sports Youthful Stickmen Prepare For Opener

advertisement
sports
timdrt, Ml 2. 1974
Youthful Stickmen Prepare For Opener
by David F. Armstrong
Once in awhile they argue
Lacrosse Coach
about the fastest
game—
Frdih the mhJ I700's to basketball or hockey: then about
modern day the game of lacrosse the roughest Hhme—water polo,
has changed very little. Modern football or boxing. But when it
man has designated a playing comes to the top combination,
anta and put certain restrictions the answer is lacrosse. Lacrosse
on the conduct of the game. The is the all-star combination of
basic ideas • of lacrosse have speed and body contact. It reremained the same; by using his quires . more elements of skill,
stick, the lacrosse palyer takes than any game I know.
the ball the length of the field by
Grantland Rice
either carrying or throwing it and
The Albany State Varsity
attempts to throw the ball into the Lacrosse team opens the 1974
opponent's goal.
season on April 6, 1974.
This year's Dane stickmen
have;: young look. There are 13
Lacrosse attracts a unique
freshman and sophomores out of
breed of individual. Its par21 men on the varsity. The varsiticipants unknowingly, almost
ty will have had 4 pre-season
magically become dedicated to a
scrimmages against Union
sport heretofore unheard of.
.College, Mohawk Valley
This intrinsic quality of lacrosse,
Lacrosse Club and RPI prior to
more so than any other sport,
the April 6 opener. Each scrimleads young athletes to new
mage thus far has shown the
heights of achievement.
Danes marked improvement.
t h e offense is built around att a c k m e n S t e v e Schuus,
Few athletic events known to
Massapequa, New York, Terry
man require such a combination
Brady, Levitown, New York and
of skills as does lacrosse.
Larry Rabinowitzl Irondequoit,
New York. In the midfield thus
far Arnie Will, Pete Connor,
Dennis Walsh, Tom Cerra and
freshman Jay Kianka have been
turning in stellar performances.
The Great Danes offense is of the
pass and cut variety, depending
heavily on each and every man's
ability to handle his stick.
Defensively Bob Wulkiewicz,
senior goal tender has shown
marked improvement which
should strengthen the team. On
the close defense veterans Bill
.lonat and Roland Levie arc expected to stabilize 3 freshman
hopefuls, David Ahonen, Joe
Mullin and standout Geneva
High School defcnscman Jim
Povero.
The varsity and junior varsity
lacrosse teams have been working diligently outside since midFebruary and are anxiously
looking forward to their opening
contests, good weather and
successful seasons. Home contests will be played on the varsity
soccer field.
he won his heat in the College
Pacing Championships.
It ws al! part of College Mixer
Night but it seemed like allot'the
students there,
were from
Albany State. Two bus loads
from the harness racing club, including this reporter who didn't
know much about harness racing, made the hour long trip to
cheer Artie on. They also hoped
to make a little money at the bet-
It might have been snowy Saturday night but It didn't stop Albany Stale harnessracingfins from making
the trip up to (irern Mountain Rice Track to watchfellowstudent Artie Finkelberg rsce. Artie (shown
driving to the finish) did not disappoint, as he drove his horse to • three-quarter length victory.
The lacrosse learn In action last vear. The stickmen open up
their season Saturday at Brockport.
ting windows.
Artie's race came after the first
regular race. I was feeling pretty
good, as my place bet in the first
race came in for a 4.20 return.
Most of the harness racing club
and Artie's friends were crowded
around the finish line, waiting
lor the race to start.
Artie was in the fourth or last
position and as he came around
the first time, he was last. But he
would come on. He crossed over
to the rail, before the turn, to
park driver three, who had the
best horse in the race. Artie was
still last going into the
backstretch.
Along the
buckstrctch, horse one and two
came off the rail and Mr.
Finkelberg took his horse and
boldly squeezed through, along
the rail,lo take the lead he was
not to relinquish. The harness
racing club was in hysterics.
Artie had a two length lead at
the top of the stretch but driver
three was coming on. Artie
maintained this lead, as he gave
the horse the whip and held off
three at the wire for the victory.
Alter crossing the finish line, Artie waved his whip in triumph
and perhaps in relief that the race
was over.
The response from the harness
racing club was incredible as
everyone was going crazy. After
Artie returned to the winner's
circle he was met by his parents
and a mob of admiring fans,
fiwmteii
Vol. LXI No. I t
APRIL 19,1974
Students Grade Profs Next Week
-.III « » t u l
In
clubs. Volunteers are still needed to
by Nancy Albsugh
Members of ACT stressed that the
- Students will be aksed next week • evaluations will be used for student administer questionnaires, however.
"
A teacher has the option of refusto evaluate their courses and information only: but. a recent
ing
to
be
evaluated,
but
most
have
teachers as the students, running report of President Benczet's Ad
Assessment of Courses and Teachers Hoc Advisory Committee on Tenure agreed to the questionnaire, which
(ACT) begin collecting information suggested that evaluations for tenure will take approximately 20 minutes
which will result in a ISO page should be conducted by students, in- of the class time.
teachers were notified of the
booklet to be available mid-summer. stead of the departments as they are
Mark Grccnbcrg, one of the now. This is only a report, however. questionnaire by Gerber and
Abramoff in late March, as the two
organizers said, "We'll have totally
Twenty questions ranging from
subjective values given in an objec- the lecturing ability of the teacher to solicited comments about the
questions. However, response was
tive form."
the teacher's encouragement of stuThe purpose of the booklet is to dent ideas arc asked in the question- light, though the comments that did
give students an idea ol class reac- naire written by Bill Rchluss. and come in were considered. They said
parts of the questionnaire were
tions to faculty and courses. Ex- based on models from Harpur, Corchanged lo incorporate those ideas.
plained David AhramolT, who heads nell. Stony Brook and other schools.
One big stumbling block was getACT, "For years I've been looking in
The booklet will include each ting lists of the classes, enrollment.
the computer listings and names I student's response rated from A teachers, and call numbers—all of
don't know. Basically, I'd like to through D on some questions , A them in one comprehensive form.
know something about the person through E on others. Questions will Finally, the Registrar made his comT h e While Roots of Peace" will be at this year's Earth Week program
also be averaged on a weighted basis. puter tapes available lo the group.
whose course I'm taking."
Opponents of the evaluation say it They then had to compile packets lor
is "just another form." hinting it will each class.
he useless if not harmful.
Others say students arc not
AC I members said although
qualified to evaluate teachers. Still courses change Irom semester to
others Iccl a standard form for alp
tivities
will
take
place
all
day
at
the
semester, students should he able to
the Environmental Protection Adby Mike Sena
departments is meaningless.
ministration of New York City. He Campus Center.
garner a general impression of how
Martin Schneider's "Ecology's
But workers answer these charges
Another
panel
discussion,
this
one
will speak here Monday. April 22. at
other students react to a particular
Batman", according to the New Mill P.M., in I.C-7.
on local environmental and energy saying perhaps someday this stan- teacher or course by looking at
York Tiini'H inventor of the Land Earth Week begins on Sal.. April problems and solutions will be held dardized form will be used in concurrent evaluations.
Rover which flys, climbs up walls, 20 at Mil) AM with a bike clinic In al Diaper Hall, on Thursday night at junction with a shorter depart mental
Tlie booklets will be distributed
stays submerged under water, and is the Stale Quad Flagroom. The pre- Mill I'M. Members will include: form. Rchluss said "It's general
run on methane from dog refuse, will Earlh Week clinic will demonstrate Mayor Eraslus Corning; James enough lo hit everyone, but specific free of charge lo the faculty
members, administration, and the
highlight this year's Earth Week ac- simple repairs and maintenance for Biggnpo, Commissioner of the enough to mean somcthin."
Abraninlf. a Junior here, con- student volunteers. About 3200
tivities. Earth Week will run Irom your bicycle. Following this, there Department of Environmental Concopies will he sold for 25c lo students
April 22-2K.
will he a bike ride to a picnic area in servation; Thomas Browne, Iacted Steve Gerber, SA President in al summer planning conferences,
Emergency
Fuel
Office;
and
others.
September,
asking
Gerber
lo
conSchneider, a re known the I'incbush al I2:.10 AM.
President Benczel will he on hand, sider his proposal for student evalua- and those at Drop-Add in the gym
photographer, will discuss solutions
Monday night Martin Schneider
next tall, flic computer lapc will be
that according to him could end speaks. On Tuesday. April 23 at 8:00 an Elle I'ankin of WCiY Radio will tion of teachers. Gerber strongly saved so a second printing can be
he the moderator. Commissioner supported the idea; he had been
pollution.
I'M there will he a panel discussion
made, if needed.
Schneider's notoriety in the pollu- on the energy crisis in the I'AC liiggiine will present a proclamation thinking of the same idea as a new
Abiuiiiolf thinks full evaluation of
tion and ecology field came as a Recital Hall. Members include: from Governor Wilson officially development for students. Gerher all courses and teachers will not he
declaring
this
week
as
Earth
Week.
said.
"Ahramofl
has
done
an
amazresult nl an investigation he did into Waller Kress of Shell Oil Co.;
necessary each semester, Rather, he
Photographic essays of 1926 war ing hob. from A-Z."
alleged dangerous waste elimination Henry Hurwllz, physicist at General
would like lo sec a booklet eon'atrocities
will
he
pail
of
a
seminar
Abramoff asked for funds from
processes lit Florida phosphate Electric; Edward Rcnshaw.SUNYA
Willing the "vital statistics" for each
plants.
professor of political economy; conducted by Schneider on Friday, Central Council; Gerber promised to course: hook requirements, number
Near Tampa. Florida the Donald Ross, director of NYl'IRCi; April 26. I he essay, entitled "Expose help them get the required money. of tests and exams, teacher's ideas
I hey got $5,00(1 from Council to pay
phosphate industry plants blow both and Sam Love, an environmentulism of Censored Material," will be in
lor paper lor the 5,000 question- about the course, the department's
sulfuric and hydrochloric acids out author. Model at ing the panel will be I.C-23 at 8:01) I'M.
idea about the course, and adSaturday. April 27. at 11:00 AM naires, and rental lees for the Unlvnc ditional costs lor the student taking
ol smokestacks into the atmosphere, Jim Williams of Channel Six News.
Computers
which
willcompllc
the
there
will
ben
paper
drive
outside
the
according lo Schneider. He said
A group of 13 Mohawk Indians,
I lie course (the lah Ices, art supplies,
these acids strip the painl off cars, called " I hcWhilc Roots of Peace," campus center. At 8:00 I'M there will data alter all finals arc graded in
lor example.I
be
a
lolk
and
square
dance
featuring
cause emphascma and ulceration of will conduct seminars, craft fairs,
Mav.
" I lie whole thing is to help us." exGail
Weiss
has
organized
ahoui
the throat, kill many thousands of movies, stage an afternoon meet the lennig's All Star Siring Band at the
plained Abramoff. T o know just
150 students to administer the
cattle, and is wiping out the citrus press session and an evening pow- second floor gym.
Earth Week concludes on Sunday. questionnaire to the 1150 classes. the name and number when youi
growers in the area.
wow on Wednesday, April 24. The
whole life is al slake is just crazy."
lo dramatize the situation, Mohawk Indians hope lo build April 28 with a walk for ecology. The About 850 of these classes will he
Schneider brought some carcasses of bridges between the Indian nation 18 mile walk starts and ends at the covered by SA funded departmental
liutopsicd cows to a Mobil-owned and the While nation. These ac- New Albany High School.
phosphate plant, fuming on his
lluioscopc
which detects
hydrochloric acid, Schneider proved
thai their deaths were due to the
phosphate emissions. He started
snapping away when Mobil plant
campuses still lacking am guidelines
were using student monies as auxguards sprang up claiming lo he
legislative interference.
prohibiting student Ices continues
iliary
lands
in
the
operation
of
the
by
Boh
Mayer
sheriffs. Schneider said he told them
Ihe first official policy on the
collection.
campus
administration.
Ihe
report
he was taking fashion photographs. SASH
collection of student fees was \sAs more students begun lo realize
flic continuing controversy over lublishcd by the Slate Board of said some FSAs purchased land with
Seeing thai he would not he believed,
there were no existing laws within
Schnedicr dashed to his Rover to es- mandatory student fees is as alive to- I ruslees on November of l%7. The the student tax funds; in one in- University governance mandating
day as il was years ago. The New guidelines approved officially the stance, a campus president used
cape.
collection of fees, university officials
I he next day Schneider sent the York Slate Legislature is now con- university's sanction for collecting Kinds to pay for his own inaugura- started to explore the policy. On
iiou. I he audit charged that several
sidering
a
range
of
bills
that
could
u
pictures out lo Hit magazine, but
voluntary lees.
I leans of Students knew thai prior lo May , l%8. the I rustces establishUntil the November decision was
they never got there. He thinks they have a crippling effect on student acl%K there was a voluntary, not man- ed the existing guidelines governing
liviiies
at
stale-supported
campuses
outlined, most students believed lees
never left the Air Express office.
datory policy on student fees, yet the collection and distribution
were mandatory. Collected by camSchneider tried lo recreate the pic- il passed and approved.
process currently found on all
Recently it cartoon appearing in pus Faculty Student Associations, they tailed to inform anyone.
tures, but again they disappeared.
Alter the Controller's report was SONY campuses. Ihe guidelines
City College of New York Ihe fees appeared on student bills
Finally, Schneider finished his
newspaper re-ignited Ihe old fires each semester. Hie FSAs then released, a group of Albany students called fin ihe individual campuses to
series. Lift published his
questioned Ihe legilaniacy of their conduct a referendum every four
with lawmakers, flic cartoon,
photographs on the polluted at- described by several legislators lis deposited these funds in their own lees being used to support religious years on whether collection of fees
mosphere bin censored his pictures "vulgar", "outrageous", and "in accounts in order to exempt these organizations on campus, When would be voluntary or mandatory. It
on the dead cows. I lie emotional im- terrible lasle" catalyzed a bill spon- funds from regular stale accounting campus SA Presidents requested a limited use of funds lo four broad
pact of the series was greatly reduc- sored by Rep-Con Senator John procedure. Il was believed these fees legal opinion, students were sur- categories: recreational, social,
ed, according to A.I) Coleman, Marchi which would prohibit any were going lo be used exclusively for prised to learn from the counsel that cultural, and educational. All
photography expert of the New student newspaper on a slate campus student governments and extra- "these student Ices are not mandated responsibility for fees would be in
curricular student activities on the
Ynik Timtx.
from receiving financial uid from individual campuses. An audit by by the Board of Trustees, and the the hands of students. The only
stipulation was that the Chancellor
On top of this, L{fe replaced student taxes.
the Suite Controller issued in l%6 stale could not force students lo pay would establish a ceiling on how
Schneider's own powerful text, with
these fees." Ihe following semester a
The history of mandatory student suggested this was not occuring.
voluntury collection was established high tuxes could go. A figure of S70
their own deleted, toned down ver- activity fees is a relatively short one,
The report noted that at various
com. imp. 12
yet it is filled with a long background institutions, local campus presidents at SUNY-Alhany, but the other
sion.
Schneider is a consultant to both of politics, legal maneuvers, and
the U.S. Public Health Service and
*!
"Ecology's Batman" Leads Earth
Week Activities April 22-28
SVNYA Student Wins at Green Mountain
by Bruce R. Maggln
There was joy at Green Mountain Race Track Saturday night
as Albany State student, Artie
Finkelberg, made his harness
racing debut a successful one, as
University ol New York at Albany
Artie, completely covered with
mud from the track but certainly
jubilant, talked after the race. "It
was a two horse race,..when it
came to the stretch, I realized I
had a shot and 1 gave it the
whip." Naturally Artie was a bit
nervous, especially alter his
horse acted up in the paddock
but he got through his first test
on what he hopes will be a long
career.
It was now back to the
business ol ma king some money.
I was still having problems
reading the charts but I was
listening to the so called experts
around me. By the end of the
evening
most-, of these "experts" came out behind. 1 was
was willing to bet conservatively,
sticking to the places and shows.
Races three and four put me
behind as the words of wisdom of
my friends proved to be
something less than that.
But I was catching on and by
the end of race sixth, I was
ahead. There were a few more
winners and losers along the
way, and by the end of the evening I was definitely smarter than
when 1 entered.
My suspicions that it is pretty
difficult to make money at the
track were confirmed. It didn't
seem to matter whether you
knew what you were doing, as
some of the big winners were
pretty inexperienced.
I also
learned never to bet a provisional
driver, coming out of the ninth
position.
It was quite an enjoyable evening and the I made a big dollar
sixty; but don't tell the IRS.
Mandatory Student Tax Threat Continues
Women's Weekend Events Slated
"flu* weekend. Afxil :», 3B, MM)
21. the Albany State -Woman**
Lifcefuliiif! Group i* aponwring a
"Women's WgakflMt**. Beginning on
Jrwtoy evening tone will he a performance *y Maxmr Felman, who
recentlydidWiowsaiTown Haliand
the titter £mJ. Her songs have been
described as "bright and wittv ...her
feminism penetrates ber guitar playing"
, >On Saturday there will be several
workshops which will focus on all
jupects of feminism and women's
culture. A lev. -new ones like
'"•Witches and Amazons" and
"Women as Victims" will he featured
along with "Women in Sports".
"^Open Marraige" and many others.
Lesbians for Liberation, an Albany
group, hopes 1o present an experinietnal workshop in which they
plan to recreate an "atmospheric lesbian experience".
On Saturday evening two events
will continue to keep sisterhood going strong. A pot luck communal
dinner will enable women to meet
together after the workshops and
keep on rapping. At 8:30 in the gym
Robin Morgan, editor of i'u/ertcW
lb Powerful and author of Monster
will apeak on her concept* of the
movement and her political definition of ""Manner**.
The weekend Will wind-up on
Sunday with a communal [brunch at
lu:30-i2:30 and then a series of
feminist films by Women Make
Movies, these will include "Fear".
"3-or Better or Worse" and
"fttnanoia Blues".
Other features of the weekend include a Woman's Arts and Cralisexbibit and recent slides of the
womerfs .movement in China.
Women's Weekend is part of the
.recent locus on "women's culture"
taking place in the feminist movement.
Ihe idea is that women
everywhere are beginning to look
buck in order that they may finally
move forward. For this reason, il is
said, there has been much effort on
the part of feminists to examine
those issuesand parts of culture thai
relate directly to the women's ,.„_
periencein past andpre sent society.
mmm mm mmm
i
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Friday:
fieatlj la Venice
LCI
7:30 and 10:00
$1,25 without
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THEIR. NEWEST! FUNNIEST! MUSICAL!
| SPECIAL DOUBLE FEATURE - RE-LIVE YOUR CHILDHOOD!
AND
THE
CARTOON
MARX
DUMBO
BROTHERS
7:00 and 9:30
$.25 with tax card
PAGE TWO
MID liAST <AP> Israeli planes bombed and straied Syrian positions on
strategic Ml. Hermon again today, Egypt hinted itmighl join tht battle, and
another terrorist explosion erupted in a Tel Aviv suburb, injuring I ? pt-ruins,
ollicials reported.
the Israeli planes scrambled following artillery barrages aimed at Israeli
troops occupying the 9.232-foot mountaintop, often described as Israel's
Middle lias! eyes, an Israeli spokesman said.
At the same lime Syrian gunners also opened up on Israeli forces in the
southern sector of the 300-sijuare-mile Syrian enclave captured last Oct ober,
Ihe Israelis said. But the Syrians charged the Israelis with firing first
It was the second straight day Israeli planes were called into action and the
fourth time in a week.
Israel has held all high ground on Hermon since the October war From tht
craggy windswept top viewers can see Damascus and beyond, tht Israelis say
In Cairo. War Minister Ahmed Ismail said Egypt would fight alongside the
Syrians if the situation on the Golan Heights became critical.
Ismail, who is commander in chief of the armies of both Syria ano lev pi.
said: "II the lighting became more serious or the situation became cm ical. nn
doubt we will lake part."
In the I'el Aviv surburban village of Pardes Kalz. an lsraehmadt hand
grenade exploded, wounding 12 Arabs and one Jew. tht Israeli militar. curnmand reported.
National
WASHING I ON (API U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica signed an order today permitting the issuance ol a subpoena demanding President Ninon turn
over records and tapes of 64 White House conversations.
I he sweeping subpoena had been requested by special Watergate
prosecutor Leon Jaworski. who said he needed the materials lor the Sept s>
trial of seven Watergate cover-up defendants.
I wo ol the defendants. Charles W. Colson and Robert C Mardun rud
joined in llaworski's request, agreeing with him that the information essentia) to a lair trial.
Sirica's order directed that a subpoena prepared b\ Jaw 01 ski be issue u .ind
made returnable before the court at 1(1 a.m. on Mas 2.
I here was no immediate White House comment on Sirica's order
The subpoena requests tapes and related documents covering t-J s.-i • •.;sations ranging from June 20. 1972. through June 4. |u7.v
The materials requested overlap 23 conversations also being sought ,n .i
subpoena by the House Judiciary Committee which is considtnng impeachment action against I'icsident Nixon.
In a motion filed with the court on Tuesday, Jaworski told luJe» N . i
that he had been trying unsuccessfully since Jan. 9 to obtain the materialvoluntarily in negotiations with the White House.
"1 have as yet received no definitive response to my request and. ,us> :dingly. leel obligated to seek these materials by subpoena." Jaworski said
SAN FRANCISCO (API Policemen swept through the streets ol San 1 un
Cisco I hursday. conducting unprecedented searches ol black men in .i -ear. h
lor Ihe killer or killers ol 12 white victims.
One ol the first to be slopped. Robert Brooks, said: "I think the major persecuting the black community for the acts ol a lew cra/v dudes
But police ollicials reported that although there was some resentment,
most persons subjected to searches understood the reason and hoped :
would uncover the man Mayor Joseph L. Aliolo described as "a mad t,:. u
"We have a mad killer loose in the city, sunplv killing people ai r.nia.
Aliolo said. "I here is no motive and no sense."
Ihe latest victim was Nelson I. Shields I \ .who was shot three time- •••"hack I ucsda.v night without warning. Police Chiel Donald Scon said !•.-:.
are at least two killers and possihlv more.
I he random shootings began last November and have lell si\ pcr-on-. wounded, all ol them while.
NEW YORK (AP| Former Commerce Secretarv Maurice Man- mi..
denied to a jtirv today thai he was guilt) ol conspiracy, obstruction ol ia-o-.
or perjury.
l-ike codelcndanl John Mitchell, the former atlornev general. Mandenied ever Irving to fix a fraud investigation ol financier Robert \ e--return lor a secret S200,()(X1 contribution to President Nixon's !-'" s.nn
paign.
"Are vou guiltv or not of these charges?" asked Mans' lawvci, Walui
Bonner, al the end of a two-da.v direct examination.
"I am not guilty ol any ol these charges, believe me." Stans said, looking
directly al the jury.
Ihe indictment charges that Stans and Mitchell defrauded the ti \(> bv
lailing lo report Vcsco's contribution, which Stans received on -\pril I"
1972. three days alter the effective date of a law requiring disclosure
Saturday:
WALT D6NEY-S
International
tunities for graduating high school
seniors.
Following a 5:30 reception, the
dinner speaker will be Helen Sallord, associate prolessor ol business
education at SUNYA and 1973
winner of Outstanding Business
Teacher of the Year Award lor this
region.
William Savage. SUNYA
professor of business education and
educational director of AMS, is
coordinator and general chariman ol
the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Business Department, program
chairman: and William Charlson.
Niagara Mohawk Power Corp..
chairman of "Career Forum."
-:vXO«<»»«>«X»«»«»5l»H^^
$ .75 with tax card
drives held during Ihe year. The
first in
the
beginning
of
September, brought in close to $2,Five Quad Ambulance Service, 000. I he second, which included a
through an indirect group called the mailing of 20.000 letters, brought in
Friends of Five Quad, will be effec- close to $1,000.
tively funded from student tux for
Council member Lew Fidlcr
the first time.
Central Council, capping off a suited that although il is not the infour hour debate at its last session tent of Central Council to fund Five
before the Spring break, voted to ap- Quad on a permanent basis, if SA
propriate money lo the Friends of docs not fund now. the service may
live Quad group from a loan cease to exist completely, he
through the Athletic Advisory recommended thai Five Quad be
Board, and through a grant from funded only as an emergency
Student Association. Council set the measure, even though the actual
group's budget at $12,000, with hall- fiscal btirden belongs vvilh the State
coming from each of the two ol New York.
SA President Steve gcrber slated
sources.
I he debate prior to Council's deci- thill tilt' -ugh it is Ihe state's rcsponsion primarily centered around the sibilitv in provide health care serpropriety of having the Student vices, there would be little chance for
Association fund a group such us Ihe state to fund Five Quad for the
coming year.
live Quad.
Gcrber also mentioned the possibiliMark Stern, student representy ol a legal problem should SA
tative I'ronil-'ivcQuud, told council
become Ihe source of the money. He
Ihtil SA should fund the group
questioned whether SA would be
because live Quad cannot get the
legally and financially responsible
money from any other source. Stern
should a person decide lo sue Five
added (fml l-ivcQuad isascrviccund
Quad,
an activity, with cighly-l'ivc people
Council member Ken Wax staled
actively involved.
that the question should be conIn a lengthy explanation. Stern
sidered in terms of its priority. Since
told Council ol' the attempts made to
there is nothing more important
receive funds from outside sources.
than a student's welfare on this campus, he said, the difference in time
Ihrcc main sources were apand speed between live Quad and an
proached including the university,
outside service may decide the questhe stale andfcderalgovernment and
tion of life or death.
private foundation.
I he final budget ol $ 12.840 passed
Stem staled that the Department vvilh money appropriated from a
ol Health. Education and Wellatcas loan ol $6,750 payable.to the AAB
well as the Department of I ranspor- and a $6,090 gram from SA.
lation could not provide any
In addition, three candidates for
assistance. I hrec insurance com- Ihe lorlhcoming elections were expanies were approached including empted from invalidation for not
Group Health Insurance. Blue having attended a mandatory
Cross-Blue Shield, and Student meeting, as stipulated on their sellHealth Insurance, with Blue Ct'oss- nominal ion forms.
llluc Shield as Ihe only company
Al Ibis weeks Council meeting,
which might possihlv provide any candidates Amy Paulin. Eric Reicl.
help.
and George .last were excused from
being disqualified upon consideraStein told Council I hilt Five Quad
tion ol Council.
did receive some money from two
by Carole Zingman
Bus Ed Awards Given
The Albany Chapter of the Administrative Management Society
(AMS) will hold its annual Business
Educational Day. Tuesday, April 23,
at State University of New York at
Albany. Outstanding business
education students from 44 area high
schools will receive Achievement
Awards from ' AMS and from
business organizations in the Capital
District.
Activities will begin at 4 p.m. in
the Campus Center Assembly Room
wi'.ii a panel of outstanding personnel specialists from the public,
private and military sectors. They
will conduct a "Career Forum," discussing business career oppor-
5-Quad Funded By
Indirect SA Grants
LC18
11 ;00 without
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
WASHINGTON (AP)The nation's economy sank swiltlv toward recession
levels in the first quarter ol the year, while inflation pushed prices upward al
an ever-increasing rale.according lo government figures released I hursdav
Ihe Commerce Department said the country's dross National Product
dropped al a 5.8 per cent annual rate in the first three months ol the year, the
first decline in three years and the biggest dro psince I95K. Inflation, on the
other hand, soared at a 10.8 per cent annual rate.
WASHINGTON (AP) The Pioneer 11 space probe will be re-aimed rrtdiij
to bring the small craft closer to Jupiter and to man's first encounter with Ihe
ringed planet of Saturn.
Ihe National Aeronautics and Space Administration says that Ihe
maneuver hopefully will bring Pioneer II wilhin 26,000 miles of. ittpiler Ihe
closest any craft has cometo Ihegium planet und could eventually force the
liny craft near Saturn.
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
Fountains Won't Spout
In Move to Conserve Energy
by Daniel Gaines
The podium's fountains may neon
only for special events, or possibly
not tit all this semester, according to
President Benezet and Assistant lo
Ihe President for Planning and
Development and Acting Director
of Physical Plants Walter M.
lisdale. In reaction Central Council
passed unanimously a bill calling for
normal operation.
Ill a memorandum lo SA President Steven Gcrber President
Bene/el explained that, "Ihe energy
conservation program constrains
us" and said: "Mr. Hartly and Mr.
I isdiile will have lo give word as to
the practical chances of turning on
our fountains for al least special occasions. I am sure, for example, we
will watt! them going at Commencement."
lisdale said that the fountains tire culls lor the fountains to be drained
all powered with motors and pumps and washed, the filters changed and
thin when operated require a con- the fountains refilled. He pointed
siderable amount of electricity. out thai is is not economical to do
I hough President Nixon 'lias this every few days. II the water was
left in the fountains and they were
declared that the energy crisis'is
over, lisdale believes there is a ', turned on every lew days they would
not need to be cleaned as often,
necessity both lo conserve energy
lisdale said,.that this alternative,
and he economical in light of rising
while saving'some energy, does not
energy costs.
save enough.
I
' .'.i.
To permit' further savings, the
fountains will hot he at "lull blower"
when on but will be cut back
somewhat.
In answer to a suggestion that
wilier be left in the fountains even
when they arc not in use, lisdale said
(hat if the water is left in the fountains lor more Ihnn two days without
litem being turned on. a complete
cleanup becomes necessary. This
lisdale feels Ihal practical purposes do exist for ihe fountains. He
sees their psychological value (i.e..
their role as an emotional release!us
their primary purpose. He said Ihal
he fought lor ihe •restoration of the
lake (al'ier ihe dam collapsed)
primarily because of its psychological value. I isdalc explained
Ihal "moving water has a certain
quality lo il." thai the fotinlains arc
"good and ihat's why we pul them
there, Ihev're only good if they're
running." he admitted.
SASU Charter Flights Save Vacation $
SASU. Inc., the Student Association of the Stale University, will
oiler Suite University students round trip charter travel flights to Europe this summer al substantial
savings, as a result of an agreement
recently concluded with Cuubcr
I ravel Associates of Boston, Mass.
lour charter llights, all departing
from Kennedy International Airport
in New York Cily, will be offered as
part ol the SASU Summer Travel
Package. All llights are scheduled
lor Amsterdam on regularly
scheduled airlines. Roundlrip prices
range from $259 to $289 and llights
vary in length from three lo eight
weeks.
A summary of available Iravel
offerings:
Charier I
Charter 2
Charter.'
Charted
June I - July 5, 1974
AH'n Class
of 7 5 mwiktfi:
Watch for
JB Night
July 12 - Aug. 2, 1974
July 19 - Aug. 16, 1974
June 25 - Aug. 16. 1974
$259.00
$289.00
$289.00
$269.00
"Ibis agreement concluded with
Gather Iravel means that SASU can
now oiler SUNY students summer
I lights to Europe at a cost well below
what they might expect lo pay
through travel agents or other travel
programs", explained SASU Services Director James Mossgruher in
announcing details of the summer
travel program. "By using Ihe fifth
largest travel agency in Ihe country,
SASU is making certain that the allloo-typical summer plight ol
students stranded in Europe by disreputable iravel carriers will nol occur lo Stale University students who
are Europe-bound."
Garbcr I ravel Associates has a
twenty-five year history of reliable
travel service and has offices located
throughout New York. New
Hampshire and Miissiiehussetts
Ihe SASU iravel program isopen
lo any SUNY student whose campus
student government is a member ol
SASU. Further information is
available from your local campus
SASU coordinator, who can be contacted at thesludentgovemmcnt office, or directly from the SASU office in Albany.
HopefullMta SASll niRhts will nol be this crowded, nor Ink rl|orom.
Students will save money hy flying S A ^ j i o « ^ v e r ; _ _ ^ _ _ _ ^ ^ _
RENSSELAER UNION PRESENTS
LGO \tome
Friday,AF'"'
8:30 PM
19
Proctor's Theater
4th Street
TROY
RESERVED SEATS: $3.50
Tickets can be purchased at RPI Union and at door.
I isdalc explained Ihal he is an
engineer and as such he is used lo
dealing vvilh empirical formulas
Iron) which definitive answers arc
obtainable. He docs not pretend to
know whether saving a certain
amount ol energy is ol greater value
Ihun using it lo create psychological
benefits. I he energy savings will he
substantive and definitive, lisdale
said thai the psychological effects:
can only he speculated upon and
cannot he quaiilitalively measured.
lisdale has made the decision lie
thinks is best and it appears il would
lake some very hard empirical
evidence to gel him to change his
mind. His two superiors. Hartley
and Hcne/el.hnve been made aware
of Ihe situation by Council and i now
becomes a game of wailing while
Student Association docs what ileun
in the lobbying department. If Ihcy
fail, ihe podium becomes a desert
and the days of frolicking in' the
fountain becomes jusi one more
chunk ol nostalgia.
Montessori2Teacher
Tralnlllg
This Smr. on wooded campus in
Chicago, June 24 • Aug. 7
Prepare for Fastest Growing FIELD IN _
For info:
MMTT-A 1010 W. Chgo. Ave.
EDUCATION!
22J
Chicago, III. 60622
For further info. 270-6505
,'„!„••
ilMlllMHMU
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
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The Albany County Chapter of the National Foundation March of Di mts
will hold a Marchjof Dime* Walk-a-Thon on Sunday, May 5, beginning at
10:00 A M , Washington Park, Albany!
The route for the Walk is approximately 20 miles long and it is expected
that over 2,000 students, plus adults/clubs, and organizations will par.
ticipate. Each person walking all or part o f the course gets sponsors who
pledge dollars or cents per mile. These sponsors can be friends, relatives or
businessmen. Anyone pan be a sponsor. A l l h takes is their monetary pledge
per mile. All funds raised willgolo the Albany County March of Dimes to aid
in their fight against birth delects.
Anyone who would like to participate in the Walk-a-Thon as a walker or
sponsor or anyone who would like to have a speaker concerning the Walk-aI'hon may callThe Walk-a-Thon office, 458-7070, at 3 Computer Drive,
Albany. N.Y.
Beyond the money raised forthe March o f Dimes program now.oneofthe
most significant aspects of the Walk-a-Thon is that these young people are
made aware of what it takes to help build a better America: indi\ idual effort
and participation.
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Students Exhibit Art Work
p
The above S U N V A M R G chart Of local supermarket p r i e s e reprinted from a previous edition of the ASP.
The purpote (if the chart » t o make aiailaMe to students a rough aurtey o f comparable items, and their
price*, for reference. U i t not dear from the chart, nor could the information be obtained from SUN VA
P I R G whether the compared Hems were Rom the tame manufacturer, the same brand label, or whether
•tore brand price* were compared.
A juried exhibition of work in all
media by students at State University of New York at AfBany opens
Wednesday. April 17, in the university's Art Gallery. The show will
continue through May 5 and may be
seen during the regular gallery hours
of 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday,
and 1-5 p.m.,Saturdayand Sunday.
The Jewish Student Coalition
(JSC) of State University of New
York at Albany has planned a
number of special events for Shalom
Week in celebration of Israel's 26th
anniversary. A l l events are open to
the public.
The celebration began last night at
8:30 with a concert in the Performing
Arts Center Main Theatre by Rabbi
Shlomo Carlebach. He is a traveling
concert artist as well as an Hassidic
rabbi.
F o u r Shabbat services are
scheduled during the week at
SUNYA's Chapel House: 7:30 pm,
A p r i l 19; 10 am, April 20, 7:30 pm
A p r i l 26; and 10 am, April 27. Also
planned are u series of films:
"Sallah," 7:30 pm, April 22, in Lecture Center (LC) 23; "I Was Born in
A l l students registered here during
the current academic sear were eligible to submit works lor judging h\
Jerusalem," 7:30 pm April 23, Campainter
Marilyn Giershjcfi and
pus Center Assembly Hall; "Wall in
sculptor Anthony Milkowski
Jerusalem," 3 pm, April 24, LC 23;
and " I Love You, Rosa," 8:30 and 11
Ms. Giersbach's
pm. April 27, LC3. Admission is 25
cents for JSC members and 50 cents number of private and public e
for non-mernbers for all films except tions. M r . Milkowski. ol the I: nits
the last one, which is 50 and 75 cents, at Hunter College, has shown his
work . the I ibor de N.ig> and John
respectively.
Other Shalom Week events in- B. Myers galleries in \ c u Hoik, as
clude a community-wide Yom well as at recent exhibitions oigaiu/HaShoah commemoration at 2 p. m., cd by the Museum ol Modem \n
April 21, at Temple Israel, New and the Jewish Museum
Scotland Avenue, Albany; an Israel
programs exhibition in the Campus
Center first floor lounge, 11 a.m.-3
p.m., April 22; Martin Edelnmn,
S U N Y A associate professor of
political science, on "The Role of the
Religious Parties in IsraeliPolitics,"
12 noon, April 24, Campus Center
Fireside Lounge.
The university's call
brought in 222 works I"
lists from which the lui
86 pieces. The works u
ling, sculpture, prim*
ceramics, jewelry, photo
conceptual a n .
Qtouier 1Eaat fflmema
i
Friday & Saturday, April 19
&20
7:30 & 10:001
Chosen but once and cherished forever,
your engagement and wedding rings will reflect your love
in their brilliance and beauty. Happily you can choose
Keepsake with complete confidence
because the guarantee assures perfect clarity,
precise cut and fine,
white color. There is
no finer diamond ring.
A n«e A H ("-cof.-
" I consider myself a reform candidate and I want no endorsem ill
trout any one special interest group
on campus." He likes toseehims •!!
as new bluod in student government
because "I've never had experience
in SA." Besides "I-riends" Thompson
listed what lie considered as his
background experience for the job.
"I've live three sears on campus, lor
three veins I've done feature stories
Inr A S I ' . I've been involved with Inlernational Student Association and
Tin a basketball champion in
A M l A."
Ihiiinpson eritici/ed the status
tmlliiilifil
ail l>W chilli
llringing his problem to the notice
ol President Steve Gcrber. on Tuesday, just threcdaysago, it was decided that .lohnson not he allowed to
switch his campaign to the Presidency.
I he mallei', brought before Central Council Wednesday night, was
resolved in the same manner. The
opinion was that there could he no
way ol determining il the one hundred signatures collected by Johnson
lor SASU were done with the
knowledge that lie was intent on running lor the Presidency.
Johnson admitted that lie was the
'vict i in nl un "unlamiliarity ol'
procedure." which led to his being
placed on the ballot lor the wrong
post.
Johnson's only recourse now is to
the SupienieC'ouri. but it isdoublful
whether there is enough time
remaining lor the Court to prepare
and decide bis case in lime lor the
elections on I uesday.
.1
i
a
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED FOR
ALUMNI PHONOTHON
The purpose of the Alumni PHONOTHONistocall
up for
pledges to help build the Alumni Conference Center.
1. Free dinner
2. Gift
$.50 with
Slate Quad Card
$1.00 without
Thomas
Chiu
Sam Thomas, slowed down a bit
by the petition proceedure, has
become an S A presidential candidate t o get a point across concerning mandatory student tax.
Thomas has a lot of experience
with SA—In court. It seems that
when he became aware of exactly
where his tax dollar was going, he
didn't agree. He feels that if ASP has
un editorial page and Central Council can meddle in politics, he could be
Kudolph K. Chiu chooses to
center his campaign around harsh
criticism of the present administration. "The present Gcrber administration just isn't doing enough
for our students...So far the only major issue Gcrber has during his entire
term is gun control. In other words,
his administration may well be
q ualified to be called a 'one issue administration.' And he has not accomplished much with that cither."
« W J« •'.»•• 5-'-' W F S :1 '
supporting groups he has no kinship
to, or might be against.
Thomas feels that the individual
students, here lor the academics
S U N Y A provides should not be
forced to support all groups on campus. So he battled in small claims
court for a refund of his $64. The
case was thrown out of court due to a
euntlmti'il on I'uac ''ixhi
Chiu sights the inability of SA to
deal with tenure as a major example
of its weakness. He focuses on the
' M i a m i scandal' as proof the other
deficiencies he has voiced. Basically
he sees the scandal as student tax
money mistakenly spent on the
entertainment of SA officials. Gcrber may not have purposely planned
continue/I mi / " W cixhi
Polydouris
by Edward Mowr
John Polydouris, currently a
sophomore here, has become the
fourth person to announce his candidacy for Vice-President of the Student Association, He is running ona
ticket with
Presidential hopeful
Sam Thomas.
A January transfer student,
Polydouris has hud no direct participation in student government.
Lnthusiusm. he claims, is the best
qualification for elected office:
" f r o m high school I've been interested in student affairs. I'm good
at dealing with people, and I believe I
really have something to offer the
school."
What Polydouris has In offer includes the following plait in in:
I) (Juml liiianls:
II'ulytlourix
uiuilil
liivnr an cmitliosis iif ilic
((iniitiiicil an /mm' t'ijtlll
ATTENTION MAY DEGREE
CANDIDATES
COMMENCEMENT
INFORMATION
LOCATION
Football field in fair weather, gymnasium if there is inclement weather.
(Admission to ceremony in the gymnasium will be by cap and gown for
candidates and faculty only).
TIME
lpm - formation for procession outside the gymnasium
2pm - commencement ceremony (approximately, one hour).
DATE
Saturday, May 25, 1974
SPEAKER
Jacqueline Wexler, President, Hunter College
CAPS AND GOWNS
Must be ordered in person at the Bookstore before WEDNESDAY, April
24 to guarantee availability.
NOTE
Tickets will NOT be issued for guests. Guest seating will be sufficient out-
3. Free phone call
doors for fair weather or in Lecture Centers, PAC and Campus Center for
INTERESTED?
inclement weather.
For further info: Call Alumni Office 457-4631, during the day or Gary Sussman, 457-4307, at night.
WE NEED TO KNOW AS SOON AS POSSIBLE!
KEEPSAKE DIAMOND RINGS, BOX 00, SYRACUSE, N.Y. 13201
PAGE FOUR
cd him to run due to his "campuswide appeal" Thompson is given
credit for being the rounder of the
successful organization "Friends."
"r-iiends" takes pride in serving a
wide ei'ossectinn of student groups
and, if elected, A l wants to do the
same. "What I want to see is power
given 10 the students. Students must
have an active say in policy. And
every group that contributes to the
University spirit should be properly
lu tided."
For those who help:
HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING
< m WW M W M M J l r t W ' I I I X H W M—t at HUlim K»UH0U1
Kd. Note
Due to confusion in the Student
Association petitioning procedures,
possible Presidential candidate T i m
Johnson filed his form for what he
believed was the SA Presidential
form.
The form was entirely
legitimate, complete with the one
hundred signatures. A l l would have
been satisfactory were it not for the
j'tici that candidate Johnson filed a
petition lor SASU delegate, contusing it it seems lor the Presidential
form.
DATES:
APRIL 24,25,28,29, and
30.
Keep
Send new 20 pg. bookloi, "Planning Your Engagement and Wedding" plus
full color folder and 4A pg. Bride's Book gilt offer all for only 25* Q-M
Thompson
Albert Thompson ( A l t.) has
halted political plans until peersurg-
Johnson
Although the gallery has hung a
number of exhibitions of student
work, the new exhibition is "the first
o f its k i n d , " according to Donald
Mochon, gallery director, "because
it is the first exhibition to be open to
all students here and because it is the
first time artists from outside the university faculty have been brought in
as jurors for a student exhibition."
Shalom Week Celebrated
r
by Andrea H e r i b t r i
There are now six candidates for S A
President, with one student's candidacy contested because o f
problems with his petition.' Randolph Chiu, Sammy Thomas, kti
Albert Thompson have recently
thrown their respective hats into the
ring to j o i n those of Pat Curran,
Wayne Halper, and Gail Knibloc.
T i m Johnson may take his candidacy t o SA Supreme Court, asking lor a decision there. April 23,
Albany students will have a wide
choice. With various reasons lor
their late starts, each new hopeful
expressed a desire lor equal time in
ASI>.
.38- .48
Cwt-
Enter Race; Total Six
New Exec
QUESTIONS
Call Campus Center Information Desk, 457-6923,
In Conn. <WHM-—fo.,
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
« * • ( « » * • ? ^W'Mi**/'********** •L'"J
Once a yew, this Unlvenft)
engages' In a process of political
mettmorphotU, as the student
governance structure is placed
before the students in election.
'from Tuesday, April 23, through
Friday, April 26, the student body
will have the opportunity to vote for
the • new Student Association
oflwrs-ftesident. Vice President,
Central jcouncil. University Senate,
MYSKANIA, Class Officers for the
Classes of 1975, '76 and 77, Alumni
Board, S A S U and Student
Assembly delegates.
- "What follows is an explanation of
the posts up for election and the
process by which the students may
vote next week.
Thfc Student Association includes
all students, so you- can be a very
vital part of your student government.. Students who feel that they're
"just a spoke" in a giant University
wheel may not realize that opportunities for representing their viewpoint do exist; all they need know is
what channels are open to them.
Ftff example, the University
Senate is composed of faculty,
students, and administrators. Your
student representatives in the Senate
are a link between you and those
people who determine University
policy.
Student Association of State university (SASU) is a not-for-prdflt
corporation of all Student
Associations of four year 'Alleges
within the State University system. It1
is not mandatory to belong to
SASU, but ifa full-time student does
join, he pays 60 cents annually and
can expect certain services in return.
SASU, a three-year-old coalition of
student governments, represents the
independent voice of State Universi-
Elections f. >r all offices will be held
in the Campus Center from In a.m.
•to 4 p.m.. and in the quads, from 4
p,m. to 7 p.m. Students must present
their tax cards and wither a photo
I.D. or meal card in order to vote.
Each campus event is assigned a
number, and when you vote a
number will be punched out on your
tax card, making it impossible to
vote twice.
SA Elections Set ToBegin Tuesday
ty students.
All campuses within the State University system, in combination with
SASU, founded the Student
Assembly. While SASU is funded by
a student activity fee, Student
Assembly is funded by State funds,
so that only dues-paying schools are
members of S AS U, but all schools in
the State University system are
members of Student Assembly.
The Student Assembly, which sets
the policies of SASU, includes at
least one full-time delegate, plus one
delegate for every 3,300 students,
from each school. The Assembly has
a lobby in the State Legislature
which concerns itself with areas that
affect students is their capacities as
students; e.g., higher education,
financial aid, governance, student
rights, and voting right. The fulltime staff includes a legislative director and four assistants.
SASU also provides services to
the student. Through the Statewide
Services Program, a student has
"purchase power"; that is, he can get
discounts on large appliances, travel
programs, etc. An Information
Clearinghouse keeps him up to date
Am 'happenings in other schools. A
media service puts out weekly and
monthly publications.
Central Council, the legislative
body elected to represent students,
determines how student tax money
should be spent.
Through his Alumni Board (Class
Board), or Class Councillor, a student has representation on the
Alumni Council
The Alumni
Association, reports directly to the
Harness Racing
chief body of the Association, which
is the Board or Directors. The Board
of Directors is a electorate responsible for making policies for the entire
body of alumni.
A class councillor, a representative
of the Board to the Alumni Association, is responsible for maintaining
the correct addresses of alumni;
producing newsletters relating to
class activities and the Alumni
Association; and planning reunions,
occuring every five years. If the
Class Councillor wishes to share
responsibility with other classmates,
this is done through a Class Board.
This concept has become popular
since the early sixties, each class having the option of electing a President, Vice-President, a Councillor,
two at-large members, and possibly
a Treasurer.
MYSKANIA, for juniors only, is
an undergraduate honorary
recognizing excellence in service to
the University. A student must be
very involved in student acvities and
student government; although he
need not have a high cumulative index, he must have good academic
standing.
Due to the action of the Election
Reform Committee, (toincrease
student participation in elections),
student voters may find some
inferences in this year's election
procedure. An Election Reform Bill,
wssed in Ihe early part of March,
imong other things, stated that;
I. Elections will be held in both
the Campus Center and the quads,
making voting more convenient
and shortening lines. Previously,
Indian Quad Assoc j
jointly sponsor
DINNER TRIP TO
SARATOGA HARNESS
all elections were held in the Campus Center. Now, for example, a
student living in Alumni Quad this
year will be able to vote in Alumni
Quad for representation in Indian
Quad, where he will be living next
year. A resident student must vote
for representation in the quad in
which he will be living next year;
commuter students should vote in
the Campus Center.
2. Sample ballots must be distributed prior to an election.
3. Persons attempting to vote
more than once in an election will
be penalized.
4. Candidates may not represent
living areas in which they do not
reside.
It would have stipulated that
Senate elections and replacement
elections for Central Council
members be held at the end of the
spring semester. Presently.a^of the
Council members, all Senators, and
S.A. President and Vice-President,
are elected in the spring, with
another
of the Central Council
members elected in September.
Ihe term of office for S.A. President and Vice-President and Central
Council members runs lor one year
from May 15. The proposal was
designed to encourage more
freshman to vote. The Committee
thought that it would receive better
election returns because voters
would know more people in their living areas by November or
December.
The Election Reform Committee,
composed of Ira Birnbaum,
Chairperson; David Coyne; and
Brent Kigncr, telephoned other
school
throughout the State's
system, comparing our election
procedures wilh theirs. Up until
about lour years ago, no student
Association officers were elected by
sludents; only Central Council was
chosen by students. Some Central
Council members, however, weren't
chosen by sludents either. A Commission System, which represented
all Ihe special interest groups, existed. Each Commission elected two
members to the Council.
Ihe Election Reform Committee,
which had been in existence since
laic October or early November, disbanded alter reporting out to Ccntrttl Council in March.
A photo I.D. will prove the identity of the voter so that a person cannot vote using someone else's tax
card. Both voting machines and
paper ballots will be used, with the
Commissioner detcrm iningwhich a
voting urea willi utilize.
Generally, lor University-wide
elections, machines will be used. For
any election which has restrictions
attached to it; for example, the election of class officers, paper ballots
will be used. Each student who votes
will get a lapel button.
Ihe Election Commission, composed of Carol Hackett. .Student
Election Commissioner, and six
Asst. Election Commissioners, is
charged with coordinating and
publicizing the election. I here will
be one Asst. Election Commissioner
present at each of the quads and in
the Campus Center during the election, along with supervisory poll
sitters, who will distribute and
receive ballots from voters. Hit
Election Commissioner and her
Assistants wil see that the votes arc
tallied. The Asst. Election Commissioners arcs Walter Mayo. Dutch
Quad (457-5286); Jane Kelly. Slate
Quad (457-6898); Mary Jane
Frederick, Indian Quad (465-7254);
Jay Kiunka, Colonial Ouad (4578743); l.aura Hutchinson. Alumni
Quad (472-5117); and Milch ZcJer.
Campus Ccntcr(436-0262).
President and Vice-President ol
Student Association require 5U'i ol
the vote, there will be a run-oll election on April 30, May l-May 3.
At least two counts ol the paper
ballots will be made, and two or
three people will read Ihe machine
voles, two people counting, neilliei
discussing it with the other, should
come up wilh the same tally. II they
don't, the ballots are counted again.
In the event ol strong objection* l"
election results, a recount could he
initiated by the Election Commission. However, nil lormalohiecnons
must he registered with Ihe Student
Association Supreme C'ouri i"i n n
only through Ihe court that \<>u un
get a recount.
Senate and Assembly to Compromise on TAP
SASU
SASU
The recently introduced Stafford/Anderson Proposal/on student
financial aid has received the prompt
approvaj of the Senate and the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP),
sponsored by Peter J. Costigan(R.Setauket), has passed the Assembly.
It is now expected that the leadership
of both houses will begin
negotiations to dcvelope a compromise version of the two bills.
In this year, which promises a
significant change in financial
assistance for students, the Stafford / Anderson Proposal (S. 9550) is
most comprehensive in nature. The
69-page bill, sponsored by Senator
Ronald B. Stafford (R-Plattsburgh)
who chairs the Senate Higher
Education Committee, Senate Majority Leader Warren M. Anderson
(R-Binghamton), Senate Minority
Leader Joseph Zaretsky (DLManhattan), and over 30 other
Senators, rewrites practically every
section ol the State Education Law
related to student financial aid. The
two-part proposal is the result of the
diligent efforts of the Senate Higher
Education Committee stall' under
the supervision of its Executive
Director, Roger Noycs. If implemented. S. 9550 will be by far the
most sophisticated slate program for
awarding student financial aid in the
country.
I he Stafford/Anderson Proposal
would he phascd-iit in two parts:'
1. an interim year program
that would increase present Scholar
Incentive awards designed to meet
the immediate fiscal needs of
students in 1974-75,
2. the creation of the New
York Slate Higher Education Services Corporation (IIESC) which
would become operational in 1975.
II ESC would he responsible for the
administration and coordination of
all New York State financial aid and
guaranteed loan programs.
Interim Year 1974-75
During the interim year, which
would require an additional appropriation of S38 million over present programs. S.9550 proposes to
increase Scholar Incentive awards
from the present $600 maximum to
$700 for students in public colleges
and $1000 lor sludents tit private
colleges, furthermore, the awards
would he determined more equitably
by Ihe introduction of a sliding
schedule of awards whereby the
FRIDAY APRIL 26
awards are decreased more gradually as the family income rites.
Therefore a SUNY student with a
family income of $5000 who is a
recipient of Scholar Incentive would
receive $400 rather than the present
$ 3 0 0 award. The Regents
Scholarship awards would be kept
intact at present levels, which means
that under the combined programs
the same SUNY student's entire tuition would be paid for.
Other highlights of the bill would
remove the requirement that the
Scholar Incentive recipient pay the
initial $200 of tuition. It would also
keep the present multi-student in
family formula and it would not impose an award differential between
upper and lower division students.
Both these measures were the subjects of controversy under the
originul TAP proposal (for detail see
SASU Legislative Report, Vol. 2
No. 3. March 8, 1974). Under the
Senate proposal no SUNY student
would be burdened with decreased
awards, and the revised awards
would apply to all students who will
be enrolled alter June I, 1974—not
just Freshmen.
Probably the most innovative
provision in the interim program is
the clarification of present financial
emancipation statutes which would
allow students who are financially
independent of their parents to
receive awards determined by their
own income. However, SASU will
be proposing amendments to some
specific.requirements in the delinit ion iql'i financial independence.
SASU will also recommend that
the interim program be extended to
two years to allow for thorough
developement, publication and input into the administration of financial aid under IIESC.
Proposed I97S-76 financial Aid
System
The new system of student financial assistance would consist of
general entitlement grants, academic
performance awards (including $250
Regents Scholarships, Lehman
fellowships, and existing programs
providing aid to medical, dental and
nursing students), and guaranteed
student loans. A highlight of the new
system would be the concept of "onestop shopping" wherebv the student
would have to fill out only one
application form for all the
programs instead of the present
The Science of
Creative Intelligence
$6.50 members
$7.50 non-members
transportation/program/buffet dinner
•
A full range of summer undergraduate and
graduate course*... tpecUl institutes and
workshops... good leather*... residence haft)
... one of America's moil beautiful campuses..
2 SESSIONS: June 24-|ury 26 and
July 29-August 30 (day and evening)
dw Summer tuHttlnt
ivC^lHajlO^v.:,:.-^.;^;^-:^;^:';^^
.Cs«N»*le,LL,N.v.1lS«l
:'VV*;';-'$iiBB
ONE MORE SATURDAY NIGHT!
Live Music with
;-•
Blue denim dungarees $10 at
Wells & Coverly's Haven
Shop,Stuyvesant Plaza
and downtown Troy.
Tickets on Sale Mon. & Tues. in CC
Lobby 1 0 - 4 or call Mark 7-4703
Wells & Coverly
|
funded hy Slmlew Assmialiiin
PAGE SIX
Mi.
Free Munchies
Price includes admission to clubhouse,
"frf*
tribute from the value of their home,
of their farm or "of their small
business. The bill should therefore
be amended to define available
assets to include only incomeproducing property such as stocks,
bonds and other investments.
SASU will seek to amend a section
of the bill that would prohibit use of
monies for educational opportunity
programs (SEEK. EOP, HEOP)for
supplementary financial assistance
for b o o k s and necessary
maintenance. . Assumedly, these
students would be eligible for pay-'
ment of these costs under the general
entitlement program, but SASU
believes that the benefits of these opportunity programs should be continued in distinct form within the
framework of the new aid system
ruther than being lumped in with the
funds for the other programs. l n ; i ,
SASU will also propose more
technical
.amendments lo the
proposal's method of defining and
proving ihe student's financial in' dependence from his or her parents.
Likewise, SASU will seek to amend
the bill to extend eligibility under the
various aid programs in the proposal
tcjijfive years for sludents in
educational opportunity programs
as well as students who graduate
1'rum.t.wo-ycar colleges and transfer
tp four-year colleges.
" Third Hand"
$8.50 non-taxpayers
LIMITED NUMBER AVAILABLE
system which requires applicant* to the HESC Trustees, i t > impossible
fill out numernui forms and often to determine ihe impact of this new
results in students not applying for system on the awards of students in
any sector of higher education of at
benefits for which they are eligible.
Awards under all programs would any income level. (It should be
be determined by a complicated noted, however, that the proposal inneeds analysis system which would cludes a "save harmless" provision
take into consideration the income so that students who received aid unand other available resources der present programs' before July I,
1975 will receive awards under the
(assets) of the individual student and
parents, a reasonable expected con- present or the new programs,
tribution from that income and whichever is greater.) Once esother resources, the1 specific expense tablished, these factors will be subbudget required to attend the ject to change every year, depending
student's particular institution in- upon the amount of funding by the
Legislature.
cluding tuition, fees, room, board
and general maintenance, an accepAt a time when Congress is in the
table budget level that would es- process of eliminating the recently
tablish the limits of the annual cost enacted federal "needs test" on
in which the State would share, and guaranteed student loans because it
the estimated amount of non-state has greatly decreased the number of
aid available. The approved budget upproved loans, SASU believes it is
level, the estimated non-state aid, unfair to apply a similar needs test at
and the expected contribution from the State level. For this reason, and
income and other resources are com- because a rigorous needs analysis
puted to determine, that percentage system for grant programs will inof student need that the State would crease the need lor a flexible loan
be responsible for. These percen- . program. SASU has also proposed
tages will be determined each year by that S. 9550 be amended to eliminate
the HESC Board of Trustees in ac- the needs test on guaranteed student
cordance with the amount of money . loans.
appropriated by the Legislature for
In regard to the determination of
the programs.
income and other available
resources in computing awardi
SASU Proposes Amendments
Until these schedules, regulations schedules, SASU believes it is unand percentages arc determined by reasonable to expect parents to con-
8:30 PM April 20th
in Waterbury Lower Lounge
"For full coordination of
body, mind, and environment?
i
$.50 w/tax
Transcendental Meditation
LECTURE
Wad., April 24 at 8 pm
to inkniniiM
Z 4s*.w»i
Qt
SUNYA Downtown Campus
BRUBACHER HALL, LOWER LOUNGE
$.75 w/o tax
$1.00 w/ State Quad card
wfrw^wg
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, APRIL 1(J, 1974
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVEN
<«»»»«»*S«MM«»*i^
Presidential and Veep
Thompson
• • • .continued
Thomas
organized it for the discount in the
first, place, for themselves. Things
like this are not preventable." He
•continued from page five
continued from page five
does however feel that they can be continued fiimipage five
quo as follows:' "(Central Council
jurisdictional problem. When he
.hindered, possibly if specifics of Quad Boards in regards lo the handl. meeting should be open but they're
became aware o f the political scene,
these deals can be handled by outside ing of student funds. Yet, "I am not
not." He compared S A to a "country
he decided to run as the "individual's
sources. •
in favor complete
decentralization,"
club, a family that doesn't like outcandidate,"
... •
Thomas is an economics major, i he added.
siders." One of his proposals for
Thomas realizes that, if elected, he
open government is that " A S P ' could'not possibly make student tax and has had executive experiences in
• Tenure: "Not only should no
the off-campus international frater- qualified teacher be denied tenure,
should print allotments of the fundvoluntary because the entire struc- nity Sons of Pericles. He iscurrently but the S.A. should light for teachers
ed groups." T o destroy favoritism
lure is built around it." However he
their Scholarship Chairman. .
and provide a desirable balance of
of merit, such as Prof. Hans
hopes to start the gears in motion
power, he proposes a limit of one job
Bergmann."
toward this goal. When the tax is
per person in SA.
University Finances: Polydouris
v o l u n t a r y , he believes as
feels that the S. A. could put pressure
.'. "I am upset about the firing of
demonstrated in the past most
good teachers because of lack of.
on the stutc legislature to increase
students will continue to pay. "The continuedfrom
pane,five
research work and degrees," Thompgovernment would be forced to work things that way, most likely he funds to and to promote the expanson said concerning tenure,. In order
sion of the University.
harder, in order to survey and really
doesn't have any planning at all."
to assure students enough power in
The first thing on a Polydouris
find out what i.<e students wish to
He sees SA committees as fields of
administration matters he proposes
building agenda would be a field
support lor their money."
glory
and
name
building
ground
for
thiit students must occupy 50% of
house. He deems a field house "abRight now he wants to give the the selective few. These committees solutely necessary for a University of
the boards in F S A groups.When
may
look
good
but
Chiu
feels
they
"individual
student"
a
bill
of
rights
questioned o n apathy he said, "New
this size." Polydouris would also exincluding the right to legal waives of are representative of SA's lack of amine the possibility of "construcPallz is a good example, they woke
organization.
Again
using
Miami
as
the mandatory tax. If a court fight is
up from their sleep of apathy. Maybe
ting graduate housing on Fuller
called for, so be it—as long asall the the example he states, "Since many
we should go back to the old days of
Road."
SA
officials
are
sitting
on
several
student's legal costs full on the
strikes and demonstrations for stuStudent Tux "There should be
committees, it stands a very good
shoulders of SA.
dent rights. This is our school, every
chance that a person may be an in- more of a differentiation between the
student must take an interest in how
He hopes that eventually the big vestigator of his own faults or (he prices of tickets with or without tux
their tax money is spent. Thursday,
budget holders, A S P , WSUA, and mistakes of his clique."
cards. For example, the saving of
Friday, Saturday nights people go
Concert Board could become
only fifty cents with a tax card for
To
correct
these
ills
Chiu
has
off campus. Concerts have not bem
autonomous. Besides alleviating
line Tom Puxlon concert is
top quality and students shouldfee• t{xcs, he feels the experience of several proposals in mind. One, being a limit of one committee job per ridiculous."
interested in why." He added that
working under their own power and
Ambulance
Service: "I would
•'every student fnlis'Pget S f l f a n d ^ * dealing with outside sources (adver- person. "Committee members under
vote."
,
h ^J.^" tisements from local merchants) will my administration should expect.
thut they have a lot to do and would
He has a wide'OWgc of) other
be of great value to staff members at
not possibly be fooling around as in
proposals. Reserving large numbers
later times.
the case of the Gcrber administraof tickets are out; ticket sales should
Thomas also believes & delegating tion."
be on a first-come first-serve basis.
more power to the quad bourds to
"As for budget, I prefer more
Likewise with parking spaces. More
decentralize the power now conmoney to be dejegated to the
adequate bus service lor downtown
tained in Central Council.
different quad boards themselves.
and commuters. He wishes to exHe believew»m gun control if
But people in charge of the money
tend the route to the capital area and
Security deems it necccssary but
had better explain explicitly how a
the hours to 2am Friday and Satur"uny officer allowed to bear arms
penny is to be used bcorethc money
day mornings. If there is a room and
must meet the rigid standards of the
board increase he wants to sec im- New York State Police Department, will be alloted to them."
As for involvement with the Adprovements in service to mutch.
he must be a police officer not just a
ministration Chiu plans on lobbying
And. infuriated by the "downtown
guard."
bust" he insists on "the official policy
When asked his views on the lor tuition waivers and loans, gelling
of no outside authorities on campus
Miami scundal, Thomas responded a voice in tenure, and securing a
without proper notice beforehand."
"My impression was that they worthy successor for Benezet.
Polydouris
Chiu
work t o get the administration to
buy a new ambulance. The pr w „|
situation is just unthinkable."
FRIDAY APRIL 19
University President: Polydouris
believes that "the S.A. should be
'directly involved in the selection of.
new President."
3 -8:30 PM REGISTRATION CC LOBBY
8:30 MAXINE FELDMAN,SINGER/COMPOSER
U.O.P.: I Polydouris wants tin
present
level of funding for ,/„
• E.G. P. lo continue.
Disturbed at statements ihal the
S.A. is for whites only, Polydouris
said that "the S.A. represents all
students. I will work lo involve more
bluck students in the S.A."
Utm Control: The candidate
deems it necessary Ihal "security
guards with the proper training" in
allowed to carry guns."
In order lo widen siudcm
a w a r e n e s s of his mm views,
Polydouris has called lur a public
debate between hiimell and the
other candidate. "We could use one
of the Lecture Halls. WSI'A could
broadcast (he discussion."
The Polydouris campaign «il| no
doubt be handicapped by the candidate's lack of experience. Opposition candidates will probably use
this fact ugainsl Polydouris
$.50 w/tax card
SATURDAY APRIL 20 )
1
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"fou'll never know how much
good you can do until you do it.
^^^SIS2
Jfr/flfrg/**
For • frM booklet on mbntoty wf ItfiGIROUX, P.O. Box 2180 , Astoria Station, Now York. N.V 11 in>
Qirouxl»tproo^A-WBRANW,lr«.iwbrt^
PAGE EIGHT
•••••••••Illtl
iiMHiiiimminniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiimiiiiiiimiiHiiiuiiiimniiiniiim
4'to*ti-Jfa*i*r75jm&. Twafap
tr—-.——y
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For information f 6 PM COMMUNAL DINNER (FREE/BRING DISH) HU 3541 funded by
18:30
ROBIN MORGAN>EMINIST POET
GYM J
S.A.
o
.—?
$.75 without
(
You can help people.
In fact, there's a crying
need for you, Your talents.
Your training. Your concerns. They make you
valuable to your business.
They can make you priceless to your community,
If you can spare even
n few hours a week, call
the Voluntary Action
Center in your town Or
write: "Volunteer!'
Washington, D.C. 20013.
It'll do you good to
sec how much good you
can do. g£%
\blunteer.
Rational Center
iluninry Action
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•FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
.,*»*
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^.J.!!"l!Z'l^mm,ttm
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WUIIIIIWHHIUUIIIHINIIWHHHIHU
ALBANY STUDRNT PRESS
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A Fast To Save Africa's People
^On Wednetday, May 1st, students cooperatives to aid small farmers in
on colleges and high schools scross the purchase of seeds', fertilizers, and
America are organizing the FAST insecticides; in short to help build the
TO SAVE A PEOPLE. Co- kind of sound and sustainable
sponsored by Oxfam-American and agriculture so urgently needed in
Project Relief, the FAST is aimed at these developing nations.
helping the six to ten million people
Even in the best of times the coun- who face death from starvation as a
result of the ongoing African tries south of the Sahara desert are
drought, which has been called "the among the poorest in the world.
worst ecological disaster of the cen- Now, in Mauritania, Senegal, Niger,
tury." The FAST unites a massive Upper Volta, Mali, Chad, Sudan,
fund-raising effort with an attempt and Ethiopia the rains have failed for
to develop awareness of both the six to eight years. Scientists estimate
crisis situation in sub-Saharan
Africa and impending food shor- that, as a result of the drought, the
Sahara is expanding into these countages in other parts of the world.
tries at the unprecendented rate of 30
miles per year. If the process is not
On May 1st, student are urged to
halted soon, significant amounts of
skip one or all of the day's mealsand
agricultural land will be permanentto donate the money thus saved to
ly removed from production at a
help the people of the droughttime of increasing world-wide food
striken area. Students will also
scarcity.
solicit financial sponsors to underwrite their fast. Funds raised in
News coverage of this insidious
this way will be used immediately for disaster has been scanty. These
food, family planning and medical countries have no oil,' no strategic
assistance. In addition, they will be location, and now, no exportable
carefully channeled into such long- agriculture. They are isolated from
range projects as agricultural train- the larger world by distance, a foring programs, well drilling and water bidding climate, and a lack of aderesource management, credit quate transportation routes. Despite
well-meaning governmental relief efforts, the need for food stuffs and
agricultural development increases.
Co-sponsors of the day-long fast
arc Oxfam-America and Project
Relief. Oxfam-America with headquarters in Newton, Mass., is the
American branch of the international Oxfam organization begun
in Oxford, England during World
War II. The organization has 30
years of experience in the field of international relief and long-term
development assistance and has an
exceptional record for efficient
management of funds and careful
planning and supervision of projects.
Project Relief, located in
Providence, R.I., is a non-profit,
tax-exempt charitable fund-raising
organization which was established
in 1971 in response to the needs of
Bengali refugees in India. The
organization pays neither salaries
nor rent and accepts only donated
staff services so that the greatest
possible percentage of each dollar is
used lor direct relief. Project Relief is
now focusing its energies on the
African drought disaster.
Open House at the Allen Center
-for Freshmen interested in exploring
the possibility of entering an interdisciplinary program
contribution to the Aftican drought
relier should contact the FSA food
conducted in the cafeterias earlier service immediately.
this year to benefit the Wildwood
For more information contact'
school, and it is probably possible to Bruce W. Roberts, Director, Project
organize another such effort by the • Relief. Inc., P.O. Box 1455, 335
target date of May 1st. Students in- Westminster Street, Providence
terested in organizing a SUNYA R.I. 0290I, phone: (401) 751-9300
irupisi <»• ..irei! ai Stop-Rite
Shop-Bite Changes To
U.F. W. Lettuce, Grapes
Local Shop-Rite stores are
UK W lettuce and grapes. Supporters
switching' to United Farm Workers
in Pcekskill, Kingston, New Paltz,
produced lettuce and grapes, as a
Poughkccpsie, Schenectady, Troy.
result of action by that group.
and Albany were all a crucial part of
After a 20 week campaign of this action. This is the first major
picketing and letter writing, local victory lor the farmworkers in the
United Farm Worker supporters Trl-Citlcs area.
have been able to convince Mr.
The "Don't Shop at Shop-Rite"
Richard Rosenberg (owner of 16
campaign was dramatically concludShop-Rite Supermarkets) that
ed on March 23 with a mass picket
Shop-Rite should stop selling non- line of 80 people at the Rotterdam,
Schenectady Shop-Rite.
The Albany and Schenectady and
Troy Friends of the Farmworkers
arc now making plans to locus on
another chain as well as continuing
their activities in support of the
Grape. Lettuce, and Oallo boycotts.
The manager of the 1235 Western
,Avenue Shop-Rite says his store is
presently stocked with UI-'VV lettuce
und grapes, but the other hrands
may have to be used if the supply ol
UFW produce should run out. Me
says a price increase will hopefully
not be required because of ihe
switch, but an increase appears
nrobable.
Draper Hall
in social and
behavioral
sciences.
As yet no FAST has been organized at SUNYA. However, a fast was
2nd floor lounge
LlfTuCE
W i
Monday, April 22
3 - 5 pm
Shop-Rite, 1235 Western Avenue
"PLEASE HELP
MAKE NEXT WEEK
THE BIGGEST OF
NY CAREER."
The brewers of Budweiser, in cooperation with ABC Radio, asked me to
remind you that April 22-27 is National
College "Pitch In!" Week.
All week, all over America, students
like you will be filling up litter cans
like me.
If there's an official "Pitch In!" Week
program in your campus community,
join up. If there isn't, you can still
support the national effort. Just pick
up any litter in your path next week
and bring it to me.
Thanks,
see you
Budweiser
then.
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
Love, Death,
The Not So Great 'Gatsby'
& Elephants
by Dennis Pihl and Robin Berier
The improbable task of recapturing F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece - hovel is confirmed by the
Paramount Pictures' long screen
version of "The Great Gatsby". It is
the third und most exorbitant film
production of "Gatsby", starring
Robert Redford as the inscrutable
tycoon, .lay Gatsby, and Mia
Farrow, as Daisy Buchanan, the girl
who breeds his illusions.
Director .lack Clayton and
screenplay writer Francis FordCappola interpret (he classic story as a
series of near-frozen scenes extracted from the texl, together with
an eye-boggling explosion ol 1920s
nostalgia. I he chic costumes and set
designs are extraordinary. A fortune
must have gone into Ihc lavish interiors of Cialsby's mansion and (he
reconstructed lurn-ol-lhc-ccntury
motor ears of which there arc more
than a lew. the expensive set
coupled with gross close-ups of inebriated flappers and pretty legs
dancing the Charleston provide the
major emphasis of the film, while
belittling the substance of the story.
Wealth and more wealth gild the
screen to impress anyone wishing to
satisfy vicarious pleasures of plenty.
II the romantic tale somehow
manages to hole through the thick
slabs of opulence, popular tunes
("Ain't We Ciot Fun"), and nostalgic
overplay, it does so by some fine acting.
Robert Redford, who easily
adapts the smile of "eternal
assurance", is an appropriate Jay
Gatsby, Unfortunately, a poor and
inflexible screcnpluy renders his
character overly reticent and
ponderous. Ihc constant phrase
"old sport" grows on one's nerves
even if its ample usage in the novel
did not seem to.
Mia Furrow (Daisy) is lovely,
frivolous and well suits the part
which she handles with charming excellence. Bruce Dern plays her crude
husband, loin Buchanan, who, with
Daisy "smashed up things und
creatures and then retreated back
into their money or their vast
carelessness." Karen Black and Scott
Wilson, as Myrtle and George
Wilson, arc line portraits of the
lil/gerald characters whose lives are
casually smashed by the Buchanans.
Ihc most unlettered portrayal
was that of Daisy's counterpart,.lordan Baker. Unlike Ihc other performers; actress Luis Chiles is not
pinned down to the golden girl image
delineated in the original text, but is
free lo capture the character's essence in her own style. She does so in
a befitting drone of a voice, while
cheating in everything from a golf
game 10 a friendship and thinking
nothing of il in the process. Though
a comparatively minor role, her
temerity plays up Daisy's fragility as
well on screen as in print.
"Ihc Great Gatsby" exhibits a lot
of silly sentimentality which
provokes an occasional chuckle
where none is intended. Gatsby and
Daisy all looollen trade unbearably
long love-struck stares at each other
which are broken up by comparable
shots of goldfish swimming in a
pool. Fitzgerald's gift of depicting
shallow dreaminess in a rich, lucid
manlier is so overlooked that the
film is actually a parody of the novel.
Il is the opinion of these writers
that you slay home tonight, turn on
your reading lump, and enjoy a truly
ureal liuiyhi:
Sam Walerson plays Nick
C'arritnuy. Ihc Mulwesterner who
comes I list lo find himself staring
Willi sympathetic eyes into the faces
of an American Dream lhal bus disintegrated info decadence and
despair, lite movie's credibility rests
on Nick's redeeming voice-over
narration which unfolds live (ale ol"
his neighbor, .lay Gatsby, who
throws wild parties in his lung
Island mansion hoping lo Hue and
regain his lirsl love. Daisy. Walerson. hearing a cross resemblance
lulu ceo I lustiii llulfmnn and
I icnch actor.Ican-I'iei re l.eaud (a la
hullatitt. is ideal as Nick Carroway
and his sensitive performance
penetrates live film's inherent difliciillies,
The most remarkable film!
I have seen this year.
Ithe
:
lety-
F j&eo&rii
-Arthur Schlesinier Jr.
NATIONAL
\
COLLEGE
! PITCH I N ! "
~P WEEK <
APRIL 22-27
starts 4 pt
Hive bat
"feting Country"!
I
CjwSyrotK.j
I
Pitch
s
ftOCK
fittrtk6-l54
Wine (Art-MO*
HfiUN»M«Sl« .
tl.epCckWtr,
ydCfottAt-K
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
found a IS year old Swedish youth,
Every film director dreams of a
Bjorn Andrcscn. The part of the
picture he wants lo do some day.
boy's elegant mother was given to
For'Luschino Visconti, the picture
was DEATH IN VENICE, the film Silvana Mangano.
adaption of Thomas Mann's classic
novella. Albany State Cinema will
When the film was completed,
be presenting DEATH IN VENICE Visconti admitted that its success
this Friday, in LC-I. at 7:30 and would be a tremendous personal
10:00.
triumph for him. He didn't have
long to wait. DEATH IN VENICE
Visconti, the celebrated Italian took the Grand Prix 25th Anniverdirector whose THE DAMNEUwas sary at the Cannes Film Festival, and
an enormous artistic und commer- won prompt raves from both critics
,_, .,-.
cial success, planned the project for and the public.
years.
When Warner Brothers
ll:
agreed lo finance it. Visconti finally
On Saturday. Albany, Stale
was able 10 realize his dream.
Cineuia wants you lo re-live your
youth, with Ihc Marx Bros, in
He took special care in casting his LOVE HAPPY, and Wall Disney's
actors. For live central character, cartoon DUMBO, an extraordinary
Guslav Aschcnbach. an artist whose double leaturc. The Brothers are
search for purity and beauty leads to there with all their humor and crazy
infatuation with a young boytiitrje antics, and so is Marilyn Monroe in
director chose one of the world's one of her earliest screen
finest actors. Dirk Bogarde. For^he appearances. It's ihc story of the
hoy, he searched Europe until he missing Romanoff Diamonds, as
told hjj SamGrunion (Gioucho).live
(near sighiedcprivale eye. It's a
wacky, wild adventure, not 10 be
missed. Along with LOVE HAPPY
will he Walt Disncy'sanimaled story
DUMBO. You no doubt saw DUMBO as a child, hut now view il again,
asa college student, and re-live those
wonderful years of cartoons. It's the
delightful story of the amazing
adventures ol a flying elephant anda
masterful mouse. Dumbo, with his
enormous ears, and litnoihy. his
loyal friend and benefactor, head the
group ol lascinaling cartoon animals
in this circus story, You will uncand
sympathize with the ridueuloiis saijeared baby elephant who is shunned
hy the circus personnel only lo later,
achieve live pinnacle ol success
Ihaiiks in ihc sieadfa.si love ol his
mother.
So ha\e a good I inlet Ins weekend pm ,1 little nostalgia into your day.
I.OVI HAPPY and I HI MHO. a fun
DOIUtl.l- I•l-.AIURF.
truu in
international
film group
-'~ JUnZH
1 state university of
yorkat albany
I Cinema 5 presents
The Sorrow and The Pity
LQirgcted^^
Si;
ne\«
TIT
HJ B. a u h u
funded by student assoeiationthe other film group
The International Film Group closes its twentieth year
of service with Marcel Ophuls' epic
documentary
study of France and her people during the Nazi occupation. A film which stands as one of the greatest
documents of human courage...and human cowardice.
Friday, April 19 LC 18
Presented at 7:30 ONLY
admission: $1.00 with student tax
lPirZAMsf
mti\
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
I &2»
l .1 .W. Lettuce at Shop-Kite
ANHIUIM-IIISCH, INC • IT. LOUIS
PAGE TEN,
arts'6 leisure
$1.50 without
(Higher prices due to the
special nature of the screening)
NOTICE: "The Sorrow and the Pity" is approximately four and a half
hours long. There will be an intermission during which free refreshments
will be provided, The film will be over before the last Draper but leaves
th,e circle.
Not Enough Moses...
Too Many Thorns
by Bob Mtdlngcr
Record albums are supposedly
meant to be entertaining. But they
lose this capacity when they become
u source of frustration. Barry
Goldberg comes dangerously close
to this with his Atco release, Barry
Goldberg (SD 7040).
For all the positive aspects of the
album, there seem to be just as many
negative ones and maybe even more.
With his experience playing
keyboards in Charlie Musselwhite's
Chicago Blues Band in the midsixties, and in the short-lived Electric
Flag, and on the first Mike
Blnomficld-AI Kooper Super Session, as well as on an album of his
own. Goldberg might have had a
dynamite album in the works.
University
CoitMrt tooM
proudly presents:
even the decent ones have their
weaker moments while some of the
bummers have an occasional
brilliant sparkle.
Maybe Goldberg needed side one
towarm up. Here his vocals basically
lack emotion as if he was afraid to let
go. Or else they suffer from being
forced and strained. His contrived
references in "Silver Moon" to the
guiding assistance of constellations
("Diana the huntress leadsmeon my
way.the fleet-footed Mercury speeds
me home today. Orion the s t r o n g he helps me along, the Gemini twins
sing me a song.") hardly seem felt
next to his recounting of cops who
planted a joint on him in order to
bust him on the fiddle and banjo
vehicle "Orange County Bus."
In addilion. Jerry Wcxlcrand Bob
Dylan produced this new package
and Dylan very noticeably conAnother disturbing laclor is that
t i n u e s his lung power lor back-up
his vocals are sometimes submerged
vocals on four songs. As if this... beneath the instruments so that
wasn't enough, the Muscle Shoals ' \Vffrds become indistinguishable. If
icssion men I'ctc Carr, Barry
these are anything like Gemini (wins
Meckel. David flood, and Roger | _)»'inging a song, then maybe we luckHawkins arc included as personnel ' ed out. Bui when an artist puis his
along with a number ol other equally
main emphasis on lyrics, producers
talented musicians and (on two
shouldn't try to hide theyolcc at the
songs) a sharp female back-up Irio.
same time especially when Ihc band
So the big question is: What went
has been as restricted in performance
wrong?
as here. We are left with nothing no voice, no continuity in lyric
meaning (if ihurc is any worth
It seems Inequality of the album is hearing) only dissatisfaction.
split in hall 4 out of 5 songs on Ihe
first side arc disappointing or annoying, and 4 out of 5 songs on side
Somehow everything falls neatly
i wo arc OK and even impressive. But in place on the touching "She Was
Sunday, May 12
8:00 pm
^"I^MWH/
Such a Lady." as well as on "Dusty
Country." "Minstrel Show," and
"Imagination." But the mixing on
others is cluttered and sloppy. What
this album needs is a good clipping removing the thorns and retaining
the roses.
Last Chance
Jones
lilvin Jones, one of Ihc world's
greatest drummers, will be appearing at the Last Chance Saloon
Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
April 18-20. W0-2:00.
Accompanying Jones will be
Steve Grossman on Keeds; Koland
I'rince on guitar; and Jimmy
Garrison on bass.
Jones, annually among the lop
runners among the globe's jazz polls,
is a thoroughly proficient artist thai
leaves out most of Ihe excesses 'of
De.lohneltc. bin who goes Hilly Hart
one step further providing a very
well rounded set.
It Is extremely advisable that YOU
attend!
Exhibitionists
In Gallery
A juried exhibition of work in all
media by students at the Stale Universiiy of New York at Albany
opened in the University Art Gallery
on Wednesday. April'17.
All students who have been
registered at the University during
Ihe current academic year were eligible lo submit works lor judging by
painter Marilyn Gicrsbach and
sculptor Anthony Milkowski. Ms.
Gicrsbach's work is in a number of
private and public collections including that of Williams College.
Mr. Milkowski is on the faculty of
Hunter College. He has shown his
work at the I iborde Nagy and John
II. Myers galleries in New York City
as welj u/tjiuj recent e.vliihj.tjo'ris.
organized by the Museum of
Modern An and Ihc Jewish
Museum. His sculpture has been a
part of two outdoor sculpture exhibitions sponsored by the City of
New York.
OTmSANT PLAZA
Although the Univeisih \r|
Gtllfcry has hung a nuinbci >>l exhibitions of student work, the present exhibition is "Insi ol us kind".
according lo gallcis iliievtiir.
Donald Mochon, "because n is the
first exhibition to he open In nil
students at State (>niuTsii\ ,md
because it is the Iirsl' ntcanisMiuni
outside the linivci'Ml) l.uulu have
been brought in as inrois lui .i sitident exhibition."
I he University Gallery's I .ill lot
I juries brought in 222 uoikshi sindeni artists, and Mr, Milkowski anil
Ms. Gicrsbach chose Kd pieeo lui
the coining exhibition. Ihe winks
shown include painting. Miilpinie.
prijits. drawings, ccrnimw K\UII\.
photographs, and conceptual an.
Ihe l u 74 Inhibition b> student
Artists will be shown thmughi Slit)
5 and
may
he seen J
«
the
LEON RUSSELL
at the
PALACE THEATRE
Tickets will go on sale
II
ALL SEATS RESERVED
- all tickets $5.00
Monday, April 22
You must own a tax card
for each ticket purchased
in Campus Center (2nd floor)
at 8:00 am
Limit 4 tickets per customer
gallery's regular hoursol') lui \lmi
da) through h'idu} and I I" 1 "H
Salurda) and Sunday.
Roomio«Mr
ChrgsoK*
3 69
CULTURAL PHASE V "KNOWLEDGE AND ROOTS"
State University of N e w York at Albany
APRIL 22-28, 1974
sponsored by
the educational opportunities program student assoc.
Acnwnr XHSDUU
MONDAY,
APRIL 2 2 , 1974
Burundi Drummers
4:30
Exhibition
Academic Podium
(FREE)
FRIDAY, APRIL 26,
Grover Washington, Jr.
8:30
Studies
$3.00 without
Communalism
Prof. N.D.U. Onyewu, Lecturer
5UNYA African and
CC Ballroom
Admission- $2.00 with SUNYA ID
African Family Life:
A Basis for
1974
CONCERT
FREE DISCO TO FOLLOW
Afro-American
Department
7:30 - LC 2
(FREE)
SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 1974
Black Bazaar
12-4 CC Ballroom
TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 1.7
Tribute to Diana Sands
Acupuncture Lecture, Film
Georgia,
and
12-4 LC 1 (FREE)
Demonstration
Georgia
Dr. Frederick D. Lewis
Medical Director
Acupuncture Clinic of America
CONCERT
Isley Brothers and Mandrill
Washington,
Admission • $3.00 with SUNYA ID
D.C.
$4.00 without
7 : 3 0 - LC 18
Free Disco CC Ballroom
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1974
Bottom of the Bucket... But Dance Co,
Rochester, New York
8:00 Performing Arts Center
Main Theatre
(FREE)
SUNDAY, APRIL 28,
1974
Black Girl and Chinese Connection
7:30
LC 1 (FREE)
THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1974
2001 Black
ALL TICKETS O N SALE A P R I L 2 2 -
Black Spectrum Theatre Co.
26
C A M P U S CENTER LOBBY
St. Albans, New York
10-9 SAT 10-6
W\
8:00 pm
Performing Arts Center
Main Theatre
(FREE)
FREE DISCO TO FOLLOW
PAGE 2 A
.,„„AyP.ANY.STIinRNt PRRS.S'
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
Jwu'etl
by student
association
e/preview/leisure/preview/leis ure, review/leis ure/preview/leisure/pr
Contest Rules
by Henry Jacobson
Puzzle solutions must be submitted to the Albany Student Press office
(CC334) by Monday, 3 p.m. following the Friday that the pirate appears.
NORTH
Tricks and Trumps
liasl wins West's lead of the deuce
of clubs with the King, and continues
with two more rounds. Wesl overlakes East's .lack with ihe Queen on
the third, and plays a diamond.
Dummy's .lack forces the Queen.
which is ruffed hy declarer.
4) A42
?
Name, address, phone number and social security number must appear o
Kjxxx
XXX
your solution.
All Day Party: in the middle of Indian Quad from
1:30 to 4:30 this afternoon. Listen to the music of
Neon Park in the great out-of-doors. 7 kegs of Bud
and entertainment are free!
Friday, April 19
Women'* Weekend: Maxine Felman, singer, comediene performs in the Campus Center Assembly
Hall, as part of the entertainment for this year's
Women's Weekend. Admission is 50c with tax card
and 75c without.
i H
Synchronised S w i m
Show: the S.U.N.Y.A.
Synchronized! Swim Club is holding its annual
show entitled "When I Was A Child..." Watch
them incorporate music, choreography, and swimming acrobatics and skill into a truly entertaining
production. Show time is 8:00, in the Physical
Education Center Pool. Admission is free.
Leo Kottke: folk and classical guitarist will perform live and in person at the Proctors Theatre, 4th
Street. Troy, tonight at 8:30 p.m. Reserved seats
cost $3.50 and can be bought at RPI Union or at
the door.
Women's Weekend: Robin Morgan, feminist and
poet, and editor of Sisterhood is Powerful,
headlines the events today. She will speak at 8:30 in
the gym. The lecture is free with tax card, and 25c
without. Workshops are in progress all day, dealing with such topics as Women in Sports, Law,
Lesbianism, and Rape. Check the AS Pad for complete information.
Synchronized Swim Show: the SUNYA Synchronized Swim Club is holding its annual show
entitled "When I Was Child..." Watch them incorporate music, choreography, and swimming
acrobatics and skill into a truly entertaining
production. Show time is 8:00 in the Physical
Education Center Pool. Admission is free.
Free Music Store: presents Intermedia Performances of Minimumly Structured Processes, at
8:30 in the P.A.C. Lab Theatre, Admission is free.
Sunday, April 21
Coffeehouse: from 8:30 to 11:30 in the Alden
Hall basement. Alumni Quad. Entertainment is
live and be Kris Miccip and John ppdor. Price of
admission is 25c; coffee and tea are provided,
doughnuts are sold.
(Jne More Saturday Night!: There is a party at Rafter's: .starting at 3:00 p.m. there will he an Open
Waterbury, Lower Lounge, starting at 8:30 p.m. House. Bring your instruments* songs, food, and
Featured will be live music, free beer, and share. At 8:30 John Haley, traditional and contemmunchics. Admission is 50c with tax card and 75c porary banjo and guitar player will perform. The
without.
entertainment is free, at the Chapel House
Synchronized Swim Show: Don't miss your last
Henways: Dance to the music of Monolith, star- chance to see this year's show "When I Was A
ting at 9:00 p.m. Plenty of beer and wine for Child..." The show starts at 3:30 p.m. in the
Physical Education Center Pool, and admission is
everyone. Admission is $.50 with Indian Quad
Card and $.75 with tax card, and $1.25 without.
free.
Saturday, April 20
/
Puzzle solutions will be drawn at random until three correct solutions have
been chosen.
On Campus
riLMiivCTriTeemend
Death in Venice
Fri.: 7:30, 10:00 L.C. I
Marx Brothcrs's
Love Happy
Dumbo
Sat.: 7:00, 9:30 L.C. 18
j&
CIN€ 1Q34
The Sorrow and the Pity
Fri.: 7:30 L.C. 18
The Last Detail
Fri.: 7:25, 9:30
Sat.: 1:45,7:25,9:30
Sun.: 1:25,3:25, 5:25, 7:25,9:30
Off Campus
Alice in Wonderland
Fri., Sat., and Sun.: 6:55, 9:00
rox coLome
The Three Musketeers
Fri., Sat., and Sun.: 7:00, 9:10
The Exorcist
Fri.: 7:00,9:30
WING 9MIL€
Funny Girl
:I5, 10:00 L.C. 24
Take the Money a n d R u n
Sat.: 8:00, 10:00 L.C. 24
Sun.. 8:00 L C, 18
Sat. a n d S u n . : 1:00, 3:15, 5:30,
7:45, 9:55
HgUJMjl
The Great Gatsby
Fri.; 6:45, 9:30
Sat; 2:00, 5:00, 7:30, 10:15
Sun.: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00
IriLDiMBePBv a n e w
Citii n Kane
SUI* : 7:00 Alden Main Lounge
iro m Gin cmeMri
F'ri. .nd Sat.: 7:30, 10:00 L.C. 7
Cinderella Liberty
Fri., Sat., and Sun.: 7:55, 9:30
TOWN€
The Sting
Fri.: 7:15, 9:50
Sat.;. 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
Sun,: 2:00,4:15, 6:30, 8:50
C€NT€R COLONIC
Save the Tiger
Fri. and Sat.: 6:00, 10:00
Sun,: 8:20
+
Serpico
Fri, and Sat.: 8:00
Sun,: 6:00
A Touch of Claw
Fri.: 6:30, 9:50
Sat, and Sun.: 2:30, 6:05, 9:40
0
* ...
Q432
SOUTH
4
9
Only one solution per person accepted.
T i~ T" \
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r
IF"
r"B~
y.ix
.Ixx
2
No one working on or for the Albany Student Press is eligible to win.
AQI Ox
*
AK.I
Bidding:
1!
1
IT ir 13 14
1;
INI
I'
IN
•III
S
311
I'
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17"
IT
20
21
I his is the third and final summary i n t r o d u c i n g the Simple
Sqttocz.e. As we've previously seen,
there are two different is pes of the
simple squeeze, each replete with its
own variation ol entry conditions
and technique.
pr
24
27
IB"
36
Since this is an explanation of a
squeeze, we shall assume there is a
squee/e then prove lhat one docs exist 17
(H) On the bridge certainly that
Etlstholds the Ace ol diamonds unit
Queen, .lack ol spades, he is busy in
tun soils.
(I.I I here are 9 out ol III winners.
Ihcrclorc I I.user.
( U | I here is a threat in the tipper
hand Ihe King ol diamonds.
I l l Ihe l-.iitrv is the Ace of spades
to the tipper hand.
(In ihe run ol the hearts, dummy
discards a spade and three
diamonds. On the last heart, lasl is
si|uee/ed. fuller a spade discard or
the release ol Ihe Ace of diamonds
yields South his contract.
I Ins hand is commonplace as far
as simple squeezes go. bill there is an
interesting negative point on litis
hand. In illusiialc. play the hand
wiiti Wexl icturnillgn spade instead
ol a diamond at trick lour. East's
lack Inices ihe King Irom Souili.
I hcicluic ullei Ihe lead ol the
iicxi-io-lasl lie.ni winnci Ihe hands
O
K
EAST,
e) Q s
X? A
0
W KST
Intramural
44
*
SOI III
o
•
Hclore. the lead ol Ihe Ace of
hearts squeezed East, Now, it
squeezes dummy first: on litis trick
I asi abandons whatever suit dummy
discards, lhat is with West's spade
lead at Il ick lour there is no squeeze,
i c , South can no longer fulfill his
coull'tlCI. Ihe reason is simple, hill
lull to bridge theory. IIIEOKEM:
Willi North holding no enlry ill his
own lineal suit, and Ihe threats are
divided between the two hands, there
is always a squeeze against West, if
North has tin entry in Smith's threat
sun. Agniiisl fast. Ihere is a squeeze
il Nmih has an enlry in Sotlth's
lineal suit, and South «/*ti hitstill enliv in Ins own sail. Otherwise a
squeeze does mil iiiuliuc.
THE SPRING FUNG
47
50"
SI
0
53
55
J
l|n,
Hdwird 3
a,' mr
4JJ a L
n- 7—^
ACROSS
39 Madison's VP
12 Woman's name or
42 Adjectival suffix
'20s song
43 Canadian province 13 Blazes of light
(abbr.)
14 Most mentally sound
44 Syrian city (var.) 18 Postal service
45 Poker term
(abbr.)
46 Steals
22 Goddess of strife
47 State nickname
25 Part of liquid
49 One way to get
waste
money It to — 26 Is unwell
50 "Or. Gillespie"
28 Catch sight of
52 Willow
29 Lively
53 Type of airplane
31 Hydrocarbons found
54 In Itself (Let.)
1n solvents
55 Nanny
32 Ignoble
33 Sheet music symbol
23 Chemical suff1x(pl.)
DOWN
34 Exhausts
24 Equipment
35 Applies wall coating
25
acid
1 F i l l with fear
37 Magician-comedian
26 ".— of thousands I" 2 Pain
Art —
27 Living quartan
3 Railroad Inventory 39 Fast gait
(abbr.)
4 Tenant
40 Kay Thompson
28 The Emerald Ilia
5 Happen
character
„ (poet.)
6 Plttfom „
41 Painter of "Rowan1
2» — . m e t e r (brain
7 No longer <m «|e
Luncheon"
pert)
(abbr.)
42 Harsh-located
30 Disease-carrying
8 Added to
43 Military rank
fllai
> In one lump
46 Baseball dtyfebbr.)
32 Hotel employee
10 Spanish equivalent 46 Stratum
36 Consumer agency
of "oul, out"
48 Dried up (poet.)
37 Roman god of M r
11 Of a particular
49 Irish-Gael 1c
38 Asiatic tent
race of culture
61 Accelerate
1 N.L. ball pirk
10 Bondmn
15 Roan on the interior
part of < ship
16 Early Latin version
of the Scriptures
17 "Ntssa1au 1n 1926
San Hur
19
ocult (aye
muscle)
20 Setting for "Hamlet"
21 Roller used In
printing
22 Ancient kingdom
StMwi U ?wim
. . . . . . . . * • <>•••
Pojjfe
IIIIIIIIMI.I
lilMlllllllll
nmi nmniHnir.1 nmnii
prion nmnmnin mm
iiHiifotj
mmmimmm
r.ii'ii-ii.ini i iiinmin
n n n n n n n rannnnnni
MHMim-l
COKTeST
U>9KKeRS
Stoufcij M e t
UI-JiJIlMIJ
ni.iuiUKJni:ii'i i.iiivjiiu
rami 111111111-11:1 Miliar*
1'ini'jn r>ii<iMiiiiM l i n n
Done Stout
HHHIIi:iHM HMKtvii.l'.liJ
111 if 111111:1 riiiriiiri.ir.i
8«ik Rteimuut
nmni.iwHi'j
I.IIII.IUHI.KI
the Capital l&lrict Spring fling
lournumenl was held April6-7 ill the
I toy Y MCA. I here were three sections; invilalional. premier, and
novice. I he invilalional consisted ol
Ihe ft hest players in Ihe area and included Matthew Kaliein. l e e Unites.
Nelson Egbert, and 15 year old Jon
lisdall Irom Syracuse. .Ion lisdall.
who is rated the third hest playei in
the country under 16 years ol age.
won ihe lournumenl h> delealing
Matthew Kalrem ill Ihe lasl round:
.Ion lisdall
Malt Kalrem
1. I'-K4
2. N-KH.l
.1, l'-Q4
l'-QH4
N-Qlt.l
IM'
4. Nil'
I'-KN.l
5. l'-OH4
6. I1-K3
7. N-Qli.l
X. OxN
l
>. Q-QI
1(1. N-N5
11. I'xN
H-N2
N-ll.l
N-KN5
N\N
l'-K4
WV.'tui
Q-K5
12.
IV
14.
15.
16.
17.
IK.
19.
211.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
O-O
I'-Q.l
K-QI
l'-Q4(e)
H-Kl
H\H
Q-K5
QxKI'
Q-Q5
II-QI14
Q-Q3(h)
K-QHI
Ilxl'
O-O
IM)
I'-QN.Kdl
I'.Qft!
Q-Q5
K-H7!
I1-N5
QxQ
HxK
K-QI
K-II5
I--Q7
It-UK
l'-K5
(J-N7
Q-H3(c)
Q-II4
fxQ
Kxll
II-K4
I--II3
K-II2
K-K2
In .lack t ppnl
III. Kv.lt
11. I'-Nl
12. I M '
I.I. K-N2
14. I M '
ii. K-IO
Id K-K4
17. K-U5
is, I'-K.l
W. I M '
III. IMJ.I
41 K-Q4
42. It-KM
IV Itxl'eli
41. I'-K4
Kvl<
l'-H5
IM'
I'-Kh
IM'
li-Nl
K-K2
H-QI
I--QK3
IM'
I--OK4
II-N3
Kxl'
K-»3
resigns
Notex-lal I he usual move heie is O() N \ N leaves black Willi a weak
backward queen pawn. (h|OI course
il would be advantageous lor black il
ivluie exchanged pawns wilh 14.
Oxl' instead, (c) Black will be able lo
regain bis pawn, and will by this
iiiaiieuvei gel nd ol his backward
Ol*. however he will he very weak in
ihe cenlei and white will have a
dclinue advanl'ge. (d) II l'-QK3
then l'-K5 and black will win either
ihe Ql' or one ol IheQNI'. (e) Ibis
iiiunedialely loses ihe exehnage,
however black had nothing better
against the threats ol QxKHI'chand
l*-y7. Ihe rest ol Ihe game ix
uicehanieal.
I he premier section ol the tournament wax won by Jack Uppal.
hollowing is a line tjclicul sacrifice
lack Uppal
1. I'-K4
2. I'-U4
I. N-QH3
4. II-K2
5. II-K3
(.. 0 - Q 2
7. I'-KK4!'.'
X I'-KH.i
Mike Moekler
I'-O.l
N-KIO
I'-KN.l
II-N2
O-O
N-QIU'.'lal
l'-KK4
l'.QK3
'). ()-()-() l'-QN4
II). N-(j5!lh| I--K4
II. NxNch llxN
N-Q5
12. I'-Q5!
I.l. Il-N5!(el llxll
l'-K4
14, IM)
Nx licit
15. I'-IU
Id. NxN
l'-N3
17 (JK-NI II- It 3
IK. I'-KM4! llxN
19. Oxl)
IM'
211 Kxl'!!
IM(
21 Oxl'
l'-H3r.'(dl
22. Q-.Nheh resigns
Noies: lai lllack should play his
knight lo QH3 only niter P-QB4. As
a resull ol this early move, black will
noi he ahle lo lake aclion on the
queeilMile as lasl as white will attack
mi ihe kingside Ihi lllack cannot
play NxN becauseallcr PxN. blacks
ON will he banished lo inactivity on
QK2 or QNI. It) While could win a
pawn hy I) HI threatening lo trap
black's knighl wilh IMI3. however
ihe chances lor attack on the
kingside are greal. (d) I hix loses immediately, however black ix dead
lost here anyhow. 1121. ...K-KI.22.
I'-N6K-III;23. Q-H5KorQ-K2;24.
K-KI and wins. I here is no escape
lor black's king.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PA }E 4A
ALBANY STUDENT PBFSR
FRIDAY, API^IL 19, 1974
mm B4}B
"THIS week
? f
•
w
. . . . ...ii-ii'I
Paper Moon
Fri.: 8:15
Sat. and Sun.: 4:15, 7:50
EAST
4 KI03
\? AK9xxxx
e) 9xxx
9 x
0 XXXX
Each of the three winners will be entitled to a SlOgift certificate to the campus bookstore. Merchandise must be claimed within two weeks ofnotificution.
54
Movie Timetable
Fri.:
WEST
NORTH
4 A4
' HOT KIM JUHr19€
fUOMG WITH THe f W PI!ec€r1Tc
Meet the
Candidates
for S.A. President
and Vice-President
w w w
W w w
9 w w
Broadcast LIVE
from the
Campus Center
Assembly Hall
Monday, April 22
at 8 p.m.
WW
w w w
w w
Candidates will field
questions from an
W&m
Q&V panel
Phone your
questions into
457-5808 457-6443
PAGE 5A
i|
to sublet lour
Mne—Aua.Call
Three
bedroom opt. on
4 bedroom lorn. apt. on b w line. Available
June ..Phone 412 — 2722.
7-4033.
Sublet one room apt. 489 — 3152.
Subtvting 5 nifty bedrooms M a r buslln*.
{
wL/AOOIf
i'-- •
l
two girtt wanted to share subleted apt. for
RtnionabU. Coll Dav« 457 — 4004.
summer near busline, own room. 457 —
Summer sublet. Beautiful apt. on Hudson
W o m e n in China
One or two people needed to complete
Sundoy?
x 20/ with kitchen—wood paneled. Very
returned from a trip to China. Sot.
Pineview
reasonable rent, CoK 482-0391.
April 20 a t 10:30 A M in Humanities 1st
Washington
floor.
10:40 A M every Sunday morning. W e
Two girls wanted to share subleted apartment
for
summer— near
PUPPY i e o u t r M free 10 week Hack l a b —
Shepherd that I can no longer hoop, ftob
438 — 0933.
T * 7 1 fern- tomW. Ag.4oW
vinyl lop. 16
|M gal. EKelont condMen. S 1 3 M or b » l '
offer (cost $3650). • % 4S7—7933
l a > 436
butch.
I : M a u l v t antique
Wanted: Orad students (2) to fill 3 bedroom
*«*
busline—own
furnished apt. on busline; 1974 — 75. 465
apartment
— 7249.
reasonable rent, washer-dryer, A / C living
busline
for
Almost nowl $173. 7 — 7799.
d r m a r , ban springs ami mattress. C o l Ab-!
•rlDU.SkTO
7 5 year. Call 482 — 6543.
St. Busline. Furnished very reasonable rent.
2
Girls only. 7 — 3040.
bedrooms, on SUNYA busline. 465-2084.
wanted.
2
furnished
m
Sublet 3 bedroom apt. 162 Western
SUBLET (female): Own room; $58 including
June through Aug. S57 month. Call 465 —
Busline. Call Rob 465 — 7259. Rick 436 —
utilities; furnished; SUNYA busline; through
7254.
1301.
August 15th. Lenore, 465-5895.
457 — 4676.
reasonable rent. Call Terry 457 — 4 7 2 1 .
Wanted: to rent own room in an apt. Sandy
»'i here!) The summer sublet you've dream-
457 — 8071.
ed of — 449 — 1494.
457-3078.
Furnished apt.
Utilities, furnishings includ. Call 463 — 4532
peaceful, across from Washington Pk. block
— M l 4.
(between
Quail
or 767 — 3000.
from Draper, for couple or single. $130,462
Wanted to buy or borrow: copy of Ham-
stJtjMpjjfc
Call Judy 472 — 8733.
— 4085.
mings Motor News. Call Kay 482 — 4 1 5 7 .
of
SF books
and
Fonder — Rhodes suitcoio electric piano.
Wilton Kramer 4 3 / 8 Medium. $30 new,
For summer sublet, furnished 3 bedroom
Wanted: used bicycle in good condition.
between Lake and Quail. 4 bedrooms.
489 — 2235.
apt. on busline. Call 482 — 4117.
Call 482 — 0669.
complete
with
coM
wanted,
2
furnished
bedrooms, on SUNYA busline. 465 — 2084.
Two girls wanted to share room in furnished
437 — 3070.
apartment
on
busline
for
summer,
reasonable rent, washer — dryer, A C living
Waterbed complete with frame. $30. Lew
438 — 4794.
room, call Vivian or Carol 465 — 1992.
l £
Summer Sublet on Partridge / Western, 2
Refrigerator lOcf good condition. $60. Call
girls each own room. Jun — Aug $50 mo.
evenings 439 — 1337
Call Anna, Ron — 4323 or Diane 2 — 8197.
Used Garrard 30 Turntable (good condi-
1 — 5 people needed to sublet spacious ful-
tion), walnut base, Empire 888 Cartridge.
ly furnished apartment on busline. Front
$20. Call David 437 — 4724.
porch, own garage, very reasonable rent.
Call Linda or Janet at 457 — 4684 or Donna
Girls Touring Bike Call 437 — 7889.
or Esther at 457 — 8932.
IO.WEST FARES
Authorfied Student Agency
For Rail Passes a n d Intra
European Charter Flights
WRITE:GlOBAL TRAVEL SERVICE,
5 2 0 FIFTH AVE.
NEWYOR|C,N.T.
10036
"... I hut all Ircc men should be deprived ul lireurms because some urc
...It is estimated thul during the past decude private cil./uns.wilh their
own g i u u . Toiled more than 25,000 attempted arsons, assaults.
hurglarics.homicidcs.rupes and rohberies-l'requently aiding police in
making arrests-all without statistical credit."
SEND YOUR COMMENTS TO:
INTERNATIONAL INTELLIGENCE,
ATHENS.N.Y. 12015
There are still a few
tickets left for the
FRESHMAN
Israeli
Dr. Carreno's office, by TODAY,
Got a gripe? Bring it to
Office.
Grievance
Hours in CC308
are Mon 3-4. Tues 10-11, 3:30-4:30,
Colloquium-
Monday,
Wed.
10-11, 2-4, Thurs 3:30-4:30, fri.
garden. 463 — 7822 ask for David.
research. Tuesday, April 30, 1974 -
pus Center (across from info desk).
on Indian or State Quad, for fall semester.
bedroom apt.
Call Don or Gary 7 — 5047.
Reasonable rent, Madison Ave. Call 482 —
Will pay $60 to four males who will live in
Morris
five man suite on Indian . Call Danny 7 —
Problem
5238.
0391.
Student volunteers needed in psychology
One or two people needed to complete
apartment on Madison. Room available 10
Two girls looking for two rooms in apt. for
N 20, with kitchen, wood panelled. Very
next fall. In France now, lor reference call
reasonable rent. Call 482 — 0391.
Stephen 457 — 5019.
learning experiment. Call Vivian 465 —
1992.
Ha lie
-"Metrical
in
Verse:
Perception
A
and
Anyone who has a question or wants
action
from
the University
Senate
Phonology." The lecture is being spon-
please contact Mitch Kassoff- Senator
sored by the Departments of Com-
from Dutch Q u a d at Box 66. Thank
parative
you
and
World
Literature
and
Draper, for July and August and / or fall,
furnished; SUNYA busline, through Aug. 15.
S41.67 plus util a month. 449 — 7343.
Lenore 465 — 5895.
Summer sublet, reasonable, on busline.
Spacious, newly furnished apt. right on
busline
Own bedroom. 465-5918
Anyone interested on working on
S t u d e n t Evaluation
T i l l H4STTX
of teachers
and
Courses contact Dave 7-5238
Couple looking far room in country or peo-
Male grads — 2 furnished bedrooms in
/ 22 call 914 — 676 — 3228 collect.
ple interested in looking for a house with us.
465 — 8994 or 482 — 4184.
mostly evenings. Apply in person to Mr.
Garvey today from 2 to 4 PM or 7:30 to 8:30
PM.
HELP WANTED
( c a n b e d o n e in y o u r s p a r e t i m e * !
call Jeff
Rodgers at
I need someone to fix broken 3 speed bicy-
453-j
Poll sitters for elections will be paid by the
Save rent! Need apt. to share. April 27 to
Walter 7 —5286. Colonial: Jay 7 — 8743.
State: Jane 7 — 6898. Alumni: Laura 472 —
Indian: Mary Jane 465 — 7254.
Commuters: Mitch 436 — 0262.
near Main. 465 — 8431.
year's Spanish
club. Elections will be
Monday, April 22 at 7:30 in Humanities
124. All interested are welcome to attend.
There will be an important meeting
of StudanH
hr t h e I m p r o v e m e n t of
Programs
for
the
Handicapped
envelopes. Rush $25 cents and a self — ad-
in he State q u a d Flagroom. Elections
located Chinese — American living room
dressed, stamped envelope. Gemco PO Box
with fireplace. Large kit, ail utilities, tel, etc.
for next years' officers will b e held at
21244 — X39. Indpls, Ind.. 46221.
the meeting.
private
rooms,
Share bath. Male — female. Call between
I * needed
6 -
7:30 PM. 434 — 6358.
WHAT P0 YOU THIHK
OF THIS STATEMENT?
"...SETTLEMENT OF THE ABORTION
CONTROVERSY SHOULD BE THE
EXCLUSIVE PROVINCE OF FEMALE
VOTERS OF CHILD-BEARING AGE."
SEND YOUR COMMENTS TO:
INTERNATIONAL INTELLIGENCE,
ATHENS.N.Y.12015
for
Socialism,
a
itudent
be meeting Tuesday April 23 at 7;30
PM.
America, Africa. Students all professions
penses paid, overtime, sightseeing, free information. Trans World Research Co. Dept.
will
All
course,
in
Albany,
Contact
Child
Sussex House for Little
45
Broad way/Riverside,
People
Rensselaer, welcomes children from 3
years
mmmmmmumm
signets
floor lounge ol Draper Hall on the
education to be held w e d . , M a y I.
Munchkin
Club
Meeting-
453H o Jayne 7-7759.
Attention-
All
undergraduate
interested
in becoming in-
volved with the Search C o m m i t t e e for
a Campus
President,
the Faculty
d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n membership
Senate Councils
committees
1974
Schedule
of
The campus
to
full-time
door/outdoor
school. G o o d
facilities,
call
inMrs.
Center
Snackbar
will
b e open ot 1 2 N o o n on Sundays to accomodate students without meal contracts
Poetry
8PM
HU
Reading-
354
for
Thurs. A p r i l
all
university
form.
you'd
produced
by
composed
SUNYA
banc*
THE
3.ID
like
to
read.
Sponsored
by
Phoenix Lit. M a g . Free wine.
Catterson from 9-5 at 4 3 6 - 9 9 3 0
s w i m instruction
beginning
Apr.
Tues.
23.
and
what fo do.
Call
Thurs.
Mrs.
Pat
Rogers at 457-4538 or 439-3939
AI den berry
Flatland,
Did yau stop your car to help a
who had fallen out of
wheelchair?
It
was
about
9
her
Cinena
presents
Edwin Abbott's short socio-
mathematical satire on Sunday, April
21 at 7 P M in the Alden M a i n Lounge. It
will be followed by a showing of
P.M.,
March 20th, in back of the Humanities
Ciliien
building, Please call 235-8 4 8 / It's im-
both films a r e tree.
Kane,
starring Orson Welles,
Stuboard,
Crass of ' 7 5 members the
Banquet
Junior
is coming soon, watch the
Music
tion,
presents a
termedia
ASP lor details
store,
in
conjunction
with the Center for Holistic Communicaworks
concert of
of
Andy
the in-
*i
Aldrich,
SUNYA senior. It happens tonight, FriCommuting
Students/
Central
Council candidates Steve Meyer a n d
d a y at 8:30 pn in the PAC Lab Theatre.
Admission is free.
Candi M a y e r will hold a forum on MonA zoo loose in the pool?
day April 22 at 2:00 P.M. in the C a m -
see for
pus Center Fireside Lounge to discuss
yourselt on Fri. Apr 19 and Sat., Apr.
commuter needs and plans lor next
20 at 8:00 PM a n d on Sun., Apr 21 at
year. Please attend.
3:30 PM as the 5UNYA Synchronized
Cot your Volkswagen
pointed FREE1
wasn't,
here's a
second
chance.
and C e n -
you
can
guarantee good governance.
Nominations
dance pretenforfen
work or just listen to others r e a d , con-
please come
Only
2
tact Robin 472-8881 by April 17 of
to the 5.A. office, C C 3 4 6 a n d fill out involve me ni
Chmtwuttt
7:30 PM I C
students who wish to read their own
are now available lor
SUNYA.
to Box 1 1 77. Any questions • call Linda
r
Impor'Shalom
(Chill Election of officers- W e d . 4 / 2 4 , 8
Week sponsored
by Jewish Students Coalition. Fri, April
For a trial size package ot Kotex1
tampons (5 tampons), a pretty purse
container, and a very explanatory
book entitled "Tell It Like It Is",
mail tjjls order loim with 25< in coin
to cqver mailing and handling to:
19 Shabbat Service 7:30 PM CHAPEL
There will be a meeting ol
Camp
Center 333 at 3:15 pm on April 22. All
Workshop. Chateau Ecole, Pittslord Vt.
membets of UnivervtyCommunity are
05763.
welcome to attend.
political spectrum. Up to 10 people can
play. Send $1 to W.L.D., Box 504, Ballston
Spa, New York.
Albany
G o v e r n i n g G o a r d in Campus
High
Christians
meet tonight and every Friday in CC
315 at 7:00 PM. Come and join with us
in the Fellowship ol the Lord Jesus
7929.
at
reasonable rales. Call Gary Gold,
439 — 6888.
C o m e to ffte 5rarmnfisch/ G e r m a n
Club
sponsors a
House, Sat. April 20 Shabbat Service
1Q A M Chapel House, Sun. April 21
Yom Hoshoah Commemoration Temple
Israel
2
PM.,
C o m m u t e r s - is Stu Simon a good
Evangelical
Christ, for furthermformation, call 7-
Photography
Clinics every Monday and Wednesday
students
the
457-5637.
Dippikill
Photography.
is in-
Technique
Mail resume of not more than 25 words
Limited enrollment. Write The Minds Eye
Wedding
Deelopmental
meeting will be to plan a workshop on
lodging and all meals. July 7 — 27. $450.
Wedding
w o m e n ' s S w i m Team
to
the
the local board of PIRG at
pm CC 370. All welcome
tion in the scenic hills of Vermont. Dorm style
Informal
vited
in joining
Downtown Campus. The purpose of the
Sketch and Paint Vermont. Expert instruc-
Quality
SUNYA
interested
in
Spring
Care,
•
Your first
tampon
should
be a
Kotex
tampon.
Classes. This is in error. CPE 3 0 0 is a 3
V o l u n t e e r s needed for occasional
pointments
'
FLOOR DANCE STUDIO M THE G Y M ,
credit course.
welcome.
•
' A p r i l 2 3 a t 7:30 P.M. M
The meeting will be held in 2nd
B 5 PO Box 603, CortoMadera, CA 94925.
game which reveals where you stand on the
ALABASTER
People
McCarthy. 7 — 8467 M. Heritage.
and occupations $700 to $3000 monthly. Ex-
w i t h any p r o b l e m .
someone who can, Give a call anytime.
tial Council
faculty socialist education group
OVERSEAS JOBS — Australia, Europe, S.
Switchboard
II we can't help, we'll refer you to
University
*•*
For further information call 7 — 4618 M.
What are your politics? Have fun with a new
Thurs., Fri., Sat
on Sunday, April 21 at 6 pm
Like that new raise? Thank CSEA. Join and
support y6ur local chapter (Chapter 691).
Earth
Middle
at 4:30. any questions call Ms. Hoar 7-
centrally
house,
place to rap? Coll the 5 3 0 0
Anyone
(S.I.P.H.)
Large
entertainment
planned.
'
portant.
Need a friend? A friendly ear? A
Fireside Lounge.
Homeworkers, Earn St.60 each, mailing
M 4 1 9 right a w a y a s o n l y o n e p e r s o n !
«,«.„. .J;
for the election of officers for next
G e r m a n Club will hold a meeting on
tools. Call Jeanne 457 — 8932.
May 18. Call Steve after 7. 374 — 5911.
H u t j o b . It p a y s $ 2 . 5 0 p e r h o u r a n d j
being taken
cle, I'll be happy to pay. Must have own
hour. Work when you can. Call Dutch:
$90 apartment available June Madison
workshops,
refreshments
Free
Self-nominations arc
held Sunday, April 2 8 , 7pm in the
5117.
} f y o u n e e d e x t r a m o n e y , you'll like J
Wease
Northway Mall. Approximately 20 hr. week,
en
Leadership course is listed a t a 1 credit
Usher needed part time at CINE 1 2 3 4
(Wash. Ave.) available for sublet
June 1 — mid August. $65Call 457 — 4022.
Speakers,
and
woman
English a n d by the Linguistics Program.
lecture
Classes, The CPE 3 0 0 • Recreational
W a n t e d ; Children a g e 6-10 for free
Humanities 354 Professor
Female wanted for own room in apt. near
SUBLET: (female) own room; $58 incl. util,
held at SUNYA April 19,20 a n d 2 1 .
.
•* •
25
Committee
April 19. Come join us!
Introductory
Transcendental M e d i t a t i o n
Correction to 1 9 7 4 Faff Schedule of
Homebound Program Albany Associa-
span 315). sign up in 55
S o f t ) e n April 18
and
bacher H a l l , l o w e r Lounge
••*
*
Students. Admission it f r e e . Tuesday,
info • Jon 457-5220.
W o m e n ' s W e e k e n d is going to b e
•
S e e P e l * Seeger's lilrn
A
Wednesday
Place: SUNYA Downtown campus, Bur-
tion of the blind, 4 6 3 - 1 2 1 1 .
People
Two people wanted to share double room
SnOSS. re W e OHV OW OtO DOOO.OSWO.
• *'• '
SUNYA-PIRG is here to help you. For
9-3. sponsored by J.5.C.
Wanted: two or three suitmates to fill suite
on busline for next year. Call 4 6 5 — 7254.
at
of A m e r i c a and want to get justice?
Info. Table m the CC main lobby from
— 5918.
from June thru August.
Club
300 level literature course in Spanish
(excluding
avenue
Dote: April 2 4
(event:
•
and Schenectady having medical a p Every Tues. there will be an
busline. $50 month. Call Carol 472 — 8733.
social hour
choice to elect as your Central Council
You can earn easy money, every month during school,
for doing nearly nothing. Beetleboards ol America will
paint your car FREE, in Incredible fashion, and pay you
for driving it around as usual. That's practically all there
Is to It. For the full story, write Immediately to:
Beetleboards of America, Inc. Or call (213) 876-7517
7765 Sunset Blvd.
Colled - Aik For Evelyn
AddressC.ty
him a card with your phone number at
Suite
box 2037,
"J3M«WiB«II
Name ~
Los Angeles, California 90046
Rop?? Call him at 4 5 7 - 5 2 2 0 or drop
Indian
Kotex tampons
Box 551 CIM1
N e e n a h , Wisconsin 54956
oflfi
n.T0S-KNlr>L
ajivtefcMs.SLe**'
Zip
Allow A weeks (or dolivory.
Oiler oxpiics December 31,1974
Limit one por cuslomor.
every
Wednesday at 3:00 in the basement
On sale Tues. April 23
PAGE 6A
accepting
1-3. Come in or fill it out and drcpit in
on Sat. April 27
Tfekefs $7 Dues Paying Members Only.
national
is
the gripe box in the lobby of the Cam-
Montreal Trip
CC Lobby 9 AM
the
354. An evening of discussion of recent
unlumiliur with their use is as illogical as forbidding (he private
ownership ol automobiles heeause some men urc poor drivers.
Pi,
April 2 2 , 1974 - 7:45 P.M. Humanities
4
*
transportation for individuals fromTroy
Chapel House.
for beautiful organic vegetable and flower
$60 month. Call Steve 482 — 3167. After 4
WHAT P0 YOU THINK
OF THIS STATEMENT?
Wednes, and thurs, 11:10 and 12:10.
Two people need big backyard in Albany
needed to sublet spacious
extension,
t e y i m Crew 0OOo ftojfy. File) flsetoffteest*
information, call 7 - 7 9 2 9 .
all in Campus Center. Pre-cana will be
roommate wanted for Spring 75 semester,
EUROPE 7 4
PART-TIME POSITIONS
Male students needed us salaried
|fittcndant - roommates to help
handicapped(grad and unilergrad) with daily living routine. Positions to begin summer
und-or lull semesters. No experience necessary. For details
fcontucl .1.Lurry Kailcy, Office of
Sludcnl Life, CC 137 ,45.7-1296
12:10 Tues,
own bedroom, on busline, $65 month. 465
busline apt.For summer, piano, fireplace,
FLIGHTS T O EUROPE
at
Wanted: 2 females to share bedroom in
mounting
hardware; excellent condition. $30. Mike
Service
on Mar. 31 and April 21 at 11:15AM, at
honorary,
7:45 P . M .
Housemates
the
Masses; Mon and Fri., 11:10;
beautiful apt on Western Ave, directly on
4 blocks From Draper. Call Josh 7 — 5076.
2
carton;
Sigma
linguistics
Washing machine. Cheap Jay 457 — 5211.
lining. Jon 437 — 7S40.
FM Car Stereo, Hardly uied; still in original
De/fa
338,
an apt. starting summer or fall. Call Sieve1
with 3 juniors. Own room. Kitchens, 2 baths,
on
2.7 overall a n d a 3.0 in Spanish, plus a
Couple looking for same. Willing to share
Huge house to sublet this summer. Share
1796eveningi.
summer sublet, clean,
Summer sublet available. On Western Ave.
Like new, never traveled. $673. 436 —
Humanities
applications TODAY only. You need a
WANTED
Willett St. Apartment for rent. $145. May 1 .
Ontario)
of
#•*
Spanish
nished
and
lobby
Education side of the building.
Wanted: People to sublet 3 bedroom furAve.
Communion
floor
472 — B733.
Western
day
Summer sublet—4 furnished bedrooms—
condition. Good t i n t . $330 Call Ed at 497
on
Sun., Apr. 2 1 , will be cancelled. W e e k -
All English majors, d e c l a r e d or intend-
spacious—near bus. 438-0384.
directly on busline. $50 month. Call Carol
on Western Ave.
and 19 between 10 a n d 2 on each d a y ,
plete Western Ave, apt for next year,
beautiful
Largo i coNoction
PM at Chapel House. The 5:30 Mass of
ingllth
2 seniors or grad students wanted to com-
ovation case, t o reusBarry Pick — up. lorry.
m a g a i i n t i . Call Jori 497 — 4743.
c o m m i t t e e will be held April 17,18
Wanted: 4 or U people to summer sublet.
413 — S36S.
apartment
Student*
6 : 3 0 i p m . Sun., 1 0 A M , 1 2 : 3 0 a n d 5 : 3 0
next
Available June 1. Close to busline. Call Sue
Responsible male roommate wanted to
1967 Chov Impala, fattettent. mochonkal
W e e k e n d Masses; Sat., 4:30 and
for
ed, may vote atthose times in the first
complete 5-man suite on State Quad. Call
apartment
year's
Ejections
Undergraduate
apt. on Western Ave. Busline. Available
Wanted: 2 females to share bedroom in
Ovation clankol guitar, how, hard shall
t
Hove you screwed by Record
Sublet 4 bedrm. apt. June — Aug. Ontario
housemates
on
Time: 8 P M
available for new women.
summer,
room, call Vivian or Carol, 465-1992.
house on SUNV busline. Many extras for $51
Chunk
at 8 P M at Community House 332
Hudson A v e . , (below Lark) Counselling
Summer Sublet. Single room In furnished
kitten (9 mos.) 463 — 3813.
bit 4 ( 9 — 404».
Two people wanted to share double room In
on
Cemrwmiry
get bock in time lor brunch, f o r more
lesbians for l i b e r a t i o n meet every
Mon.
Two girls wanted to share room in furnished
month. Ready June 1 for summer / 7 4 —
Free very affectionate part—Angora male
Zenith Stereo System. Top rated by C.U.
Mini M i l by'June
,
AbusltamtatftQwWfer
'
and Partridge, 4 or 5 people or separately.
Reasonable rates. Call 457 — 4037.
W o u M yaw M w to 9 0 t o c h u r c h * *
slides by Micki G r e e n , who recently
room. 457-7960.
7960.
workshop a n d
apartment on Madison. Room avafablo Iff
OPEN 6 NIGHTS
Closed Monday night
297 Ontario St.
tmmmmtmmmmmmmm
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Artists' Portfolios. Color slides and black and
lounge
white photographs of sculpture, jewelry,
chemistry buildings. Come and relax
prints, paintings, ceramics, etc. Professional
quality at reasonable prices, Fast service,
call Gary Gold at 439 — 6888.
between
the
p h ysics
and
with good food and G e r m a n conversation,
Continued on
page 12
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE7A,
\
•fc j-.; I M V H I T W *}.«•;
«. * * > J » I « * « » » i y • « • * * .
'j-f^.-avi-V***-
JFbrlrf Premiere
High Court Upholds Village Law Barring Apartment Sharing
A P , Statcttmn
Conductor, Julius Henri and the •
Jicob Druekman is currently on
Albany ' Symphony have been .the faculty of Julliard. A prolific
v i g o r o u s l y reheariing Jacob
.composer, Druekman has received
Druckman'i Lamia, which will
many honors for his compositions
receive i l l world premiere Saturday
including the Pulitzer Prize in Music
evening, April 20 at the Palace
in 1972. He has also received inTheatre in Albany at 8:30 P.M.
numerable commissions from
^S3EpWaVWrUte'i»_M"i' dittinctively
various musical organizations.
Druekman idiom, i> a synthesis of- '•' Mezzo-soprano, Jan DeCaetani, a
the traditional and the new. The
native of Ohio and a graduate of the
piece itielf, composed of three
Julliard School has been Artisl-inmovements, running approximately
Kesidence at the University", of
12 minutei, is open and accessible to
Wisconsin and a faculty member of
the listener. It is soared for two
the Julliard School. Now Artistorchestras and voice and includes
in-Rcsidcncci at the Aspen Music
such unusal instruments such as an
Festival, Miss DeGaetani also conelectric organ, vibraphone, conga
ducts master classes at universities
drums, temple blocks and various
throughout the country.
sized tam-tams.
If you ever wished you'were there
The second orchestra will be conat the premiere of a great work of
ducted by Robert Kogan, a young
music, here is your chance. To get
New York City conductor and
your tickets or for further informastudent) of Druckman's.
tion call or write the Albany
The orchestra will also perform the
Symphony Orchestra, IV Clinton
Franck D minor Symphony and
Avenue. Albany, New York 12207.
Mozart's "Jupiter" Symphony, No.
456-4755.
41.
Psychology of Psyches
The International Film Group
closes its twentieth year of service
this friday night with a screening of
Marcel Ophuls unique documentary, T H E S O R R O W A N D T H E
PITY.
Ophuls film combines
historic footage and filmed interviews to paint a dramatic portrait of
France under Nazi occupation during the second world war. The film is
much more than a newsreel in its
social and psychological study of the
French and German psyches. David
Jafftrson Airplane
Denby of Atlantic Monthly called
the film "One of the greatest films
made. T H E S O R R O W A N D T H E
PITY is a contribution to history, to
social psycholoy, to anthropology,
and Id art. If there's any justice in the
world. Marcel Ophuls' monumental
labor will be studied and debated lor
years."
Due to the length of the film (ap
proximately four and a half hours)
there will be only one showing at
7:30 Friday. April 19th in LC-18.
(MM
The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of a Belle
Terre, N.Y. toning ordinance which
allows the village authorities to
restrict the number of unrelated
students living together in a single
dwelling.
CoaMSMMttr Cody t o last night's concert.
Glug, Glug
Do you ever daydream about
those good old days when you were a
kid? If you do and you enjoy it, then
we invite you to join the S U N Y A
Synchronized Swim Club as they
present their third annual show entitled "When I Was a Child...".
There will be three presentations:
tonight. Friday, April 19. and
tomorrow night. Saturday, April 20
at X I ' M and Sunday April 21 at 3:30
I ' M , at the PE Center Pool. The admission is free and all arc welcome.
The routines to be presented include some which won second and
third place medals for the club at the
Eastern Inter
collegiate Synchronized Swimming Conference
Routine Competition held here
March 22 and 23, and ranked the
club second among thirteen schools.
II you didn't seeany ol the swimming
that weekend, here is your last
chance. Don't miss it!
Black Sabbath
A Second Circuit Court of
Appeals overturned the latter decision in February 1973 noting that inhabitants of a neighborhood and city
officials "cannot under the mask of
zoning ordinances impose social
preferences upon their fellow
citizens."
Those who favor the Belle Terre
type of ordinance usually have cited
the physical deterioration of
neighborhoods and homes occupied
by an excessive number of residents.
The case was presented to the
IT'6 A 660LCKS»I5T$'
CCHVeWTtOH.
by Al Seniii (SASU)
Student demonstrations and sitins at the State University College at
New I'altz have subsided lor the present with apparent student victories
in several campus governance
matters, but student unrest over
similar issues has spread to a second
SUNY
-cainpus-the
State
Agricultural and leehnical College
at Morrisville.
Student dissatisfaction with campus i n f i r m a r y
operations,
meanwhile, has flared al SUNYStony Brook and S U NY-Buffalo.
As students ended a week-long occupation of the administration
building at New Fall/., their counterparts at Morrisville launched an effort to increase student participation
in many aspects of campus life.
Three
hundred
students
demonstrated peacefully on April 3,
presented a list of grievances to the
campus administration, and began a
series of negotiations with the campus President, the Vice President,
the local college council and the
Dean of Education.
Laura Nyro
Negotiating sessions between a
small group of student leaders and
campus administrators continued
throughout the week and various
campus rallies were held to appraise
students of the status of the
negotiations. There arc some 2.501)
students on the campus.
OF COURSE THERE'S
THOUSANDS MORE!
I he major issues in the student
protest involve reform ol the campus
Faculty Student Association and in-
stitution of a 24-hour intcrvisitation
policy in campus dormitories.
Newly elected student government
president Dave Burgess says there
are a number of secondary issues
fueling the protest actions. These include:
-A lack of adequate student participation in the hiring and firing of
faculty members.
-A demand lor consistent evaluation by students of faculty performance.
-The removal of the Dean of
Students.
-Reform of campus infirmary
operations.
-An
inadequate
campus
bookstore.
-The poor quality of campus
meals and the lack of a campus dietician,
Burgess indicated that some
progress had been made by the end
ol the week on institution of the
visitation policy and I'SA reform,
hut lie added that the administration
has relused to reply specifically to
main ol the student demands.
Some ol tile impetus lor the student protest. Burgess added, may
Inns come from protest actions al
SI It-New Fall/. " I he instigators of
the protest here knew about the New
Fall/ action and wanted to show
some support for it," he said.
"Anyone who knows about it here
supports it."
Spokespersons for the New Fall/
ROUND ROBIN SALE. THE BIGGEST SALE IN THE AREA.
PLUS
LOTS AND LOTS OF NEW $ 1 . 9 9 JAZZ LP'S.
Sly and the
Family Stone
•t-iwi tmtmmmmmmmmm
» u a ease
84 Central Ay*.
Albany, N.Y. 4344)085
€>ut£ibe
Inn
234 Washington Ave.
GOES QUALITY
Come T r y
Twenty Mall
Guilderland, N.Y. 456-8187
MOLSONS
O n Tap
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
PAGE 8A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Lawrence Sager. a New York Civil
Liberties Union attorney who
handled the case for the students,
said that he was disappointed by the
high court's decision. In his argument before the court, he had said
that the village ordinance was "at
drastic odds with the fourteenth
amendment's concept of personal
liberty and restraint upon state action."
Sources close to Sager incorrectly
predicted that Justice Douglas,
Thurgood Marshall, and William
Hrecan would decide in favor of the
students. While Marshall and Brennan wrote dissenting opinions,
Supreme Court Justice WHIIam O. Douglas
Douglas voted with the majority.
Brcnnan dissented from the majority opinion because he felt that the
appeal was based on a moot question, since the students no longer lived in the house. Marshall maintained that the first and fourteenth
amendments gave citizens the right
to choose their political and social
ordinances, and that, therefore, the
demonstrators said throughout their
week of protest activity that they
hoped similar actions would spread
to other SUNY campuses and spark
a new wave of student concern with
the quality of campus life.
A l New Faltz, the week long administration building sit-in ended at
students were assured they would
have a stronger voice in determining
how the college should be run. T w o
new advisory committees dealing
with overall educational goals and
the granting of faculty tenure have
been established by College President Stanley Colfman, and a popular philosophy professor, denied
appointment because of his age, has
been rehired on a part-lime basis.
to accept Assembly decisionsus having the "utmost importance" in
policy decisions.
During the week of protest,
students had charged that some element o f the f a c u l t y ignored
Assembly decisions and that the
New I'altz administration tacitly
supported the boycott.
In unrelated protest activity,
angry SUNY Stony Brook students
held college President John Toll captive in a college auditorium for a
short time on March 27 aler he
ordinance was unconstitutional.
Belle Terre Muypr James Philbin
is on record as being extremely
pleased with the decision. "This is
what we always felt was the case,"
I'hilhin said. "Chat is. the village's
right to he self-discriminating and
'maintaining the traditional familywhatever that is."
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
responded to student demands lor
better health care. The students,
members o f a coalition who arc
attempting to expand health care
offerings on the campus, were
angered al what they fell were
evasive responses and a lack of concrete proposals to their demands. A
petition drive for improved health
care has been underway on the campus for the past several months. Toll
has blamed budgetary cutbacks by
the State Legislature for the lack of
adequate inlirmary care on the campus.
In a letter distributed to the campus community last week, Colfman
said he supported rclainmcnt of the
campus experimental
studies
program and indicated he would
support a student run food service,
as long as the campus Faculty Student Association was involved in the
operation.
Additionally,
the
College
Assembly, main academic governance body at New Faltz, passed a
resolution al the urging ol its student
members that calls on President
C o l f m a n to respect Assembly
decisions as representing the entire
university community and urges him
Open new vistas of hope for her
The kind of girl who has crumbled
under the awesome pressures of a
disrupted home and an inconsistent
society. The adolescent girl who has
built a wail around herself and who
will never grow up emotionally unless
love breaks through to free her. . . .
themselves to guiding adolescent girls
who have personal, social, and family
difficulties.
As psychologists, child care and
social workers, teachers, nurses, recreation leaders, and in other fields,
the sisters strive through love, understanding, and total commitment to
Christ to help these girls find themselves and God again.
The SisrtiKS Op THE Goou SIICPHEKD who are religiously committed
and professionally trained dedicate
Do you have a deep Interest In
others? Would you like more information on our opostaliitc of curing?
She's the kind of young girl that feels
lonely. Feels left out. Feels the whole
world is a hostile place.
DONT FORGET OUR SATURDAY $ 2 . 9 9 / $ 3 . 4 9
Charlla MutMiwhltt
Court on behalf of the village by
Village Counsel Bernard Gegan,
who argued that the law is aimed at
retaining a traditional single-family
character in the community. Density
control, community stability, and
rent control were also claimed goals
of the ordinance. It was admitted by
Gegan in his February court
appearance that the law was primarily aimed at students, but heargued it
was not discriminatory.
Student Unrest Surfacing On SUNY Campuses
HERE ARE JUST A FEW
OF OUR NEW $1.99 LPs!
AND
In a 7 to 2 decision, the court ruled
that the enaction of the zoning law
was within the bounds of a village's
authority. Justice William O.
Douglas wrote the majority opinion
lor the court, which made it the first
venture of the Supreme Court into
housing into local zoning laws in
nearly 50 years.
The ruling is expected to have a
significant impact on the students
and college communities across the
nation, as many university areas
have zoning ordinances similar to
Belle Tcrre's.
im*»m.mi.im(.>mmimcmnmrimr-imx
Nilsson
David Bowie
The ordinance prohibits more
than two unrelated persons from living in a one family dwelling. The
specific action under question was
against six unrelated students who
were living in a rented house in the
village, which is near the Stony
Brook campus Long Island.
The case had been brought to US
District Court in I972by three
students from the State U niversity at
Stony Brook, NY, and their
landlord, requesting that the Belle
Terre ordinance be declared unconstitutional. The three students
had been served with a summons for
violating llie ordinance. The District
Court ruled in September 1972 that
the town had a lawful interest in
maintaining the "marriage and
blood related" character of the
neighborhood and could do so
through zoning.
Yes, please send me Information.
Vocation Director
vnjsi
is'tens of the Qooo Shepheuft
Mt. Florence, Peeksklll, New York 10566
ABO
Address
*lp
College
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
A-. i&Jlvi
CLAflftlFIEM
M k gl<H»i lessons; wtperlancedl leather,
I M M I W U * nriM Call 4 n — OMf.
•oraoy MCfwonol AQi6ncy( Th9MMf ttrm
popvft, dtiisffcilioiit* PTWM J™ •••"• W20t
m — J3M after 6 PM.
<'} '• \ 'V
GrMn: '
.
< sv
« V'iDeor Narpesi « IV "'•'
Med cabbogt, ihit oe«k, big chimney, '^''-Ita^llsllrirMair.'SiirprrMlli"
{tuttonam* a ftw, Ouraglide Too.
':'•'.':
'•**•<
Pot*ntial Narpesses
Orange
'aim.
Typing dam in my heme. So8 — 2474.
To the Throe: Easy Pieees^-.
You're all bananas, but you're a nice
bunch.
Love, the other Two.
Typing dan* in my hanw. 412 — 1432.
. Wendy —
lost: gold chain amber bracelet. Reward.
Call Dtbra 472 — 7739. '
,(
lart Rod Frtnch pun* in CC or Lib. PLEASE
raturn. 482 — 0343.,
Two rings left in third floor girl's room of
library. Reward offered for return of pearl
ring. Call Carolyn 457 — 4494.
Baby bracelet with "Nancy" on It. If found,
please call 7 — 8074.
ippsil .
The brothers of KB, residents of Ryckman
Happy Birthday to a great roommate.
Candl and. Steve
Bob: You're a great cook!
Schlag
Dear Lenny,
Happy Birthday Sweetheart.
take
this opportunity
in con-
gratulating Bruce Altaian on his recent appointment
to the position
superintendent
of
control
for the Federal Defense
Bill
jluiicr
"I
I
I
hsmyuatj
msij3
i
i
i
love your red hunting hatl
Lorrie
The Oph
Come see the Crafts Fair) Today in the CC
happy to be trapped with ya. I love you.
months, and hopes for many more.
Ski — wash
Wanted:
Dates for Spring Weekend. Call 7 —
7892 ask for Social Chairman.
Weebst
Happy, happy 19th.
:
4k
^ U C n 'OVe'
"X... s&p
Will the real Ben Nobel's daughter please
stand up?!
Cltere Barbara —
Bonne Anniversairel
Jeanne
Theta Xi Omega is having
a wash at Un-
iversity Getty tomorrow from 10-4. Come
have your car washed by the brothers for
one dollar,
ttuiiimieil from / " W iWif
per academic year was set..
Hut political activism soon came
to SUNY campuses, and taxpayers
and legislators alike began to raise
serious questions about funding.
Where was the money coming from
thai produced "radical literature,"
organized demonstrations and
transportation to and from anti-war
rallies?
An intense reassessment of student activity fees followed.
In June, 1970 Controller Arthur
Levitt audited seven SUNY campuses and found most campuses
were using activity funds correctly.
Some campuses however, were
managing disbursement of the Ices
poorly.
Thai same month,"aTY'Eric County
grand jury subpoenaed financial
records of Ihe SUNY-Bulfalo
GRADUATE STUDENTS and FACULTY MEMBERS
§
\
. . . comprising 350 outstanding Boys, Girls. Btoth*r-Siit*r |
•nd Co-Ed Camps, located throughout in* New England, Mid- |
die Atlantic Stain and Canada.
|
... INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concerning summer employment ai Head X
Counselors. Group Leaders. Specialties, General Counselors.
Write, Phone, or Call in Person
1
Hut the legal action failed lo signal
the end of the issue. Chancellor
5 Min. From Downtown Lot Angeles In A Suburbia Community
Enrollment Now Being Accepted for September term
Inquiries Are Invited By The Dun 01 Admissions:
G1INDAUC0UIGI0FLAW
220K4.SUNDAUAVI
GlINDMI,CA.*i2tM
Maxwell M. Alexander, Executive Director
O X 5-2656,
In Albany, an undergraduate student filed suit in the State Supreme
Court in July of 1970. in an attempt
to have the court declare mandatory
collection of student fees illegal. The
court decision eventually upheld the
student, and the Albany administration was ordered lo control the expenditure of mandatory fees. Until
Albany created a new policy, the
judge ordered all funds at the Albany
campus frozen.
I h e Student
Association
lawyer,
Sandy
Roscnbluin suggested that the case
could not be won and recommended
against appeal.
A Degree Progrim Qualifying Graduates For Calif. Bsr Ewm I 9 '
Association of Private Camps — Dept. C
m SS West 42nd Streef,
studetn government, campus
publications, and various clubs. A
former Graduate Student Association 1'resident was indicted for misappropriating USA funds.
GLENDALE COLLEGE
"
OF LAW
p
THE ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS
N * w York 3 6 , N. Y. p i
(213)247-0770
Art Council in conjunction with University
Speakers
invites you to Two Lectures presented
on April 22 and April 25, 1974
Forum
r O T 1 1 I I i
II
*'
I
__
Prof, Colin Eisler,
Institute of Fine Arts, N.Y.U
will speak on: "Simone Martini's frescoes in Avignon*
Monday, April 22
7:30 pm
Prof. J alius Held.
Emeritus of Barnard College
will present: "Observations on the O i l Sketches off
Peter Paul Rubens"
Thursday, April 25 7:30 pm
Both illustrated lectures will be in the Fine Arts Building - Room 126
PAGE TWELVE
team charges that the first jury was
so biased against the inmates that it
indicted only prisoners, despite the
pleading of prosecutors. Now, says
the Attica defense group, a new jury
is being selected to indict a few
guards, thereby making thecntire investigation seem balanced.
Mandatory Tax Threatened.
CAMP COUNSELOR OPENINGS
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
tMin, ogt 19 & compltlion at oi Uatl 1 yiar of colli>ga )
hollowing the Attica violence, a
special ytate commission conclusion
that the principal blame for the
violence and killings should be placed on state officials, not prisoners.
However, the first grand jury disregarded this finding and indicted
only inmates.
Inner lobby from 9-4.
Squish — I love you! Thanks for three great
Commission. Very Good Brooooce.
Julie,
Why won't ya marry me?
Peggy
Have fun in Shrub Oak. I'll miss you.
me
Holden
all my love,
Hall, listers of Chi Sig and KD and all the
troopers
S t a t e prosecutor
Anthony
(Zodiac) - The New York Slate
Simonetta says that the new grand
Attorney General's of rice, in an unLove you, precedented move, will empanel a se- . jury is being empaneled because the
Nudl* cond grand jury next week to in- original jury is refuting to take additional action in the case.
.
Happy Birthday Doctor AI. vestigate the 1971 Attica prison
rebellion.
".
Hey O. I. S. Sources close to the grand jury
> Are you pulling my leg? Or am I pulling
Trie move .is unusual because the
report that the prosecutor has been
yours (her* -r- heh)?
original Attica grand jury, sworn in
attempting to convince the grand
LC
two-and-a-half years ago, is still in- jury to indict a few guards.
living off campus next year— For reip risi- vestigating the same case. That first
ble representation — Vote Candl Mayer
grand jury indicted a total or 61 perThe Attica legal defense team conand Steve Meyer for Central Council (Comsons, all of them inmates, following
tends that prosecutors simply want
muters). Voting Tees. April 23 — Fir. April
the
prison
uprising
in
which
state
" A few token guards indicted so that
26 Campus Center first floor lounge 10—4
PM. Tax cards and ID needed. Mas* troopers shot more than 40 men to
the grand jury investigation will
death.
yourselves heard — Vote)
appear to be a fair one." The defense
Dear Phyllis,
John McDermott:
How was Carolina?
Where are you?
Remember Corky knows caH.
Will pay SoO to four males who wil live In
five man suit* on Indian. Call Danny 7 —
Typing service. 43» — 1765.
Second Attica Jtm Galled
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Hoyer ordered the creation ofaTusk
force lo investigate Ihe use of student lees. The task force failed to
make any recommendation.
A controversy ensued when the
statewide student association as well
as student members of the task force
indicated there was no real student
involvement in the decision. Iloyer
responded with this statement: "The
decision for a referendum and lot
administrative supervision of funds
when Ihe lees are mandated,
recognizes the responsibility of the
university and reflects Ihe sentiments
of a majority of campus prcsidneis
and student leaders."
I he IM72 legislative session could
he considered the delayed legislative
response lo mandatory student fees.
Though anti-fee hills had been filed
preciously, little chance of their coming to the Senate or Assembly floors
occurcd. However, in April ol 1972.
one such Ice bill was reported lo the
Senate floor and approved by a one
vole margin. Later il was defeated in
the Assembly, in a two hour debate,
the arguments oi accountability,
radical activity funding, and loose
controls were augmented by Ice support of "radical and pornographic
newspapers and the infection of high
schools with campus trash."
One of the staff directors of the
legislative eommillee says that the
legislators were not so upsel about
reports of continues mismanagement ol lands, hut were more concerned about ihe pornographic and
radical content of the papers.
It is those public reactions that
prompted many legislators to vote
lor a voluntary lee. Il is a similar
reaction today thai gives strength to
pending legislation which would
curb what the public considers
"misuse" of mandatory student lees.
editorial/comment
iFor Whom The Bell Tolls
iQIJR FOURTH .Slir.CESSFUIj
YEAR
VERIFIED RECORD OF OUT
•STANDING ACHIEVEMENT.
State Senator John Marchi. a Republican Conservative from Staten Island, sponsored a bill
that would prohibit the use of student activity fees to help finance student publications on stateoperated campuses. Purportedly to "protect" students from the "many" incidents of obscenity,
libel und "unacceptable" political, moral and social views, the bill would spell thedeath of many
state school papers and severely cripple those few managing to survive.
Mr. Marchi's apparent concern for the rights of students seems admirable, but his true
motivations questionable. For one who claims to be working for the rights of students, action
that would eliminate the existence of the student press is hardly consistent. Beneath the bill's
benevolent veneer lies a blatant attempt at censorship and oppression.
Ihe value of the campus newspaper is inestimable in terms of the broad range of services it
provides. It is the sounding board for issues; it is it calendar of events; it is the core of communications. The campus newspaper provides educational experience for those involved in its
production, as well as those others who participate in the politics of its pages.
Il is unfortunate that so many college papers must rely upon mandatory student funds for their
survival.Yet we are sure (hut students would much rather have lo pay a little lor their publication,
rather than lo have no paper at all. We arc sure, as well, that the students would support a
newspaper that is free of censorship and oppression, rather than ado-nothing rag that mouths
Ihe words of those in power.
Mr. Marchi's proposal supposes that the student in our University have no brains, no sense of
decency or responsibility. Apparently he does not think us capable ol self-restraint and good
judgement. I hat is a tragic misconception.
I he bill is currently being held hack while ihe school singled out for us pari icular offense is trying lo "work things out." M i . Marchi has agreed lo kill ihe bill if he is satisfied with the awaited
report. The campus press should then be able torcsiimc normal operations; that is, until the next
Act of Intimidation.
What Saginaw Saw
Richard Nixon is in trouble. I he government has assessed the tux-delinquent president nearly
hall ol his (oilUttc, l» the tune of $4(>3,00(). One ol his aides has been convicted ol' lying lo a grand
jury investigating the Watergate break-in and subsequent attempts by the Nixon Administration to cover up the incident. Latest public opinion polls show that Nixon has indeed picked up
in the public's rating, and now hovers around a 25f'<• mark ol support lor his continues residence
in the White House. Hut perhaps the most telling blow to the scandal-ridden Nixon Administrav , , , . , . v , >„M.,v. u u , |>k
|J,iiuk urn.,, u
£ m i , , , i t , Mlb r>v,iMUdl-| IUUCI1 I1IAUI1 / Ml 11II11ISII it"
lion was the new chapter added this Wednesday forecasting the disintegration ol Ihe much
heralded "Silent Majority."
In Saginaw. Michigan, lor Ihe first time since 19.12. a Democratic candidate for the office of
Congressman. Robert I raxler, defeated a Republican in what was once considered a bastion of
Nixonian Republicanism. VVhal makes this Michigan election significant above and beyond the
obvious indications thai ihe Republican parly is losing control of its once safe constituency, is the
lael lhat the President of I he Uniled States went lo Saginaw, placing his political prestigeon the
line, lo personally plead Ihe case ol [lie Republican, .lames Sparling, ,lr. Hut in spile ol (or
because oil Mr. Nixon's ellorl.s, Mr. Sparling lost lhat race, and the embarrassment in
Washington is acute.
Hoth candidates, lo be sure, played down Ihe role oi ihe President in the election, saying thai
Ihe results would have been Ihe same regardless of whether the President consented to make an
appearance or not. Yet l he fuel tlttti both admit thai a Presidential showing would at besi have no
ellecl on ihe outcome ol an otherwise close election is a remarkable indication ol the extent to
which Richard Nixon's Presidency has fallen. Ihe record for the off-year special elections for
vacated Congressional seals have proven dismal lor the Republicans. They have lost four out of
ihe live special elections In the Democrats, and as Nixon's ineptitude continues to be displayed
before incredulous Americans, thai record will probably deteriorate even further.
I he Silent Majority is daily becoming more vocal, and thai voice is being heard where it
hurts the Nixon Administration mosl ill ihe p Ms. With ihe vole lor impeachment coming
before the House as early as June, Ihe Republicans, who by thai time may be panicky over the
impending rout in Congressional elections litis lull feel loward the President that if the man is
gone, the slain will go with him, lo those, we must poinl out that stains are not that easy to wipe
clean, but removing the disease is definitely a course on the right track.
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
Kuriou IN Cum
ANN E. BUNKER
ASSISIANI X I Till. KltlKIH
llAKKV HliNNH I
NI.WS KBITIIH
Asxmmt. Niws KDITOHS
(IIV Kl>
N, S M A l
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1,974
"-"-; D * V I S
"'
°ANm*
Jllnv D
*™"NT
Bitot. MAOOIN
I
Ass.K,»nS«misKt.iToa
£S:::::::::::::::::::::::::
| Pei.DiKTK.N
:VIN
f«N AaouiNo
I.IM.V M. i.i.
ASMK'WU ApvumsiNd MANAOW
.Aov.,1
MlLUm
Ll3
Aim Ko.i.hK
ASMK l»Tl ,\«TS KniTOtt
Paivtiw bin-tut
Shims Koittm
<'.,A,*lm n ADV«,.«, N ( i MANAOl.
IKHNKAUKDITO.
ASS4KIAT.. TtlMN.tAI. Kp.TO.S
•l'*IN»« M I N I . ' . .
D vl
* " U:KNtR
" u ''"• l ) S M I ' 1 ' t i A , N I - s
T»>N III II MO. 11 M.I.I.
N A N I V
KnnoHiM. .I'AI.I. KDIUIK
Aovm.MN.iMANA.ira
for information,write or call
450 7th Ave, NYC 10001
Tel. 212 594-1970
I
Phones rang frantically in student newspaper offices across the state this week as word spread
that the bill had cleared the Senate Higher Education Committee and was on its way to the
Senate floor.
LAW BOARDS
INSTITUTE
Announces that its LSAT1
WORKSHOP in preparation!
for the July 27th LSAT begins]
SATURDAY JUNE 29th.
Q a o f e o f t f c t D a * •"";'••';"
"There*! no question in my mind that President Ninon
didputlia|»UUc»Jtt^uUlionM«p<>litkMBonthefas«
in Mschi|tti. That reputation tufleisxJ i aetback. 1 • » '
ticipate we'll Have a new president."
-Senator Vmti Harlke (D-lnd.)
LINOA D « M O N »
M
L » ZtlCKSKMAN
DANISt. CHAU
* " MliV1! "' ^ " ^ *™»™">»
Jli
"" V * L » « E t ' ' "
••••••••••••••••-
-
e ^ S e o > / > • ivt-eL / I S C O U l l T
eZ/"ie»AC»
" 0 1 6 5
*«««
S by Ron Hendreni'SSSWiWAWffi
The energy crisis, although it has apparently
delayed House hearing on the matter, has in
fact provided a plus to proponents of discount
Clllw« ALU*., CINDV BHNNSTT. CAKV MISIMAN
.
f L *
»*s.*+l-r***r\*\'
i n r e U T C I I C U
W A S H I N G T O N - Discount lares offered by lares who poinl to jumbo jets Hying at half or ,
some air, rail and bus lines to youths, senior less than hall capacity. "It's a terrible waste."
citi/.ens and the handicapped may be a thing of says Janie (iroverman of the National Student
the past unless the House Committee on In- ' Lobby's legislative staff. "Younger and older
terstate and l-'orcign Commerce moves soon persons rarely fly because many of them live
lo act on legislation already passed un- on low fixed incomes and can't afford full air
animously by the Senate.
fares. And so they opt for what they can afIhe Senate proposal, authored by Sen. ford, automobiles, which in turn adds to the
Warren Ci. Magnuson (D-Wash.) powerful gas shortage problem, while planes arc Hying
chairman oi ihe Commerce Committee, came hull-empty all Ihe time."
lasl year in response lo a ruling by the Civil
NSI. has been perhaps Washington's most
Aeronautics Hoard that prohibits air carriers active organi/aliou working for passage of
from offering discount rates on cither stand- discount fare legislation.
Ihe American
by or reservation basis.
That ruling is Association ol Retired Persons and other
scheduled lo lake effect June IJustn few short organi/alions representing the young and the
weeks away, and although the matter is on the old have voiced approval nl discount fares,
House committee's agenda, no hearing date but by mosl accounts has e not placed the issue
has been set.
high on their list of priorities, Their lack of action, needless lo say, has done nothing to
ides to Rep. Ilarlcy O. Sniggers ( D . W.
speed up Ihe House Committee
and Rep. John .larmon (D-Oklu.),
c lirmen respectively of the full committee
Indeed, one eommillee aide told me lhat if
a d its Subcommittee on Transportation and
Aeronautics, assure me that both men arc students and senior citizens really want disclaim fares, they had heller let the committee
committed lo holding hearings as soon as
know it. He said committee mail on the subject
possible this session.
to dale has been light. However, aides lo both
I he problem is that the committee is
Staggers and .larmon indicated lo me Ihey had
presently bugged down trying to iron out
been receiving considerable mail in support of
enei V crisis legislation, and in addition is facdiscount lures, both from within and without
ed with al least two more weeks of hearings on
their districts. In fact, it was in part pressure
lour key transportation measures. Taking
from Staggers'West Virginia constituents that
into account the upcoming April recess, il will
led him lo introduce his own version of the disbe at least the third week in May before the
committee could turn its attention todiscount count lure proposal, which would, in Staggers'
words, "allow each airline to decide for itself
Mares.
On the surface the issue does not seem to be what il wants to do." I hal is basically the
thrust of the Senate bill, .larmon, although he
a highly controversial one. More than 170
has not taken u position on Ihe issue so far, is
.House members have sponsored or cosponsored discount lure legislation of one likely lo go along with the rest of the committee. I wo other committee members, Rep.
kind or another, Almost all of those proposals
Dan Kiiykendall(R-lcnn.)and Rep. Bertram
aulhori/.e and encourage (but do not order)
Podell ( D - N . Y . ) , have sponsored discount
air and surface carriers to otter lower rules to
legislation,
youths (persons under 22), the elderly (63 and
over) and the handicapped, leaving the
, percentage of the discounts and other
.variables up to the carriers,
Oritomii*AHliM«Atiii)isC'AMHiisCt;Nir:«..2f1ANi»3.14ANi»<Hi«HaiiNBA.B457.2l90ANO457-21»4.
Wti AW ftiNDtn av Tim I T I I M N T AS.«K IATION
MR. M&S/MGER SAtt> THE HONEYMOON NEGOTIATIONS WERE
FRUITFUL. BOTH 6IVES WERE SECRETIVE, BUT MUTUALAGREEMENT& WERE REfORmi INPICAT1NG- HOPEFUL...'
Hut all of this will be to no avail unless we
let the powers that he know by wrilinga letlcf
to;
Honorable Hat Icy O.Staggcrs
House of Representatives
Washington, U.C. 20515
.jffiffl?3)££S**#*
letters
What Makes
Sammy Run...
T o t h e Editor:
I would like to take this opportunity to announce my candidacy for president of the Student Association. I believe|that the Student
Association has ignored the rights a n d
plefbgtrJyMof the individual student a n d is
thus n o longer serving the needs of the indivigual student. T h u s , t h e theme of my campaign is t h a ' :he individual o n c a m p u s
i i t o : bel afforded every o p p o r t u n i t y t o express
himself. T o d o this, checks 1 and balances are
needed t o c o n t a i n the high-handedness of the
TJ.A (against t h e student.
These checks and
•balances I believe should be instituted as
follows:
1) Any student w h o feels so aggrieved by the
S . A ( h a t he feels compelled t o seek justice in a
court' of law, should have a l l his reasonable
legal expenses paid f o r « b y the Student
Association. In this way, t h e S.A. fVill be less
p r o n e t o ignore individual needs and wants.jlf
it should d o so, the individual is allowed a foolproff method of seeking relief.
2) The free market system is the only way that
S.A. Icould be sure that flhe g o o d s a n d services
it provides a r e actually desired by the^tudents.
By use of t h e free market system, t h e S.A.
could avoid the h a z a r d s p f using t a x money t o
subsidize events that are not generally wanted.
In this end, the largest user of.student funds,
(Concert board, A S P , WSUA.ctc.) could be
guided o n t o the road of self-sufficiency) We
have a large enough student body that this
would be feasible.
3) Finally, I believe that politics arc the
prerogrativc |of a voluntary organization, not
of a g r o u p such a s the S. A< Thus, I would ban
any actions o r expenditures that p r e s u m e d ' t o
a n n o u n c e a political policy o n behalf (of the
student body.
All of these proposals a r e designed t o allow
the individual student a n even break against.
S.A.) ' believe that if these proposals arc instituted,! and ' a m c ' e c t e d , ' b e individual student will never again have to fear being dragged into the S.A.\or its events against his will
Thank y o u for your consideration.
Sammy Thomas\
Commuter's
Programming
T o the Editor:
Will y o u be living in your own a p a r t m e n t
next fall, or perhaps at home with your folks?
II so. y o u have special needs a n d interests that
your Student Association should be concerned with. With u m a n d a t o r y student t a x of $54
per year, c o m m u t i n g students should receive
their fair shai c of services and attention. And
with t h e great preoccupation with quad
p r o g r a m m i n g , they haven't been.
As a c a n d i d a t e for a Central Council C o m muter scat, I'm trying to determine h o w S.A.
can give you your money's worth. Son.e ideas
worth l o o k i n g into might include a scries of
concerts a n d picnics in Washington Park in
the full a n d spring, student food and clothing
CO — o p s , later buses o n weekends (we'll keep
tryingl), a n d the long awaited fieldhouse for
basketball a n d ice hockey. F u r t h e r m o r e I fully e n d o r s e Pat C u r r a n ' s plan for a n Off —
C a m p u s S t u d e n t C o o p e r a t i v e , which would
p r o v i d e students with recourse against
t r o u b l e s o m e landlords, t h e utility companies,
a n d o t h e r legal hassles.
M y qualifications for being entrusted with
representing you e n c o m p a s s all b i t n e h e s of]
student g o v e r n a n c e , including service as
C h a i r p e r s o n of t h e 197} Executive Branch
Budget C o m m i t t e e , t h e Search C o m m i t t e e for
a O i a n of t h e College of A r t s a n d Sciences,
PAGE FOURTEEN
and Justice o f the S.A. Supreme Court. Mditionally, I have attended C e n t r a l C o u n c i l
almost regularly for my entire 3 — y e w tenure
at S U N Y A, having served o n many o f h i c o m mittee!. I a m quite familiar with Council's
written and unwritten rules, and especially
with the vital need for responsible representation.
Helper Responds
Seniors Weak?
by Steve
T o the Editor:
Despite Barbara Fishkin's article ( A S P ,
In o r d e r t o meet a n d talk with b o t h this
April 2) a b o u t t h e Senior Class plans; several
year's a n d next year's c o m m u t e r s , fellow c a n details a b o u t this year's g r a d u a t i o n ceremony
didate C a n d i Mayer and I a r e s p o n s o r i n g a
a n d Senior Week h a v e n o t yet been m a d e
forum o n M o n d a y the 22nd a t 2 P M in the
clear. It's a b o u t t i m e class president Jeff
C a m p u s Center Fireside Lounge. If y o u ' r e
Bernstein realized his c o m m i t t m e n t t o t h e
wondering n o w if you a r e getting y o u r
class.
money'sj worth o u t of S A , a n d p e r h a p s a bit
First of all, many class m e m b e r s A R E indisturbed a b o u t t h e $64' you never seem t o
terested in helping o u t o n Senior Week a n d
benefit from, please come a n d m a k e yourself
graduation plan, b u t t h e O N L Y meeting ever
heard.
Perhaps s o m e of these c a m p a i g n ,
publicized for t h a t p u r p o s e was in J a n u a r y .
I resigned from Central Council for purely
proposals a r e difficult goals t o attain, b u t I'd
No o n e 1 know ever saw even a graffiti a n like t o try t o m a k e t h e m w o r k for us. I'd a p - a c a d e m i c reasons. Both this a n d last semester,
n o u n c e m e n t for a M a r c h meeting, as Jeff
preciate y o u r help a n d s u p p o r t . T h a n k you. I have taken courses which have met o n
Wednesday nights from 6:45 t o 9:45. This was ' claims was in t h e A S P .
Steve Meyer
t h e only time which I could take these courses.
More important than t h e actual plans,
Inasmuch as the courses were important o n e ;
i h o u g h , is t h e fact that despite promises, we
for me getting into g r a d u a t e school, I felt t n a t I
have yet t o see a new constitution t o free o u r
couldn't devote my Wednesday nights t o
class funds. Without the money (an estimated
Council meetings (although I d i d work o n
$8,000.00, we've been told, or O U R m o n e y ) ,
Council committees d u r i n g the year).
more than underclassmen will be packing their
T o t h e Editor:
bags t o leave by May 18th.
I also would like to point o u t that next year I
In t h e March 29th issue of the Albany
Stuwill be in my 5th year at S U N Y A . If elected
dent /VRss.thcre appeared a n article entitled
S.A. President, I plan t o only t a k e 6 credits
"Council Starts Budget Review." At t h e end of
Thirdly, a s a member of M Y S K A N I A ' 7 4 , 1
each semester so that I can devote my full time
that article there is a p a r a g r a p h which states
regret that any seniors felt that we, as a g r o u p ,
t o the j o b .
"Council m e m b e r Allen Spivak stated that t h e
were trying to control any plans. By p u r e
J . S . C . (Jewish S t u d e n t s Coalition) does n o t
chance, three of our four class officers h a p p e n
respond t o t h e c o m m u n i t y ' s needs." Council
to be members of M Y S K A N I A '74, but the
Another point I would like to bring up is the
m e m b e r Eric Lonschein, t h e p a r a g r a p h conremaining eleven of us were never a p p r o a c h e d
fact that I was quoted as saying that I wouldn't
tinues,
"said that they
( J S C ) never had
as a central planning commitlce. Those of us
accept the $1500 that the S.A. President is
t o because they were never funded by S A . "
that did attend the J a n u a r y meeting t o offer
given. Thill is true. But I also would not allow,
While I thank Kir. Lonschein for his defense as SiA. President, t h e Vice President a n d
opinions did so with Ihc feeling thai we could
of the organization, his statement is n o t entire- Chairperson and Vice Chairperson of Central
contribute ideas equally with other class
ly a c c u r a t e a n d M r . Spivak is certainly way off Council t o receive money (as they d o now).
members, but also a s a representative g r o u p
base.
••• |j<
elected by seniors Ihcmselvcs. Weonly wished
All in all, $7500 is allocated from your student
The Jewish S t u d e n t s Coalition dues res- t a x money t o pay elected officials in S.A.
to participate, not t o rule. We feel that under
pond t o t h e entire c o m m u n i t y ' s needs in a
the present system of class government,
I a m against anyone receiving money for
n u m b e r of ways. J S C provides p r o g r a m s of
responsibility for class affairs falls to Ihe class
d o i n g this sort of job. T h e budget is t o o tight
cultural, educational a n d social interest to all
officers.
to allow this money to be spent in this way.
students of Albany State including Jews, GenAlso. 1 don't sec why, if S.A. executives a r e
t i l e s , m e m b e r s and n o n - m e m b e r s . All
paid, then the executives of clubs a n d
members of t h e University C o m m u n i t y a r e
My final, and not least important point, is
organizations on campus aren't paid too. They
always invited a n d encouraged to come to all
thai we slill don'l k n o w w h o o u r g r a d u a t i o n
d o as much work, in my mind, as the S.A. peoJ S C events. I might a d d that membership in
speaker will be. A list of suggested names,
ple. Since this type of equal system impracthe J S C is also open to all regardless of race,
drawn up al Ihc J a n u a r y meeting, was s u b tical. I propose that nobody in S.A. gets paid
religion or religious philosophy. Hardly a
milled lo President Henc/el. Perhaps those
for their j o b .
school week goes by where the Jewish
public figures were unavailable or unaccepA final point I'd like to clear-up is the fact
S t u d e n t s Coalition is not s p o n s o r i n g cither u
table in the S U N Y A administration for any
t h a t I a m against E.O.P.S.A. receiving $40,feature film, mixer, deli-dinner, a lecture, disn u m b e r of reasons, bin ihc class has a right l o
000 each year.
I d o not see E.O.P.S.A.
cussion, Soviet Jewry p r o g r a m , Israel inforknow w h o else has been approached in o u r
providing Ihc entire university c o m m u n i t y
mation p r o g r a m or tabic in the C a m p u s Center
n a m e . If Jell claims a lack of interest o n the
with services that are different from the ones
or n u m e r o u s other special events.
pari of senior class members, perhaps he can
that S.A. does. There is a duplication of serattribute ii t o the lack of information available
T h e Jewish Students Coalition, t h r o u g h its vices here. Inasmuch thai 8 5 % of ihc E.O.P.'s
•ten us.
remarkable growth in the last few years, h a s students tux money is given t o E.O.P.S.A., I
Senior Week has Ihe potential lo finish o u r
become a major organization on c a m p u s that d o not see Ihc system being fair to all groups.
Albany years with a grand lling, bill o u r of|all students can be proud of. It is unfortunate No other group on campus is given 8 5 % o f the
ficers had best gel moving, F A S T !
that s o m e students cling t o the n a r r o w defini- lax money of the people w h o participate in it.
tion a n d stereotype of a c a m p u s Jewish
J u d y Bialcr
organization a n d apply it to the Jewish
I accuse the present S.A. of paying off the
S t u d e n t s Coalition.
As t o Mr. Lonschcin's point that J S C did E.O.P.S.A! I cannot understand why they
not have t o respond t o the c o m m u n i t y ' s needs give E.O.P.S.A. so much money olher thuii
since it was never an S A funded g r o u p , t h e that they arc scared! Scared ol what, you ask?
The S.A. is scared thai E.O.P.S.A. is going t o
above points out thul J S C did respond
anyway and now, with S A funding, very little be vocal and lell the entire university c o m munity how corrupt S.A. is and what kind of
needs t o be changed.
political deals are constantly being m a d e
I would like to Ihunk Central Council a n d
there.
To the Editor:
Budget C o m m i t t e e lor recognizing the imporI ask yoi: lo look at the people w h o are on
Telethon 74 has again shown the capital
tance of Ihc Jewish Students Coalition t o
Central Council now and sec how they have
district that SUNYA students are willing lo
C a m p u s life a n d giving it a n S A allocation.
voted this year. Nolicethal they all have voted
give of themselves, almost without measure, lo
Steve S h a w
aid a needy cause. To witness this telethon was
P r o g r a m Director. inconsistently. They vote for clubs and groups
which
they
are
interested
irj,
not
in
which
their
not only entertaining, bul also a moving exJewish S t u d e n t s Coalition
constituents are.
perience In see how college students can work
together Inward a seemingly impossible goal
and mil slop until they met it!
This is the type of politics I a m trying t o d o
T o t h e Editor:
I would like t o take this chance t o reply t o
t h e letters which have a p p e a r e d ' i n the A S P
a b o u t me since I announced my candidacy for
S t u d e n t Association President some time a g o .
First of all, I have been attacked for resigning from Central Council this past year. It
should be noted that I resigned in early
S e p t e m b e r at the beginning of t h e school
semester. Unfortunately, certain people h a v e
wrongly assumed my reasons for resigning.
JSC Rebuts
Telethonic Boom
Fund-amental
Problem
away with. Political deals and lies will be a
thing of the pasl if I amelcctcd S.A. president.
In conclusion, I would like lo point out that
T o the Editor:
The other day I saw u poster advertising all of the letters which were wrillen about me
W S U A ' s Award-winning
Radio
D r a m a were composed by people who a r e already
Series. According to the poster, the p r o g r a m s prescnlly strongly affiliated with Student
were "funded by the Student Association." Association. These people are scared thai I
This was news t o me, since 1 a m the o n e w h o a m going lo be elected a n d clean up what
d o n a t e d the tapes, free of charge t o W S U A . seems lo be a rather corrupt government.
W h o ever heard ol a student association where
I w o n d e r if this operation is typical of the
people involved in it get special extraordinary
way in which the Student Association
privileges? This is what I will d o away with as
o p e r a t e s letting others d o the work (in my
S.A. President, so that these people will not
case, over three hours of t a p i n g ) a n d then j u m gel free concert tickets, o r free bus tickets t o
ping in t o take t h e credit. If t h e S t u d e n t
Miami, or free use of the Student Association
Association really wants t o fund these
C a r (which, by the way, only S.A. people may
p r o g r a m s it may d o so by sending me a check
use for their own personul use). Let's muke the
for $10.00. M y mailbox is in the English
system equal for all I!
department.
Wayne llalper
Lester Heverling
ALBANY
From The Presidential Podium
DENT PRESS
We. associated with Wildwood School, are
exceedingly grateful lo all involved with this
outstanding effort, including the cochairpersons Lori Cierber and David Taffel,
Ihc many committee chairmen and the hundreds who devoted much lime and talent to
this program. The coverage in the Albany
Student Press and Ihe student station WSUA
was excellent, and without doubl a key factor
in the telethon's success. Thank you all, both
for the generous financial contribution to our
program to help children, and for your spirit
of enthusiasm that was contagious to all
ussociiiled wilh Telethon '74.
Gerber
This column is an annual message to detail
this past year in our student government.
Most of you who have gotten this far may
recall that Student Association collects a
$64.00 per year student activity fee and funds
and .helps administer all the extracurricular
activities on this campus, including concerts,
theatre and the arts, intramurals, and the
ASP, WSUA, the Torch, movies and intercollegiate athletics. In this seemingly brief
eleven months as Student Association President, I have tended to elicit two areas of involvement - internal programming and activities and the advocacy of student needs and
interests to the faculty through the University
Senate, our local administration, the Faculty
Student Association, SUNY Central Administration and the State Legislature.
When I took office last May 1 felt the single
largest gap in our student government was
recognition by you. Barry Davis - Vice President. Bob Kanarek - Controller and I spent
many hours this summer at the Summer Planning Conferences. Many new students became
inlcrcsled in Student Associaiton and our
groups. As a result of Student Association involvement in the Conference many members
of the freshman class picked up their tax cards
al Ihe beginning of the fall semester.
We promoted Activities Day, fall and spring, lo show you where your $64.00 ure spent.
Over the summer, Barry and I rewrote most of
Ihc policies, changing Ihc lax policy to enfranchise parl-timc students, for example.
Hob Kanarek finished converting our accounting system forall Student Association funded
groups lo computer. This has cut down the
waiting lime for vouchers and assured fiscal
integrity.
This year we are purchasing an additional
% acres at Camp Dippikill, creating a clean
environment for our property which now
totals over 840acres, including iwocabinsand
a farmhouse. Those of you who have not had
an opporlunity lo visit Dippikill please do so.
as you will definitely enjoy yourself.
We also tried lo increase the availability of
student services. In addition to free legal advice every Tuesday night, we also arc an
authorized Greyhound ticket agent, provide
xerox services, Purchase Power and other
SASU services. As the students' represcnlalivcs. Student Association is also responsible for Ihc linen and dry cleaning contracts,
health insurance, and the cheapest refrigerator
leases in the Stale University.
Throughout this year, it seems as if we go
from one crisis in governance in another, l.asl
spring, many students were concerned about
the procedures governing promotion and
tenure. There were sit-ins in the Administration Building. This resulted in the resignation
ul the Dean of the College ol Arts and
Sciences and the formation ol an ad lioccnmmitlcc composed of equal members of the
faculty and students to examine these policies.
Much time was invested in these two efforts.
In early September, the University announced that security had been bearing loaded
firearms in their normal tours of duty. In the
University Senate, students were instrumental
in requiring Ihe security personnel to be legally
qualified.
In November, the first meeting of the Student Assembly of the Slate University washeld
at this campus. For the first time, a governance unit, the Student Assembly, was integrated with a student corporation, SASU,
Inc. to try to advocate students' views in the
University and the legislature. SASU, Inc.
holds many benefits towards students, present
and future.
In December. Barry and I drafted a course
proposal in student governance to be taught in
Ihc Allen Center. Certain problems prevented
Ihc course from being taught this semester but
it Is a registered course and hopefully will be
offered next fall for the first time.
In December, Ihc gasoline crisis hit SUNYA
and the administration "announced" that cutbacks in the bus schedule were necessary. We
claimed thai Ihis would be illegal and
Ihrcalened lo sue on the grounds of denying
equal access lo Ihe uptown campus for
residents of Alumni Quad. In light of student
pressure, Ihe administration was able to work
out anarrangemenl to avoid drastic cutbacks
in Ihc bus service.
In Ihe fall semester, the Student Association
re-examined the need for a student evaluation
of courses and teachers. Under the guidance of
Dave Abrainolf (the Coordinator of Assessment of Courses and Teachers), A.C.'T. is now
a reality. Next week, sludents will canvass
most undergraduate classes with the results of
their questionnaire to he published and
available al fall registration. Although Ihis is
an enormous project in scope. I hope it will he
a success.
In the course of ihc year. Student Association nominates many students lo serve as
representatives lo the Faculty Student
Association. Ihe Councils of Ihe University
Senate and Search Committees, which seek
lop level administrators. Through many hours
ol unheralded work, student representatives
serve mi virtually every university-wide group.
Student members of the T'.S.A. have been instrumental in ensuring that the corporation
ilocs indeed serve our constituents. Despite
using Innil costs, it is hoped that board contract prices will remain Ihc same next year.
We attempted lo change internal
procedures su dial Student Association could
he more responsive. Central Council upturned a proposal to move up thedutc of elections to next week and to pin vide for voting on
the i|iiaits.
I he budgetary process was altered In inwilvc nunc Central Council members in the
Siiiilcni Association Budget Committee. Undci ihe leadership ol Chairperson Howie
(iriissiuan. the committee tried to be fair wilh
the myriad ul organizations we Innil and not
*° " • • • • "
fi* *
*N
r s . . i l i kiar>_TW
-Gene
Shall.,
NBC-TV
I feel a s if Student Association has t h e ability t o grow much further. T h i s year, we tried
new concepts; some succeeded and s o m e were
dismal failures. But I can firmly state t h a t we
have always tried t o b e fair t o you in t h e execution of o u r duties.
About two m o n t h s ago, I realized that there
were m a n y projects that were not going t o get
off t h e ground. O u r single most conspicuous
failure has been the lack of direct communication l o you about issues a n d problems. We
have been able t o spark increased interest in
what Sludenl Association is and what it
should he. us evidenced by Ihc a b u n d a n c e of
candidates for President, Vice President and
other elected positions.
Many people have asked me who is t h e best
candidate for President. F r o m my vantage
point (admittedly subjective),'I feel thul we
have moved in some good directions this year.
While most of t h e Presidential candidates
have certain attributes that would serve you
well. I feel lhal Gaylc Knibloe is Ihc most outstanding.
T o the Editor
As this year comes t o a d o s e , a s S. A. Controller, I find myself unable to objectively discuss the relative merits and failures of the
current administration. While 1 h o p t o have
served you well, a year o f hard work has led t o
.some definite perceptions about the kind o f
'qualities an S.A. officer must have.
Ihe powers are awesome, s o the person
must think before they aet. Many dedicated
a n d h a r d w o r k i n g s t u d e n t s invest a great deal
of their time in clubs a n d organizations which
may be hampered or disbanded by a simple action o f an S.A. officer by not communicating,
freezing the budget o r deluncting t h e g r o u p .
I h e j o b is e n o r m o u s , s o the person must be
a leader. No individual can d o a n y of these
jjobs alone, s o it is important t o be able t o involve other people w h o have time, ideas a n d
hard work t o offer. Without a tribe, there can
be n o chief.
The time c o m m i t m e n t is great, so the person
must have lime to give and the ability to use
that lime well. Unless each minule a n d hour is
spent in a n optimal m a n n e r , there is n o feasible way t o accomplish even everyday tasks, let
alone additional hassles.
The pressures are strong, so the person (tinnot he a uuiner.Xm
or twelve limes u d a y .
visions of freedom dance through the mind,
bin t h e greal responsibility necessitates continuity.
Many delicate personal relationships must
he maintained in the University C o m m u n i t y ,
so ihe person must he discrete. Indescretion
will severely curtail the officer's ability toscrvc
our students most effectively,
I d o not claim iiV'have Ihcse qualities, bul I
d o think lhal Ihe candidate will! these qualities
will d o the best j o b for you. F a r above Ihe
others is Ciayle Knibloe. I ask your vole for
her in lhal I have found her lo he a strong
• leader who is discrete, always thinks first, is
judicious in using her lime and completes what
she starts, In Ciayle. I place complete confidence and in Ihe sludents I place trust that
Silhev will elect Ihe best candidate-CiavIe
Those readers w h o have read this far will
nole lhal there is not much r o o m left. I would
like to lake Ihis opporlunity t o thank the A S P
and W S U A for their efforts at com- & Knibloe.
munications this year.
II would be h o r r e n d o u s if 1 did not tell you
lhat without many other people, the Student
Association would not have accomplished
much Ihis year. Harry Davis, Boh Kanarek
and Sally (iondall, Sludenl Association's
seerelary, have been Ihe hcsl and the hardest
working and least recognized people in Ihis
Association.
Without their work and
leadership Sludenl Association would have
been a myth. There have been literally dozens
ul people who have helped the Student
Association this year. I am sorry thai I cannot
list them all but you know who you are. Words
cannot express my deepest thanks a n d a p preciation in all the people who have sacrificed sn much ol their time. Finally, I would like
lo thank ynti for giving nic Ihc opportunity to
work in Sludenl Association ihis pasl year and
encourage you in ensure gnnd government by
participating in the elections next week.
.V/i'cc
(ierher T*. the atnvnt
\.\Mniaiimi
h-csidctll.
-
.
Hob Kanarek
Student
Be KetghfaJtbf and Vlut Ik
^UOHTSttt,
&"
cut those groups behind their backs. The committee and I proposed a budget which would
call for the tax to remain at $64.00 next year,
despite increasing costs.
I feel that in the area of group communication we have made the most progress this year.
Bob Kanarek has been phenomenal al helping
groups with the financial management of their
Student Association appropriation. For the
first time. Student Association funded groups
have been asking for advice and help in the
eordinution of university programming. And
although there will always be hassles with
organizations over specific problems, I think
lhat Bob has created an aura of good-will
between the funded groups and Association.
Goyle-Storming
»*r
*•
h
— New York Dally News
"A DAZZLING MUSICAL FILM!"
—Judith Crist, NBC-TV (Today Show)
Across
The
i Street
"LIZA MINNELLI IN 'CABARET'
—A STAR IS BORN!" Magazine
Viffla ftetued Ittt 2 out
John Detwylcr
Cupilal District C h a p t e r of New York S t a l e
Association for Brain Injured Children
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIFTEEN
Free The Highways
by OoaglM UComt*
Item I: The U.S. Postal Service u
becoming increasingly irregular and
(independable ai well as expensive.
First Class postage has risen nearly
70% in the last five years while service has steadily deteriorated.
Item II: After New York City
bought the subway system the fare
increased 200 per cent in 13 years
while the quality of service diminished and the Transit Authority lost
money and continues to do so.
In the case of the Postal Service,
the system is under "public" (State)
control and private enterprise is not
allowed to compete for the delivery
of 1st class mail. IPSA however, a
private profit— making postal
system, delivers in seven states 2nd
class mail at $25 per 1000 pieces
compared to the Postal Service's
price of S44 per 1000 pieces (as of
l%9). And IPSA makes a profit
while the Postal Service loses
money.
The subways, while under private
ownership, maintained their fare at
5c lor 36 years prior to the city's
takeover in spite of a 32% rise in
wholesale prices.
Item III: The Tennessee Valley
Authority, the government-owned
power company, cost American taxpayers over 2 billion dollars in subsidies its lirst 26 years in existence,
yet power from TV A is more expensive than that available from any
privately owned power company in
America.
On the other hand, the SUNYA
bookstore, once a paragon of inefficiency and poor service, was put
under private profit-making control
and long book lines and shoddy service became a thing of the past.
The fact is that virtually every service under government control or
ownership suffers from inefficiency,
waste and an ama/.ing ability to consistently lose the taxpayer's money.
A private company, on the other
hand, because it is a profit-making
venture, attempts to provide
economy, efficiency and good service. If it does not its business'will be
lost to a competing company which
by Bob Mayer
Many of the highways would be
toll roads, as they are now, while
another way for highway ownership
to be profitable would be to make
them a co-operative venture among
a chain of motels, restaurants, and
service stations. Costs lo drivers
would not necessarily be much
higher than now, as the highway
owners must not kill the user's incentive to travel by auto. If highway
tolls arc prohibitively expensive,
other road builders, as well as train
and airplane industries, would fulfill
the demand for lower cost transportation.
The incentive for building safe and
fast highways likewise is that the
motorists would seek the alternative
of using someone else's roads or taking alternative transportation if the
highway is not up to high standards
of safety and maintenance. The arbitrary and unrealistically low speed
limits now seen on the limited-access
highways would hopefully become a
tiling of the past, and those who arc
truly unsafe drivers due to drinking
or carelessness would be indentificd
and simply banned from the
highway.
iiach driver is now paying over
$100 each year to build and maintain
highways. Willi private roads, the
driver would simply be giving the
money directly to the highway
owners rather than as laxes to the
State bureaucrats. With each driver
paying transportation expenses
directly, however, the true high cost
of automobile use would be brought
home more clearly and act as an incentive for seeking alternate
transportation. The accident rate
would decrease, pollution would
lessen, and fuel would be more plentiful.
by Barry Davb)
On April 23,24,25 and 26 Student
Association is holding its Spring
Election. Among the positions to be
'filled by this election are President
and Vice-President of Student
Association, three-fourths of the
Central Council, three Student
Asscmbly/S.A.S.U. delegates, and
the student contingent of University
Senators. Elections are also being
held for the class officers of the
classes of '75 and '76, Alumni Board
and Myskania.
1 always hear complaining about
Student Association not representing students well enough. I've heard
complaints about poor budgeting. It
is very often the compluincrs who
shirk every student's responsibility
lo make Student Association what
the students want it lo be. A student
has no basis for complaint if that .student refuses lo gel involved by voting
or running for office.
Uven if you're a content student
and don't feel it makes a difference lo
you who wins an election because all
those running are competent* it is
important lor you lo vole. When
Steve or I go talk to administrators
we feel our cloul on behalf ol
.students is not as good as it could be
because so few students voted in the
election. We were elected by about
12-15% of the student body. When
Student Association fights against
the blatant use of firearms oragains
by Mltchel Zoltr
Secreted deep and safely in the
cavernous halls of the United States
Court House off Foley Square in
New York, a chunklet of history is
being acted out and recorded for
future playback. The drama is the
trial of Maurice Stans and John
Mitchell, who are accused of giving
political favors in return for Nixon
campaign contributions. It is composed of innocuous appearing slices;
day-by-day roles are played out that,
out of context, seem to make very little difference and not too much
sense.
Off lo one side of the courtroom
sits the nole-taking, picture drawing
press, rushing in to take Iheir seats
just before this day's session begins.
The scries of drawing pads line up,
row on row, with a ridiculous redundancy, as each network and major
paper must have ils own sketch that
looks just like the one next lo it.
When there isn't a pad and magic
marker, there is a notebook and pen.
this time condensing and soriing out
testimony. Al the lirst recess, six
competitor reporters huddle and
sort through notes, making sure each
has the same lull account that all the
others do.
Adjacent to ibis is the "public", a
crowd of about fifty, many wailing
for two hours lo insure their entrance into the courtroom. One of
the trusted regulars to the case is the
keeper of an informal appearing
stack of numbered index cards,
keeping track of when each of us
[arrive. The profesional looking
numbers of the Bursar put these to
shame. During recesses, these
regulars talk knowingly of ihc flow
.il the ease, evaluating the dramatic
impact of a previous crossexamination. Sprinkled in are a
handful of sport-jacketed tourists,
occasionally studying their maps to
see which point of interest should be
seen next,
segregated parking our strength is
tied directly to the perceived studen
interest.
Rush hour traffic jams would be
If many students vote it makes
virtually eliminated. Since the law of
next year's Students Association a
supply and demand would regulate
group thai might lind it easier makthe cost of road usage, increasing deing this a better place lor students.
mand (the supply of roads being the
In order lo bring the election closer
same) would lead to correspondingly
•" students. Student Association is
higher tolls at normal rush hour
holding the election on the Quads
time, thus encouraging staggered
from 41*.M. - 7P.M. in addition to
business hours to avoid rush hour, or
Campus Center from 10 AM-4PM
giving strong incentive to leave the
eforplac Don't cripple next year's
car al home and use a bus or train. II
Student Association before it begins,
the demand is great enough, mass
. please vote!
transportation facilities would
Remember these dates. April 23.
proliferate quickly, and they would
24. 25, 26. ThclulurcolourStudcnt
lo open the proceedings, history
not require huge subsidies from the
Association is in our hands
is given its due as the clerk of the
taxpayers in order to be profitable,
Barry /•• Davis is the current Vive court announces with a ."Hear Ye,
comfortable and economical.
President of Student Association.
Hear Ye." lhal this particular
regional court of (he United States is
in session, all parlies with business
before it please step forward. Now
the game begins.
McGovern did lo harm the party in
America. And the trend in ConIn the ring are Stans and his loin
1972. I hat is a bitter lemon to bite
gressional elections now is for the lawyers. Mitchell and his two
on especially when you are talking
Democrats to end up with an lawyers, lour U.S. attorneys, the
about the Number One man in the
overwhelming majority in the Judge, and Ihc witness, a lawyer by
Republican party.
House. I his will mean a legislative lire name of Markman. Lawyers acdictatorship."
Meanwhile the Democrats are encusing lawyers cross-examining
joying a new political high, l-'romall
.lames Reston of the New York lawyers defending lawyers all being
indications they are headed towards
Times described Mr. l-'ord as presided over by a former lawyer.
a .veto-proof
congress this
"stupid" last week. He was absolute- Within this knowledgable circle Ihc
November.
Ihey have a good
ly collect. Since when dots a majori- questions and answers, the objecchance of capturing several goverty in the House and/or Senate con- tions and the permissions, the subnorships, including New York's
stitute it legislative dictatorship? Uy missions and processing of evidence
After a nine' million dollar debl the same token one could argue that Hows like a well oiled machine. The
if a Democrat oi Republican is presi- points and counterpoints bounce
their coffers are beginning to swell.
And if the Republican Party con- dent then there is a Democratic or hack and forth in an intense tennis
Republican dictatorship. Similarly mulch of games won in the eyes of
tinues to he plagued by its present
il a Catholic is elected president, ac- the jury. At limps the speed is blisterlow popularity the Democrats just
ing and blurring lo the untrained eye
may walk into 1600 Pennsylvania cording lo ford's logic we would
Avenue.
I he Democrats, so have a Vatican dictatorship. One and ear.
can be sure that when the
proficient at showing off the scars of
So, in the grey light that comes in
Republicans were suggesting a
internal political battle for the first
from two courtyards in Ihe denter of
time in two decades can sit back and "new majority" alter the '72 elecIhc building complex, justice
watch the other side struggle with a tions. Mr. l-'ord did not warn
marches on. I oday's timetable looks
problem as big us I.II.I, the Vietnam America ol a one party dictatorship.
like: Begin: 9:50 a.m.; Recess: 11:20;
War, Hubert Humphrey, and
In spile of the Republican misforResume: 11:40; Recess for Lunch:
George McGovern all in one.
tunes and the Democrats'new found
12:35; Kcsumc:2:00p.m. for another
Vice-President Ford, supposedly fortunes there are still the people of
iwo hours, forty minutes of Irial-a
the Republican parly's last ace in the Michigan and the resl of the nation
total of aboul 5 hours per day. Peohole drew perhaps the mosi absurd wh presently harbor a deep resentple connected with the process like to
conclusion from Michigan's elec- ment for all politics and politicians
term il a mclhodical, thoughtful one.
alike.
The
Michigan
vole
simply
tion. Citing Ihs election as "bad
lo another observer, il would seem
.suggests
lhal
Ihc
American
people
omen" the Vice-President said "One
more accurate lo simply call il slow.
are
jusl
plain
led
up.
parly conlrol is no! good for
The ASP And WSUA 640's
J
Show 'This Week' Will Sponsor And f
Broadcast LIVE
2
Prom The Assembly Hall
«
On Monday Night April 22 at 8 p.m. T
SA Candidates I
E
Streak
into a
VanHeusen!
For revtaKng your true colon
in • matt original way,
streaking can hardly be
overlooked! But for keeping
up appearance* in the molt
higk-hpiritedetyling,
daring
design* and eye-opining
hue*, you'll alto need the
(lathing faehion from
Van Heuten — adventurous
now ihirt* that ahoayi get
noticed!
mdidates will field questions J
from an ASP-WSUA panel
{
VAN
H
hone In Questions To:|
57-5808 ond 457-6443J
H i X i t u i l n l i t l n l l if ill ill iti t l i t l i f l i f t i f . i l i
ftifl
C2BJ3a2E)fflBra(aiK8'
2
I
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1
For What It's Worth
The Michigan vole was more than
a warning to Republican politicians
that they had better disassociate
themselves from their Republican
president. The' Democratic victory
in the 8th Congressional District
suggested more lhan Mr. Nixon's
unpopularity among the voters.
Tuesday's special election reflected
more than ihc futility in Nixon's
campaign to save his presidency.
I he Democratic Victory this past
week clearly proclaimed that the
American people are just plain fed
up.
The President put a great deal into
the Michigan election.
The
Michigan Republican hierarchy did
not feel his presence in their slate
would do much to help their candidate. Ihey, in fact, encouraged the
White House lo stay away. But the
White House was persistent and
Richard Nixon flew to Michigan
with one goal: toiprove through a
Repu blican victory that he was still a
powerful force in national politics
and any attempts by the people in
Congress to vote for his impeachment would hurt their chances for reelection.
Of course, conclusions can only be
drawn when there is a victory. In the
face of defeat the White House
PAGE SIXTEEN
provides better, more economical
service. A government operation
however, with no incentive for efficiency, just gets more heavily into
debt, and the taxpayers end up supporting inefficiency with ever greater
subsidies.
The solution therefore, is to get
the government out of running
businesses .which could be managed
better under pure capitalism, as re. cent history proves that nearly
everything the State tries to manage,
control or regulate turns into a
hopeless bureaucratic mess.
The big question has been: how
exactly can private enterprise take
over the functions which the state
has been ineptly operating for so
long'.' Well, a booklet by Jarrct
Wollstein called Public Servies Under Laissez Fain explains not only
why the government must get out of
dispensing so-called "public services" but also how private enterprise could take over and do a much
more economic and efficient job of
it. Wollstein explains how laissezfaire capitalism could run utilities,
education, charity, the phone
system, lire departments, the postal
system and the roads.
Let us take a look at roads, for instance. Why not sell the highways to
private interests? There are those
who have a vested interest in seeing
that long, well-maintained highways
arc available and accessible. These
would include the oil companies,
steel manufacturers and automobile
makers. Though the cost of building
and maintaining highways is, ol
course, enormous, there are many
firms who could afford the price. In
1967 there were 104 corporations
with total sales over one billion
dollars. Many of these enterprises
are those with direct interests in seeing that a well-kept network of
highways exists.
Trials And
S.A.
Wants You Tribulations
would have us believe that the contraposilive is inoperative. This is
revealed in the official response. According to Deputy Press Secretary
Cierald Warren the President was
neither "dismayed" nor "disheartened" by the election results. You can
carry an untruth jusl so far. Arc we
to believe lhal Mr. Nixon and his
cabal are "gladdened" and optimistic" or perhaps just plain immune to any negative interpretation
of the vote?
Whatever is said publicly, the
p r i v a t e discussions among
Republicans must be bleak and dismal. Ihey now have lost four out of
live special Congressional elections
of which at least Ihree were assumed
lo be safe Republican seats. They
can argue forever that issues like
energy, inflation, neighborhood
schools, crime, etc.were the cause of
defeat but these issues have often
served Republican candidates, not
hindered them.
So sooner or later enough
Republicans with clout will jusl have
to say publicly what each one
already accepts privately. That is
that Richard Nixon is going lo do
more to strengthen (he Democratic
parly in 1974 Congressional elcctions this November lhan George
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
ANP THE PRAGON DID INSTRUCT
THE KNIGHT IN HIS FOOLPROOF
SURPRISE METHOP.
WHENCE THE KNIGHT DIP REPAIR
TO THE LOCAL PUBLICKE HOUSE
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Gridders Face Tough Schedule in Fall
State University at Albany's schedule coach Bob Ford said
Athletic DirectorJoe Garcia has "this year's schedule should
announced the 1974 Great Dane provide some real good football.
football schedule. Albany, 7-2 Alfred was 7-2 last year and head
last year, will be playing all varsi- coach Alex Yunevich's career
ty teams for the first time since won loss record of 171-90-11 is
The Saxons
achieving varsity status last fall. phenomenal."
finished eighth in votes for the
Albany's 1974 schedule is:
Sept. 21 at Hofstra. Sept. 28- Lambert Bowl.
Alfred. Oct. SRochester In"Hofstra," Ford said, "plays a
stitute of Technology. Oct. 12 at fine level of competition.
Massachusetts Maritime. Oct. They're in the class with Curry
19 Nichols. Oct. 26 Brockport.
and Nichols, a good, tough footi
Nov. 2 at Curry. Nov.9 at ball team."
Plattsburgh. Nov. l6Rensselaer
Last fall Hofstra finished 8-3
Polytechnic Institute.
and placed ninth in 4 Lambert
Albany's new opponents will Bowl competition.
"Massachusetts
be Hofstra, Alfred and
Maritime,"Ford continued, "is
Massachusetts Maritime.
Commenting on the new similar to Albany. They turned
LaCrosse
Albany middy. Amy Will, who
scored the goal to tie the game.
continued from page 20
Then Schaus popped one in for
This closed the Danes scoring for
Albany to tie it once more.
Middlebuiy gained a stroke, the afternoon. The whistle
sounded anticlimatically, as
when their midfielder scored.
though out of breath. The game
Attackman Terry Brady, guard- went into overtime tied 7-7.
ed closely, came around the
crease and then faked the Albany played defense WednesMiddlebury goal tender out with day, but not well enough to prehis onehanded underhand shou- vent Middlebury's attack men
vle shot. This.-tied the-game from landing three more goals in
again. One of Middlebuny's the overtime period. The final
players tipped his hat as he put was 10-7, the first Albany loss,
his third goal in the net. A Brady and a tough one at that.
to RabinowiU, Armstrong sttack play kept Albany in the
The stickmen stand 2 and 1.
The team plays Colgate,
game. An unassisted score put Castlcton, Ceneseo and Oswego
Middlebury ahead midway on foreign turf before returning
Wednesday May 1st to have it
through the fourth quarter,
ferry Brady gave a sharp pass to out with Hartwick.
varsity last fall and jumped right
in. They played such teams as
Boston State and Plymouth
State."
Better coaching will be required,
and the kids will have to be better
mentally and physically
prepared.
The schedule for 1974," he
continued, "is much more formidable and more challenging.
"The tougher schedule will
help in recruiting, it will be more
appealing for a kid to play
against Alfred, than say Stony
Brook.
"I don't think we'll be outclassed with the new schedule. There
will be some good, tough football games played and we're
looking
forward to the
season."
Mets in a Tailspin
dive, must be attributed to some
by Bruce R. Maggin
• If someone would have told pretty ineffective relief pitching,
you that the Mets' Dave Schneck fug McGraw doesn't appear to
and Don Hahn would both be believe anymore, as his earn-runbatting over .400, you probably average is over 10 and he has
would have thought that Mets contributed little. The rest of the
would be near the top of the relief staff has proved equally ineffective, helping to blow leads in
National League East.
the late innings. Reporters love
4o second guess Mets manager,
However, this is not the case,
Yogi Berra, for leaving in his
as the New Yorkers are moving
pitchers too long, but with a
in the wrong direction and are
bullpen that has thus far shown
approaching last place. Before
little. Berra is certainly in a
the season started, the Mets' only
weakness appeared to be in dilemma.
didn't do this and he has failed to
win a ame.
g
center field. After the first ten
games of theseason, this position
Ace righthander lorn Seavcr
has thus far proved to be a Met claims to be the best pitcher in
strong hold in art otherwise field baseball. A pitcher of this caliber
of weaknesses. Schneck, who should win the big game.
had failed in previous trial with
Throughout his career Seaver
the Mets, is playing the best ball has proved something less than a
of any Met. His two-homerun clutch pitcher. Tuesday's game
performance against Montral against Montreal is a good exWednesday is goodjSrVidencc of ample. When a team has a losing
this fact.
streak, like the Mets, the ace of
the staff is expected to pull the
A prime cause in the Mets team out of the slump. Seaver
Run production is another big
problem, as the Mets arc getting
nothing out of their first three
hitters. Leadoff hitters are supposed to get on base. The Mets'
Wayne Garrett has completely
failed in this job, as his average is
under .130. In Wednesday's
igamc against Montreal, the
Mets' first three hitters, Garrett,
Millan and Staub, went zero for
twelve combined, adding up to
four complete innings of hitless
ball.
Thus far the Mets' season has
been a disaster. Berra probably
would say that things will turn
around and point to last year's
miracle comeback. However, the
Mets are playing ball like they
don't believe. The Mets can't depend on the other teams in their
division to lose. They must start
putting it together themselves.
Lack of Pitching Could Hurt the Danes
During those golden days long
ago when Milwaukeewas known for
beer, Atlanta cotton, and Boston lor
the Braves and beans, there was a
saying around the Hub City, "Spahn
and Sain and pray lor rain." A saying around the State University at
Albany's gym is "Quinn lor a win,
and what then?" Pitching is the big
question on coach Bob Burlingamc's
mind as Albany State tries to defend
its S U N Y A C baseball crown.
struck out 22, while walking only six,
and finishing conference play with a
da/./liiig 0.84 ERA.
on balls with seven. Terry Kenny,
described by many major league area
scouts as the best prospect they've
seen in recent years, will roam center
field. Kenny is learn leader in RBI's
with 12. He's the third leading hitter
on the team in both conference and
overall play with a .318 and .285
average respectively.
In overall competition Bcntlcy
appeared in fourgames, winningtwo
and losing one. Blair and DeVilo
were credited with saves.
Outside the pitching staff, the
Danes shape up as an cxpercinced
team. With the exception of first,
third, and the catcher, all the starters
are seniors.
Kevin Quinn. an overpowering
righthander, is the only proven
hurlcr on the Danes' stall'. Ken
Behind the plate. Vie Ciiulianelli.
La Roc. 1-1 inSUNYACConferencc who caught during the fall and hit
play this fall, graduated in .244 in l(> games, could he challengDecember. John Bertu/./i who as a ed hy freshman Mike l-'agen and
freshman, posted a 3-0 record last Dave Bacz. Jeff Breglio who averagspring, will not be playing this year. ed .255 overall, and hit .294 in six
Thus. Burlingame is laced with con- SUNYAC contests, is the leading
verting members of the varsity squad contender for first base. At second
lo pitchers, bringing up someone DeVilo. the club's leading hitter with
from the junior varsity, or going with a powerful .394 average in Idgames,
inexperienced freshmen.
is lire man lo beat out. Completing
the keystone combination will he
"Right now." he says, Wei're look- Bcntlcy, the team's second leading
ing at Dave Bcntlcy, our shortstop. hitler in SUNYAC play with a .38(1
Ton) Blair, our third baseman, and average. Blair, the Danes' leading
Sieve DeVilo, our second baseman, conference slugger with a .411
as possible conversions to the average, will play third.
pitching staff. A couple of freshman
righthanders." Burlingame conIn the outfield. Dill Hopkins will
tinued, "also being considered are play left. I hough not a hitler for
(ilenn Sowalski and John Dollard." average, Hopkins has the ability lo
gel on base, lie led the I)anes in base
During S U N Y A C play in the fall,
Quinn was 3-1. including two
shutouts, one against Oncnntn. handing them their only conference loss
nl the fall. The big righthander
Dan IX'I'orest, will play a key role
in the Danes' campaign t o hang on "Everything depends upon the pace
the the S U N Y A C crown. DeForest, of our pitchers developing behind'
a senior, will be Burlingamc's -Quinn.
designated hitter and utility inficlder. positions he Tilled during the
"We're playing the toughest
fall. He leads the Danes in home runs schedule the school has ever had.
with three.
The teams t o beat in the conference
Commenting on the season, will be Cortland, Brockport. and OsBurlingame. who begins his 15th wego: Hartwick. Union and RPI are
year a s Albany coach, says, (he toughest independents around."
Siena Tops
by Harvey Kojin
We all know by now that "it's' ping a single contest to the Siena
not nice to fool Mother Nature," Indians.
hut to the Albany Great Danes
Albany State played almost
buscbull squad it must have flawless baseball in defeating
seemed that those margarine Cortland in the first game, 5-0,
people were up to their old tricks behind ace Devin Quinn's
over the past vacation. While . pitching and some timely hitting.
most of us were graced with the The Dane's number one hurler,
opportunity lo leave the wind who posted an amazing 0.37
and cold for a while, the SUN Y ERA'in leading Albany to the
defending champions watched championship last season, went
10.8 inches of snow make playing the lull seven innings while
baseball a bit difficult, resulting allowing just two hits.
in several postponements as well
Things were a bit different in
as a severe case of chapped lips. the second game, with Cortland
Finally things got underway romping by a score of 12-0. By
this past week, with the Dunes virtue of the split, the Dunes consplitting a double-header with ference record is now 5-3 (4-2 in
league rival Cortland and drop- the full).while Cortland dropped
from the undefeated ranksto.3-1.
In the Siena game .sloppy play
hilighted the contest, with the Indians prevailing. 8-6. Being a
non-league battle, it had no
effect on hte standings.
Looking ahead on the Dam
schedule. Brockport will be in
Albany for an extremely important double-header this Saturday. April 20th. At this writing,
the Golden Eagles are in first
place with a 6-2 mark, so a sweep
by the Danes would enable them
to overtake Brockport. Game
time is 1:00 P.M. at the baseball
Held, which is located behind Indian Quad.
Hundreds of
American students
placed in
RECOGNIZED
OVERSEAS
MEDICAL SCHOOLS
Celebrate
Spring
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For the session starting July, 1974,
Euromed will assist qualified American students in gaining admission
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And that's just the beginning.
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There's no easy way for Charlie Nelson to become Dr. Nelson.
But there Is a way to make It somewhat easier.
Our way. The Armed Forces Health Professions
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But what happens after you graduate?
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And if you've read this far, you may be interested
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In addition, Euromed provides students with a 12-16 week Intensive cultural orientation program, with American students now studying medicine
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Stnitr or graduate itudintt currently
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For application
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FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
PAGE EIGHTEEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1974
Pass the Jug. Pour the Jug. Jug-a-lug.
Jug is the Great American Folk Wine. In Apple
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When you finish a jug of Jug, you can put a
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Enough sell. Vou want a Great American Poster?
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
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PAGE NINETEEN
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