirhanSirhan
acted alone in Robert Kennedy's
assassination. James Earl Ray, Martin
Luther King's alleged assassin, is
currently winning his battle lor a
retrial. He claims that he was only a
party, that he wasollereda job in a gun
running scheme and received orders
to be in a certain motel room at a
specilic time. He claims that he kept his
appointment and was at the scene to
be trained as the lone assassin ol
Martin Lulher King. Shocking as these
allegalions arethereis moreprool ol an
assassination conspiracy, in Ihe
assassination ol John Kennedy,
allegedly murdered by Lee Harvey
Oswald.
I
Alter President Kennedy's death,
Presidenl Johnson appointed a
commission to "lay to rest rumors
surrounding the death ol John F,
Kennedy". The commission was
h e a d e d by Earl Warren, and
composed ol several congressmen
including Gerald Ford and Allen
Dulles the lormer head ol the C.l A.,
who had been removed Irom ollice by
J.F.K.The commission ran a rather poor
investigation; none ol its witnesses
were s u b l e t to cross examination, it
relied en existing government
agencies lor its investigative work, and
the members ol the commission issued
its report in one volume, supported by
twenty-six volumesol evidence. These
twenty-six volumesol evidence, which
Earl Warren did not want published,
are very valuable even though they
represent an insullicient investigation.
The evidence gathered and published
by the Warren Commission directly
contradicts Ihe conclusions ol the
Warren Commission. It appears that
the Warren Commission, rather than
tell us the truth about John Kennedy's
death, attempted to tullill its task ol
Laying to rest the rumors." ol
conspiracy.
slumping forward in his seat, probably
because the first shot that hit him
struck him in the back between the
shoulder blades. Moments later the
filmshows the president clutching his
throat, guite likely a response to a
bullet fired from the front, entering
near his neck-tie knot. Neither of these
wounds would have been fatal, but a
moment later the Zapruder film shows
the president's head blown apart and
his body thrown back from the force of
a bullet striking him from the front.
Motorcycle policemen riding behind
the
president
and
to
his
left were sprayed with blood and
brain tissue. A large chunk of the
president's skull flew off and was later
recovered near the left side of the
street. All of this evidence indicates
that the president was shot from the
Iront as well as Irom behind. The
Zapruder film leaves no doubt that the
president was lired at Irom several
directions. Abraham Zapruder testilied
that the shots came Irom behind him,
Irom the grassy knoll. Railroad worker,
Lee Bowers, who was on duty in a
watchtower testilied that he saw a
commotion in the bushes on the grassy
knoll, seven other railroad workers
also testilied that they were sure the
shots came Irom the grassy knoll. Mr.
Charles Hester threw his wile to Ihe
ground and lei I on top ol her when he
heard a bullet whistle by his ear as he
stood on the grassy knoll. One ol the
ollicers in the motorcade drove his
motorcycle directly up the knoll in
pursuil ol the assassin. All ol this
evidence appears in Ihe twenty-six
volumesol hearings before the Warren
Commission, but Ihe report concluded
that Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone
shot at the president Irom behind, Irom
the sixth lloorol theTexasSchoolBook
Depository Building.
There Were several people who did
testify that there were gunmen in the
Texas School Book Depository
Building. Arnold Rowlands testified
that he saw men with rifles on both
ends of the fifth flobr. He stated that the
man in the southea st corner waB black.
Annos Euins independently verified
Rowland's report of a black man in the
southeast corner. Mrs. Eric Walther's
testimony also corroborates thatol Mr,
Rowlands as to the man in the
southeast corner. Only one witness
claims to have seen Lee Harvey
Oswald on ihe sixth floor of the Texas
School Book Depository Building. The
commission stated that Oswald alone,
using his Italian Mannlicher—
Carcano bolt action rifle , was
shooting at the motorcade. Oswald's
rifle could be fired only once every 2.3
seconds. By examining the Zapruder
lilm irame by frame the commission
concluded that Oswald's rifle could
only have fired three shots in the time
available. The commission's version of
the number of shots is that John
Kennedy was hit twice, Texas
Governor George Connally hit once,
and a spectator, James Tague was
injured by a bullet that struck a curb.
B e c a u s e ol t h e photographic
evidence, the commission was forced
to claim that the first bullet hit both
Kennedy and Connally. Using this
information it is conceivable that
Oswald's rifle could have lired all the
shots. However, the commission
ignored the report that James Hicks
gave to the Dallas Sherriff's Office, of
another bullet that hit a highway sign
he was standing next to. It also ignores
Richard Randolph Carr who stated
that he saw several bullets rip into the
grass ol the grassy knoll. There are
also reports ol additional bullet marks
on the presidential limousine although
these reports are impossible to verily
because the interior of the limousine
was stripped and redone immediately.
The most important contradicition
however, was with the assertion that
Governor Connally and Presidenl
Kennedy were both hit by the lirsl
bullet. In a statement on C.B.S.
television Governor Connally stated "I
u n d e r s t a n d that there's some
questions in the minds ol the experts
about whether or nol we both could
have been hil by the same bullet, and
that was the lirst bullet. I just don't
happen to believe thai. 1 won't believe
it because, again, I heard the lirst shot..
.1 had time to turn to try to see what
happened. I was in Ihe process ol
The e v e n t s surrounding the
assassination are well documented. At
about noon on November twentysecond 1963 the motorcade carrying
President Kennedy turned down Elm
Street in Dealy Plaza. The progress of
the p a r a d e was
recorded
p h o t o g r a p h i c a l l y by Abraham
Zapruder, an amateur photographer
who was taking home movies. The
Zapruder film show the president
JFK's A&aassinati
Twelve Y ars Later
There re Still
More Q lestions
Than nswers
turning again before 1 lelt the second
bullet." The Zapruder film supports
Governor Connally's statement. The
avalilabe medical evidence also
indicates that several people were
firing at the presidential motorcade.
The doctor's who treated the president
at the emergency room ol Parkland
Memorial Hospital all spoke ol m
entrance wound in the iront ol ihe
president's throat and a latal hoiid
wound, in the right temple. Thus was
not consistant with the official version
that Oswald lired on the motorcade
Irom behind. Unfortunately no other
civilian doctors were allowed to
examine the president alter he w is
pronounced dead. The body w is
forcibly removed despite the proli •>;; .1
the Dallas County olficials and taken i
Washington. In Washington in
autopsy was performed. The :.:. i
version stated the the presidenl .-. i,
shot through the neck and the 1 >• i i
both wounds were declared I Ii
been inflicted Irom behind. It is :••• •..•
to note that the military d< -" : .
c h a r g e d the autopsy staled U-1 :•••:.•
Warren Commission thai I;. •:.•
privacy ol my own home
I n
dralt of this report which I
:• ..
. .This dralt I personally bum. :
revision lit the official version in . i
conllicled with the reports by v.
doctors.
An examination ol Ihe holes :n ".
president's clothes indicate thai ': • ••
wasanentrance wound in the Ui- ?• i •'
it was seven inches below the c. .|i t:
Also, the F.B.I, summary report ' in "••
assassination states lhal the i i •'•
wound was indeed well below 'i
neck and that the bullet did nnl ••:•: '
The commission's report .1
president's wounds clearly i:
supported by the bulk ol evidon •
The Dallas police, besides a< <' 'u. ;:• i
Oswald o I single hand, i
assassinating the presidenl i
accused Oswdld in the inuid. :
ollicer J.D. Tippit. Tippil was k
approximately 1:15 p.m. install' .m.i >
hour alter Ihe murder ol i'losi.l' :.'
Kennedy. It is possibly sigiiilicani n. •'
Tippit was killed only Iwo block: li •
Jack Ruby'sapartment.There are in >" •
c o n t r a d i c t i o n s in Ihe W n e
Commission's version ol Oswald
murder ol Tippit. It is virtual curtail •!'•
that il Oswald was allowed to stand In •••
lor either the Tippit ol Ihe president:
murder, he would have been loin id n
guilty. There is only one witness v.i;
identilied Oswald asTippil'srnunli •«•'•
Her name was Helen Markhuin n. i
is quite sigiiilicani that she •'• ;
described as hysterical by Ihe I' 1 " '
police. Her testimony conllicls with '••
the other witnesses to the murdei I"
tape recorded,telephoneconvers.il" '
with Mark Lane, Mrs. Markham sialyl
thai Tipplt's killer was short, somewh.il
heavy, with slightly bushy hair. Tins
contradiction alone would have made
Mrs. Markhan's testimony useless.
Oswald was very thin and had very
short, thinning hair.
Only o n e other witness gave
testimony that might implicate
Oswald. Domingo Benavides was the
closest witness to the killer. He relused
to identify Oswald and stated in lact
that Oswald was not the man he saw
shoot Tippit. In February ol 1964
Domingo's brother was murdered, in
April ol 1964 Benavides stated that he
was wrong in his statements and that
the killer did resemble Oswald.
Benavides was most reluctant to
i m p l i c a t e O s w a l d . Two other
witnesses, Aqyukka d e m o n s and
Warren Renolds also relused. Mrs.
Clemons relused to identify Oswald
and reported that she was harassed by
the Dallas police and told her lite
would be in danger il she spoke to the
press. Warren Henoldsalso relused to
identity Oswald when he was
interviewed by Ihe F.B.I, in January ol
1.964. Two days later he was shot in the
head. When he was released Irom 'he
hospital he requested an interview
with the commission in which ho slated
that Oswald was definitely Ihe killer.
Although some witnesses were
harassed into identitying Oswald, they
all originally gave' testimony that
would have contradicted Mrs.
Markham's testimony and cleared
Oswald.
contradicted by Seymore Weitzman,
the policeman who found the rifle.'
Weitzman, a fire arms expert dictated
in a notarized statement that the rifle
found was a 7.65 mm Mauser. He
discussed the rifle in great detail in this
statement, leaving no doubt that it was
not the rifle owned by Oswald. There
are also additional reports of other
rifles being found in the book
depository. Tom Whalen ol N.B.C.
News described the rifle found as a
303 British Enfield. There is also
photographic evidence ol a Dallas
police ollicer carrying another
assassination weapon out ol the
building.This weapon was clearly not
Oswald's gun because it had no
telescopic sight.
Even il we ignore the ambiguity
surrounding the murder weapon,
there are several factors that clearly
prove Oswald's inability to commit the
assassination. First, Oswald was a poor
shot, he barely managed to qualify for
the m a r i n e s b e c a u s e ol his
markmanship. Second, even anexpert
using Oswald's rille could not have
made the shotsattributedtoOswald. In
F.B.I, tests, shooting at a still target, Irom
a shorterdistance than Oswald would
have had to shoot Irom, none of the'
F.B.l.'s expert markmen could
duplicate Ihe shots Oswald was said to
have made. The shots were simply too
dillicult and the rille not accurate
enough.
The case against Lee Harvey
There is also great ambiguity about
the bullet shells found near ollicer
Tippit's body. Original police reports
slated that they were Irom a thirty-eight
caliber automatic pistol. Oswald
carried a thirty-eight revolver. Also the
police technician who originally
processed Ihe shells testilied that he
thought he marked them with his
initials, when asked to identily the
shells before the Warren Commission
he could nol lind his markings. There
is lurther doubt cast on Oswald s guilt
by the lact that some ol Ihe shells were
manufactured by a different company
that
the bullets that were removed
Irom ollicer Tippit's body
The available evidence hardly
provides what the Dallas police
described as an "open and shut case'
against Oswald. In lact there is little
evidence linking Oswald to either ol
the killings. One piece ol evidence is
Ihe testimony ol Howard Brennan He
claims that he saw Oswald lire the
shots Irom Ihe sixth Hoar ol the Texas
School Book Depository Building. The
lact that Brennan had poor eyesight,
casts doubt on his idenlilicalion ol
Oswald and in tact, Brennan was
unable to identily Oswaldin a police
lineup. The only other evidence is the
claim by Dallas police that they found
Oswald's 6 S mm Carcano rifle in the
Texas School
Book Depository
Building. This claim is directly
Tippit and Ruby were close associates.
An entertainer at Jack Ruby's Carousel
Club, Bill Crow, even testified before
the commission that he had seen
Oswald at the club two days before the
assassination. -Nancy Perrin Rich, a
worker at Ruby's club gave quite
detailed testimony to the commission
about Jack Ruby's part in a C.I.A.
operation smuggling guns to AntiCastro guerillas in Cuba. Emlilion
Santan gave similar testimony under
oath in New Orleans. Marguerite
Oswald, the mother of the alleged
assassin stated that two days before her
son was murdered the F.B.I, showed
her a picture of Jack Ruby and asked
her il she knew him. Rose Cheramie
several months before
the
assassination was thrown Irom a
moving car. At the hospital she stated
that she had been involved in heroin
smuggling lor Jack Ruby. When the
other occupants ol the car she was
riding in started talking about a plan to
assasinate the president she protested
and was thrown Irom the car. Alterthe
assassination she was killed in a hit
and run accident.
Oswald simply would not have stood
up in courl. Ihe two -witnesses against
linn were both poor witnesses at best,
their testimony would have been torn
apart by any competent delense
lawyer the Dallas police simply did
not have a ease. Oswald, lor two days
alter Ihe assassination, continually
maintained Ins innocence. II the
conspiracy was to remain a secret
Oswald had to be eliminated. On
Sunday November twenty-lourth, Iwo
days alter his arrest, Lee Harvey
Oswald was murdered by lack Ruby
before the eyes ol do/ens ol law
ollicers, and millions ol television
viewers across the nation. The Dallas
police were oil the hook, their only
suspect was dead. The murder ol lohn
V Kennedy was a closed case.
Hul what about this man lack Ruby?
What made him shoot Lee Harvey
Oswald? We can only speculate but
certain lacts are clear, lack Ruby was
very prominent in Ihe tragedy ol the
assassination. Although he denied it,
several newsmen who knew him
slated that Ruby was at the hospital
when President Kennedy died. Ruby
Wtis a l s o p r e s e n t at p o l i c e
headquarters while Oswald was
questioned. At one point he even
corrected District Attorney Wade at a
press conlerence. There isquitea bitol
evidence linkinq lack Ruby with
ollicer Tippit. Several witnesses said
PAGE 4P
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
APRI
- .:._. - = ^ : v ^ ^ ' ; ; . ' e , ' : : ^ .
shot through the heart in his ollice in
theLong Beach Public Salely Building.
He died immediately, ending his
p r i v a t e i n v e s t i g a t i o n ol t h e
assassination. Later in September of
that year, Jim Kolhe, Hunter's personal
Iriend and companion at the meeting
in Ruby's apartment was found dead in
his bathroom. The cause ol death, a
karate blow to the throat. The notes on
his investigation into tine assassination
were stolen. A year later Tom Howard
one ol Ihe lawyers at ihe meeting was
dead ot a supposed heart attack (no
autopsy performed). Jim Martin, the
other lawyer present, was later to
become a lawyer lor Jack Ruby and
business agent lor Lee Oswald's
widow.
Lee Bowers was a man who had a
particularly good view ol the
assassination sight or. the day ol the
killing, lie was a railroad watchman
positioned in a lower overlooking Ihe
grassy, knoll and the area behind. He
testified to the commission lhal he saw
several cars circle Ihe parking area
behind the grassy knoll immediately
Warren's denials ol this lact, Ruby before the assassination. He stated
slated that il Warren would not take lhal Hiesecars had whip antennas lor
him out ol Dallas he would never see communications equipment. He also
him aliveagain. Warren relused. Ruby stated that he saw a commotion" and
was never to come before the possible gun smoke ovei the grassy
commission again. Late in 1966 he knoll as the president w is murdered,
wasgranted a retrial outside Ihe city ol Bowersdid not heed warning nol to tell
Dallas, in December ol 1966 he was ol what he saw. In August ol 1966 his
sent to the prison hospital. On January brand new company carveeredoll the
Ihlid ol 1967 lack Ruby was dead; road and struck a budge abutment.
otlicially a rare type ol blood cancer There wen- no skid marks ol apparent
caused his swilldea111. lack Ruby was a reason lor the accident.
harlene Roberts, the widow who ran
man ol many talents and interests. It is
most unfortunate that he was never the boardiiighouse where Oswald
allowed to tell his story to the American lived, testilied before the commission
that Oswald entered the house about
people.
Perhaps more mind boggling than one hall hour alter the assassination
the conspiracy to assassinate the and went lo his room. She claimed a
presidennt was, as in Watergate, Ihe Dallas police car came to the house
cover-up conspiracy. There are an and sounded its horn. Oswald then
appalling numberol deaths associated departed. The event Mrs. Roberts
witli the Kennedy conspiracy cover- related to the Warren Commission was
up. There was an alleged meeting to very curious. Furthermore Mrs.
have taken place in lack Ruby's Roberts testimony placed Oswald a
apartment Ihenighlheshot Oswald. Al mile away Irom Tippit only eight
the meeting were two newspaper minutes before Tippit was murdered,
reporters, two lawyers, and Ruby's providing Oswald witli a possible alibi.
apartment male, George Senator, The Mrs. Roberts complained about police
meeting was discussed before the harassment alter giving her testimony.
Warren Commission by Mark Lane but In January ol 1966 she was
no witness to the meeting ever pronounced dead, presumably Irom a
confirmed thai it took place. George heart attack, again, no autopsy was
Senator testilied that he could nol performed.
Domingo Benavidddes was the
recollect the meeting. The evening ol
Senator's testimony in April ol 1964 closest witness to the murder ol
Bill Hunter, one
ol the newsmen patrolman J.D. Tippit. Benavides
present at the alleged meeting was however refused lo identity Oswald as
But most iascinating of all is Jack
Ruby's testimony before the Warren
Commission. He testilied only once, in
the basement ol the Dallas county jail.
He told Earl Warren that he had many
new lacts to tell which he could not
divulge unless he was taken Irom
Dallas. He stated that his life was in
danger in Dallas. In response to Earl
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
5,1975
KEMBYlslcElEDBYSNirEll
AS HE RIDES IN CAR IN DALLAS:
JOHNSON SWORN IN ON I'LAM
PAGE 5P
"NBWSBftPER CHARGES OP IU-EGAL C.I.A. ACTIVITIES ARE DISTORTS AND EXAGGERATED/"
Tippit's killer and was not allowed to
view the police line-up. In February of
1964 Domingo's look alike brother
Edward was shot in the head and killed
in a bar. Domingo's family was
convinced that Domingo was the real
target and his father-in-law J.W.
Jackson began his own investigation.
Jackson himself was soon, the victim of
an attempted murder. A policeman
who arrived on the scene just after
Jackson was shot at declined to chase
the assailants. Instead the police told
Jackson to stop asking question. In
April of 1964 Domingo changed his
testimony and stated that Oswald did
indeed resemble the murderer.
Warren Reynolds was also a witness
to the Tippit murder. Like Benavides,
Reynolds saw the killer but refused to
say it was Oswald. Two days later after
giving his statement to the F.B.I.
Reynolds was shot as he closed his
used car lot for the evening, Upon
recovery Mr. Reynolds contacted the
Warren Commission and stated that
Oswald was the killer.
In his investigation, Jim Garrison
presented a good case for the
involvement of David Farrie in the
assassination oi J.F.K. In February of
1967, one week before Ferrie was to be
indicted in New Orleans lor conspiring
in trie assassination, he was lound
dead in his apartment. The same day,
Elado del Valle, who worked with
Farrie on Anti-Castro gun running,
and a witness Jim Garrison hoped to
use, was also lound dead in Miami, his
throat slit.
Although the Warren Commission
was merely a whitewash, there was
another ollicial investigation into the
Kennedy assassination. The Warren
Commission claimed that Lee Harvey
Oswald acting alone killed lohn
Kennedy. In New Orleans, however,
District Attorney lim Garrison claimed
a conspiracy was hatched which led to
Kennedy's assassination. Mr. Garrison
eventually lost in his attempt to
convice Cloy Shaw as a conspirator
However in the course ol his
investigation Garrison uncovered
many new leads and stated thai he
thought lower level C.i.A. employees
were involved. He accused the federal
govemmenl oi a massive cover up
because they relused to aid him in his
investigation. Several ol his prime
witnesses lied to other Btatus which did
nol have extradition agreements with
Louisiana Governor Rhodes ol Ohio
remsed to return Gordon Novel, a key
assassination Injure, to Now Orleans
even alter the Louisiana legislature
passed a special bill requesting his
oxtradiolion.
Willi such lack ol
PAGE 6P
cooperation it is not surprising that Mr.
Garrison could not make his case
against Clay Shaw stick.
It is clear that there was a conspiracy
to kill JPJC. Lee Harvey Oswald was
obviously a "fall guy", a patsy. But who
was behind the conspiracy? Some
claim the communists were behind the
conspiracy, but the communists had
nothing to gain by killing Kennedy.
Indeed, Fidel Castro expressed deep
regrei.saying thatat leastKennedy was
an enemy he knew and trusted. In
Russia Pravda declared that American
right wing fanatics had killed
Kennedy. In the democracies ol
Western Europe, the conspiracy was
widely accepted.
FollowingKennedy's death America
deepened its involvement in Viet Nam.
U n d e r the administrations that
l o l l o w e d K e n n e d y , the social
programs he envisioned were trimmed
away. The tax reform he talked of has
yet to become a reality. Only recently
h a s c o n g r e s s repealed the oil
depletion allowances, a proposal that
certainly won Kennedy no support
among the Texas oil people
The Bay of Pigs has been tal ked ol as
one ol the reasons lor Kennedy's death.
President Kennedy's relusal to send
American military support too
invading Anti-Castroites marked the
lailure ol the
C.l.A.'s Bay ol Pigs
Invasion. Under John Kennedy the
F.B.I, even was beginning lo crack
down on Anli-Castro guerilla activists
in the United Slates.
Thomas Buchanan in his book "Who
Killed Kennedy" builds the case lor a
conspiracy ol oilmen and arms
manufacturers; both ol whom wanted
conservative liscal policy at home and
expansion into Southeast Asia.
lim Garrison's investigation pointed
lo a conspiracy ol some C.I.A.
operators and extreme right wing
lanatics
Organized crime also had little love:
lor the Kennedy administration. Bobby
Kennedy was just beginning what
might well have; been a I aicj and
successlul ollensivt- .* la.n it organized
i.TiMii' As limmy Holla put it lohn
Koiiri'-'iy'a death made I' ibby
Kennedy iusi another kid lawyer.
But all ol Ihis is merely speculation.
We do know thai Lee Harvey Oswald
was nol the lone assassin the
government tried la make him. We
know thai iliere was a massive coverup conspiracy. We don't know lo what
extent the federal govemmenl ur L.B.I,
were involved; whether they merely
went along with something they had
no control over, or whether the plot was
initialed Ironi the higher levels ol
government. A thorough investigation
could still reveal the identity of the
c o n s p i r a t o r s . Photographs and
missing frames Irom theZapruder film
could be enlarged to identily the
gunmen.
We can and we must insist on
learning the truth about Robert
Kennedy's death. We can watch with
great interest while James Earl Ray
tries to prove he was only a patsy in the
conspiracy to assassinate Martin
Luther King.
We must have the courage to
wonder about the strange similarities
in the deaths of our greatest liberal
leaders. We must insist that we be
given the truth.
Appendix I: Lee Harvey Oswald,
"Secret Agent"
Although it cannot be proven
without a thorough investigation, it is
quite probable that Lee Harvey
Oswald was in employ ol at least one
American intelligence agency. Gerald
Ford, in his book, "Portrait ol the
Assassin", stated " . . . Lee Oswald was
hired by the F.B.I.; that he was assigned
undercover number 179; that he was
on the F.B.I, payroll at two-hundred
dollars a month and that he was still on
the p a y r o l l the day he was
a p p r e h e n d e d . . ."
There is
considerably more than Ford's
statement lo back up the claim that
Oswald was an intelligence operative.
While in the Marines Oswald learned
Russian, he read "Provda" regularly,
and began to Marxism. It's rather
curious thai although Oswald seemed
to be a communist, he was granted
security clearance in May ol 19S7.
While in Hie Marines Oswald worked
with electronic communications
equipment. He was stationed perl ol
the time al IheJapaneseair base Irom
which the U2's Hew oul ol. Alter
getting a hardship discharge Irom ihe
Marinos.Oswa Id delected to Ihe Soviet
Union. He staled lo western newsmen
Dial he intended lo tell Ihe'Soviels all
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
he knew about American military
communications, . including much
classified, material,
t h e Russians
rewarded'Oswald' by giving him a
relatively high-paying job with little
real responsibility. Oswald married a
Russian girl, Marina. When Oswald
became disenchanted with the Soviet
Union and asked permission to reenter the United States he was granted
permission and was even granted a
loan to cover his transportation. Once
back in the United States he obtained
several jobs in New Orleans and
Dallas. In New Orleans Oswald set up
a local chapter ol Fair Play lor Cuba. Il
appears thai he was Ihe only member
serving as president under an
assumed name and secretary under
his own name. It is another curious lact
that Oswald's Fair Play lor Cuba
committee, supposedly Pro Caslro
group, shared the same building as an
ollice lor a militanlly Anli-Castro
group. It was also strange that Oswald
approached Anli-Castro exile leader
Carlos Burlinger and ollered his
services in training Anti-Castro
guerillas. In Dallas Oswald worked on
an a n t i - c o m m u n i s t manuscript
denouncing the Soviet Union. Oswald
applied lor a passport lor travel in
Mexico; strangely he received his
passport in twenty-lour hours, even
though, using his last passport he had
delected lo the Soviet Union and given
away military secrets. Using his new
passport Oswald traveled to Mexico
City and visited the Russian Embassy,
supposedly to try to gain entrance to
Cuba. When arrested in Dallas lor
murderOswald had in his possession
both the phone number and license
number ol Ihe local F.B.I, agent.
Oswald's history as a political
operative is strange indeed. He
maintained a loot-hold in both pro and
anticommunistgroups. Hecontinually
straddled the lence, with the assistance
oi the government ol the United States
he traveled Ireely even alter delecting
and giving away military secrets. The
Warren Commission finally concluded
thai Oswald's strange political
behavior was Ihe result ol a deranged
m i n d . C r i t i c s ol Ihe Warren
Commission take a dillerent view, they
see Oswald's actions as typical ol
govemmenl intelligent operatives.
Appendix 11: The "Extra" Secrel
Service Men
11 appears at the time ol the
assassination a number ol extra secret
service men appeared. All ol Ihe
ollicial secrel service men went with
the presidential motorcade lo Parkland
Hospital. However, Dallas police
sergeant I.M. Smith actually attempted
lo arrest two suspects who showed him
secret service identification. Another
ollicer, Sergeant Harkness reported
encountering secrel service men
behind Ihe Texas School Book
Depository immediately alter Iho
assassination II is quite likely thai Ihe
conspirators used lalse secrel service
credentials lo expedite their getaway
Champion of a Fantasy Course
by Michael Smith
was in the golf department at
Sears looking over a set of
irons.
He came in blowing on his hands,
snapping his fingers and smiling as if
he knew me. He wore a baseball cap, a
light house-painter'B type jacket,
sneakers and a pair of khaki trousers.
I was holding an eight-iron. He took
my elbow.
"George, you really look like a
golfer."
He'd been drinking something like
an aiter-shave lotion. He took the club
Irom me. He had a singsong in his
voice and a little two-beat rhythm.
'This is perhaps the finest set of irons
made."
He gripped the club tenderly, as il it
were revealing some secret to him it
had withheld Irom me. He kissed the
Jack Nicklaus inscription.
"What a sweet, sweet club."
He addressed an imaginary ball and
looked out across the aisle al some
phantom green.
"Feels good, leels great. 1 tell you, I
woke up this morning and my hands
lelt so thin they began to hurt. 1 had to
come here and get my hands on aclub.
You know what 1 mean. You're a goller.
It's March, but il doesn't matter. You
know, you've got to get a club in your
hands."
He waggled the club and look a
short swing.
"Ah, that's better. I'll be all right Irom
now on."
He took my elbow again.
"Listen, George, 1 can tell you're not
the kind that goes lor the straight bet.
Don't ask me how 1 know, but I do. You
wouldn't be looking at Nicklaus if you
did. And I'm not used to asking. I can't
do it. I'm a goller, not a panhandler.
George, I've played them all—Winged
Foot, Pebble Beach. Pine Valley—you
name it, I've played it. The name's
Franks, Charlie Franks. You probably
remember me Irom a lew years back.
Won $21,000 back in '64 and won a
couple ol big ones in the winter tour.
You understand, I'm a pro. I can't ask
for handouts. That's why the straight
I
ttuehn
beg is out with me. I don't have the
temperament lor it, George."
He squeezed my elbow and looked
me straight in the eye.
"Here's what 1 have in mind. See
how it appeals to you. I'll make you a
genuine business deal. We split down
the middle alter expenses-—50-50. For
a little investment you and I own half
interest in a louring goll pro. I need a
little roll to get a tew meals, get the
clubs out ol pawn, get some goll shoes
and head south. The winter circuit is in
Doral right now. The way 1 ligure,
George, we can catch them about St.
Pete's ormaybe Miami. Maybe the lirst
three or tour weeks 1 play them cozy.
You know, down the middle, go lor the
tilth-and-sixth-place money, lake no
chances. Pick up, say, seven or eight
thousand in the lirst few weeks. Get the
wrinkles out of the belly, get the old
s w i n g g r o o v e d . Then a b o u t
Greensboro—that's the course I know
like the back ol my hand. Thirty
thousand top money and 1 go for it. 1 go
•
rHiu-v:
if
APRIL 15,1975
*i.'--"'!,»i\V *'*•'-
''".-i'.!'.A
f . B l.i..
. M M * * " kB
all out, go br the long ball, the shots stiff
to the pin, aim for the back oi the cup.
George, we can make it and I meah.it's
good living; alpaca sweaters, Foot Joy
shoes, and all that big money."
He grabbed the club again. He was
smiling. He saw it all. He was shaking
hands with Arnold Palmer at Augusta.
He had the green championship jacket
on and was telling the TV audience
what wonderful fellows Player and
Trevino were. He had his $40,000
check in his pocket, and his agent had
already signed him with Spaulding,
Jantzen and Liggett & Meyers.
"I'll get hot, I know it. I leel hot just
talking about it."
The management was looking over
at us. He began talking faster.
"What do you say—$100..And it's
50-50 alter expenses."
He coughed, smiled, dried his hands
and Hexed the club again, with a
prolessional llourish.
"And no more booze. Not a drop. You
have my solemn word on that."
Mold him $100 sounded cheap lor a
deal like that, and 1 meant it, but I
couldn't allord it.
"That'sall right, George. We can get
by on less. We'll cut corners. Why, I
can make it out ol here with clubs lor
$50."
Two salesmen were walking toward
us. His singsong stopped, his words
raced together and he moved me
towaid the door. 1 had swallowed the
lure, the hook, the leader and the line.
All he had lo do was get me to the door
be lore the salesmen got to us.
"We'll put it in writing over a cup ol
collee."
One hand was on my shoulder, the
other on my elbow. 1 lelt warm, weak,
buoyant and strangely benevolent.
"George, this is one day you're
going to remember. Maybe you can
join me when 1 hit Pinehurst. I'll lix you
up with a nice room at theCarolina. It's
lovely there."
Suddenly my dreams were broken
by the street noises on Central Avenue,
the revolving door, the tennis shoes,
the scented breath and the salesmen. 1
shook my head, but before I could say
my embarrassed no, he squeezed my
elbow.
"It's all right, George. 1 understand.
Don't leel bad about it. 1 know how it is.
Anyhow, it was nice talking to you, 1
isally enjoyed it."
He smiled, tapped me on my
shoulder and with the same hand
waved away the salesmen. He was still
in charge, still in touch with an old
dignity.
"Tell you what you can do lor me
though. Ca n you see your way clear lor
six bits. I'd like to get a cup ol collee,
maybe some soup too. You know,
George pick up the spirits. I'll go ahead
and catch a freight down to Doral. I'll
pickupthe tourmaybe in Miami. lean
borrow some clubs, maybe Irom
Nicklaus. He alwaysdid like mygame.
1 lelt ashamed only giving him a
dollar.
"That's great, George. 1 won't torget
it. Listen, I'll be playing them cozy lora
lew weeks until I gel a little roll going.
Just a tew weeks. And then, watch out."
His leet were so cold he limped, but
when he got through the door on the
Woll Road side he called out, "Keep
that backswing slow and watch lor me
in the papers. Don't lorget the name,
Franks, Charlie Franks."
&&&%$*&£*
APRIL 15,1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 7P
Vietnam Revisted
w*
JS)
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To the Editor:
In light of President Ford's recent request to
Congress for additional aid to support the
Thieu regime, it is imperative that we oppose
further U.S. military intervention in Vietnam.
We should support efforts toward a
nonviolent reconciliation of the people who
have been wounded, killed, orphaned or
displaced by the tragedy of war in their
homeland.
At a time when we should have been
bringing the children of Vietnam back to their
land, culture, and families, we instead
kidnapped them and brought them to the U.S.
hoping that here they would be safer and
happier. 1 question both the legality and the
morality of Ford's "babylilt" program which
assumes that these children would he "bettet
off" in American homes than in their native
land.
First of all, it is the children who would be
the strength and hope of the country in the
future. To take them away from their people is
in effect an act of kidnapping which will
deprive Vietnam of potentially valuable
human resources. While it is arrogantly
rationalized that they will be better cared for
in ihe States, we can cornier what will become
ol these uprooted children when they grow up
alicnntcd from their Hue cultural heritage and
national roots.
Secondly, Ford's adoption program docs
not have the full support ol the South
Vietnamese government or the people. Ihe
Minister of Social Welfare Iherc lias openly
opposed the adoption program and ihe lust
airlift made without the consent of any South
Vietnamese officials. Furthermore, it is
important thai we understand what it really
means to be a so-called "orphan" in South
Vietnam. Quite often "orphans" tire children
who arc placed in orphanages by a living
parent who, because oi physical injury,
displacement or economic hardship, is unable
Reconciliation or the American Friendt
Service Committee since most other groups
cannot guarantee that the funds will be used
for their original purposes. According to Don '
Luce who spoke here last Friday, money that
wasoriginallyallocated for the Food for Peace
program was diverted to be used to build tiger
cages which imprisoned and tortured rather
than liberated the people. The F.O.R. has
maintained contacts with the Buddhist Peace
Delegation in Paris and the Pearl Buck
Foundation. They will continue to provide
relief and financial support for refugees and
the orphanages which allow the children to
reumin in their own country. Despite the fact
that they have been denounced by both the
Saigon government as "Communist
sympathizers" and the NLF for feeding
refugees, the Buddhists in South Vietnam
have always supported and stood for those
who were suffering.
Anyone interested in local relief efforts may
contact Mt. Carmel House, 535 Schenectady
SI.. Schenectady. 12307.
Dianne-Marie Piche
use the services, (he professionals and parents
who work closely with the handicapped.
Many groups are supporting this bill
(United Cerebial Palsy chapters, Albany
County Chapter for Mental Health, to name a
few) but more support is needed.
Unfortunately the Nolan-Brown bill is in
committee, but if enough people write and
voice their support for this bill (S.2298,
A.2942) perhaps it will come onto the floor
and get the attention it deserves. I urge the
friends of the Wildwood School and all the
handicapped to write their Senators and
Assemblymen telling them how you feel.
Please do it now before time runs out. The
handicapped have been unrepresented too
long.
Kathy Maloney
Greer
Misrepresented
lead a human life. Despite their" many
pregnancies most women in developing
countries spend more time working in the
fields than at home. Their economic and
human plight necessitates more birthi, not
less, according to Greer, Spending millions on
contraceptives and mobilizing feminists to
push family planning is the wrong direction
for foreign aid. When 85 % of the world's
resources are being used up in one small part
of the globe faminees are caused by maldistribution not by overpopulation. Help feed
not sterilize said Greer, ask people what they
need instead of imposing unwanted plans on
them.
Ms. Greer was skeptical about injecting
more rationality in U.S. wasof life and foreign
policy. More likely she said, the masses of the
world will rise against the elites exploiting
them.
In short, Ms. Greer hopes that Womens'
Liberation would be part of world wide
liberation from opression caused by economic
and political exploitation both at home and
abroad. Issues such as abortion and more jobs
for women are relevant. Exploitation however
takes many forms and so should liberation.
The slogan of "Women's rights" ha: one
meaning in U.S. suburbs and other meanings
in different parts of the world.'
Nabil A. Khoury
To the Editor:
A news reporter covering a lecture is
supposed to convey the gist of the lecturer's
argument. Betty Stein's coverage of Cicrmainc
Greer's talk in the March 14th issue of the
ASP failed to do that by a wide margin. A
To the Editor:
substitute report is in order.
A demonstration has been called for this'
The lecture was largely dedicated to
Friday by the Capital District Indochina
women*' need to give rather than abort birth
Support Committee, concerning American
in third world countries. That Betty Stein,
involvement in Southeast Asia. Specifically, except for one short and vague sentence
the demonstration is calling for: an end to all
totally ignores this basic theme leads one to
U.S. aid lo the corrupt Thieu regime; think that she is either "anti-natal" or antiimmediate reparations lor all damage third world. The lecture was a surprise and
inflicted to thecountries by the U.S.: an end
Ms. Cireer warned it would be. Greer's
to military intervention or aid by the U.S.: dubbing U.S. feminist issues as only relevant
and. lo make the U.S lie up to the I'ari.s Peace to U.S. suburban housewives must have
Agreement lot January, 1973), the document disappointed many ol her listeners. This might
from which Ihe first threedemands originate. explain hut certainly not justify a reporter's
MftW.
few Americans understand just what this misrepresentation of her views.
treaty was meant lo establish, and thanks to
As the title suggested, the lecture was about
con I'usingand anti-Vietnamesepropaganda in fertility, feminism, said Ms. Greer, is often
lite Albany Student Press reserves ihesole
the press, even fewer understand how the misrepresented as being anti-natal. While
right in print or edit letters to the eiillor.
I hieu regime, with the lull support of the U.S. control of one's body sometimes means
Submit letters TYI'ICWKITIKN to Camhas consistently betrayed the peace agreement abortion il also means pregnancy. In three
pus Center Room ->«6.
ev cry step of the way. For those interested, the quarters of the world pregnancy is not only
main concern of the Paris Peace Agreement noble hut vital if the parentsare to survive and
was Ihe setting Up ol a coalition government
something which Thieu and his U.S. backers
have no intentions at present
ol
establishing.
I wish, how ever, to explain the involvement
ol the U.S.-China Peoples Friendship
Association in the ISC. Normally, the
USCPFA does not participate in political
programs, as we exisl to further better
by Pat ( urran
relations between the U.S. and the Peoples
Ever since I first took an interest In government, as an academic discipline and as an
Republic of China, which is basically a extra curricula r activity. I have marveled at how people seem to miss the connection between (I)
cultural problem. We recognize, that the problems or situations which are in need of change, and (2) the means by which change may be
continued existence of U.S. military support accomplished. It's frustrating. Allow me to offer some examples of how a student government
lor unpopular regimes in Indochina is officer has been confounded by a lack of constituent cooperation.
detrimental to the cause of friendship between
We had a big argument in the Student Association office early lasl semester about whetherto
the U.S. and Chinese people. Imagine our own call for a sit-in at City Hall over the anti-student housing law. The plan was voted down because
reaction il Chinese armed forces invaded some ol us fell that Albany students couldn't be motivated to take such action. SA officers
Canada! I hcrclorc. we see il as consistent with instead fought the law at public hearings and protested it in the press. However, the law passed
our program lo support the demonstration.
and now we wonder whether the sit-in could have made a difference.
We will be assembling at the park at
Later last semester there was the problem with possible continuation of overcrowded
Washington Avenue and Northern Blvd. at dormitory conditions this Spring. A big fuss was raised and the student body was asked to
11:30 a.m.. and will marelMo Ihe Capitol steps withhold payment ol this semester's room fee if the situation wasn't ended. Whether the boycott
tor it noon rally. We urge aH friends ol China, would have been supported no one knows for sure. Luckily (though the outcry undoubtedly
as well as anyone concerned with peace and brought about a speedici resolution) administrators were willing lo be reasonable without being
justice, to come lo this demonstration.
forced.
lummy Schcrhcnko
Now we arc faced with the possibility of having $804,000 gouged from our university's budget,
Chairperson. SUNYA-USCPFA if the Stale Legislature doesn't act. Can 14.000 students, over 1000 faculty, and thousands of
administrators, stall, alumni, parents, trustees, and Iriendsof the university be convinced of the
urgency of our cause'.'
Look al it this way. gelling back lo the point made al the outset. Next year, if the Legislature
does not restore the cuts, there's going to be one heck of a lot ol grumblingon this campus. With
15 lo 19 teaching faculty positions knocked off the payroll, there'll be a lot ol'grumbling about
overcrowded classrooms even worse than we now lace!
When students have to wail lor weeks or months to see a Financial Aids advisor, for instance,
To the Editor:
A hill has been introduced jointly by or to get an appointment in the University Counseling Center, will they remember it'sduclo the
Senator Howard Nolan and Assemblyman cutback ol IS to 22 student services stuff members by Ihe Legislature?
II tuition at ihe Stale University of New York is boosted, or who knows, maybe evcndoubled,
Thomas Brown entitled "Division for ihe
Handicapped" (S.2298, A. 2942). Ihe bill will people be kicking themselves for not doing something about it in ApriflU
March for Peace
Perspectives
But What Can I Do?
MJlM
to adequately care for her his child. Many ol
these parents are mothers of children who
have been fathered by American soldiers iind
who have left their children in the orphanages
temporarily, intending to return for them at a
better time in their lives.
We must also realize thai Ihe Vietnamese
have a strong sense ol community and the
extended family is very prevalent there,
making it likely that a child whose parents
have died could be more than adequately
cured for and raised by other relatives and
friends given the existence of peaceful and
favorable economic and social conditions.
Finally, 1 believe thai we are morally
responsible to provide humanitarian aid to
Vietnam including desperately needed defines a handicapped person and also creates
medical cure for the victims of the war. Since il ii 3U member panel I 3 of whom shall be
is only the healthiest children Ihat are taken handicapped or parents and guardians of the
for adoption, there are many left behind with handicapped, Ine panel would evaluate
illnesses or physical delects. Especially crucial existing programs and suggest new programs
is the problem of those who have lost limbs as 10 be implemented lo improve existing
a result of the war. There are simply not services. An ombudsman's office will also be
enough! facilities available to I'll everyone created to act as a representative for the
adequately with arlifical limbs which must he handicapped. Ihe ombudsman would have
Ihe power to lake legal action. This bill would
refitted every six months to a year.
aid all handicapped people and promote
I would suggest that any contributions lor betlei and nuire efficient services lor them. It
medical relief or the support of orphanages also allows lor input of ideas from those who
only be made through Ihe Fellowship ol
Pen Power
APRIL 15,1975
I Ins week and next, and throughout the remainder of this semester, I plead with you to help us
"do something." Write a letter to your Stale Senatorand Assemblyperson. It doesn't take long—
and it won't cost you a penny. Student Association will pick up Ihe lab. there will be tables on
Ihe dinner lines where you will be given stationery, envelopes, and fact sheets explaining the
budget cuts. Do it! Write!
One lastlhing. II you're the least bit tempted to tell yourself your one letter won't help, ask any
SUNYA legislative intern how many letters a legislator receives on any single issue. Not muny.
And when he/shedoes, the lawmaker jumps, especially when the letter writers are here in Albany
ready to publicize the vote of each and every legislator on the SUNY budget restoration.
We in Student Association believe that this is the best means of preventing what could be a
very big problem.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
columns
The
Dutch
Connection
by Nancy Nonnbifton
Have you ever wondered where the wierd
"authentic New York Accent" comes from?
The one that thrives in taxis and around
ballparks and hotdog stands. Well, it's as
Dutch as the beer first brewed in the New
World on Staten Island in 1640 under the
direction of the Governor sent over from
Amsterdam. When you hear the old Bronx
cheer "trow da bum out," or the interrogative
"whatsa" madder which youse guyseT", you
are hearing the linguistic legacy of the
Netherlands. Amsterdammers, just like New
Yorkers, enjoy their reputation as free earthy
speakers, no matter who's listening.
When Nieuw Amsterdam was first
established by the Dutch West India
Company in the early 17th century,
Amsterdam was the most important city in the
world. Successfully commercial and
conspicuously tolerant, Amsterdammers
might be called the first Yankees.
BUI number 568, which changed the date on
the New York City flag and seal from 1664 to
1623.
T h i i is the first and last chance 111 have to
change history," the Mayor chortled as he
penned his name to the bill. In Fact, after
hundreds of years, New York has finally
gotten around to recognizing that its cultural
and historic roots extend back to the Dutch
settlement of Nieuw Amsterdam, founded in
I62S.
Not only, • then, does I97S mark the
beginning of America's Bicentennial, but it is a
year of a pleasant coincidence as well:
Amsterdam, the mature Old World parent, is
700 years old just asNew York, the precocious
stepchild in the New World, reaches its 350th
year.
Despite the "where it's at" accent of Fun
City (New Yorkers consider history the way to
a wino regards an empty bottle), New York
has a lot of history that is vital not only to its
own soul, but history that has shaped the very
sould of the nation.
An Abused and Confused Force
by Sharon Strach
Daily newscasts inform the average American that producers of manufactured goods are
victimized by a lag in sales. Adding further to this dilemna, producers report high inventory
levels of raw and finished products. Those of us who formulate the labor element amidst such a
producer know well that our jobs will not be sustained for long without an increase in demand of
manufactured goods, as evidenced by an increase in sales volume.
The crucial role of the consumer in altering this recessionary trend has been clearly identified
by national rebate campaigns. Rebate offers on cars, stereos, hair dryers, furniture, etc., indeed
seem to suggest that industry is trying to work with the consumer in bringing up satisfactory
levels of demand.
Nonetheless, the effect of rebate offers does not seem to be enough. Why is this so? Perhaps the
answer lies in the practices of wholesale distributors, which in the past have offered generally the
best prices to the American consumer through sheer volume of supply.
Let us explore further the consumer-distribution relationship. Common sense suggests that
the force of abstained consumer demand would have to affect supply in a restrictive manner.
When less units of a good are demanded, less units are manufactured. The distribution of a
product plagued by a lapse in demand would either remain the same or very likely become less
available. Wcas consumers effect an artificial shortage of a given product through the practice of
abstaining from demand. The end result is an increase in product cost. Therefore, the consumer
force of abstention may be viewed as an essentially inflationary one.
Unemployment statistics formulate another result of the force of consumer abstention. When
less supply of a product is demanded, a smaller work force is required to support the new level of
demanded production. Of course when one is unemployed, one's purchasing power diminishes.
By now it should be clear that the consumer force of abstention is a primarily negative one. It
actually works against the plight of the individual consumer. Consumer abstention is
inflationary and recessionary.
What then can we expect from the consumer force of altered demand? By altering our demand
we arc reinforcing distributing abuse. Altered demand gives forth a silent approval from
consumers to distributing practices. Wholesalers are free to offer us a limited choiccof goods and
can proceed to control supply of such goods.
When no serious check is imposed on one abuse, it can be assumed that, yet, another will rise.
Wholesale distributing practices amply characterize this deduction. While free to enforce
artificial shortages of supply, product price control power is attained by wholesale distributors.
Shortage of a good warrants a price increase. Who is forced to pay the price of such abuse? Alas,
the consumer force of altered demand works against the consumer as well.
Mayor Beame saved a special one-liner until
the signing ceremoney was nearly finished:
"This is a pleasant act, even though it puts us
in Dutch." The year of the Dutch connection
had begun.
As it stands, the best the Big Apple can
expect this double birthday year is a Dutch
Treat.
Industry must focus upon their distributing procedures and structures. Such procedures and
structures must become more receptive to consumer needs and more appropriately register
them. Through such an effort, inflation and unemployment will be challenged and diminished. A
creative system of checks and balances should be disigncd by industry and imposed upon the
distributing strata of our nation. American consumer demand must be given a healthy climate in
which to function once more.
MfJM
Recently, New York's Mayor Abraham
Beame sat before the television lights in his
City Hall Office. Hewas about to sign into law
ftiftSKrSWBSW
Zappa to be Unleashed at Palace
by Spence Kaggki
and Matt Kaufman
Among the many people included
in the sort that still believe the world
is flat exists those who also deny the
existence of Frank Zappa. Others
believe he is the true reincarnation of
Mr. Green Genes or King Kong. In
reality, Frank Zappa docs exist. In
reality, he is just another pervert
residing somewhere in the midst of
the spacious plains of Burbank,
California.
On April 24, direct from the
phallic phreeways of California,
SUNYA will present, for the
degenerates of the area, Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention.
Yes, that man noted forgrossing-out
millions (or at least 10 members of
the London Symphony Orchestra
in 1967 at the Albert Hall in
England), spreading tales about
m o u n t a i n s and
mudsharks
throughout the land. Yes folks,1
here's Frankie.
/ am gross and perverted
I'm obsessed, n deranged
I've existed for years
Bui very little has changed*
If you search through the annals
of musical history you might find
Frank Zappa's name; and if you do,
you are probably looking in the
wrong'book.
"Perhaps the must unique aspect
of the Mother's work is the concep-
tual continuity of the groups output cert halls the world over. ("Wowie
macrostructure. There is, ami always Zowie"!) In concert. Zappa always
has been, a conscious control of manages to do something unexthematic and structural elements pected, never doing the same show
./lowing through each album, live twice, mixing the elements of
performance and interview."—FZ.
story.profanities. jamming, and even
Frank Zappa began his successful a touch of music.
(?) career eleven years ago in his own
"There is no undertaking more
studio (Studio Z) in Cucamonga, challenging, no responsibility more
Cu. From these minisculc begin- awesome than being a Mother."—
nings, he continued to discos on the Richard M. Nixon.
Sunset Si rip, to Hill Graham's
"Thanks a lot, Dick."—VZ.
Fillmorcs and now arenas and con- '"I'm theSlime'VMunchkin Music
Jazz Concert Swings
by Spence Kaggiu
and Matt Kaufman
The CC cafeteria resembled a
crowded jazz club Saturday night
thanks to another of Concert
Hoard's free jazz shows. This time
the featured attractions were .lack
Wilkins on guitar and Eddie Gomez
on bass.
Wilkins lives up to his reputation
asoneof the great jazz guitarists exhibiting not only speed and accuracy
but also effectiveness. He mixed the
different elements of the guitar,
(chording with leads; bass with treble) creating interesting moving
musical forms. Physically he was
everything his music was not,
seemingly detached from lingers
Tropical Fruit Co.
Dance Performance
Dance Studio, 3rd Floor Gym
Wed. 8:30 pm
HAS YOUR COUNCIL REP BEB4 DOING HIS JOB?
Central Council attendance policy: It Bhall be the duty of council members to attend the council meetings.
Should a council member have thr** unexcused absences , the vice-chairperson shall notify Council
$.50 w/tax card
$1.00 w/ID
$1.50
General Admission
(Council) will decide if a motion for impeachment is in order by a two-thirds vote of the constituted quorum
THE HONOR ROLL
Member* Irom worst to beat
DavePEHECMAN (COM)
Roberta HARWITT (ST)
Ken WAX (COM)
Dennlt ESPOSIT (COM)
Ralph BEISLER (COM)
Mike SAKOFF (COM)
Maureen DEMAIO (IND)
Andy DOLAN (COM)
Candl MAYER (COM)
Gary COOKE (ALUM)
Andy GOLDSTEIN (ST)
Andy BAUMAN (COM)
Ed CAREY (COM)
Dave KENLINE (DUT)
Jon LEVENSON (ST)
Dave WEPRIN (SUT)
Gary BENNET (ALUM)
Sue LEBOFF (ALUM)
Mark HAMMER (DUT)
Rick MECKLER (DUT)
Dave COYNE (COM-IND)
Seth HABER (ST)
Jon MARTIN (IND)
Stu SIMON (COM)
Nell O'CONNOR (COL)
Sieve DIMEO (COL)
Stu KLEIN (COM)
Kathy BARON (COL)
Lew FIDLER (IND)
Average
«Roll Call Vote*
During tenure
on council
106
131
131
106
131
131
131
169
169
131
169
131
106
131
169
106
131
131
131
131
152
169
28
169
106
28
28
28
169
((Roll Call
%age vote*
Votes Milted
Members Irom worst to best
mined
Dave PERECMAN (COM)
Ken WAX (COM)
Dennis MPOSIT (COM)
Roberta HARWITT (ST)
Andy DOLAN (COM)
Stu SIMON (COM)
Ralph BEISLER (FAC)
Mike SAKOFF (COM)
Maureen DEMAIO (IND)
Jon LEVENSON (ST)
Ed CAREY (COM)
Dave KENLINE (DUT)
Andy GOLDSTEIN (ST)
Dave COYNE (COM-IND)
Sue LEBOFF (ALUM)
Steve DIMEO (COL)
Seth HABER (ST)
Dave WEPRIN (DUT)
Gary COOKE (ALUM)
Candi MAYER (COM)
Lew FIDLER (IND)
Gary BENNET (ALUM)
Mark HAMMER (DUT)
Rlck MECKLER (DUTS)
Nell O'CONNOR (COL)
Andy BAUMAN (COM)
Kathy BARON (COL)
Stu KLEIN (COM)
Jon MARTIN (IND)
on Council
13
19
13
19
25
25
19
19
19
25
13
19
25
21
19
4
25
13
19
25
25
19
19
19
13
19
4
4
4
505
20
722
3549
excused
unexcused
missed
6
3
Zh
5Vi
6%
7
3V*
2%
2
2
Vh
2
2'h
Zh
2
'A
0
2
2
96
52
46
42
34
32
31
26
26
20
15
15
14
14
13
12
12
11
10
8
8
6V2
6
4Vi
3
2Vi
2'/2
0
2Va
3%
1
<h
0
2'h
1
1
1
2
%
VJ
VI
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
%
1
0
0
Va
0
0
0
7
5
5
O
Z
0
PAGE TEN
, , «»-»»-»
i
1
ii
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Frank Zappa, who haa recorded a dozen-plus albums, and playa a host
ol Instruments too numerous to Hat here, la expected lo continue his
reign ol strangeness at the Palace.
Putting the music aside for the
moment, Saturday night was also
enjoyable as a casual listening experience. There were no expectation,
no pressures, people wandered in
and out, beer flowed in from the
Rathskeller, mixed drinks from the
Alabaster show iwo floors up.
Everyone appeared lo he having a
good lime.
Folk Singer
at 8th Step
Friday and Saturday. April 18 & I'J. the Eighth Step Coffee House will
present Andy Cohen, iolksinger and instrumentalist, ill an evening of varied
program of liilk music from many traditions. He will be accompanying
himself on al least the piano and guitar. Andy Cohen's background includes
an early fascination with the lirchousc Five Plus Two which developed his
talents lor playing rill's. In high school he played the bass drum and cornel.
From there he jumped to jug band music. Taking up the guitar, hediscovered
the field of folk music and learned lo play the guitar with si) lislic influences
ol Rev. Gary Davis and Big Hill Hroomsy, As a Iolksinger he has logged
thousands ol miles and a lot of performances while also working al
everything from dishwasher to performer.
vWJKWWWWW^
*»yro:*»H*»»™ •»£*
N 10a
... /
Beeflieart Here?
(ZNS) Don Van Vleil. better
known as "Captain Hccfheart." is
rehearsing with Frank Zappa's
Mothers of Invention in Hollywood
and is scheduled to join the Mother's
lour later this month.
Bcefhearl. who,grew up in Lancaster, California, with Zappa, had
recently quit music in his words
"forever."
He had retired lo Trinidad.
California, a small town on the west
coast, to become a lull lime lumberjack, saying he was disillusioned
wilh "promoters who were ripping
me off."
However, being a lumberjack apparently wasn't his thing. Bcefheart
s again back or. the recording set
with Zappa.
Cleft Palate
On April IS. 1975. the Speech
Pathology and Audlology Club and
the Speaker's Forum of the Suite
University of New York at Albany
will be presenting Dr. Betty .lane
McWilliums. authority on clefi
palate. Dr. McWilliums is the Director of Ihc Cleft Palate Center in the
Denial School of Medicine al the
University ol Pittsburgh and is a
faculty member of the University's
Department of Speech and Theater
Arls. She has specialized in the areas
of cleft palate and learning disabilities and hascondueied extensive
research on the psychological
aspects of lliese disorders. In addition, she has published numerous articles and isnalionally renowned and
highly respected in her field. Dr.
McWilliams will speak al X p.m. on
Friday. April 18 in Lecture Center 3
on the SUNYA campus.
I SAVE ALBANY STATE!!!
\STOP THE BUDGET CUTj
The S.U.N.Y. Budget has been severely cut by the |
! N.Y.S. Legislature. Albany State was one of the
I hardest hit. Help restore these cuts and prevent
|
I overcrowded classrooms; HIGHER TUITION, less
\ services, and a general decline in Academic quality. J
0
0
(Note: Council has impeached both Mr. Wax and Mr. Perecman but only Mr. Perecman has been removed.)
Council has directed that this be printed,
Jimtled by student association
t
Inquire Wed. nlie about
workshops on Thursday
Brought to you by Dance Council
%age ol
during tenure ((absences. ((absences meetings
98
54
48
46
31
30
30
28
27
2t
19
16
15
15
13
13
12
11
5
5
4
4
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
104
71
63
42
51
39
39
47
46
28
32
21
16
20
22
14
16
15
7
7
5
5
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
((Meetings Held
lured to use a bow. strange sounds
sometimes escaped form his bass.
The drummer was a local.
Hal M illcr. whose excuse was that he
had never played with Wilkins and
Gomez before. But even so. there
must have been someone better
available,
running up and down his guitar.
Gomez, only slightly more
animate, is an extremely inventive
bassist who does some interesting
things with rhythm. He plays a string
bass with a ceramic pick-up. but due
lo sound problems he was forced to
hook up a mike also. This only partially corrected the trouble; the bass
was still very heavy sounding, and on
the occasions, when Gomez ven-
STUDENTS TRIM &
SHAPE CUT
to suit just vuu
$3.50
imlHi by
1
iS
On Dinner Lines Wed. April 16
through Friday April 25.
lumiett nv snielli tisu>cmiun
young mtni fey
Cathy oiAl
PMtcscJm
connmsoniy Uyllng. SnglMi k m an*
French cuta.
•«•
A L * HAIR 8HOP
RAMADA INN
WE8TERN AVe.
482-8573 use A entrance
m i n i i i i i i «-»»-»-»-«-»-»^-«-»-«~»«-» » « » • • » • »-»
APRIL 15,1975
APRIL 15,1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
Again, That Empty Feeti
by Timothy Bitash
Bob Carson had never felt as out
of place as he did that moment,
gazing through the window of his
coed-dorm room. The new multimillion dollar college complex of
which he was now a part seemed
huge and remote. True, he had lived
in Brooklyn, a part of the largest city
in the United States, and was used to
big places. But it wasn't really the
bigness that got to him. Just what
was it?
A barely audible "tap-tap" at the
door made Bob jump. Boy, he was
upset. It was probably Tom, from
down the hall. He said he might stop
by before going to dinner. As he
opened the door his mouth nearly
fell to the floor. There, standing in
front of him, was a> girl. Half
expecting her to say something like,
"6h, excuse me. Wrong room.", he
was again stunned as she smiled and
in a tone as soft and airy as her taptap said, "Hi!"
In spite of his agitated state, Bob
managed to blurt- out a hello and
smile back. What was going on, he
wondered. Did he know her? Why
was she here?
"1 was wondering if my roommate
and I could keep some things in your
refrigerator, that is if you haye room.
They ran 00} of them before we
could get one, and-now we have
some food that will spoil if we don't
get it cold. I saw you carry yours in
this morning, and thought maybe
you'd let us."
Bob suddenly understood.
Somebody wanted something from
him again. It seemed the only time
people ever paid attention to him
was when they wanted something.
He had had enough of that at home.
Why couldn't things be different
here? He felt the urge to tell this
intruder off and slam the door shut,
but his training prevailed as he heard
himself say, "Why not? We've got
plenty of room."
She smiled again and he wondered
how he could have ever wanted to
yell at her. She turned and
disappeared down the hall, calling as
she went, "I'll be back with it right
away."
Before he knew it, they were
sitting side-by-side having milk and
cake and had been talking for hours.
Dinner was long since over, but Bob
hadn't noticed until he glanced at the
clock on his desk. She seemed to
notice the time simultaneously, for a
few seconds later the room was again
empty, save for the one. lonely boy
and a whispered promise to return.
"Maybe she was different," he
mused. Alter all, he hadn't met that
many people since arriving two
weeks ago. Maybe he was wrongand
things were different here. He'dfitin
after all.
That next Thursday they went to a
sorority party together. Bob was
amazed at how many friends she
had, and could scarcely keep up with
all the names. At first he was thrilled
at each new introduction. But later
into the night hefelt out of place, not
knowing where to turn or what to
say. More than a few times she had
to bail Bob out, and on leaving he
was very depressed. Bob shrugged it
off, though, and after he said good
night he was back in a good mood.
Or so he thought.
That night he lay in bed, awake
and restless. Why was he so
comfortable when he was with her
alone,yet inacrowdorbyhimsclfhc
was panicky und nerve-wracked? He
finally fell off to sleep.
They began to date every
weekend. He thought of her
constantly. She was his refuge,
something to relate to. She made his
world liveable. He thought she felt
the same. One day in the beginning
of the second semester, he found out
differently.
Hewas returning tohisdorm.The
warm and beautiful day added a
special sparkle to his mood. Lust
nigh! he haddecided to ask her to go
steady. It would be almost a
formality, he thought to himself.
"'
' '" "'' '"""-°"""-
last night," she said. Her eyes and
lips acted sad. "Is something
wrong?"
"You know what's wrong. Why
did you Uike so long to answer
yesterday? Why didn't you let me
in?"
Her face fell when she realized she
had been caught. She could u.se him
no longer. "It took you long enough.
If you don't like it, go to..." She
stormed out as she finished her
sentence.
Alone in his room, Bob felt that
empty feeling return. He finally
knew what caused it. People wereall
the same. They always took and
never gave. Now he understood that
he felt out of place because he was
different. But that wasn't the
problem. You got used to being
different. But when you couldn't
recognize the different people as
such, when your best friends turned
out to be the most hostile, you lost
faith in yourself. That feeling of not
knowing up from down got to you.
Being physically there but never
knowing if you belonged anywhere.
The telephone rang.
"Hello. Bob. This is Susan, from
math class. Could you help me with
my homework? I'm completely lost."
l-'or ti moment Hob thought back
to Diane and that first meeting long
ago.
Another person wanted.
something.
"Sure. Is seven-thirty O.K.?"
"That's line. I'll come over to your
room then." Before she hung up she
added, "And thanks. Bob."
"Anytime," he replied.
Maybe il was worth it after all.
•
•
LECIRCLE
FRANCAIS
CAMPUS
CONTRACEPTION
CLINIC
i'or appointment, <«H
457-3717
Confidentiality assured
University of
San Fernando Valley
COLLEGE OF LAW
Announcing;
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DRIVE OUR CARS
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For details contact one of our representatives.
:
LIFE & CASUALTY
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meeting
Thursday April 17, 8 pm 1
HU-137
1
Karen Martell
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80 WOLF ROAD
* ELECTIONS!!!* j
SUITE 414
ALBANY, N.Y. 12205
PHONE 459-1280
also we will be discussing
our upcoming trip
to QUEBEC CiTY
COME!!!
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Why the Aetna College Plan?
a
AETNA LIFE INSURANCE CO.
••<
Must be I B y n r i o l d
PAGE TWELVE
The Aetna College Plan
JfUjUjtJ
Just to make it official. He was even
skipping his class so he could
surprise her.
He scurried up the steps and
entering his room fumbled tit the
wrappings. The ring shone and
transformed the golden-yellow beam
of sunlight into an airy and softwhite glow. It reminded him of her
smile.
He had never surprised Diane like
this before. They had always agreed
beforehand when they would sec
each other. This would be just the
right time to break the pattern. He
knew she'd be in - she had a paper to
write.
Ashcwalkedsoftlyupto thedoor,
he heard laughing. Probably Diane's
roommate was back from class early.
But the one voice did sound too
deep. He knocked and the voices
stopped. He knocked again harder,
but no answer. As he was turning to
go away, the door clicked and Diane
stuck her head out. She gulped, and
broke a smile. The smile was not the
soft one that Hob had come to adore.
He spoke first, "Uh, Hi.", not really
knowing what to say. She explained
that she had been showering, and
was sorry she hadn't been able to
answer the door right away. Bob
nodded and when she didn't ask htm
in, said he'd see her later. As he
walked back to the room, he tried to
piece together what had happened.
That night he did not see her in
fact, he avoided the dorm
completely.
The next afternoon she came
knocking at his door. He opened and
asked her in. "I didn't sec you around
John Tracey
Rick Fusari
supervisor
Jeff Dashew
APRIL 15,1975
Young Actor Explains Hit Trade
b y Edward Moicr
As he sat in the University box office reading a review about his latest
role, SUNYA student Nelson
Avidon talked about acting.
"I always liked play8...my first
part was in the second grade. I
played a turkey in something called
Turkey Lerkey, I'm afraid that 1
forgot a couple of gobbles"
Besides that illustrious and
fowlish classic. Nelson has had
sizeable roles In more recent,
SUNYA productions such as Marat
Sade, Comedy' of Errors, Country
Girl and. lastly, Dark of the Moon
(he played the preacher.)
Several years ago Nelson opted
for an acting career after a four week
stint with a local theater company
convinced him of his true vocation.
"Unless you're positive about your
goals, you shouldn't go into acting.
The chances of succeeding are slim.
Nelson: " T h t actress who I toft In the lurch c a m * o v t r t o I h t a i d * of the
stage and motioned me to come out. It was the audience's laughter at
this that
brought
me
my senses.
senses.
it o
rougnt m
e to
to my
because the field is about 90 % unemployment right now...! guess 111
be a bum all my life."
The student stressed acting technique: "There's different schools of
thought on how to approach a
rolc.mostly 'tho, there's agreement
that there should be a balance
between control and emotion..."
"...You can't be too emotional.
For example, in The Glass
Menagerie Julie Harris got really
caught up in her role and even
started to make up lines; she screwed
up the other actors, threw off their
timing."
"On the other hand, you can't
think too much about what you're
doing, or your acting is bound to
look mechanical."
Nelson said in a production he
tries to get an "internal feeling"
about thecharactcr he plays, and lets
loose this emotion in the early
rehearsals. "Later, as we approach
the live performances, I work on my
control, the refined technique."
Nelson, a 20-year-old junior, said
concentration on his role was a
problem, since most rehearsals,
which last upwards of four hours,
are an emotional drain. "Conccntra-'
lion is extremely difficult to hold
when the audience laughs, especially
when we're in the middle of a tragic
scene."
Last semester Nelson directed his
first play, He, by Eugene O'Neill.
When asked what qualities he had
looked for in those whom he choose
lor roles, he replied, "Relaxation
with being on stage; I like people
who read the script smoothly.
Helievability. And physical and persona
I qualities tti.it
that ggo
the
sonalquahtics
o aalong
l o n g wwith
i l t i me
•1973 by Obie, Tht Sew Yorker
Batters Split 3-5, 2-1
by M i t t Pjtkarski
"/..•/'( ltv> III'- <•/•'/"!
role they're doing."
Nelson has been in theater long
enough to witness numerous gaffes.
During He an actor tripped on a
suspended runway and nearly fell
into (he audience. And in one of his
own plays during junior high Nelson
forgot to come out on stage at the
right time. "The actress who I left in
the lurch came over to the side of the
stage and motioned at me to come
out. It was the audience's laugh tetat
this that brought me to my senses."
The actor is interested in writing
as well. He's currently working on a
play called Good-bye, about a
college graduate who travels to
California. When asked if the play
was autobiographical, Nelson
replied
of movreplied he
he had
had no
no intentions
intenimnsoi
m,n-
ing to the West Coast.
Nazis at
Bleeker Library
"Confessions of a Nazi Spy."
propaganda melodrama made
1939. will be shown at Harmanu.,
Hleeckcr Library on Thursday, April
17, at S p.m. The film is pari nl the
series, "Hullels, Ballads, and
Brothers," sponsored by the Friends
of the Albany Public Library.
The film, starring Edward (i.
Robinson, George Sanders, Paul
Lukas, and Francis l.ederer,depiels
the undercover activities of Nazi
spies in the United Stales and the
work of the (i-men lo break up the
spy
network.
p> n c m m i ,
^ ^ ^
r
"TheClas7op78
amif
Parties
Vic Giulianelli's two-out, twostrike base hit to right field in the
bottom of the sixth inning, drove
home the runs that gave the Albany
Great Danes a crucial 2-1 victory
over Cortland in the second game of
their home doubleheader Saturday,
keeping alive their slim hopes for the
SUNVAC title.
After dropping the first game of
the twin bill 3-3, the Danes faced
possible elimination from conference contention in the second
contest, as they trailed 1-0 after five
and a half innings.
But with one down in the home
sixth, Carlos Oliveras bunted his
way on and was sacrificed to second.
John trace then legged out an infield
hit, putting runners on first and third
with two outs.
With a two-strike count on
Oiulianelli, the senior captain then
lined one into right just under the
outstretched glove of diving rightfielder, Art Cotugno. Oliveras
scored easily and as Iracc was
reaching third, thirdbase coach (and
also manager). Boh llurlingamc,
waved him around. Iracc slid in just
ahead of the diving tag by Pupillo,
who took the hurried relay up the
first base line, giving the Danes the
lead.
Ironically, Giulianelli's blast was
the only outfield hit surrendered by
Cortland pitcher Garth Tymeson
and it cost him the game. When
Albany's John Dullard mowed
down Cortland in the seventh to
preserve his complete game victory,
it kept the Danes still mathematically alive in the SUNYAC race.
Fredonia still leads the pack with
Albany and Cortland in a second
place tie.
"We have four losses now," said
Buriingamc, "and even if we win all
three (of the remaining conference
games) we'll just have to wait and see
how the other teams do. It's gonna
be tough!"
Tough is the only way to describe
the Danes'first-game loss. After the
hosts had taken a 3-2 lead in the
third, Albany starter Tom Blair saw
Cortland tie the game as a result of
an error and win the game as the
result of his own wildness.
Cortland scored first, reaching
Blair for two second inning tallies
after one out. Bill Izzo doubled off
third baseman Willoughby's glove
and after a sac bunt moved him to
third, scored on Cotugno's single up
the middle. Blair then committed a
fatal balk. Cotugno then scored
from second on Jon Cooley's windblown double down the right field
line.
Cortland's starter and winner Bill
Bartlctt was having much better luck
with hismovetofirstashepickedno
less than three Danes off the bag-in
the first four innings.
And his pitching wasn't had
either. In going the distance, he
whiffed six Danes, while walking
only two and experiencing one bad
inning.
That came in the third. Jim
Willoughby led off with u triple
clown the right field line and was still
there when Mike Carnage drew a
one-out pass. Bartlctt then got Paul
Nelson on a pop-up, before Oliveras
slammed a single up the middle scoring Willmighby. A wild pitch put
two runners in scoring position and
Blair capitalized on that by bringing
both runners home with a bouncer
through the right side.
But the lead was short-lived. Izzo
reached on a throwing errbrand was
doubled in by Cotugno in the fourth.
A passed ball moved him over to
third, where lie scored on the first of
weow PARK
V.in D y k e
$158 I $186 I $213
1 Bedroom I
AMfttoK: .50 Mwutt wiik Tax
.75 ojfcett uiUk fax
M.25 aft etta vmtom
•
e
e
e
e
e
2 pateA ©t 3<W a Ticfeeb
6 Boitte* ol Ucuilta
2 Bedroom I
3
Bedroom
Electricity and heat included.
A l l electric, modern appliances.
24-hour security patrol.
Economical laundry centers.
Ceramic tile baths.
Bus line a t door.
Directions: Take Interstate 'JO (East, if
west of Albany, Wesl il east of Albany) t"
Exit 6 (South Mall); left at litilit; take next Model apartment
left onto Northern Blvd.; right onto North
open
Manning Blvd.; 1st rij|lil onto Uirk Street;
pass Ten Broeck II; Ml on Colonic Street;
Miiii-I'ri '<-.r>
follow signs to Model Apartment. E-2.
0.7
Wed
For information call 465.244° or call the
III-:I
S,il
Albany Housing, Information U'ntei
12.4
465-3359.
Sun
Please bring proof
K0T6: Ttat witt (x a special kit tauty km Hie athont* tj Dutek Quad at 1:30 ant geitttj back dtmdtum fa Mumi Quod
Sponsored by Class off '78 Marc Benecke, President
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
The
A.M.I.A.
Yankee
doubleheader trip is set for Sunday,
April 27 verus the Milwaukee
Brewers. Buses will leave the circle at
approximately 9 a.m. Sunday and
return after the second game is over.
Total cost of the round trip and an
infield reserved seat is SIO. Tickets
are available in CC 336 on a first
come, first serve basis.
The A.M.I.A. Swimming Meet is
tonight in the Physical Education
Building. Sign up this afternoon in
CC336. Soccer captains: today it
the butt day to enter team. Mandatory meeting for captiaos will be
hekt this afternoon at 3:30 pjn. in
CC 373. Rosters and bond money
due at meeting.
Wrestling Tournament ii April 20.
Successful pickoff try from pitcher Bob Kronenberger to second baseman Mark Fuehs in 7th
Inning of g a m e o n a . K r o n e . a w a l k o n this spring, notched D o n — ' f i r s t save of the season yesterday
In 6-5 win over R.P.I. Batters home today versus Siena at 3:30.
JEWISH STUDENTS COALITION PRESENTS:
Admission Covers All:
PAGE FOURTEEN
with a smile.
The Danes take on Siena today at
3:30 at the university baseball field,
and havea week off before Hartwick
comes to town on the 22nd. ',"
AM1A Plant Trip To Yankee Gam*
ruggers played to an 11 —4 win over
by Tom Suhrhoff
Opening day for the Albany State Springfield. The hours of practice
Rugby Club, the newest sports- during the preceding week payed off
oriented club at S.U.N.Y.A., found for Albany, as they capitalized on
the ruggers matched against mistakes made by the penalty-ridden
Springfield College last Saturday, at Springfield Club. The game was
Springfield, Mass. The fine playing characterized by quick, hard-hitting
weather foreshadowed the outcome play, and was dominated by Albany
of the game for Albany as the State's scrum (best analogy would be
Ftidau April ISKt 9:00 pM
Screwdrivers
15 Kegs of Michelob
Pink Flamingos
Munchies
Soda
D M * Ptigeft:
that, he allowed just two hits and
finished with eight strikeouts on the
day. It looked like it would all be for
naught until Giulianelli's heroics
sent the die-hard State fans home
Ruggers Win Opener
at Dutch Quad U-Lounge
leabttuif)
Blair's two wild pitches with the run
that proved to be the winner.
Cortland added an insurance
marker in the next inning on a walk,
stolen base, a Blair wild throw on a
pickoff attempt, and another wild
pitch. The Danes, meanwhile, could
muster no attack whatsoever as they
managed only one hit in the last four
innings.
The second game was a continuation of the Danes' hitting woes. In
fact, Cortland's Tymeson allowed
only one hit until the fatal sixth-a
bunt single by Mark Conslantine in
the third. But Albany's Dollard was
pitching a fine game himself. A double and rbi single in the second proved to be his only bad inning. After
Managed by Clifford Rental Management.
Incorporated.
APRIL 15,1975
APRIL 15,1973
Israeli Coffee House
Wed, April 16
CC. Ballroom
starring:
RUACH REVIVAL
Charge:
50*} minimum donation to U.JA
or the Israel Emergency Fund
Falafel and refreshments will be sold
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
a football offensiveline), as they continuously pushed Springfield into
losing control of the ball.
Albany's first score was set up by
Dominic Roncone on a thirty yard
run to within one foot of the goal
line. Captain Frank Martens followed immediately by running the ball
over for a try(touchdown).
W.LR.A.
WIRA Basketball Playoffs will be
held Wed.. April 16. and Thurs.,
April 17 from7:l5to 10:15 p.m. and
Saturday morning, April 19 in Gym
C. A limited number of spectators
will be allowed to watch the playoffs.
Playoffs will be as follows: 2nd place
vs. 3rd place league A and winner
plays first place league B; 2nd place
league B plays 3rd place league B and
winner plays I st place league A. The
two winning teams then play each
other for the WIRA Basketball
Championship; T-shirts will be
awarded to the winner of this game.
The WIRA Softball season began
Saturday. While no more complete
teams may join the WIRA Softball
league, any individuals wishing to
join an already formed team may do
so by leaving their name and phone
number in Mr. Dennis Elkin'soffice.
The WIRA Council meets
regularly Wednesday mornings at
10:00 A.M. in Mr. Dennis Klkin's office, CC356. Anybody who wishes to
join the WIRA Council and help us
plan Fall 1975 women's intramural
F o o t b a l l and Field Hockey
programs is urged to attend.
PAGE FIFTEEN
My first experience with the uptown/downtown phenomenon occured when I announced
proudly lo my friends that I had just received a teaching appointment at the Allen Center, "the
Allen who?" "The Center for what?" were just a few of the responses I received. "The James E.
Allen. Jr. Collegiate Center," I answered, articulating each word very clearly test! my shortened
form of the name be the source of unclarily. ThekM smilesand benevolent shakes of the head
indicated that the abbreviated name was no the source of the problem. I grew anxkms awaking
my official contract from the University infear that the uptown administration mightprov* to be
as unfamiliar with the
AllenCmlerassomeofitsfacutty.lwasextraordinarilydissapolniadtluu
so few people knew about the Center, but perhaps I was even more upset about the few who
believed they did know what It was.
Collegium Story by Debra Kaufman.....See Page Eleven
SUNY 78, CUNY 72
by Bruce Msggin
The State University of New York
All-Stars held off a late comback by
the City of University of New York
All-Stars to win the initial City-State
All-Star. Basketball Classic, 79-72,
yesterday evening at University
Gym.
The game was typical of most allstar contests. The ball players had
little time to practice with their newl; acquired teammates and it showed
throughout the game. The ga me was
close all the way as neither team was
able to break away.
The opening seconds of the con-
test set the tone of the game as the
State stars committed two easy turnovers. From then on, it was a
collection of missed shots,
overthrown passes and many fouls.
Most of the baskets came from underneath, after the missed shots. It
took almost 13 minutes before a
pretty pass was thrown.
But as the game went on and the
pace quickened, as the ballplayers
finally remembered what a basketball was. The crowd finally awakened by some good outside shooting
and some sparkling passing. Rob
Rich's (Oswego) shot with three
Albany State's lone SUNY All-Star Pete Koota inaction during SUNYCUNY Game.
seconds left in the first half gave
State a 34-33 halftime lead. Bill
Curry (Brockport) and Jack. Dalton
(Oneonta) were the first half stars for
State as they scored 8 and 6 points
respectively. Harry Price led City
with 8.
The second half wasn't much
different from the first as both teams
continued to make errors. City
scored the'first six poins of the half
and looked like they might run away
with the game. State then scored the
next 12 points ttakea lead that they
would never relinquish. In the final
minutes of the game both teams
started to play some exciting basket-*
ball. City fought to conic back as
Willie Davis (Queens) and Stan
Brown (Lehman) led the charge.
Davis scored all of his 13 points in
this half and this earned him City's
MVP. City finally caught up with
State with 3:25 to play. But Mike
Panaggio (Brockport) and Ed
Robata (Geneseo) controlled the
ball, City couldn't gel the lead, and
State hung on for the victory.
City committed 23 turnovers to
State's 18, as the team that made the
least mistakes won. Dalton of
Oneonta wasState's MVP, finishing
the game with 14 points. Robotaattd
Brown shared high scoring honors,
each chipping in 16 points. Albany's
Pete Koola had 6 points and 6
rebounds.
The game was on live radio across
the state and will be seen on a
delayed basisSaturday afternoonon
public television (Channel 17 in
Albany). The game provided exposure for two conferences that normally aren't recognized. Perhpas a
tourney involving the top top learns
in each conference would be a better
show than an all-star game. It certainly would be more exciting.
hate
SUNY-MVP Jack Dalton goet up for lump shot over Pete Gartlan.
Dalton scored 14 points and 7 assists.
Trackmen Destroy Queens, 112-32
by Jon Lafayette
On a windy day at the University
field, the Albany State track and
field team swept the field events in a
convincing 112—32 victory over
Queens College. The Queens team
was badly undermanned, and was
unable to enter even one: competitor
in many events. They (Queens) were
the last team to beat the trackmen
bcofre their 31 meet winning streak,
snapped Thursday by R.P.I. "We
needed a convincing win," said
Coach Bob Munsey, "and I'd say we
got it."
Rudy Vido.TomCleary, and Tim
Holloway placed I —2—3 in the first
event, the shot put, establishing
Stale's dominance in the field events
early. Bill Mayer and Pierre
Beauvior both cleared 11*6" in the
pole vault, despite u strong wind.
The wind also held down the distances in the long jump, triple jump,
and the high jump. Hiram Febles
won the Ion jump at I9'3" followed
by Tom Pardini at IX'II". Febles
also placed second in the triple jump
which was won by Jim Pollard with
Pardini completing the sweep.
Febles also placed third in the high
jump following Bill Malone. who
cleared 5'IU", and David Cole. Jim
Holloway threw the discus 130"4" to
take tnat event, and Tom Cleary
threw the Javelin 178'8" showing the
way .for Perry Hoeltzcll and Doug
Sabo who placed second and third.
In these seven events, Queens could
manage only a second (in the discus)
and a third (in the long jump)
Brian Davis made his move on the
last turn, kicking by a Queens runner
to take the mile for Albany in 4:27.
Carlo Cherubino out lasted the
three-mile field to win by 50 yards in
15:22.4. The 440 yard relay ream of
Alan Zube, Brian Donovan, Billy
Brown, and Orin Criffen won the
440 in 44.3 seconds, and the mile
relay team of Art Bedford, Phil Sullivan, Bob Eberlyn, and Bob Colieli
took that event in 3:35.5.
The hurdlers also looked good,
with David Cole breaking the school
record in the 120 yard high hurdles
running a 15.3 followed by Bob
Malonc, Roger Phillips'won the440
yard intermediate hurdles in 1:01.
Queens got its only three wins of
the afternoon in the sprints, Alex
Clark starring for Queens. Ther
freshman took the 220 in 22.9 and
the 100 yard dash in 10.2, sticking his
tongue out at the finish. Bob Bedford look the 440 yards in 52.5 for
Albany to prevent a washout with
Queens taking the 8X0 also
The track team lost IX of last years
performers leaving Coach Munsey
with many younger and untried people, lie is very pleased with the
progress of the team and especially
with hishurdlers. Duvid Cole looked
"savage and hungry" in breaking the
team record in the 120 yard high
hurdles. "It's amazing because no
one from Queens was in the race,"
A & S Candidate Trades
Opinions With SUNYA
SA Presidential
Hopefuls Agree
On Mass Funding
said -Munsey. "He was pressed only
by himself." Roger Phillips was also
impressive in winning the 440 yard
intermediate hurdles. Munsey was
most surprised by the performance
of Stew Finton of the J.V. He was
close the school record in the high
hurdles, taking first in that event.
Coach Munsey also ' praised
Pollard. "He was entered in three
events, winning the triple jump and
was on the second 440 relay team
which almost beat the first team."
"He set the record in the huiles set by
Cole today," said Munsey. Pollurd
was recruited by Munsey as a junior.
and has also impressed football
coach Ford. He is also high on Bob
Bedford who won the 440: "he is
quick and I may try him in the half
mile," SAID Munsey.
Sprints a problem
The coach recognized his problem
in the sprints but said that they
would improve with the warmer
weather.
On Thursday, in a meet with
R.P.I, and Hartwick, R.P.I.
snapped a 31 meet winning streak
and Hartwick failed lo score a single
point. In that meet, the mile relay
team of Hob Bedford, Hob Colieli,
Ryan, and Hob F.berlin won in
3:35.2, Ryan also taking the XXO.
Tom Pardini and Hiram Febles
places I —2 in the long jump.
The next meet is at Williams
College, where Coach Munsey
lehman
believes, "we have a good chance to
Bob Malone tackles the high hurdles during track team's win over iwin, although they will be very
Queens.
toug."
by David Winzelberg
The issues concerning S.A. funding arc cmcrgingas most important
in the upcoming elections for next
year's Student Association executives. Most of the already announced candidates share similar
views on funding and the majority
heavily favor mass programming as
an S.A. top priority.
Cited as a "major priority" by
many of the candidates, mass
programming gathered much support as a direct result of the recent
EOPSA budgeting situation. S.A.
Presidential candidate Bob O'Brien
expressed support for muss
programming while claiming that
EOPSA is receiving "higher priority" and slating that. "Everybody
should get their lair share." Dave
Coyne, a possible candidate, is "very
strongly" in favor for mass programmingand forcuttingback funding of
campus ethnic groups, "Student
Association is open to all students. I
refuse to believe that a student who is
white can't represent a black student.
If we accept that principle, we reject
democracy." Presidential candidate
Andy Bauman commented that
"students aren't getting their $54
worth 'and favors' limited ethnic
funding."
Another candidate for the S.A.
presidency. Ken Wax asserts that
"Too much money is going into too
lew hands". Wax also adds, "There
are some groups whose funding have
to be reassessed in the interest of fair
programming for all students. No
amount of screaming or attempted
pressure tactics should be allowed to
become an obstacle". Candidate
Kim Kreiger feels, "Mass programming should be the number one S.A.
priority for next year". She adds,
"Students are interested in partying,
concerts, movies and athletics."
Vice-Presidential candidate Joh
Lcvcnson supports mass programming. Levenson believes, "No group
deserves preferential treatment".
Rick Meckler.alsoa V.P.candidate,
sees ethnic funding important
culturally, but feels that "these
(ethnic) groups should cut their
social spending." Meckler commented, "EOPSA should receive
proportional funding."
Most of the Presidential and Vice-
kirchmayer
A&S candidate George Stein, called Albany State "a place with real
possibilities but some very serious problems." Presently he teaches
history at SUNY Binghamton.
Presidential candidates are in favor
of keeping a mandatory student tax.
Out of the five announced candidates for president, Bauman, Wax
and O'Brien support the continuation of the present $64 mandatory
tax. Kreiger, presently Services
Director for S.A., says that she
"can't take a stand either way" leaving it up to the students to decide.
Candidate Coyne believes that the
tax should become voluntary,
because it would be more "libertarian" and would "force S.A. to be
more responsive".
Meckler, a member of Central
Council and the On-Campus Student Life committee, feels that
"Programming would collapse with
a voluntary student tax". Levenson,
the S.A. Ombudsman, Central
Council member and Chairman of
the On-Campus Student Life committee is in favor of a reduced, but
still mandatory student tax. The tax
issue will decided by students
through an upcoming referendum.
A majority of the candidates also
agree on continuing the present level
of funding granted lo A.A.B. (controlling SUNYA's lntcr-collegiate
athletics). Student Assistant for
A.M.LA. and member of the OnCampus Student Life Committee,
candidate O'Brien is high on University athletics. Citing this year's growing enthusiasm for varsity and other
team sports, he points out that
continued on page seven
kirchmayer
by Betty Stein
Looking very much like a
younger, more handsome version of
George Gobcl, the third Arts and
Sciences Dean Candidate, Dr.
George H. Stein engaged in a give
and take process with SUNYA
yesterday. He gathered his impressions of the University, and the
University gathered its impressions
of him.
Dr. Stein, now a distinguished
teaching professor of history at
SUNY Binghamton ("it'scalled Harpur"), candidly refers to SUNYA as
"a place with real possibilities but
some very serious problems. This
should have been the flagship of the
SUNY system," he said, then
wondered aloud why Rocky used to
fly visitors over the SUNYA campus, while taking them to Stony
Brook for an actual tour.
He does not, however feel the
situation is hopeless; "1 thought you
people were in worse shape than you
really are," he said when last night's
SA Pushes Letter Rally
Against Budget Slashes
by Michael Sena
About 160 students wrote letters to their assemblymen and senators today
as part of Student Association's effort to pressure the legislature to restore
some of SUNYA's budget.
Over the last two days about 400 letters have been written.
The letter writing campaign comes as a reaction against Governor Carey's
and the smaller legislative budget for SUNY and particularly Albany State.
The legislature's budget is $804,000 less than Carey's SUNYA budget.
If the state budget remains the same, SUNYA will lose 15-19 faculty and 68 staff positions, couseling services— including career and psychological
counseling which will be cut as a result of an expected loss of 18-22 student
services members, the physical maintenance of the campus will be reduced,
the library's acquisitions will be cut by 10,000, the work of the Atomospheric
Science Research Center will be cut, and various campus center services, the
Registrar, and the Office of Student Life will be cut.
With many students gathering around the podium to dance, talk, hang-out
and enjoy the warm spring day, SA decided to have the letter writing
campaign outside.
Comments by students were mixed with jest as spirits were high because of
the seventy degree spring weather. Student Gene Burgers said; "Lately, I've
tried to become socially active— this cause warrants social activityindividual activitymay not have a great effect but in the mass it docs. 1 want
my legislator to try to find alternate ways to face this crisis other than budget
cuts."
"They're destroying us by cutting out budget. They can't do it to us. I like
writing letters to my assemlymen — everyone should. Stuff like this,
reforming the marijuana laws, and anti-bottle bills, deserve letters," said Bill
Bishop.
Barry Cohen summed up the hope of the organizers: "I used to work down
at the legislature. If they get enough letters and know how their constituents
feel on an issue they might not want to go against it."
Some of the organizers were: Pat Sakal, Dave Coyne, and Andy Bauman.
kuehn
open meeting with students turned
to talk of the recent budget cuts,
"But appointments are being made;
that's heartening."
"He (the A&S Dean) should work
to create the best possible climate for
education," said Dr. Stein. He feels
that whoever occupies this post has
an obligation to regulate the quality
of course offerings, faculty, and
classroom experience. Stein stresses
the role of a Dean as a unifying element in the College. He emphasized
the importance of having one person
represent the collective interests of
the College divisions.
On the other hand, Ivo Lederer.
the Arts and Sciences Dean candidate who appeared on campus
March 10, was noncommittal on this
issue. Whcnasked whathesawas being the duties of such an administrator, or if there was even a
need for adean in the College of Arts
and Sciences, Lederer simply declined official comment.
When the pcrenial issue of tenure
arose, Dr. Stein got right to the
point; "Let me give you a series of
answers— the simple answers arc
just bullshit."
" I th ink most of the incompetency
in the classroom comes from not caring," said Dr. Stein. He feels that a
combination of incentives and opportunities can act as an a sort of
adrenalin to stimulate unproductive
faculty members.
Dr. Stein stressed the necessity of
having both faculty members who
arc strong in the area of teaching,
and those who specialize in research:
"Somebody has to produce
knowledge for it to be pervayed," he
said, explaining that, if not for people in research, "within five years,
thcre'd be nothing to teach."
An element of doubt was cast on
Dr. Stein's position as a serious contender for the post of Arts and
Sciences Dean by an article that
appeared in Pipe Dream, Harpur's
student newspuper. The article,
dated March 7, quoted Stein as saying that he was not giving "serious
consideration" to the position here
atSUNYAandthalhewas'Tarfrom
leaving SUNY-Binghamton."
However, Robert McFarland, a
faculty member in the School of
Graduate Studies who acted as one
of Stein's many guides during his
visit, places little importance on this
information. "At that time, nodates
had been set; no jobs had been
offered."
.kirchmayer
SA Presidential hopefuls from left to right: Bob O'Brien, Dave Coyne, Ken Wax, Kim Kreiger, and Andy Bauman.
'kuehn
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