Schedule Will Change Things

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BaalaaaW P R E S S
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GWcfefersiYo/wtflr Schedule Will Change Things
by Bruce Maggin
For coach Bob Ford and his football team, 1973 was an interesting beginning for varsity
football here at Albany Suite. It
was a year of continued success and
improvement with the DanestoUvlly dominating their three club
rivals. Albany finished with a very
respectable 7-2 record.
D a n e ^ n t h e i r final game against RPI.
Albany Is hopeful for a
Perhaps Albany was too
successful. The Danes were caught
in between a schedule that was just
too easy. Four years ago. nobody
could have predicted that the football team would be able to make so
much progress, I he program just
advanced quicker than the
schedule, I cams that Albany was
playing almost evenly in previous
years were blasted oil the Held tins
year. Coach lord feels that the
schedule had a bad effect on the
players. 'Some kids fell that they
were super ball players alter those
games." However. Albany's
schedule will start improving next
year with all ol Albany's
obligations with club teams ending. I he Danes will play RIM.
Platishurgh. Kl I. Curry, Nichols.
and Brock port. Albany had booked Drexel loi next year, but they
announced on I hursdav that they
were dropping football. Albany
has had the problem oi finding
schools with open dates, as many
of the better small college teams
book three to four years in advance. R ight now, the team is faced
with three open dales, but there is
talk of playing some really fine opposition.
Ford is not sure where the football program is going. "1 feel the
team will eventually level off."
This will probably happen when
Albany meets teams like Ithaca
and Cortland in '75 and "76. The
Danes will be al a distinct disadvantage before the team even takes
the field: Alhunv has only two fulltime coaches, white the teams the
Danes will he lacing have as many
as five lull-time coaches. 1 here is
slill the never ending problem ol
money and recruiting;.
Also, there is a problem with
fans. I lie students who do come to
the games have known nothing but
success over the last lew years. In
lac!. Albany has not lost at home
since 1171. I he Danes have gone
nine straight games at University
lield without a defeat. Will the fans
he able to accept losses at home
when t lie caliber til the competition
increases' I hat is really had to
answer.
three starters, so the future looks
good, light end. Bill Adams will be
the toughest to replace. Also
graduating, will be Jeff O'Donnell.
Dom Pagano, hirry CJuihan and
four-year veteran, Vinnie Pierce.
Much must be said about
sophmorc quarterback, John Herlu/./.i, who really pulled the team
together and displayed excellent
leadership. He handled the
wishbone-1 with great perfection.
I his year he started throwing the
ball more frequently with good
results.
last week the squad voted then
outstanding players. Iv O m a n
was voted top offensive lineman.
Marvin Perry was picked as the
lop hack, l o r d calls him
"phenomenal" and savs. "He
Mucks like a mail man." I he top
delcnsive lineman is Kudv Vido.
who really catneonovei theeotirse
ol ilic year, lord feels thai thepros
should U>11k al Rudy nevt yeai
when he is graduated Anne Will
was voted the best delensivcback.
As lor the season ilsell. the
Danes displayed a wealth ol la lent,
especial!} in the running corps. I he
team is lelalivelv, young. I he team
lost onlv five p la vers, including
Perhaps the star ol the team is
Coach lord. Innisell. His loin
years as coach made lyotball here
al Albans what ii is today. As tor
ucxl war. l-ord lecls, "I lie team
has a p ret is solid nucleus. I he big
questions are: Will . •ivoiic stav
health) while al school, and will
live team be willing to work in the
nil season?"
tougher schedule next year.
Alleged Danes Discrimination Probed
by Bill Heller
This is the lirst part of a two
part series. In my three years ol'
covering the Great Danes, I
have heard and seen a lot of interesting things concerning
racism at Alhany. My goal in
writing this is to enlighten people, but most importantly to get
the facts out and the myths
buried.
The series will be
limited to football and basketball, the two sports I regularly
cover, although I regret I didn't
have the lime to extend it.
Baseball was supposed to be included but Coach Burlingame
is away on sabatical.
What is racism in sports?
The term itself involves many
aspects especially when applied
to the world ol the athlete.
Racism can be slacking
Blacks in certain positions, outright discrimination, a quota
system, or playing whiles solely
to appease while dominated
audiences. Kucism can also be
an excuse, and nothing more an excuse for nol playing, not
making a team or not performing well.
Although sports at Albany
are small college, they often
m i r r o r s i t u a t i o n s in the
professional leagues. Because
ol thai, comparisons to the big
leagues arc pertinent and may
throw added insight to the
world of SUNYA.
I he most intelligent remark I
ever read about sports was by
Howard Cosell in a Playboy
interview.
Cosell said that
sports is a microcosm, a
miniature society in itself. Just
as there is conflict, racism, and
ugly situations in the outside
world, there are these things in
sport.
As long as there is
human competition in sports,
there will be human problems.
"He'll never get
tired. He's a
Supernigger."
Although I had been vaguely
familiar with the idea ol slacking in loolball, I never really
thought about ils implications
until I interviewed Carvin
I'ayne.
C a r v i n was a
sophomore halfback, a good
one, who has since lelt Albany.
"Ol course you
have no
Black quarterbacks. What do
you use a Black lor'.' (live him
the ball and let him run, run,
run. He'll never get tired. He's
a Supernigger."
Is it true'.' A look at the pros
reveals a chronic absence of
Dlack quarterbacks, also Black
centers. Besides Willy Uinicr,
one is likewise hardpressed to
come up with Black middlel i n e b a c k e r s , the defensive
quarterback of a team. W h y - i s
it racism, slacking, stereotyping Blacks as unable to think,
unable to lead'.' And what of
Albany'.'
I o begin with, there have
been two recent Black quarterbacks on the (ireat Danes:
Kick Petty, who played quite a
bit two years ago, and Don
Whiiely on this year's squad.
However, neither were permanent fixtures.
When Petty surprisingly
didn't come out lasl year, people wondered why. The year
before he had split the quarterback job with Bill ITanagan; he
figured lo have a good shot al
being number one.
Immediately Ihere wercrumorsbl
racism, file same Mr. I'ayne
inlormed me thai Petty didn't
come out because Coach Hob
l o r d would never go with a
Black lor his top quarterback,
false.
Upon checking the story,and
then verifying it with Blacks on
the team, I learned thai Petty
gave up loolball for two
reasons.
I he biggest was
academic; Petty wauled to
g r a d u a t e a year
early,
something football would interfere with. Also, he was having trouble adapting lo the new
Wishbone, as did freshman
Whiiely this year, whohussince
moved to end on his own request.
l o r d says that everyone who
goes out lor loolball is Healed
equality, regardless ol
racc,
color, creed or money. "When
everyone comes mil, we ask
I hem what position they want
lo play." In general, f o a l feels
lhal "in lour years here, we've
had tremendous relationships
belween our athletes.,.We've
also had Black leaders." Along
llvese lines, he cites Ron Gardner, Marvin Perry, and liny
"I haven't seen
any racial problems
on the team."
Ilolloway as being "excellent"
examples on this year's squad.
I inning to Ihe pros, l o r d
says. "I think there's enough
pressure on a coach lo win...I
can't believe Ihere'd he a pro
coach who wouldn't start a
Black quarlerback who was
belter than a whiteqb...lle'd he
in danger ol being fired."
Concerning Ihe notion ol
placating while crowds, and or
while owners by forcing while
players into the lineup, he
stales, "It might be. I like lo see
a gieatgame. I don't curu who's
playing. Iliere have been some
clubs throughout their history
that have been extremely resistant to letting Blacks play, like
the Boston Red Sox in
baseball."
"Maybe ihe lack ol Black
quarterbacks goesu lower levels
like high school and earlier,"
l o r d continued. "Maybe then
Black kids are stereotyped into
positions when Ihey're very
young. Also, there are no Black
quarterbacks to emulate lor
y o u n g k ids., .only running
backs and ends."
Goodman Lawsuit Against Kendall Dismissed
by David turner
and Glenn von
Nostilz
Former Assistant Professor
David Goodman's $100,000 lawsuit against Associate Dean
Richard Kendall has heen thrown
out of court.
State Supreme Court Justice
Hdward Conway, presiding at an
Albany County Special term,
granted a motion to dismiss
Goodman's complaint hecause
Kendall was acting in an official
capacity, and he is afforded in that
capacity "absolute privilege with
respect to statements and conclusions such as contained in the
letters and statements" that were
Goodman's basis for action.
Goodman had attempted to sue
Kendall personally, rather than officially.
Conway also ruled that thceomplaint failed to allege special
damages with particularity and
that the charges were therefore "insufficient as a complaint in action
for a prima facie tort."
Not Ihe end
Conway's decision does nol
represent the end ol the legal controversy. According to Cioodman
and his lawyer, Sanlbrd Softer,
they will he taking other action
within the next tew months against
Kendall, although they maintain it
is still premature to announce exactly what they plan to do.
"Kendall is nol oui of the woods
yet" Goodman said in a recent interview.
Ihe former assistant
professor staled that there arc
"several alternatives" lor him to
lake, and that "we've got a long,
long time before this is all over."
Soffer feels that Goodman still
hasagood case, and said hcwilldo
everything possible to back his
dient. Comments iheattorney: "If
he didn't have a good case. I
wouldn't have taken in on in the
first place."
Kendall refused to make any immedtitle comment on the case, and
asked that reporters address any
questions to him in writing.
out that Kendallcoulddo anything
he wants without fear of reprisal."
Administration spokesman Ted
Jennings said that while there can
be no official comment on thecase
by the administration, since "The
Administration isn't really involved in Goodman's case so it
really shouldn't have much to say"
he acknowledged that, "the University is pleased that the case has
been settled, if indeed it has in fact
been settled. Of course the administrators are not lawyers and
we don't realty know if the ruling
closed the issure." Mr. Jennings
emphasized that he couldn't speak
for the President's office and that
the President should not get involved in the issue.
The Response
Reaction to the dismissal ol
Good man's case was extremely
guarded, as students, faculty, and
administrators were careful in their
expression ol opinion over both
ihe meaning ol the decision and its
possible future implications on the
entire tenure process.
Vice-President for Academic Affairs Philip Sirnlkin said he
hesitated to comment on Judge
Conway's action lorlcarol prejudicing any possible appeal on ihe pail
ol professor Cioodman, should he
decide to act in lhal direction.
Siroikin did reiterate his agreeinenl with Conway's beliel that
Kendall was m laei acting within
the scope ol his employment as
history department chairmen, "il
was his job lo transmit his
recommendations concerning
tenure on any candidate, and the
judge obviously fell that he was in
the process of doing this when
Goodman issued his charges,"
Sirotki n si id.
Professor Carolyn Waterman,
ihe controversial teacher ol the
Psychology department who just
Goodman's first slop on the grievance trail was In Vice President Lewis
Welch's Office for University Affairs,
last year received tenure, commented that she was nol surprised
at the court's decision.
"The
court's decision", Waterman said,
"was quite consistent with its
policy ol always ruling with iheadnunislration on any issue." They
have always sided against opposition to administration dominance.
I iny Ilolloway, a junior
defensive tackle, has been on
1 ord's squad for three years.
lie said, "I haven't seen any
racial problems on the team, or
Black players nol gelling playing lime."
" I Ins \ear. there's a lot ol
guys. Black and while, who Icel
lliey should he playing more."
I iny commented. "Coaching is
nol an easy thing.
there'll
always be complaints Irom people not playing. But thal'sgood
they wouldn't he loolball
players il lliey didn't want lo
play "
"Von can'l look al Ihiiigsand
say the coach is a racist. Look
and see what is behind your nol
playing - what does Ihe other
player have lhal you don't'.'"
there was one lasl question
lor Coach l o r d :
Would he
start 22 Blacks if they were bis
best players?
"I think I
probably would," ford said.
"My objective is to win."
On tridiiy...Basketball and the
Doc... and some touchy issues.
she contended.
Stronger language came from
Dr. Curt Smith of the English
Department, whosecase lorlenure
is up for review this month. "It
shows, as far as the courts a re concerned, that the University must
resolve itsown alfairsand leavethe
courts out ot it," Smith said. "It's
only obvious by now that all
reform in the tenure system must
come from within the University."
In his statement. Smith cited Judge
Conwa y's explanation of his decision to dismiss ihe case.
Conway ruled that Kendall is
given an absolute voice with
respect to any statements such as
those thai were in ihe letters thai
served as ihe basis loi his refusal to
recommend Goodman tor tenure,
In addition, Goodman's ease tailed
In prove t'hal specific damages had
been inclined h\ him as a direct
result ol Kendall's decision. In a
prima facie toil, ihe judge said.the
plaintiff must show lhal he lias
sustained a specific loss as a d ueci
i estill of I lie d etc nd anfs action and
ill.il he. thi' plainlill was nol at
I.mil as well
I i'Kill Kotitc Hud
Smith
maintains lhal 'Viol
leceiv nig leniii e. is. in iisell. a
seiious inuleiial dcpiivatiun
I he
legal i otile seems hopeless UH him
It's worse than hopeless
I It em m e
eases lhal lliey (ihe Adniinistra
lion) win. ihe w oi sell w ill gel loi lis
5
in an\, future court action." I Ins
ease eleaily shows lhal aie simplv
uo checks ami balances on ihe Administration, and serves to point
Vice-President for University
Affairs Lewis P. Welch was quite
apprehensive about commenting
on the Judge's ruling. He did say
that "Goodman seemed to have ex hausted all the official channels
open to him. though 1 really can't
be sure...Certainly Kendall is
pleased with the decision...but the
Administration doesn't have any
opinion out ihe events." "I'm really
not thai familiar with his case."
Welch continued, "and I really
don't have any personal opinion
other than that he used all the
proper channels tor grievance."
Welch outlined the "proper
channels" as a series of five sleps,
the first louihcing statccontrolled,
due lo the lacl that all those involved in deciding a grievance,
from Welch's office to the state
wide Ol I ice o I f-mp loyee
Relations, are state employees.
Hie fifth and lasl recourse is for
outside arbitration, which n
Goodman's case meant thecourts.
Never Had u Case
linallv. Barry Davis. VicePresident ol the Student Association summed up what appeared lo
be Ihe prevailing mood, by saying,
"Idon't know if Goodman ever had
a case Most crucial to the issue is
whether (his will haveanv bearing
on the activities of ihe Search
Committee which is looking for a
Dean ol Behavioral Sciences. Hie
Seaich Committee, if il is, as I
believe, eousideimg Kendall or the
posi, will have lo look al the
evidence lhal ihe nidge saw vers
e.itelullv I lie com I nun have dismissed ihe case not because ol the
merits ol ihe ev idenee. bill because
he was acting ( Kendall) tin del the
scope "i his employment He was
protected b> the courtsltoin te.illv
uclciniiiung ihe wilitlnv ol Goodman's eluu ges
'I ,iin noi lamiliai with ihe
details "l his case i"k now whelbei
Kendall did act wioiiglv in his
handling ol ihe issue, but the
chaiges aie sei uius enough lhal it*
ihe Sea'ch Cumin nice is consul e-i ing him. ihe) ought logivel lie
whole mallei a thorough investigation." I >avis concluded
Kkh.idKen<l.ll.f U ni.er!ll.loryl)e,)»rln,en.ch»lm..n, W ho\*onhl S <lefe..» e «U»l..sK;ood n i«nsl»wsul.
Erastus Coming's Albany Budget... see page
Binghamton Prof. In Row
Over Free'A's
Plattsburgh Profs Chum Quotas
by Chris Oberle
S A S H P r e s s Service
A delay in the granting of t e n u r e
t o six professors a t the S t a t e U n iversity College a t P l a t t s b u r g h
highlights t h e o p p o s i n g o p i n i o n s o f
S U N Y a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and faculty
m e m b e r s o n the issue of t e n u r e
quotas.
T h e controversy began on J u n e
6, 1973 when the faculty m e m b e r s
were notified by their d e a n s that
Plattsburgh
President G e o rge
Angell had n o t r e c o m m e n d e d them
for tenure. T h e President e x p l a i n ed that by recommending the six
for tenure he would be increasing
the proportion of tenured faculty
in their d e p a r t m e n t s to 75 percent.
Before d o i n g this he w a n t e d the
t w o d e p a r t m e n t s involved
to
develop written plans that would
establish the d e p a r t m e n t s ' longrange ability to a d a p t to c h a n g i n g
educational needs. Angell feared
that d e p a r t m e n t s with high percentages of tenured faculty would
possess limited future flexibility.
T h e six professors argued that
they had been denied t e n u r e for
one reason: President Angell ar-
bitrarily
had
i imposed
a
d e p a r t m e n t a l tenure q u o t a w h i c h '
he refused to exceed without a d e q u a t e justification.
T h e faculty members filed a
grievance with the local c h a p t e r of
the United University Professor!
(formerly
Senate
Profcssiona
Association, formerly S U N Y Un
ited). T h e grievance a d v a n c e d to
the second level, which involved
review by S U N Y Central, before
President Angell decided to grant
the teachers t e n u r e on the basis of
the newly-developed long-range
plans
produced
by
the
departments.
Since Angell's decision, all of
Plattsburgh's d e p a r t m e n t s have
had to write p l a n s o u d i n i n g how
they will m a i n t a i n flexibility by
oflering p r o g r a m s that will meet
changing student needs.
T h e Plattsburgh administration
argues that these plans d o not
a t t e m p t to impose a tenure quota
on
individual
departments.
Plattsburgh Vice President for
Academic Affairs Joseph Burke officially disavows all systems of
tenure quotas and
ratios.
He
JSC - Hillel Sabbath Services
FRIDAY. 7 , 3 0 - CHrfPGL HOU9G
Speaker: Dr. Kessler, Jst. Dept.
"Jews and Christians Myths and Misconceptions"
:;MT NORM. 9,30 - CHrlPGL HOUSG
Traditional Service - Kosher Lunch
NEWS BRIEFS
echoes administrators t h r o u g h o u t
the state system by emphasizing
department-level planning and by
advocating the ideal of "flexibility"
in a c a d e m i c programs.
According to Burke, the most
basic q uestion which every university must ask is "what is the ability
of the individual department to respond to changes in programs and
staff in the I970's'r He reels that
the best way to answer this question is for departments to develop
long-range plans similar to the
ones which currently are required
of e a c h of
Plattsburgh's 22
departments.
Representatives of United University Professions agreed that
these p l a n s do not represent the establishment of an official tenure
quota
system at
Plattsburgh.
However, U U P is concerned with
insuring that a department's "flexibility" does not infringe upon the
right of present faculty members to
earn tenure. The president of the
Plattsburgh chapter of the U U P .
H e r m a n Doh, vows to "tight any
specific
references
in
the
departmental plans which indicate
tenure quotas." The case oftfe six
faculty members this summer indicates that Mr. Doh and other
l e a d e r s of
United
University
Professions are willing to support
their w o r d s with action.
by Valerie Foley
A M a t h professor who had
guaranteed an "A" to a l l o t his 563
students who attend class regularly
has found himself in the center of a
controversy
on
academic
s t a n d a r d s and the value
ALGIERS(AP)
F o r t h e first time in the 25 y e a r s o f Arab-Israeli warfare,
a summ it conference of A r a b leaders h a s endo rsed the concept ol a permanent peace seulement with Israel. S e c r e t a r y G e n e r a l M a h m o u d R iad of the
A r a b League said the conference did n o t p a s s a specific resolution on the
subject. But the tacit acceptance of t h e idea of p e a c e - a n d therefore of the
permanent
existence
of
Israel
-
marked
what
President
Houari
Boumedienne of Algeria called "a major t u r n i n g p o i n t in the history of the
Arab peoples."
Israeli and Egyptian cease-fire n e g o t i a t o r s m e t again today on ihcC'airoSue?. road, then broke off theirdiscussions a n d the Egyptian representative
said the situation was "very, very bad."
A U.N. spokesman said no further meetings w e r e scheduled
As Israeli Maj. Gen. A h a r o n Yariv and Egyptian Maj. Gen. Miihamol
cl-Gamasymet in t h e U . M . conference tent at Kilometer 101, ma June fun
and mortar fire exploded a b o u t t w o miles
away.
W A S H INGTON (AP) Lsrael, Egypt, Syria and J o r d a n have been
to attend the Middle East peace negotiations expected to begin in ( >ene\;i
Wednesday
in mid-December, U.S. officials acknowledged
T h e Palestinians apparently will n o t be present at the first stage ul
Both Israel and Jo rdan are known to have resisted participation In P
nian reprcseniatives at least at the start.
George Vest, the State D e p a r t m e n t s p o k e s m a n , said separate itmi
to J o r d a n had been extended by the United S t a t e s and the Soviet I
which hae played a major role in p r o m o t i n g cease-fires and thcpeai
lerence. likdyto begin December 17 or IS.
T h e lines are clearly drawn:
rega rd less of how much S U N Y ad minislralors deny the existence of
tenure quotas, faculty members
and their bargaining agents will
resist any measures which hint al
the imposition of arbitrary quotas
or latios.
(mm &mi mm
SAIGON
(AP) The S o u t h
Vietnamese military command wnl n
bombers knocked out two North Vietnamese tank sin a column that ,N —
ed the C a m b o d i a n border.
Song
The t a n k c o l u m n w a s moving Iowa id the l>»
b o r d e r punt, in the central highlands, w h i c h gmeriiiieiii I.IIIJM
recaptured earlyWcdnesday.
I n c c o m m a n d sa id i is air I o n el lew * ' -i ukc
in support of the forces at Dak S o n g .
W A S H I N G T O N (AI')A l e d e r a l g r a n d j u r y t o d a y indicted l o m n i V.I '
limit.' aideDw ighl I., ( l u p i n on four c o u n t s of lying to a W.i fu \r
|iu\
I he indicunentchiiiged that C h a p in lied In the uripiutl Viniei,.,
jury on April I I. 197.1 when asked a b o u t t h c a e i i u l i e s o l Donald II -•
ii. underground political agent for the 1972 Nixon re 1 lee nmi . e ; <
committee.
Fellini's Roma
Friday,
Nov. 30
I he formal charge lodged againsi Chapiii is "making I.IIM .I . i, ••••'•••
David Klarncr, who teaches
Math I 30."A Survey of
Math
Ideas." insists on the uniform grade
of " A " to remove the problems of
pressure and competition from the
class.
He had originally wanted to
have the class graded on Pasif^o
credit, but did not appeal to the
A d m i n i si rat ion
soon
enough
before registration, and students
signed up lor the normal grading
options. Klarncr said that the
students were m m illing to change
their grading option to P a s s p o
Credit when he suggested it to
tli em.
He wa ntseaeh student lo extract
Irom ihe course what he feels is
relevant lor him, and not feci compelled to memorize something lie
find's u n i m p o r t a n t lor the sake ol a
good mark. "How d o you evaluate
what students learn'.' Von cannot
measure ohjeeltveh."
Klarncr I eels that the class will
h a \ e in go through ;i • series ol
changes; "We're sort ul groping
around (tor the proper was to
leach this)." He said that he was
s e n s i t i v e in
students'
needs,
d e m a n d s and capabilities.
M a i n students seem lo think the
course is tarcical. Although ihey
see ihe potential and validity of"the
course,
there are several impediments to its effectiveness. 1 he
major complaint is that Klarncr
m i n e s too quickly Irom topic to
to pie. "He assumes loo much." explained Allan Koeiiigsherg. He
I eels Klarncr is directing himself
lowaul people with more n a m i n g
in ma I h. and d o c s not lake into ac-
H •: ^ !
W A S H I N G T O N (AI») cfcrald K. F o a f s r n m i i n a u . m l..b» \ "
I he House is expected
to act
on the- noiuiiiiilioii
''
"
i
•
m-i
A;- -
:
e.
overwhelming approval is assured.
I he Senate approved the nomination earlier this wet k
International Film Guide's
Film of the year -1973
lieu lariy in the held ol civil
'
''
rights.
IIIIII
m l ( e n l e 1. H l l l l k - l l
hm.
1 hen
lie is of I ended that ihe course
has he-en termed "trivial"and "boring" by some. "Any one who takes
ii seriously
will find it d a m m e d
hard." he said.
I he situation was outlined for
Central-Council in the m i n u t e s of a
meeting of the "Central Council
Ad Hoc Committee on
Ihe
1 • . O P S . A . . " which included the
tollovving:
"I asl yeni
PK.0.1..K.
(the
Puerto Rican organization which
has since changed its n a m e and
structure) had one representative
lo 1 O P S . A . P.R.0.1..I-. was disband ed. and broke down into six
new co.ni.rn ittees." Ilaeh committee
wanted a separate representative to
P . O . P . S . A . However, " t h e constitutions (ol the six committees)
were lost, so they were informed al
an K O . P . S . A . meeting that they
won Id
return
lo last year's
procedure, with P.K.O.I .1 , having I representative."
Ihe biggest problem with this
ruling was that
P R . O . I . J : , no
longer
existed,
having
been
supplanted by "hue/.a P a t i n a " and
Us six committees, l i e d S t o k e h n .
president ol I O P S . A . , allegedly
had not even been made aware ol
the existence ol hue/a Patina, but
he sii speeled one ol the commit t e e s . Uorinquen
iiihghienmenl. ol being loo political lo be
el rgibfe lor Student Association
landing.
the
P.O.P.S.A.
Deeei nbei
on
l.ipie
D o II
W A S H I N G T O N (AP) A $25,000 a yuti pay cm to e
•<'•
stitutioiial snag to Sen. William B. S a x b e ' s a p p o i n t m e n t a ,»
general appears headed loi d e a r sailing in Congress
\M-lllle.
4H
- al - 111) I'M
is '•'OII.IJOO l'i .
Uvei us
is
1 lice
\ n i e i lean h u m
I l l li
.11
W - u .11-old
.,
Vermont. II,.- spell I
III Viet N a m \ \ H I k i ne
VolnnUii \
h i l e i m i t u > i i.il
the
I he Constitution prohibits any mem he i o I Congress I nun t.rl
lor which Congress voted a pay increase d i n i n g Ins n u n
\ml "
Republican was among those w h o voted in 1909 I o raise ilies.il.in "I '•'
lorney general and olhei Cabinet m e m b e r s to $60,00(1 a v e.n limn ' '
$.75 with tax
$1.25 without
S P A C E ( E N T E H , Houston ( A P )
i lees. hi-eomin e
Im
Sei-
ihen iliu-i l i i l
ill
l l c i c s n i i i . ,-il l i . o n l \ s i II l % 7
m i l l lo simh a , l l l i l o
io
1*1
ami
Willi s p a a ' s l u p e u i i i m pi . 1 * " '
solved. Skylab .Ts astronauts have received an okay to resume mam H " ' " ' ' 1
il
emi|!
i
" ! ''
Siilill i \ u l
Hecui l l s e
C a i r . William It, I'ogueand Edward G. Gibson were mid mi I "
"l":
Ii is
leilili u l
that changing Ihc position was t a k i n g much more fuel tlian p t e d u W
Saturday, Dec. 8 - A Day at the Races
with the Marx Brothers
Friday & Saturday,
lllt
The Ruling Class
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
will postpone reopening fro the winter term Irom J a n
spokesman said.
7 loJ.ni
'i
iiiiiin
io
the
I'i- '1
S o l i l l I \ let N.i 111
SIIIIII
i i ui
lie
.mil
11
S.
1
h e l o i i - Si-uali- .mil
lions .mi] s c u i . l l
\ias
he
im
i . l s u . l III,
sin
mil
In
lellil
.
L
ST
S . u II III 111.' l u l l . ,1 I M ?
- | H . i . i l i i . H , ' s | H i i n l i n l I, • i MM
l i e s|,o-k,- m i l l \ i l n 1 U ..M
Se u s
s III i 1 .III a i a n i l s l i u l i i ll m i l
asa
row
Union will close for C h r i s t m a s vacation D e e e m h e i 7. as se'hediileil i""
''"
.Union anticipates a 25 percent reduction in n s s i i p p l v ol healing " l l l l m
winler.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER iU ' '''
He notes that the Council,
by
freezing
the k'.O.P.S.A.
budget,
has
established
a
precedent
which
could
well
apply
to
agreed
lo recognize and
fund
l u e / a liilina and accept o n e g r o u p
representative. Bui a m e m o r a n dum Irom hue./a l.atina indicated
tha t I he gi ou p still w a n t ed a
separate representative from each
comm utee.
Stokelin. in an angry speech,
charged that the dissatisfied faction was in reality nothing but lour
students and that the rift was just a
fiction Ihe u n n a m e d lour students
were perpetrating. No one Irom
Puc/a
I alma
was present to
answer his charges. He also
cniicized Council lor hav ing Irozed I O P S . A ' s budget, claiming
lhat l - O . P , S . A , had conducted
it-sell responsibly t h r o u g h o u t the
I V n e D e b u s is a 2 l M ear
old I lench citizen with ,i Master's
ik-giee in Math He went lo V KI
V i m HI IWiK h> lullill Ins nnlii.iiv
iCLpiireuieut b> leaching I lench
ll)7t) he was shocked h\ eonins i u \ id S.mi.iiul u a s i e l e a s
t\l lioni two \ e a i s ,iv ,i pohiical
pi isoin-1 in ( Iii Una l'i ison in
Saigon
life was a u e s i e d ,t\u\
heutine a disseiiiei ) He is now
liaveilmg and tellmg Ins stois ol
pdMiiicis. aiulis eo-aullioi ol l i e
\ 101-
Sonlli
l l l l l i s Ol 1 uiieiL-ss o n
SCHENECTADY
(AP)lr, an attempt to savel uel. I nimi I "lief
announced Wednesday it will cancel its lirsi two weeks lo < lassses in
.kinuary.
A school spokesman said it was taped Ihe closing would rum " l l
college with e n o u g h ,'ucl to last the remainder ol t h e a c a d e i n u ye.ii
Ihe
nan li- M- ( l O M ' l l i i i i e n l i n
on
stop maneuvering Ihe 118-fool-long space station alter n w a s d m . n e i
|l
o l
IIS,,||S
i na
11 l.l 1 Ins
In
the
I ae.es in , I I I ,
S;n It's l.llllisl
ol
uillul i.iiui
"We figured you guys would work out s o m e t h i n g . "
A Separate Peace
In I T I I he in , , 1 , - I I O I I I I I H - ; ul l i n e s
|i w i l h h i o \ i u el l e a n
w h e n In
the orbiting station l-rrday.
"Glad to hear that," c o m m a n d e r (ietuld P. C a n said when inh
goodman
Director
of E.O.P.
Vernon
A.
Buck
commented
on
the
freezing and later thawing of the
E.O.P.S.A.
budget
by the C.C.,
saying he feels the Council
acted
responsibly
in so doing, but said
that the Council, of which he is
a
member,
displayed
some
prejudicial
attitudes
on
the
matter.
However,
he
supported
the bill to hold the budget
funds
until a report on the
situation
was made.
show .
Willi in Ihe last two weeks lie was
i the Piovisionaiv Kevolutionarv
iovernmenl zone
peaks Vietnamese llueiltl)
o-authoi ol i w o i . o o k s . I /c/
Sum ' the I tiht'uid
I <>/rc\ and
titt\U-tgt'\
<>f Hoi
Saigon's
/'nttihiil l'n\i>ncr\
He is also eoediloi
ol
lie
PrtMtiu'
One
Inttther, f'urnn
I rum Ait
\\tan
II ui
Q u o t inn
11 Din
lime
maga/iiie, " | ) o n I uce is to the
Si mill \ leiii.imese ((oveinmenl
u l u i Ralph Nadei is io (ieneral
M o i o i s He k n o w s ilieeiiltufeand
people heliei than \ irtualK anv
coiiespondeiil oi I S Cuivemiiieni emplovce
_ _ J
I'llSOl t e i s , 1 t i i i i R e l e a s e "
eoml
PAGE TWO
Klarncr said he is becoming ine r e a . s i n gly
m o re a w a re
ol
sludcnls'pioh lenis. He complained
ih,n he received little leed-back at
first Irom live students, a n d misinterpreted some ol what he did
receive. Me now intends to slow
down Ins class, in accordance with
i he students' ties ires, and cover
probably one mam idea per day
C e n t ra I C o u n c i l
froze
R. O . P . S. A. 'sen tire budget o n N o v .
7. p e n d i n g a clarification of the dispute. A solution satisfactory to all
the concerned parties has yet t o he
worked out, but Council n o n e theless gave P . O . P . S . A . back the
right lo spend its funds.
1 Inn. l
Coming:
Dec. 14,15
Jeati- f ' l e l l ' e
D e l u i M l llls|K-,l k al i l i e C ' h a i
Wednesday.
Friday, Dec. 7
ami
1 nee
D o II
by Democrats who objected to l o r d ' s c o n s e r v a t i v e viiiiiir i
9:30
IllllltV .
C e n t r a l C o u n c i l , a t Wednesday's
meeting, continued its investigation o f an alleged rift, between the
Educational
Opportunities
P r o g r a m Student Association and
some of that g r o u p ' s P u e r t o Rican
members. The dissatisfied Puerto
Ricans want five of their representatives on the P.O. P.S.A.'s governing b o a r d , while the F..O.P.S.A.
will recognize o n l y one.
Veterans Probe South Vietnamese
Political Repression At RPI Speech
l)()l) line on each ol llie lour c o u n t s .
I
&
All Ihe s t u d e n t s interviewed
agreed that Klarncr was interested
in his work, that he was sincere,
a n d all said they were able to glean
al leasl o n e or two concepts Irom
his lectures, a l t h o u g h not everyone
attends his lectures regularly. His
idealistic grading system and the
reasoning behind it were also praised, although marv\ felt it unworkable.
I hey
admitted,
however, that ihcy did not mind
taking advantage o I s u c h a n o p p o r -
by Susan l e h o f f
Ultimately,
I he eli a rge car ties a maximum p e n a l t y o I live > e a r s in p i o
All eightvotesagainst t h e n o n i i n a t i o n i n t h e l l o u s e e o t i i i i n i u . *
7:30
A n o t h e r c o m m o n complaint is
the size of the class, which the
studen ts feel is his problem as well
as theirs. They find the noise in the
room distracting, and believe it
affects his ability to leach. During
one class, in fact, Klarncr walked
out to protest the noise.
belore grand jury or court."
was approved 29 to K l o J a y by the House Judiciary (
LC18
of the
grading system.
count the many students w h o have
had no training past the high
school level. M a n y become bored
a n d frustrated because they cannot
grasp the principles he is trying to
teach. One student complained
that while his ideas were inleresling, he was not able to piece
any of the ideas together to form a
single concept.
Council Returns EOPSA Budget
lllllol is ill t h e V i l l h
1 '1 /1 , i p | i e i i i a l o n
liUMC
I he lecture is/liee lothc public,a
n and an sue i period will
In \ | H ll l ' ) 7 l
he u - .lihi'il .11 ll le I ' c u l . i e o n I'a p e l s
I mil 111 1 OS >\l illi-les. ami I ,1 Max
Mt( \
fa^l
^
lollow
n i l ) \>i
•RIDAY NOVEMBER 1JU, L973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
situations
among
other
S.A.
sponsored
groups, and even the
S.A.
itself, when some
persons
claim
they
are
not
being
represented.
Buck said that he
does not believe
the
students
who complained
represent all of
the Puerto Rican students
within
the E.O.P.'s
852 students,
but
likely spoke for more than the
four
students
who
were
mentioned
by Fred Stoklein.
He
suggested
that perhaps the C.C.
should conduct
a referendum
of
Puerto
Rican
students
to
determine
the
majority's
sentiments.
dispute
Ihe
ne w b u s i n e s s
on
Wednesday \
agenda
consisted
almost entirely ol a p p r o p r i a t i o n s
lo Student Association groups-: the
A S P . the American College Unions ( A C P ) l o t n n a m e n t .
and
Students lor the Improvement of
Programs lor the Handicapped.
In a change ol heart. Council
agreed to land the A CM' I o u r n a inent.
in which M) S U N Y A
students w ill go lo Bulla lo to compete in what could be labelled
" s o l i " sports such as bowling.
billiards bridge, and chess. All student taxpayers, including graduate
students, will be able to tr\ out lor
learns.
Council approved a budget lor
Si PI I. w fitch was organized carl icr
this veai at St NVA Al [Jegrall,
president ol the Students lor the
Impioveinent ol P r o g r a m s lor the
Handicapped, described his g r o u p
.is a serious educational group
which investigates the problems
handicapped students have on ibis
campus, and said the gioup runs an
emergency wheelchair re pan service SI I'll also p lans lo make h a n d icapped mtlIV (duals throughout
ilu cotinl u a w a i e that SI W A is
o ne
o t i he
lew ca m p u s e s
[eavrriablv accessible lo a siudeiii
in a wheelihaii Mr, DeCiiall said
then- are piesentlv twelve students
in wheelchairs on campus. S I P H
sponsored the leeenl "Awareness
I ).iy" in which m a i n students experienced the piohleiiisol the handicapped bv spending .t lew hours
in a w heelehan
stud en ts have been dropping
s u g g e s t i o n s into ihe
library
( i n e v a i u e li,is and lell Sheininn.
(li.iii person ul the til levanee
t nniinitlee. has announced that
llie eomnutiee h a s icsolved one ol
i lie i no if i mi lino u eotnp la nils. Ihe
libiai v lias now piomised i h c c o n i '
uiitiee ill.ii In nevl I,ill u will open
•.ii he
t i l l IIS
u be lightened, so ihe problem of
students I Hiding the h o o k s they
w.ilil have been stulen will hopelull\ haveendetl I lieC oniniiiice has
also i eeomnu'iided dial the libiaiy
luin tine ol Us A i o \ in.iehiuesinio
,in ""cypress" niaelune, lo be used
loi copying items ul loui p a g e s o r
less
PAGE THREE
Where will you be
when the lights
go out?
Q. How does the
energy crisis
affect you?
An ASP
Roving Report
by Audrey Seidman
As a commuter, senior Jim
Sprinkle is dependent upon his
c;ir loget to shool. Due to the
energy crisis, Jim said, "I have
problems getting to and from
schooland work. "Jim work son
weekends and says there are
lew ga.s stations open weekends
now . Some stations even close
•it X I'M weekdays. Jim sees
positive and negative I actors in
this crisis.
He believes the
northeast will beaHecled most
due to the "Rush. rush, get up
and go"society. whereas other
areas w il I be more able to take
things in stride. I his will "Bring us hack down to a level with
everyone else." Jim said thai
he has Ilea id rumors o I new anil
m u r e ellicicnl
carburetor
which hasn't been inanulactured due to some companies
having out the patents. He
hopes these will he released in
the ease ol a severe shortage.
Like most students, it tooK
s o p h o m o r e Jeff
Feldman
longer to get home last week.
His main complaint, however,
is that he believes the university
is turning off the hot water a t
night
He says his morning
showers arelukewarm and turn
cold just when he's ready to
wash his hair. He is cutting
o u t e x c e s s u s e of lights in his
room.andis getting used to the
dim lights on the podium.
Junior Larry Keleher does
not feel d irectly affected by the
fuel shorage. As a resident o n
Indian Quad he has the same
problems ol colder rooms and
wale, but he does h is traveling
bv bicycle, lie sees o u r nation
independent upon oiland show
to research o t h e r energy
sources.
He cited Australia
which lias been developing
solar encrgv lor the past ten to
fifteen vears. It is being used to
heal homes and lactones.and is
being used experimentally in
cars. Becausetheoil supply w ill
eventually
he depleted b\
1990 in Iran, he sees the need
lor developing a n o t h e r l o n n ol
er.ergy. He sees solar encrgv as
economical and non-pollutant,
and nuclear encrgv a s r i s k y a n d
too expensive.
SUNYA basketball star Melvin
Brown complains that the
energy crisis has"made thegym
freezing. That's how come we
messed up on our scrimmage
Saturday. You have to have the
gym warm to perform." Melvin
said there is no heat in his Van
Cortlandt room, but he isn't
cold because "I'm a wann person." He sees costs going up
due to the incicased luxuries of
society. Continuing on hisdaily routine, Melvin isnotalways
affected by the energy crisis,
but he said "thinking about it
bugs me."
Dave Coyne says theheat's
down on Alumni Quad. It was
oil totally lor one night and the
next morning the "bathroom
lloorwas frozen." Ilewashoping to buy a air next year, b a n s
having second thoughts due lo
the using price ol gas. "1 think
I'll bea perennial hicvcle rider,"
he Slid. At home Dave never
thought ol Hulling oil lights,
hut makes an el fort lonow. He
lintls he is more conscious ol
encrgv waste leu instance, the
hall lights on \ liiinni a I c bright
all day. and dimmed at I I I'M.
\-, lie letl thegamerooiu. I )ave
had one lasi thought "II the
cueigv crisis ever ctilsdovvnon
the amount ol pinball in this
school I'm suing."
Assistant Dean of StudcnF
Life Ralph Be islet is ridings
bus the 2i/ 2 miles to work cvm
day instead of driving noV
His thermostat at home |, as
been lowered to64degrees,and
he h a s been more carclul with
lights and elctricaI appliances.
He said the plantdeparlmentis
now adjusting theheaiand electrical appliances. He said the
plant department is mnv ad.
justing the thcrmosialsalluvei
Jackie Sonnenbcrg, a grad
campus
to
| „ w a Hie
student, was found at the Stutemperatures. Mr Ikislei JK|
dent Assistanfsdesk i n t h e S t u point out that llieic are no
dent Association office in her
stormwindows on am huiklim,
ski jacket.
The reason was
on campus. He sees lengthen.
obviousi'I'm freezing." Since
ing the intercession asi-icuitm!
the heat was turned down in the
' many other significant v luniiex.
S.A. office, the office window
but thill he "wuuldlnu! .i«,i\in
has been closed due to draft.
eopewith it." I he biggest cause
Even S.A. president SteveGerof the energy crisis acconmi i„
ber was walking around sneezMr. Beisler is "the \mciic;in
ing. Jackie can't afford the gas
way of life."
prices, and doesn't forsee
traveling much in the future.
Her classes are cold, and she
has lo wear her coal in the
caleteria. She thinks someone
'should check the I'atroon
Room a nd President Benezet's
o Hi ee.'
f i cshm an commuter George
Romanalion is living to save
gas bv not going home lor
dinner on nights that he has lo
sludv in the librarv. lie believes
ilia I the encrgv crisis came
about loo quickly, and that is is
due in pan lo •mismanagement
hv the adn\;iuit,iraitim.''^reHe
would not be personalis hull by
an extended schoolycardueto
a longer unci session, but thinks
in.inv students w ill he. George
would not mind losing the
spr ing recesses.
I he Pine Hush has been
threatened by a Hurry- of development companies, mosl notably the
Carlton Construction Company
which would like to sec the area
used lor industrial and residential
purposes,
Thousands ot years ago. as the
glacial ice receded, hike Albany
was formed. As lime passed, the
lake dried up and the winds blew
sand\ sediments into dunes. Evcnluall) il became covered with oak
and pine forests. I his is (he Pine
liush.
Originally the Pine Bush consisted ol 16.500 acres located in
A lhan\.(iuilderland.and Colonic
Only 4.0(H) acres til it remain pure.
Ol ihis. only about 2.000 acresare
considered salvageable. Il exisisin
lac blocks which are separated
from cadi other by roads and
developmcnl I'wo blocks lie in
\ lb.tin. two in the I own ol
(unlderland. and the last one on
lhe \lham -Culnnie-Cuilderiand
bnimd.ilies.
pmwk
INTERNATIONAL
NIGHT
The ruins oftheold Isaac Truax Tavern on the KingsHlfJiway inColonie is being excavated by PYE
archaeologists in search of early American artifacts.
Mohawk Valley and beyond.
On the Old Road, which is sixteen miles long, taverns sprouted
up along its length. Issue Truax ran
one about 1767, It wasslandingunlil 1941 when it burned down.
William 1 ilher, in the 1920Vfound
n and tned to save it.
PYE (Protect Your linviron-
is d o j n g
meir
p a rt to
preserve the Pine Bush. Don
Ritlncr headed an archaeological
dig. They began excavating in
August and ended in midNovember. They found ihe Truax'
tavern and its foundation was still
mainly inUtcl, Over 4,000 artifacts
were found, including ceramics.
menl)
^
^
ill i mg h iln*
into ihe
(Duteibe
•Inn
musketballs, pins, and animal
bones, especially those of horses.
A p p ro x i ma te ly 200 ya rd s
behind the tavern, the location of a
small cemetary was found. Five
head-stones were scattered. The
archcaological crew cut the trees.
grass, and brush down. They
replaced the stones on their bases.
Oin ol the trees ihey bu 't a fence
and enclosed ihe cemetery. Right
now they are working on the
possibility of having the Colonic
llislonc Society maintain ihe
grounds.
I h is tavern is on private
property and had been seriously
I he Bush is an tlnn|iic eco•A sic in lis Liunbinalinn of plants.
,11 als. .iiul gcogiaplnca I leatuies
.iu- tiiMiHiniKiii.ilK i,lie Bcincs
a ltd w ild oKh.mls and an niniiinei.ihle .iinoinii ol tulvci pLmi
• |K'cus ale piescui. Pitch pine and
oat ,tie the innst dommaii\e.
\mm.ils and birds such as rabbits.
ch ipuiunks. and orioles mhahii the
land. \ bioltigicalh unique hived
ul butlvrlly. Ihe Kaiiici Blue.
dunes there with oiliei mvecl life.
Outing the I rench and Indian
War. the "K mg's High way" was ihe
unite used hy soldiers lhal were going west When the -\meiican
Resolution occui red. this uail was
agaui used hy(ieorge Washington
and his soldiers Seltlcis folloucd
usstHtuiton
neglected. It took eight dump
trucks fifll of garbage to clear the
area. There is now a good chance
that it will be put on the National
Register of Historical Places. Ms.
Betty Ernst, who owns this part of
the Bush, runs a horse farm on it.
Her business has just about
doubled from the publicity the dig
cccivcd from all three Albany
devision stations. Proper careof
the land must now betaken. PYE
hopes to have historical plaques
erected onall thesitesandhavethe
Old King's Highway route retraced.
by Nancy Cook
The Protect Your iinvironmenl
Club has. along with concerned
groups of the Albany, Colonic and
(iuildcrland region, been actively
engaged ina last dilclieflort to save
what remains ol the Pine Hush.an
area immediately adjacent to the
,\llian\ Slate campus, local environmentalists, such as I hcresa
Cooke, the losing candidate lor
•Mhany comptroller in ihe recent
election, consider the Bush lohave
a rich variety ol rare and uniquely
indigenous species ol plant life.
I i oin a Insloi rut I ponu ol \ ivw .
Ihe Pine Bush a tea is one o| disunction It was live Buffer / o n e
between Scheneciad\ and Albany
in colonial limes loi the transportation of people ami trade. Aran
Van Curiei weni through Pine
Bush and founded Schenectady m
lonl Albany had a Hading post
monopoly Originally il contained
a large numbei ol Indian trails.
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
funded h\ sttuhm
Pine Bush Preservation: History On The Line
Reasons for its preservation are
many. It could be a recreational
and open-space area which the
stale needs more of. Billions of
gallons of high quality water lie
trapped in the layers of clay and
natural blocks. A reservoir could
be ihe answer to the community's
projected water shortage in the
future. If it is bulldozed and ruined,
the water could become polluted.
Ihe Pine Bush is a natural
I a b o ra t o ry fo r env iro nmenta I,
biological, geographical and
historical studv
A good portion of the Pine Bush
is privately owned. Presently.
Ciuilderland has bought land as a
preserve. Colonic and Albanyarc
still trying to buy some of it. Ihe
New York Stale Department of
I in iionincni and the Nature Conservation .ilealtempling to buy the
laud lo preserve it lor ils hMorical
purpose.
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED FOR
Phonothon has been extended two
more days:
December 3 & 4
and we need your help!
The original Isaac Truax Tavern asseen ina 1940 photograph. It burned
down the following year,
If you can help
call Gary Sussman - 457- 4307
» w w w w w w w w w w w w w < w w
Indian & Dutch Quads bring you:
I THE FIRST ANNUAL BATTLE of the BANDS
Friday, Nov. 30
9:00 -1:30
CC Ballroom
Monolith
Nevermind
(formerly
Skin)
Neon P a r k
JM WASHINGTON AVB.
Sooner or
later,
You Know
We're
\Gonna Geffcha.j
Sat, Vwmbw I 8:30 pm CC Bafcont
aimsbm *l.00 iwft fax; *l.50 wAmi
PAGE I'DUH
ALBANY STUDENT PRKSS
FRIDAY, NOVL'MBr
Beer (40 kegs) - 20c a glass
Wine (2 kinds) - 45c a glass
College ID or Tax Card required
-ADMiSSMON75c with tax card
$1.25 without
funded
hy student
association
- — - — • — o a r — - " • * - — ! « • ! * " • -—•——
••/run
'AGE FIV
ISO Talent ShowToiiiorrow
For sevenor eight \ears now ,the
International Student Organization
has put on an International Night,
a variety show featuring international talent from both on and
off campus; this year is not an exception... or is it? The fact is that
this year's International Night
promises to be interestingly unusual and somewhat unorthodox,
due most to the fact that Mike
Rainbow, a Communications student who usually doesn't dabble in
this sort of thing will be both
hosting and directing the production.
This year's approach to the
design and staging of the show is
different. Still expecting the usual
crop of local VIP'sas well as many
campus students, the show neverthe-less stresses a more relaxed,
semi-formal approach as opposed
lo previously more conventional
International Nights. This year,
the production was al first difficult
to get underway, but now it'
promisestobeenjoyablcand entert a i n i n g with its scheduled
refreshments and activities, which
range from singing and dancing to
musical performances and a
fashion show.
The strcssgoeson "production"
this year with less convention and
more emphasis on having the show
mn in a smooth and relaxing
manner.
Introductory speeches
will he short and sweel this year.
says Rainbow, "If anything is going to happen, I want it to be r d t .
not explained." Ilic International
Night performance will be held
tomorrow night. December 1st at
K;10 in the Campus Center
llullroom. Tickets will be sold at
the door. Tomorrow night's performance: may be somewhat
strange.but in all respects appears
lo he:i potcnttiully inlriging. and if
not. Il'.v-n at least an interesting
show'
Gay Speaker Will
Highlight Weekend
Speeches by the well-known Dr.
Howard Brown and Ms. Nathalie
Rockhill are scheduled for Friday
to open the Gay Weekend being
sponsored by the SUNYA Gay
Alliance Dr. Brown will speak on
"coming out;" Ms. Rockhill will
talk on lesbianism.
Dr. Brown recently appeared on
the front page of the New York
limes.
He was New York City
Commissioner of Health under
John Lindsay. He will held a press
conference at 8 JO Friday.
Brown recently setup a National
(•ay Task Force, which is working
lo involve professionals in the gay
lib movement, and in Dr. Brown's
words is a clearinghouse lor local
Ciays. in order to serve them in a
supportive manner. This group is
working lo gel Gay Lib into the
"mainstream ol the AmcricanCivil
Rights Movement." according lo
ns members.
&
State-wide NYPIRG's Set
To Convene Tomorrow
The New York Public Interest
Research Group .NYPIRG. will
hold its annual state-wide conferenccatAlhanyStatc tomorrow.
„ The lledgling Albany chapter of
S5 the group, having jusl completed
sji its intensive promolional campaign lor student acceptance, was
delegated the responsibility of host
chapter.
As part of its hard-sell campaign. Albany NYPIRG promised
action on many ol the more immediate bureaucratic and legal
problems students lace in addition
the less well known issues. The
conference ha s as its expressed pu rpose thcconvcningol all New York
state chapters with the intent of
w focusing all of its efforts in the
i | direction (he group will lake lor the
| y a u K o r l h c Albany chapter, this
| m c i l i n m o s t | v listening duty, as the
I he speeches are sel from 7:00 | recenlncssol their inception lefllilPM. and wilj.lake place inJ....CLJ ,| c , j m i . |,„ u,.|initivc W l ) r k .
v?3
Agenda for the morning's session
i n c l u d e s reform, the Stale
Legislature, recycling on campuses, current environmental
legislation, and organizing new
NYPIRG chapters of other
schools.
Among those ollicials ol the
group converging on Albany will
include ils executive direclm
Donald Ross and the groups legal
stall.
An afternoon session has been
scheduled in addition with topics
expected to cover Mr. Ross renoi
and more workshops,
I In
workshops will involve processes
lor increasing student input iiiiu
NYPIRG. strategy lor oigam/me
other PIRCi's and the determination ol a director lor the group
I he location has been sel l<u
Saturday in lecture centci I1' ,n
1(1:30,
All NYPIRG meetings are open
In the general public
M2>
I
mm
WKBlter*>~^Mrs£*rz2' *****
Albany City Budget Undergoes
Close Scrutiny Monday Night
by Glenn von Nostitz
Albany's proposed $41.6 million
budget should undergo some harsh
criticism at a public hearing to (ie
held Monday night at City Hall.
Expected to attend the hearing is
the outspoken Theresa Cooke,
who ran for controller this year,
along with her supporters.
The new budget was released
only lasl week by Mayor Corning,
and includes salary hikes for all
employees, police, and firefighters,
but holds the line on a tax hike,
the new budget exceeds lasl year's
by SI.X million.
No lax increases are expected
hecaltseol a two per cent rise in the
city's asscsed valuation from $297
million last year lo %MH million
this year.
I he police and firelighters will
receive ;in aeeross-the-board increase ol IS750 iI the budget is approved In ilic Common Council
aivdCorniog's-salary will be raised
Iroin S1 2.(XX) lo S2().()t)() a year.
Other cits employees can ex peel to
receive .i SAW a year pay raise,
retroactive to November 1st.
Proposed allocations for uasli
collection, the city landfill
operation s. st reel clean ing an d
parks maintenance areexpectcd tu
undeigo ver\ close questioning al
ihe hearing. Critics, including
Cooke, former
Republican
mayoral candidate Can I ouhey
.mil Ilic Washington Park Spirit,
have charged that these operations
ha\ c been consistently over funded.
Alihough lie new budget calls lor
MM ,i 11 d ecrea se s in t h CM'
departments* budgets, the city
would still be spending more
money on street repairs, cleaning
and parks maintenance than
Syracuse, a city with 70%.larger
population than Albany, lnfact,
die entire Syracuse budget is only
live million dollars greater than
Albnay's. and Syracuse provides a
eityairport. a zoo, city-wide trash
collection, and reportedly better
snow re mo \ti I than Albany.
I he most prevalent criticism of
the budget so far seems to be thatit
is too vague and does not break
down large, lump sums. Although
the hreakdown provided by the
Mayor's office does include such
specific items as "City Historian"
and "Ambulance Service" it also
contains such generalized expenditures as for "City Sewer Budget'1
and "City Water Budget."
Also certain lo be argued about
are lite Mayor's across-the-board
salary increases.
And lhe critics will probably
point out ihal alihough the Corning administration has promised
a new library to the city this year,
I here is no provision lor il in the
budget.
I inally, there are a large number
ol iteinsonthebudgelon which the
tils spends more than $500 per
year per item. Slate law mandates
thai all items above $500 must be
put out lor public bidding.
lloweveV in! order,., allegedly to
avoid such bidding Iheeity currentIs buys in less than $500 lots lire
department laundry, police and
truck tires, motor oil and an-
tilreezc. office equipment, furniture, lawn mowers, stationery,
janitorial supplies and other such
items. The critics want to know
whether the Mayor will put these
items out for hid in the new budget
and thereby save money and lower
the tax rate.
I olal estimated revenues under
the new budget are sel at $22,065,472, with Federal Revenue Sharing
funds amounting to another $1,0VX.542. The current tax rate of
$64.06 per thousand dollars of
assessed valuation is expected to
remain essentially the same as last
year.
Each year for about the past 'ten
years the eily has set the tax rate in
November based on the 'assessed
value" ol the city in November.
Each winter the city usually
arranges compromises with hundreds ol businessmen and lowers
the assessments on business
properties throughout the city.
1 his lowers the assessed value oil he
ci ly. and therefore lowers the taxes
available to be collected by several
thousand dollars. This is another
administration practice which will
moslcerlainly he questioned Monday night.
nmtituu'tt on pant' eight
magrocn
Albany City Hall: Mayor Corning will defend his $41.6 mflu'on
budget here Monday night at 8:00.
tower oast
R*0H1
ONCE A KNIGHT WAS ADVISED
BY HIS FRIEND AND ROOMMATE,
A DRAGON, THAT THE PURSUIT
OF ACADEMICS MIGHT NOT BE
BEST SUITED TO ONE OF SO
ARTISTIC A TEMPERAMENT, AND
THAT THE KNIGHT COULD BEST
ACHIEVE THE GREATNESS THAT
WAS HIS DESTINY BY PURSUING
A COURSE IN FILM MAKING.
THE KNISHT DID SEE THE WISDOM
OF THE DRAGON'6 ADVICE AND
DID REGISTER FOR THE COURSE
AND COMMENCE WITH STUDIOUS
PREPARATIONS.
WHICH PREPARATIONS WERE
SOON INTERRUPTED BY REVERIES
OF CINEMATIC CELEBRITY. HE
DREAMED HIMSELF PIRECTING A
CAST OF THOUSANDS IN A
CINEMASCOPE RENDITION OF THE
LIFE OF IMMANUEL KANT.
OR ENGAGED IN A FILMIC HIGH NOON
SHOWDOWN WITH DIRTY JOHN,
IGNOBLE VILLAIN OF A FILM BASEP
ON A THIRD-RATE JOKE CALLED
^THAT'S DIRTY JOHN'S GIRL."
LEVI'S
HOUSE
H. I. S.
OF
WRANGLER
the Master
of Shock...
A Shocking
Masterpiece!
PANTS
BROOMSTICKS
LARGEST
SELECTION
IN
CAPITALAND
A deadly new
twist from the
original Hitchcock
MEN'S SIZES
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S "FRENZY-
27 to 50
BOYS1 SIZES
OR, PINNACLE OF PINNACLES,
APPEARING AS AN URBANE
SPOKESMAN IN A GENUINE
SCHAEFER BEER COMMERCIAL.
BUT ALAS, HE WAS CALLED BACK
FROM HIS REVERIES.
4 to 18
Regular-Slim-Kusky
AND WAS GIVEN BY HIS INSTRUCTOR
HIS FIRST ASSIGNMENT: HE WOULD,
OH, JOY, BE SPECIAL-EFFECTS WAN
FOR A DOCUMENTARY FILM
TENTATIVELY TITLED 'THE MATING
HABITS OF THE CLIFF PIGEON."
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
NOV. 3 0
DEC. 1
7:30 and 9:30
LC 7
$ . 5 0 with q u a d card
special
^w^M(^mmmm^m(!m
stia/lt on, fataet- uiutA. tA*. .JatAw-ut. off tbdau-
241 Central Ave., Albany, N.Y.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
•TUDAY, NOVEMBER '-'
feature
friday
and
Saturday:
A MAN CALLED HORSE
starring
$ . 5 0 with state quad card
Richard
Harris
$ 1 . 0 0 without
munmmmmmmmmmmmm MMMMMMMMMaMMMMMMMMMi
Schaufur Browunes, Now York, N Y, Ballimoro, Mri , Luhitfh Valley, Pa
PAGE SIX
midnight
$1.00 without
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER .40, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 7
continued
from
page
seven
W h a t t h e new b u d g e t
t o d o is
friends arc still charging that the
proposes
satislyv e v e r y b o d y .
All
of
waste,
and
that .Albnay
tax-
c i t y e m p l o y e e s w i l l g e t a raise, b u t
p a y e r s h a v e been a n d s t i l l w i l l be
there will
p a y i n g t o p d o l l a r f o r generally i n -
budget
be n o
will
tax
most
hike.
likely
p r o v e d b y the C o m m o n
Monday:
Ihey have never
one,down.
However,
The
be
ap-
Council
turned
Cookeand
f e r i o r services.
will
do,
they
F o r a l l the g o o d i t
will
be
vigorously
p r e s s i n g t h e i r c h a r g e s at the h e a r ing
Monday.
proposed 1973-1974
CHANGE;
+
Elections
City Planning Boaid
City Hall
A l b a n y Oarage
(city •owned)
Howe Library
$136,850
109.250
73,725
81,970
59,500
213,600
200,500
70,846
40,800
12,500
80,416
282.750
16,850
104,605
122.100
40,250
219,580
151,000
22,595
Municipal Building
Academy Park Building
Senior Citizens Center
Public Works
Barbers Examining Board
Board of Estimate & Apportionment
f i t ) Historian
57.800
39.062
15.300
93,070
3.150
9.500
3.200
+2.100
+3.660
—4.640
-70
SAME
SAME
+400
Kire Department
Police Department
T r a l l i c Control
hire-Police Communications System
A n i m a l ( ontrol
Pa rk i nil
Meter
D e p ii r t m c n t
W e i g h t s * Measures
Si reel Maintenance
Snow & Ice Control
Street Lighting
Sidewalk Repairs
Slice!
D e p a r t m e n t (iarage
Garbage Colfcctinn
3,672.069
5 . 6 5 7 . 8 12
96.200
408.100
30.500
7.700
8.800
478.000
296.300
700.000
15.000
250.000
400.000
245.000
625.000
766.000
102.560
24.500
15.000
65.000
+570,278
+440.521
-15.010
+63.612
Supply
Office
Trash'Collcction
City Dumps (landfill)
Street Cleaning
Public Hubs
Vital Statistic
Pesl Control
Ambulance Service
WASHINGTON
; House
lawyer
(AP)
J.
Fred
"No,
White
i secretary
Nixon's
whether
Buzhardt
personal
she c o u l d
+2.800
-6,675
+8.000
+4,600
+ 11,000
+1.650
+6.000
+9900
SAME
-^2,225
+28.700
+ 1.750
+1.580
-16.090
-13.400
+991
+9.000
-1.300
-8.300
+ 5.500
SAME
-40.000
-63,000
-100.000
SAME
-4.200
-8.000
-25.000
-25.000
- 78.000
- 640
+ 1.600
- 2.000
SAME
A New Dimension in C i n e m a Luxury
FOUR EXCITING THEATRES UNDER ONE ROOF'
did
not,"
Buzhardt
n o w W h i t e H o u s e chief o f staff.
i t e s t i f i e d t o d a y t h a t he n e v e r asked
I President
they
| Key Man Forgets
r e p l i e d . A l e x a n d e r M . H a i g J r . is
Buzhardt
Woods
ex-
had
testified
told
that
him
what
she
t o t r a n s c r i b e t h e t a p e o n O c t . I. B u t
i the Watergate tapes even w h i l e he
: was trying to d e t e r m i n e w h a t had
he s a i d he never pressed h e r a b o u t
I happened.
why
I
Rose
Mary
Woods,
the
i
President's secretary, had
:
she m i g h t h a v e h a d the r e c o r d b u t -
; ton
depressed
testified
accidentally
18 m i n u t e g a p i n t h e
: June
20,
1972
I between the
H.R.
I Haldcman.then White Houscchief
| of staff
talk
to
Miss
Woods?"
Watergate
; Richard
assistant
Ben-Vcnislc
he r e p l i e d .
u n p r e c e d e n t e d 8 0 m i l l i o n acres, o f
p r i m a r y s u b j e c t s o f the S e t t l e m e n t
bined
international
j told thinas.
land in Alaskaareavailableforany
Act.
bracing m o s t o f l h c S t . E B a s m o u n -
(8) A d d i t i o n s to K a t m a i
use the U S g o v e r n m e n t w a n t s
national
tain range, but w o u l d stop h u n t i n g
Monument.
and mineral exploration.
p r o x i m a t e l y 2 m i l l i o n acres.
H e also had trouble
|:
Wednesday
w a s t o l d at a l l .
first
t i m e he l e a r n e d
|
was
recalling
t h e t a p e s he n e \ e i
18 m i n u t e s l o n g , o n t h e n i g h t
•
l o r d a t c s . " B u z h a r d t s a i d w h e n , uit-
;
der
the g a p t o U . S . D i s t r i c t J u d g e J o h n
i
prosecutor Richard
.1. S i r i c a o n N o v . 22.
:
c o u l d n ' t r e c a l l w h e n he h a d t a l k e d
thought
they h a d b e l t e r r e p o r t the g a p t o
:• t o
questioning
President
by
assistant
BenVeniste,he
Nixon's
sccrelan
;
a b o u t a possible blank
s e c t i o n nt
I
one o f t h e s u b p o e n a ed l a p e s .
w a i t u n ti 1 sub m i l t i n g a s u m m a r y o f
:•
all the s u b p o e n a e d
|: R o s e M a r y W o o d s , to the w i t n e s s
tapes a w e e k
"Wily
didn't
you
report
ii
on
B u / h a r d t f o l l o w e d the secretary,
•: s t a n d
Wednesday
t; a l l i e d
to
i
M o n d a y . " Ben-Veniste asked.
al
a
determine
hearing
whal
j: nl the t a p e o f a J u n e 20, 1 9 7 2 . c o n between
the
Parks
820.941
-26.081
and
Playgrounds
212.500
SAME
o b l i t e r a t e d b y a steady
South
End
Recreation
Center
82.180
+2.000
92.300
-2.200
Skating Rinks
85250
+12.400
Band & School Concerts
3.400
R i d g c l i ' l d Park
Celebrations
(parades,
etc.)
Ihcater
Neighborhood
Police
Units
Headquarters
Mohawk
Brush
Park-Marl
Bldg.
(part
(city-owned)
city-owned)
C r i m e C o n t r o l Planning
1 rallic
Engineering
Department
Youth Activities
-81.400
or A l e x a n d e r M .
House
h i m t h e r e m i g h t b e a b l a n k segment
o n o n e tape.
1-1 o o d C o i n m l
15.903
55.000
I ibranes
710.000
Albany
Symphony
Palace
Ihealre
Deputy
63.675
Gerald
House
h,>
L. W a r r e n
SAME
arc intact,
+400
llie
SAME
seven
silions
-10,000
subpoenaed
except
lui
the
18-niiniite
OIK'."
375.(X)0
l e n g t h a b o u t h o w he l e a r n e d o l the
10.5(H)
+3.000
b l a n k s e g m e n t a n d how lie came i,,
26.500
Oiehesiia
132.626
+57.626
c h a n g e his o p i n i o n a b o u i w l i e i h e ,
Central D a t a Processing
107.900
'900
the
C i t y D e b t Service
9.719.680
(city-owned)
them.
llaldemaii
June
73.570
conversation
20 was c o v e t e d by
City General Fund
35.710.240
H.499,252
poena
City Water Budget
3.583,260
t328.683
W a l e i gate special
C i t y Sewer Budget
2.29 5.23 1
issued
lie
40.965
Morton,
December
dations
who
has
until
18 t o m a k e r e c o m m e n -
Under
c o n d o f t h r e e steps in t h e p r o c e s s o f
w o r l d ' s largest n a t i o n a l p a r k s .
National
d e c i d i n g w h a t w i l l be d o n e w i t h t h e
sate l o r i g n o r e d c l a i m s w h e n
the
UnitedStatcshoughttheland form
and
ol
the
villages
are given
lirst
p i c k o f the l a n d s as p a r t o l
their
main
groups
have
l o b b y i n g in a t t e m p t s to
been
influence
preserve
as
said
last
July
Congress.
million
Ill
July
recommended
ed
lor
mineral
the
covered
subpoena,
the
as
comcrsatiori
minority
Currently Alaska
Ml.
McKmlcy.
No
P/2K.
Ihe
plicated
severely
limited
access l o r m i n e r a l e x p l o r a t i o n .
M o r t o n , according to a
Siictite
Monitor
lowanl
a
considering
new
types
them
some
up
primarily
refuges,
in
areas
to
parks
systems,"
maybe
in
kind
Slate ollicials
i n . i k e s o m e d e c i s i o n s , because the
anil,
as
Itub
the l a n d
in
Stale
Planning
e e i n . i i e the W r a n g e l l - S t . L l i a s a r e a
lestilied
can
alloltl
the
luxury
ol
Kliiane
foe
I lias a r e a
million
National Park
IIIJJ
Ihe
Stale
in t h e
high
available
l"i
"multiple
i i i u u u g c n i c n i " .mil
use
development
H a l d c m a n .is w e l l as i h e ,,n<- \ u i i
v, u k , i n
I ei i it., i >
I he
land
use
slijjluly
laigei
than
couldn't
n,i
h i s I I p i l i u m on w h c l l l e l l l i e i
was
eoveied
by
Ii w a s n ' t u n t i l N o v
NKW YORK
(AP)-The
Albany
apparent
l*olice D e p a r t m e n t needs a s p e c i a l
\ug
u n i t t o help w i p e o u t i n t e r n a l c o r -
I h e c o m m i s s i o n also
the
vestigation C o m m i s s i o n .
mosphere p e r m e a t i n g the
commission
said
it
"corruption,
and
deficiencies"
had
the
Wrangcll-Sl.
F.litis
Comprises
National
14.2
million
acres.
the
I t
II. i l
student usstidmion
,-
.
_,
„„
.
tll.lt
the
(
, ol the Arctic National
mi prises 9.5 million acres.
14)
South
Yukon
Vilionnl
In
the
hleil
p a y . H i e s a l a r y o I the c h i e f , at 5 1 5 . 7 1 0 a n n u a l l y , afso is t o o l o w l o a t -
A l b a n y earlier this fall.
tract
in
he
decided
NOM I K W A * M A l I
PAGE EIGHT
111
', S
DMMWBBBWBBBBBHBI
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"utmost'
m e m b e r s of i h e Police I X ' p a r l m e n t
leadership
qualities
engaged
professional ahilities."
in
Luminal
burglaries
accepted
payoffs
violators and
acls
in
and
and
in-
with
proven
the
report
said.
from
committed
violation
of
their
gone
knowledge
on
ol
ihe
without
the
lui
command
of-
SCHOOL
ficers/' ihe r e p o i l a d d e d .
three
lop
commanders
report,
"revealed
a
ol
ARM
t o the
woeful
in-
d illerence o r lack ol k n o w l e d g e o l
has b a - u
PROBLEMS?
h a p p e n i n g in their
depailment lor many years, and a n
o b v i o u s d i s i n c l i n a t i o n l o r o c k the
Kiver-niarle)
I'a k. 11
Rive
million ;
EiriMel
may oiler RX via
overseas iraiRlm
I he i n t e r n a l a f f a i r s u n i t p r o p o s ed i n Ihe r e p o t ! w o u l d w a t c h o u t
l o i ",i n\ o f f i c e r s w h o a i c I i v i n y i n
j
Referendum on the Impeachment
C o m e I s.ill,HI
i
Starring- Maddy Isaacs & Anne Marie Marra
E
with
independence,
I
Hi,
Munchkin „ Indian Quad
Club
Assoc.
Coffeehouse - Sun., 12/2 8pm
CINE 1 2 3 4
someone
tegr i l y ,
"ft w a s a s t s o n i s h i n g lo hear that
HAVE YOU VOTED YET?
speu.i
. -.
\~A\™ Quad
n,,r,A Sk.nroom
QL-;«r™™ 25c with tax
Indian
50c wJfhout
more
starting
I h e commission's probe includ-
bo.it "
It is p u p u l a l w it11 b o t h
get
ed n i n e d a y s of p u b l i c h e a r i n g s i n
what
(.1) koFHik Sand Dunes National
I'aik Cum prises 1.5 million acres.
20-
policemen
Euromed w i l l assist qualified Amer-
sul,
Don't Cut Vour Weekend Short!
7:16, 9:15
Albany
t h a n t h e i r c u r r e n t S9.44K
the d e p a r t m e n t , a c c o r d i n g
link
from
I he c o m m i s s i o n s u g g e s t e d t h a t
major
4(M)-man
department.
Ihe
Uiu
at-
depart-
police officers.
" I h i s e v i d e n c e has r a i s e d s e r i o u s
<2>
political
t r i b u t i o n s had been s o l i c i t e d
dis-
ineffective
other
in
"unhealthy
m e n t " a n d sit i d i l l e g a l p o l i t i c a l c o n -
I n a r e p o r t released W e d n e s d a y ,
the
regular
criticized
r u p t i o n , a c c o r d i n g to t h e S t a l e I n -
q u e s t i o n s as l o w h e t h e r t h i s c o u l d
Park
of their
For the session starting Fall, 1974,
p i n s e i M i n i III s u p p o l t , ,1 i l l , silt,
pucn.l.
excess
and k n o w n sources o! i n c o m e . "
ican students in gaining admission
to
recognized
overseas
medical
schools.
1-1. w h e n h,
I C - r c a d .1 i i i e n i u l ' . i i u h n n
eoutl
150.-
Albany Police Needs Unit
;•.,.
mm
poena
••
wildlife
i c c a l l w h e i h , , iln
P r e s i d e n t , iilso a l a w \ e i
sation
coastal
(10(1 acres.
I hrlieliiiiau
He
acatlcrcd
p u b l i c t r u s t . " the report stated.
m l . m i s i n , m a i l s . m i l lew p e o p l e ,
niilina.
Wildlife
C o m p r i s e s a b o u t 7.8 m i l l i o n a c r e s .
other
acrc W i a n g e l l area, w h i c h
millit
actual
established
I n C a n a d a lasl v e a l i n the b o r d c i -
access "
final,
F o l l o w i n g i s a list o f a r e a s e n -
is
wi Iderness retreats a n d Ihe e o s t s o l
I,n
his
dangered:
acre
air
li.uel
submits
the A r c t i c a r e a ,
I he W r a n g c l l - S t .
the
make
III
Pa M i l
National
ComPLUS
have
I he t w o areas o l p a r t i c u l a r c o n -
opposite
Togiak
Refuge. C o m p r i s e s a b o u t 2 m i l l i o n
then future
stifle
lew
acres.
relugc areas, t o t a l l i n g a b o u t
.larcenies,
l a n d w o u l d n o t be b a n n e d . "
a n d Ihe G a t e s o l
Morton
l lie o b j e c t s o l i n tensive l o b b y i n g b y
ol
general in ns w o n Id h a v e a c h a n c e t o
would
Range.
National
Comprisesabout3.0million
(I 2) N o a t o k N a t i o n a l W i l d l a n d s .
covered
pipeline.
have
eon-
up"
In a d d i t i o n , t h e a r e a
both protectors and developers.
public
ment
this
to
and
lestncted-iise
"locking
lomiulated
a s s i g n m e n t s , a n d a r e c e r t a i n to be
economic growth through develop-
because-
areas,
have
use
we can
some
Neither
Alaskan
Morion
interest
lands
lies
l e g i s l a t o r s h a v e l i v e years in w h i c h
both
nonmulliple
management
"And
an
comit
r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s to Congress, the
* I lie 81) m i l l i o n a c r e s s h o u l d be
set
Arctic
National
Imutuk
prises 4 , 4 m i l l i o n acres.
leadership
Once
joint
for
is
that
nor
ed t r a n s - A l a s k a
park
of
lo
w i l l be split b y the n e w l y a u t h o r i z -
is
p l a n t o r m u c h o l the l a n d , a n d is
said
resources
area
fact
federal
A r c t i c areas.
Chris*
national
Wildlife
the
policies for c o o r d i n a t e d l a n d usein
report,
lor
natural
the
the
governments
with
d u s t r i a l i s t s see a vast p o t e n t i a l
"I
b\
park
a n o t h e r 80 m i l l i o n a c r e s o l
Alaska
late o f
the
area
to
and
for
wanted
a b o v e the A r c t i c C i r c l e .
in-
ol
minority
mittal reportscalling forprescrva-
and
State
opened
t i o n o l t h e land as a w i l d e r n e s s or
has
o n e n a t i o n a l p a r k , the a i e a
Ihe
and
i c e t e t i l i t i r t t i M n d e c o n o m i c uses.
o i r o a d s arc p e r m u t e d i n
area
1.4
p r e s e r v e i t as a w i l d e r n e s s a r e a .
sub-
mining
lavors a national p.uk
uiili
A
of
c o u n t r y , le.o nig the i c s t o l i h e l a n d
wtiilcn
exploration
development.
acre
Addition
s p l i t by
Commis-
I h e m a j o r i t y favored the 2
ment.
Mor-
t o n that n u i c h o l t h e l a n d be o p e n -
available
who
pioseculoi
to S e c r e t a r y
Use P l a n n i n g
m i n e r a l e x p l o r a t i o n and d e v e l o p -
Commission
management
ol i h e l a n d l o " t h e p i m l e g e d
2 * I n Mi,
the
make
is s u b j e c t l o several
e . n l i e i i b i s seal . w o u l d l i m i t t h e use
pioseculoi
lire
much
wilderness
the h i n d
sion.
i m p o r t a n t restrictions: no h u n t i n g ,
Direcloi
a p p e a l c d l o b e i n c n o i mas-rtirriiiie
thai
to
the s u b j e c t o f a 5-4 v o t e
the9-membcr
n i n g C o m m i s s i o n ; the t h i r d is t h e
Under the
Act. native
corporations
I h e Gates o f the A r c t i c area was
Shishmarif
Park.
(20)
Alaska
I he first w a s
(19)
m i l l i o n acres w o u l d
(I I )
land.
150 years a g o .
The
s t i l l b e e n o u g h t o c r e a t e o n e o f the
j o i n t f e d e r a l - s u i t e L a n d Use P l a n -
Russia
" m u l t i p l e use".
r e m a i n i n g Wi
the
natives the right to selcct40 m i l l i o n
giowlh.
the sub
provisions o f
acres o f A l a s k a n l a n d t o c o m p e n -
p.uks
on
other
for
Mildlife
about
EQdlands.
Wildlands
S e t t l e m e n t A c t , M o r t o n is t h e se-
disposition o f the land.
I he S e t t l e m e n t A c t g a v e
Service
Forest
Peninsula
Comprises
UkeClarkPassNationalPark-
final
t o the Congress o n
oppose
H u / h a r d t a l s o was q u e s t u n i c d .n
75,000
+14.000
Ait
hands o f I n t e r i o r Secretary Rogers
m i l l i o n in that area to the
Alaska
m i l l i o n acres.
C.B.
l . i i n e d i n Ihe l a n d
+110,000
in-
(lO)Yukon Rats National Wild life
Range.
Comprises about 7.5
milion acres.
no
(18)
Refuge.
for
I he
cuiiwi
ap-
other economic opportunities
i n A l a s k a since
f h e i e a i c m> b l a n k s m
from
National
Comprises
at least I I ' / J m J I i o n acres o f t h e 20
c o n v e r s a t i o n s the s u b p o e n a c m e i
<4M)
total.
and
m a j o r p a r k areas h a v e been c r e a t e d
l a t e r . " ILtere is n o q u e s t i o n i l i . i l i l i ,
W i l d l a n d . a b o u t 4.5 m i l l i o n a c r e s
acres.
em-
land developed, creatingjobs
surrounding
saul
(16) I anana. (17) I n n o l o N a t i o n a l
A b o u t 5.3 m i l l i o n a c r e s .
guarantee
Flats,
McKinley
is reportedly p l a n n i n g t o t u r n o v e r
intact.
such areas.
White
Secretary
Ml.
O t h e r n a t i v e s w o u l d l i k e t o see t h e
preserved
to
5.7
A b o u t 3.7 m i l l i o n
Lake lliamna National
only
HEM
pressure
to
(9)
Park Service
ml,!
1 0 . 0 0 0 . , , , , , •, t i r M E i W r k T i E M ' j >
Senior Citizens
&
fust
However,
Additions
National Park.
o n M o r t o n have been great, and he
or
area. L a n d under c o n t r o l o f t h c U S
Haig Jr.. Vtlnu
chief, w h o
un-
park
(7)
d u s t r y a n d the U S F o r e s t S e r v i c e
easier
couldn't
2.000
142.900
History
stall
he
areas
com-
drastic
developed
p a r k , w h i c h w o u l d m a k e it
testified
many
which
US
helping
cither
leaning
also
solution,
in the area
changei n their traditional lifestyle.
lands
was t h a t h e h a s b e e n w o r k i n g 16-
He
the
crowded and preserved, thus also
mm
liour days.
park
leave
l . n v i r o n n i c n la lists w o u l d l i k e t o
SAME
NEW
would
see t h e b i n d t u r n e d i n t o a n a t i o n a l
60.800
+11.864
struggle
M o r t o n ' s final recommendations.
that
9.100
79,500
fierce
Aleuts w h o were
M a n y t r i b a l l e a d e r s f a v o r the
ocurred
recall w h e t h e r it w a s the P r e s i d e n i
110.900
ol
when
conversations
+950
19.500
Islilute
remembering
4.100
43.129
a
has
divided.
b e t w e e n g r o u p s w h o w a n t t o see
Ihree
+15,000
ITEM
off
situation
dividuals w i t h homestead claims.
Ix
+12.184
Municipal Golf Course
Albany Port Commission
lo
24.544
NEW
This
is
the
hum
36.635
C o m m u n i t y Ueauulication
Albany
Haldcman
and o t h e r
SAME
450.000
Hleceker S t a d i u m
trouble
touched
it.
r i g h t s a n d the rest w i l l go t o i n -
President
H e said t h e r e a s o n he w a s h a \ mg
S w i m m i n g Pools
of
terms
might
have c a u s e d an 1 8 - m m u l e segment
ILK.
make
to
C u r r e n t l y the p r o b l e m is i n t h e
" I don't have a g o o d recollection
versation
NI'U
who
of N o v . 14. t o t h e t i m e he r e p o r t e d
nolT'Ben-Venistc
asked.
Civic
in federal
A n d . he s a i d , t h e r e w e r e some
:
later.
" D i d the P r e s i d e n t o r Cien. H a i g
infer you should
j r e m e m b e r w h e n he may h a v e been
the c o u r t i m m e d i a t e l y r a t h e r t h a n
asked
Hu/hardt.
"No."
the possibility o f a
group
National
(14) K o y u k u k . (15) K a n u t i
Park.
present
things about
Monday,
(6) K e n a i F j o r d s N a t i o n a l
kimos, and
I case h a v e m a d e it h a r d f o r h i m to
third
Delta
Comprises about
C o m p r i s e s about 400,000 acres.
C l a i m SetUement Act o f 1971, and
Ihe
(l.3)Yukon
Wildlands.
m i l l i o n acres.
A
i
19 he t o l d H a i g he
800.000 acres.
would
a n d c o n v e r s a t i o n s he h a d f r o m t h e
B u / h a r d t said that on
National
approximately
m i n e r a l a n d sheep h u n t e r s .
meetings
t h a t t h e gap
Crater
Comprises
National Park
told him some things.
questioned
Aniakchak
Park.
T h e s e are t h e n a t i v e A l a s k a n s , E s -
j
about
by John Christ
( C P S ) U n d e r the Alaska Native
hum.
Nov.
prosecutor
says t h a t thb l o n g d a y s h e has been
court
closely
White
Buzhardt
(5)
Environmentalists, Developers, Natives
Clash Over 80 Million Alaskan Acres
i p u t t i n g i n o n t h e W a l e r a g t c tapes
j
" D i d s o m e b o d y tell y o u not t o
[ special
(AP)
.1. F r e d
t i l e t a p e was o b l i t e r a t e d b y a s t e a d y
for
conversation
lawyer
':
Ben-Veniste
tapeofa
President and
13 m i n u t e s
WASHINGTON
i; H o u s e
of
Hu/hardt
• a b o u t five m i n u t e s a t the start o f
I the
an a d d i t i o n a l
[
i
Miss
t h o u g h t she h a d d o n e w h i l e t r y i n g
• p l a i n the 1 8 - m i n u t c gap in one o f
Following is a breakdown of the proposed 1974 city budget.
ITEIVLi
Common Council
City Court
Police Court
Traffic Court
Mayor's Office
Comptrollei's Office
Treasurer's Office
City Clerk's Office
Purchasing Department
Board o f C o n t r a c t
&
A ssessment & Taxation
Corporation
Counsel's
Civil Service
C i t y Engineer's Office
Buzhardt Never Asked
budget contains millions of dollars
]
j
Polls Are Open Until 3 PM Today
j
Campus Center Main Lounge
*
*
!
*
j
State and Indian Quad elections are being held on those Quads J
during dinner hours.
State Quad residents will elect one University
i
Senate member. Indian Quad residents will elect one Central Council i
free
^ d coffee
onuts
•RIDAY, NOVEMBER :.(), I' 1 /
of President Nixon
I
memDer.
KH1DAY. NOVEMBER 30, 1973
And that's just the beginning.
Since the language barrier constitutes
the preponderate difficulty in succeeding at a foreign school, the Euromed
program also includes an intensive
12 week medical and conversational
language couise. mandatory for alt
students. Five hours daily, 5 days per
week (1216 weeks) the course is
given in the country where the student
will attend medical school.
In addition, Euromed provides students with a 12 week intensive cultural orientation program, w i t h
American students now studying medicine in that particular country serving
as counselors
Senior or graduate students currently
enrolled In i n American university are
eligible to participate In the Euromed
program.
For application
information,
and
further
phone
(516) 746-2380
or write,
Euromed, Ltd.
170 014 Country M M
II Ml
funded hv .student association I M i m u l i , H.»
:
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
:
„«-.*»
PAGE NINE
. . .-..•. >::-.rt:.-tn'
.:..
£:ffi¥ftSSWAW8ftW:
Pot Not Harmful, Study Says
arts XJ leisure
Pass—Fail Fails
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 30, 1973
T w o studies on the long-term
effects o f marijuana and hashish
smoking have de term ined that over
a period o f years, smoking pot has
little or no ill effects.
T h e marijuana study, published
last month by Medical
Tribune,
wasconducted by Dr. Vera Rubin
of New Y o r k o n h e a v y p o t s m o k e r s
in Jamaica during 1970 and 1971.
Rubin concluded there are n o ill
effectsphysica'ly, mentally, or
psychologicallyfrom
heavy
pot
smoking over a period of years.
Rubin studied 30 non-smoking
if
Jamaicans, and 30 others who had
smoked the equivalent of 17 joints
a day foran average o f 17 years. A
second team o f researchers, who
were not told which g roup was the
control group, gave all the subjects
various mental, physical and psychological tests. This team found
that long term marijuana smoking
does not: cause any changes in
blood pressure or heart activity;
show any evidence of brainactivily
changes induced by pot smoking:
cause any significant personality
differences between smokers and
Get your Volkswagen
pointed FREE!
mental or physical changes.
The study was financed by the
National
Institute of Mental
Health ( N I M H ) with a $158,000
grant, and was turned over to the
Institute in February, 1972. The
fact that the report was not released until last month created speculation that the report had been suppressed. An NIMH -spokesman
responded saying. "That suggestion, if you'll pardon the expression, is BS." He explained the
reason for the delay was. "because
the press showed very little interest
in it." The spokesman conceded,
however, that if the report had c o n cluded that marijuana had harmful
effects, then " s o m e b o d y high in the
Nixon a d m i n i s t r a t i o n would h a v e
announced the findings the next
day."
Hie hashish studs was performed in Greece h\ Dr. ('.
Stcfunis of the Alliens National
Medical School. Stelanis selected
31 men w h o had smoked an
average of eight g r a m s ol hashish
daily over a period ol 1') years.
You can earn easy money, every monlh during school,
for doing nearly nothing. Beetleboards of America will
paint your car FREE, in incredible fashion, and pay you
for driving it around as usual. That's practically all there
is to it. For the full story, write immediately lo:
Beetleboards of America, Inc.
Or Call
778S Sunset Blvd.
(213)876-7517
Los Angeles, California 90046
Collect
%
«
•:•:
;§
!•:•
;i;i
g.
:jl;
:•;•
j:j:
•:•:
8
:•:•
;•;
;•;•
A recent survey indicates undergraduates with more than 10
pcrcen t of their courscsgraded on a
pass-fail basis will be disadvantaged when applying to graduate
and professional schools.
According to the
Educational
Record, the survey also indicated
students with a majority of passfail courses will also face difficulties in transferring to other
schools, obtaining financial aid,
and finding employment.
I he pollol' 2 0 0 graduate schools.
50 law schools, and 50 medical
s c h o o l s showed that a d m i s s i o n s
directors feel evaluation of passfail is "extremely difficult if not
impossible."
x';
:•:•
¥:
•;•;
:•;•
¥:
Si:
•j;
:•:•
%
:••:
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;:•:
$
:•:•:
;£
"I he greater the p r o p o r t i o n ol
the students' record which is
reporled in terms ol a nontraditional grading system." the
lUlucutional Record reported, "the
greater the potential lor difficulty
in entering a n o t h e r institution."
I he majority of u n d e r g r a d u a t e
institutions have some form ol
non-traditional
grading
and
students who utilize these systems
generally like them bin "when
more than ID percent ol a student's
grades are non-traditional, he o r
she
is likely
lo
experience
problems."
non-smokers; or produce any other
After subjecting the men to 10.
medical and EEC! tests. S t e l a n i s
c o n d u d e d there w a s very little
evidence ol medical changes in any
of the 31 men. What I ittle c h a n g e
there was. Stelanis speculated, may
have been due lo the fact that all
the subjects were heavy alcohol
drinkers and tobacco smokers.
S t e l a n i s also discovered
I he
wives ol thesuhjectssaid Ihey liked
their h u s b a n d s belter when their
husbands were stoned.
g:
I he survev revealed that when
•:•: law schools are laced with a largely
pass-fail record, they rely heavily
on Law School Aptitude Test
( L S A T ) scores to determine a
student's aptitude. G r a d e point
averages based upon a combination of the traditional and pass-fail
grading are regarded as inflated,
according to the survey. A statem e n t by the LSAT" Council un
Pass-Fail G r a d i n g Systems said
grade point averages based on a
c o m b i n a t i o n o l grading sisicins
"seem to overstate in a compound
way the student's genera I academic
ability and achievement."
Medical school udmi.ssion.scom
indices dislike pass-lail grading
due to the extra time involved m
reviewing applications, aceordiiie
lo Ihe survey. O n e admissions nl
Itcer n o t e d
Ihose submitting
transcripts with
non-lradilitmal
grades might be admitted, h u f w ill
probably
be
assigned
,i
probationary s i a l u s " Ik- added
I ha 1 such applicants "eiivminki
seriousdilficuhicsin compeling lm
financial aid where cnadidates aic
rated on the basis ol iheii giailc
poinl averages."
Nationwide admissions HIIKVIS
expressed general agiveiiienl with
Ihe survery's findings ami nuicd ..
p r e l e r e n e e l o r g r a d e d cuiusc woit,
Due al Harvard said. 'Tass-I.nl
grades. ..are ol no help in us \ \ .
don't even I n In i-i.iln.iii- ilicltl
| Evaluation of pass fail is
'extremely difficult'
Five Thousand Fingers of Fantasy
by Jeanne-Maria rarest
The cinema of ihe fantastic,
movies that arc meant to awe you
and solicit the child in us. Hie
movie with more than t h e s t a n d a r d
a m o u n t of imagination o r the inexplicable
special el feet,
Ihe
cinema that I eaves you slack jawed
with marvel. II you like l o b e a m a z ed, the International Film G r o u p
h a s Iwo very crowded week ends
lor you: seven ol the lines! fantasy
films made in the past forty years
will be presented on \ o \ . Mi. Dec.
I. 2. 1 & X.
I-riday. N o \ . M). you are invited
to an evening ol dimensional
animation {stop motion a n i m a tion). Dimensional Animation is
thai vers special, special effect [hat
calls loi the painstaking Uisk nl
a n imating a three-dimensional
model and then integrating ii into
live-action loolage. It's the process
used to h h n g king
Katii> and
\fixht\ .loi' Young t o life. I h e two
lea Hires lo be shown are the work
t) I a n i m a t o r Kav ilarrvhauscn and
d i reel o r
Sal h a n
J u ra n .
I l a r r y h a u s e n . ihe modem master ol
dimensional animation, learned his
crali I rum (ieorgc Pal and Willis
O'Brien, the crcalot ol effects in
king
hong.
Ilarryhausen's 7th
I t>V(tt>i,i<f ,<w/i7v/</vvas the "sleeper"
ol ll>57. An adventure slury c o m plete u ilh evil magicians, magic
I . i m p s , i l i a g o n s . and ej clops
m o n s t e r s all brought
to lite
through
Ihe genius id
Kay
Ha ri v ha usen, I'irxf Men in the
M/IHII, made several years later, is
.i rat he i broad adaptation II.(i.
Wells' novel. An> liberties taken
.ne easilv loigiven in ihe laee ol
Ha i rv hail sen's stunning
effects
showing lite moon to he h o n e y combed uiih great crystal galleries.
/ /; s/ Men in the Maori will he
shown al *):)$ and ?ih I <<i</,s'<' •>/
Stnbiitf M 7~. 1 5 and I I , Iwo (Icoige
I'.i I I'uppelonn shorts circa the late
Itirues w ill be shown to round out
die evening. I his p r o g r a m will be
in I C I
Sal. Dee I. II (i brings back the
WW version ol The Wizonloj
Oz.
Mere is the lilm thai everyone
thinks ol when i h e g e n i e ol lanlasv
is mentioned. I h e film features
J u d y U i r l a n d , Ray Bolger, J a c k
Haley, Bert l.ahr. Frank M o r g a n .
Margaret
Hamilton and
The
Singer Midgets as the you-knovvwhats.
Everyone has seen the
lilm on television, but it's a brandnew experience lo see it with a large
audience. Last year's midnight
screening ol the film was a
legitimate blast. Ihe lilm will be
shown al 7:3(1, ll):00and Midnight
in I C IS.
S u n Dee. 2 is something else
again. I v e r v h b d v has seen ihc'.'W
Wizard nl ()z. hm almost no one
has seen the original silent version
made in l l >25. A s a m a t t c r o l l a d ,
lew even knew it existed. I he lilm.
winch lakes a totally different
direction than Ihe '19 version, was
directed by silent comic Larry
Sen-ton and lealUres a east including Oliver llardv prioi to his
teaming Willi Stan Liurel. I his
rare and remarkable lilm will be
piesenled with a new musical score
using the music ol C o p l a n d .
Williams.
Miihlei and
Hoist
a m o n g o t h e r s ' 1 he score has been
piudueed lor the occasion by I K i
co-chairmen Kenn Rabin and
J oseph
Dougherty.
Ibis
fascinating and different lilm will
be shown in I.C IKal 7:00and 9:00.
I n . Dec. 7 will see iwo views ol
s u r r e a l i s t i c film-making.
Jane
Fonda a p p e a r s in Roger Vadim's
shghilv se.Msi space odvssev. Harharclla. Ihe adaptation ol J e a n Claude Forest's I e I cr rain Vague
eomie strip was handled h\ ferry
Southern and lea lures Marcel
Ma icenu .is a rathet contused
scientist and David H e m m m g s a s a
less than competent revolutionary
as well as the pie-hheralion .la ne
londa.
Ihe highlight ol thai l n d a \
evening w ill be ihe neglected
masierpeiee. I hi live Hum saint
lingers ol Ih. /'. A film withall the
ehaml and w n o l ihe 'W Wizard of
():. Dot lot I went i ighl over the
heads ol evervhodv and his b r o t h e r
when released in IV53, ll is a
strange and wondimis lilm, ex-
isting on a number of levels; only
t o d a y is the film developing a
following. Just a s the n a t u r e of
Depression America shaped the
1939 Wizard into the kind of escapist film it i s , s o d i d the nature of
America in ihe early fifties find its
reflection in Doctor 7",v script by.
n p n e other than. Dr. Seuss. On the
surface we have a charming little
fantasy a b o u t a small boy who
doesn't want lo play the piano. He
falls asleep while d o i n g his lesson
and d r e a m s about being locked up
with live hundred other reluctant
kids in a gigantic and grotesque
music a c a d e m y run by his p i a n o
teacher. Dr. lerwilliger. In the
dream. Icrwilligei (played lo the
hill b\ Hans Conreid) becomes a
maniac bent ol fulfilling
one
d r e a m : seeing his thousand hand
piece lor piano performed by the
Happed voungsters on ihegigantic
lerwilliger Happv
Lingers Institute keyboard. All f i n e a n d d n n dv and a great deal of Inn, but
something more. too. ihe speech
and lee! ol the lilm come out ol the
lilties a n d have a strange sense ol
"grown-up" tear and paranoia
a h o u l them I he boy tries lo gel his
"hero-lather figure" lo help him in
his hghi against lerwilliger, but
the said " h e r o " is t o o busy installing sinks to get involved a n d .
anyway, it's Dr. 1 who's paying
him lo install the sinks in ihe first
place. Ihe fifties head comes up
when the hoy realizes the only way
to destroy Dr. I is with something
"A tonne."
II //je five thousand I-tn£i-i-M>t
Doctor I is |iisl a kids' movie, then
D o a Siegcl's Invasion ol the liodv
Sno.liters
is jusi another sci-fi
mov ie Harharvlia will he shown at
7 I Sand I I and Ihe five
Thousand
htiRtrs ol hi / a t 9:15, all in LC
IX
I he final lilm id the set is George
Fal's a d a p t a t i o n ol |l.(i Wells'
//JC Iinic Machine, Ihe I960 lilm
won thai > e a i \ \ c a d e m y Award
lor Special I Meets and will be
presented al M idnighl onl) on Sal.
Dee. X in I C IK
Yellowbricking on the way to Oz: Bert Lahr, Judy Garland, Ray
Bolger and Jack Haley.
Mischievous Melodies
for Albany
IK p o p u l a r d e m a n d , Albany's
own Stanley H u m m e l will be playing two eoiicerts with the Albany
Symphony Orchestra on Friday.
l)ecenihcr 7ih al I roy Music Hall
and S a t u r d a y . December Kth al t h e
fVilace Lhealre. Both concerts will
he al 8:30 I'M. I w o seasons ago
when Hummel played with the
Albany S y m p h o n y , the concert
was sold out. Mr. H u m m e l will
play ihe Rachmaninoff Piano C o n ceito No. y which he prepared lor
ihe composer as a student al the
Julliaid School.
Hummel, who has made his
ivonie in A Ibnnv. has pei lormed
:oneerlsall over the world. In Fulopc in 197 I. he played in L o n d o n ,
v ienua, A m s t e r d a m and Brussels.
iceeiv ing glow ing rev lews praising
his rich laie.nl and sensitive inlerprclalions.
Mr. H u m m e l h a s peilormed
w ilh such o r g a n i / a l i o n s a s the New
Yin k Philharmonic. I h e National
Syinphonv O r c h e s t r a , the Julliaid
Orchestra and the C h a t a g u q u a
festival Orchestra. He h a s played
,ii Carnegie Hall three limes and
has piesenled ten l o w n Hall C o n certs.
His repertoire is made up ol the
standard literature, as well as much
present dav music. It includes the
eomplcicwork ol C h o p i n , of which
lie has made a specialty. Mr.
Hummel leaches piano in our area,
md he and his w ile and daughter
reside in Delniar.
Ihe program will be conducted
n Julius Hegvi and will also include D v o r a k ' s "New
World"
S\ in phony and Schciliin'sConcei1M loi Orchestra. Ihe Schednn
C o n c e r t o loi Orcheslia includes
m a i n Russian lolk melodies and is
subtitled "Naughlv 1 uneiieks" oi
••Mischievous M e l o d i e s "
h e k e l s loi ihe Deeemhe. 7ih
a n d Mh conceits are available al
S.1 Ml). S4 U(), ,\m\ SS 01) and also
Sb (III |,n Mbanv onlv l o timet
U ' k c i s oi loi luiihei i n l o m i a l i o n .
call i h c A l b a n v S v n i p h o i n a t 4 d 5 •t? SS Dt wnte enclosing voui check
and
se 11 -ad d i essed , s t a m p e d
envelope to ihe Mbanv Svmphonv
Oiehesii.i
19 ( Lin ton Avenue.
\lh.iiiv New W i k i::i)7
Exhibitionists
Take Note
^jP'
p*8"
Send
to:
The
Navy
U . S . NAVY
111 Washington Ave
Albany, NY 12210
PAGE TEN
ss
I lu I n . u - w u \ i l I i.i!li-l\ n.i.
H I J I I , uiul. I»,l\ IMI .1 S|.imi: , -.
Illhl
l l . u k , Ii
I ,,•]. :•'. - I i
hihiiitm il.iti-, « i l ; IH \|iiil | I
s
iliniiittli M.i\
l'»'l \ . i . n i l i i n t i i i
I)..mill
\liii-h.iii, ilu- |iaJlci>'s
lIllClllM. Ilk- IlilllKnCnillji ,-\hiliiUun w ill IK- MIL III si nl n 4 nul un
Ilk- \lll,IM\ ( .1111 [HI -. IX-..11ISI- II « ill
lx- iijvn 1" .ill •.iiiik'ius.iiiiiwill ..j
linu-d.
Aeroplane Rides!
TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR A FREE DEMONSTRATION FLIGHT IN|
A MODERN SPAD--THE NAVY T-34 .
SEE THE NAVY INFORMATION TEAM ON
CAMPUS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY
4
I llllll's Mil I 111' UlR' 111 llll- I IIIMIMI> \ n l..ilk'i> In \ | i n l I I IKS
will he iiuictl In Iwu iinislsa man
.nut .i w o m a n , limn the C a p i t a l
DisliiL-i Any simlcnt who was at
Slate
I'nneisiu
al
Albany
DEC. 1973,
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 197 <
King of the Palace: B.B.King, thai Is.appearingal Ihe PalaceTheaJreon Friday, December 7
In l i i , H I \ii|||i,l Jd. I')'t.inil \piil
I I ' l l , , liviihlc MI Mihinit a n enii , I ni'k-Mii.n IH iii.illini'ili.i..ii •
IHU' in Mi M u i h u n . and a
I
nl t all I HI I n u n ' s Ini 111 mil
In .ii.nl.iMi' ,ii Ilu- ii.illi'ii alii'i
l.imi.iii IS. I')74
\ let'L'ptiuii Un ihnsi- siuili'iii aril sis u hi isi' IUII k u ill heineluded in
ilu- exhibition u ill he held An ayt-'tln-hc decided date dining the first
p.II i ol ihe exhibition period.
|-,n lurlhei inhuniaiion please
call: Donald M o c h o n . Nancy I.iddie, l-nincoisc Yohalem, o r J o h n
Wismewslii. 457-3375.
preview/ans/preview/arts/preview/ahs/preview/ans/preview/arts/preview
Contest Rules
m®
Bridge
Puzzle solutions m u s t be s u b m i t t e d to t h e A l b a n y Student
P r e s s office (CC 334) by Monday, 12 n o o n f o l l o w i n g the Friday
that the puzzle a p p e a r s .
WSUA 6 4 0 I
Tricks and Trumps
Si,
Friday, Nov. 30
Saturday, Dec. 1
University Art Gallery: presents
G r a d u a t e Exhibitions.
T h e a r t of S a n d ford L a n g b a r t , W a l t e r L i p k a , A l v e r a
Nielson, Gregory Price, and Jerome
International N i g h t s p o n s o r e d by the InternationalStudentAssooiationin theCC
Ballroom at 8 PM
Tierney c a n be seen e v e r y d a y M o n . t h r u
F r i . , 9 - 5 , a n d S a t . & S u n . f r o m 1-5, u n t i l
D e c e m b e r 16
C o n c e r t : Cymande
a n d Kool and the Ga ry
p r e s e n t e d by t h e E O P - S A in t h e G y m ,
starting at 8 PM
C o u n t r y d a n c i n g : w i t h Fennings
AllStar
String
Band,
sponsored by the Eighth
Step Coffeehouse. T h e s t o m p i n g begins
a t 8:30 i n t h e T r i n i t y M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h ,
215 L a n c a s t e r S t . , 4 3 4 - 1 7 0 3
College of St. Rose: p r e s e n t s
Another
Pretty Face a t 9 P M i n t h e C S R C a m p u s
C e n t e r . 471-5102
Indian & Dutch Quad: p r e s e n t a t h r e e - w a y
Battle
of the Bands,
with Monolith,
N e v e r m i n d , and Neon Park. T h e action
b e g i n s a t 9:00 i n t h e CC B a l l r o o m . 75<f
w/tax,$1.25 w/o
L e c t u r e : The Gay Experience,
presented
b y t h e S U N Y A G a y A l l i a n c e in L C 2 a t 7
PM. Interested folk w e l c o m e
Performing Arts Center: presents An
Evening
of Chamber
Music b y t h e S t u d e n t E n s e m b l e a t 8 3 0 i n t h e R e c i t a l H a 11.
Free
Sunday, Dec. 2
Rafters
Coffeehouse: presents
the
t r a d i t i o n a l a n d c o n t e m p o r a r y folk m u s i c
of R a y A n d r e w s ' b a n jo a n d g u i t a r . B e g i n n i n g a t 8 P M i n t h e C h a p e l H o u s e . 4898573
U n i v e r s i t y A r t G a l l e r y : presents a recept i o n f r o m 3 to 5 P M in t h e g a l l e r y f o r t h e
c o n t r i b u t o r s of Graduate
Exhibitions.
All
welcome
P e r f o r m i n g A r t s Center: p r e s e n t s the
Boston
Symphony
Chamber
Players
s t a r t i n g a t 3 P M in t h e M a i n T h e a t r e . $1
w/tax
Name, address, phone n u m b e r and s o c i a l s e c u r i t y mini be
m u s t appear on your solution.
Puzzle s o l u t i o n s will be d r a w n at r a n d o m u n t i l three correct
jsolutions have been chosen.
iEach of the three w i n n e r s will be e n t i t l e d to a $10 gift certificate to the c a m p u s bookstore. Certificates m u s t be claimed
Iwithin two weeks of notification.
No one w o r k i n g on or f o r t h e A l b a n y S t u d e n t P r e s s is eligible
to win.
Only one solution per person accepted.
Timetable
Off Campus
'
'
21
20
•
28
2<t
38
48
55
Cine 1234 (459-8300)
T h e V o y a g e of S i n b a d
F r i . 7:15. 11:00
Eagles over London
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00. 9:00
1st M e n in the M o o n
Kri. 9:15
The Sex Shop
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:45. 9 « 0
1939 W i z a r d of O z
S a t . 7:30, 10:00, m i d n i g h t
Executive Action
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:15, 9:15
1925 W i z a r d of O z
S u n . 7:00, 9:00
|Mbany State Cinema
FelUni's R o m a
F r i . 7 3 0 . 9:30
T o w e r East
That D a m Cat
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 9:15
H e l l m a n (459-5300)
A m e r i c a n Graffiti
F r i . a n d S a t . 6:00, 8:00,
10:00
L a d y S i n g s the B l u e s
F r i . a n d S a t . 9:35
Circle T w i n (785-3388)
Hell House
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00
Last American
F r i . a n d S a t . 8:45
P a p e r Moon
F r i a n d S a t . 7:15, 9:10
M a d i s o n (489-5431)
Delaware (462-4714)
T h e D o n is D e a d
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 9:00
Frenzy
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:30, 9:30
F i s t s of F u r y
F r i . a n d S a t 8:40
A M a n Called Horse
Fri. and Sat. midnight
T r i p l e Iron
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 10:15
(A I den berry
Suspicion
F r i . 7:00
PAGE2A
Cinema 7 (785-1625)
T h e W a y We W e r e
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:00, 9:30
T o w n e (785-1515)
31
51
32
•
33
}''
1*1 ^ • ' • -
1 •'>::<
•52
•
6 1*7
U*
53
HUH
57 I H 5 8
56
59
60
61
63
66
64
Soy lent Green
F r i . a n d S a t . 8:05
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Pass. You h a v e .10 s u p p o r t
lor p a r t n e r ' s su it. nor do you
have one of y o u r o w n . lie
happy t h u t y o u ' r e safe al the
one level.
Given the following h a n d .
what is y o u r lead alter each
set of biddin ;?
C Qxx
pa r
I'
dbl.
P
P a r t n e r ' s double is le
directing, and instructs you
to l e a d d i a m o n d s . He
probably h a s some combination of high diamonds and is
m a k i n g y o u r choice of lead
easier to m a k e . Seeing the
.lack of d i a m o n d s in front of
you on the table will bring a
smile to your p a r t n e r ' s lips.
opp.
111
•11J
(ill
vou
p
p
p
opp.
an
•HI
I'
part.
P
P
dbl.
u ncond i t i o n a lly ( leniands a lead of
d u m m y ' s first bid suit in this
ease d i a m o n d s . Si nee you
have lotud lainonds and y o u r
o p p o n e n t s h a v e e a e h nilPa r t n e r
s
bid
n o u n e e d a g u i l d diamond
h o l d i n g . 11 m a k e s it probable
that purlin •1
suit
upp
1'
yoi 1
1'
2!M'l
P
IS VOU 1
in that
opp
III
:1NT
pari.
IS
P
1'
P
irse there
\l 1 tl s p a des.UI a n
IS 110 d u n !il U n i t a s p a d e is
your p r o | i e r p l a y , hut the
O p e n i n g Ld:
NORTH
x
4
(J ,lxx
0 A.I Ulxxx
AUK)
^
I
I
^American Indian!
iMusic,
I
&
t
I
2
SOUTH
4 Axxx
^KQxx
?KQx
* xx
¥
Poetry,
%
and Prose I
ft
i from 9 until midnight
(solution ^ivon next week )
9fC 3|C 3fC 3f€ 9{4 9|C &(-^ 3|C 9fC 9|C 9fC 9^C d\<^ 9|C 9|C
1
m
Contest
!
Winners j
tThis Week:
Mitchell Kleinrock i
I
"Is SASU
1
a Rip-off?"
Kathy Kuczynski j
Debra Braverman J
,;.v.
!
w
63
67
70
Fact and Fantasy
?l
fly EDWARD J U L I U S
:&: Produced by
Ted Liban
DOWH
F i c t i o n a l Captain
5. Decrees
10. P r i c e
14. Ameche Role
15 Meat Jelly
16 And Others (abbr.)
17 Miss Fitzgerald
18. Beyond Usual Limit
19. Throw
20. Rod
22. Geometric Pigure
24, Terra
26,
Pao
27. Velvety Singer
30. Set ABide (2 wds.)
35. Foreigner
36. Accounting Term
37. Late 0o]' Great
38. Spanish Aunt
39. Relevant
42. Cistern
"*3. Light Tan
45. Impecunious
46. Pormer Yankee
48. Designate Again
50. A Craving
51. At Bats
52. Shout of Joy
54. In Proportion (2 'da,)
58. Mean Coward
62. Highway Part
63. Measure of Light
65. Sundry Assortment
66. Pencing Sword
67. Troup Encampment
6 8 . On Top of
6 9 . Await D e c i s i o n
70. Types
71. High-speed J e t s
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
B.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
21.
23.
25.
27.
28.
20.
31.
32.
33.
34.
36.
40.
41.
44.
47.
49.
50.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
64.
Burrows and F o i t a s
Succor
Therei S p .
Woman1 s Name
Bad T e n n i s S e r v e s
S m a l l Landmass
Fitting
Make Weary
Onion
Of t h e Back of the hyOn
S o v i e t News Agency
In Addition
C a r r y i n g Out
Cover
Type of Payment
Dolorosa
Mrs. Kramden
P o p e ' s Crown
At a D i s t a n c e
and F i e l d s
P i l e Up
Luxury V e s s e l
Amphibian
New T e s t a m e n t L e t t e r s
Group C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s
S e i z e d and Held
Loud and D i s o r d e r l y
Health Resort
Barons
Highly S k i l l e d
P r i v a t e School
S e x u a l Crime
Portent
Car
Mountain Range
Violent Disorder
P u t s On
Damage
Solution to Previous Puzzle
sP
c AL
A
SQB2 11 xxx D JlOxx
opp. you
opp.
III
I'
311
•INT P
51)
(ill
I'
1'
lead of the Queen s u g g e s t s a
doubleton or p o s s e s s i o n of
the .lack. T h e 2 u s u a l l y
g u a r a n t e e s three c a r d s headed by an h o n o r , which is incidentally, e x a c t l y the information you wish toconvey to
partner.
As South of the hand
below, how do you realize
nine tricks after the following bidding?
N
S
W
10
3D
I'
dbl.
IS
P
:1NT
65
I
I N 0 Z A
L I B E R
L T 0 I, n
Bom QiacioH amaara
Westworld
F r i . a n d S a t . 6:45, 9:45
In each ease y o u a r e S o u t h
with the following h a n d s and
bidding s e q u e n c e given.
What do y o u b i d ?
1H
dbl.
?
1) S x H 9 x x x x x D A x x C J I O x
4 H . T h i s bid will sever c o m m u n i c a t i o n s between y o u r
opponents a n d will m a k e it
hard tor them to a s s e s s their
combined v a l u e s with a n y
degree of c e r t a i n t y . T h e contract h a s e x c e l l e n t c h a n c e s
of m a k i n g .
2) S Qx H A K x x D Qxx C
AJlOxx
Redouble. T h i s is the only
s t r e n g t h s h o w i n g bid a l t e r a
double. The m i n i m u m p o i n t
range for this c a l l is 10 pts.
Game is a c e r t a i n t y and s l a m
is not out of the q u e s t i o n . It is
still e a r l y in the b i d d i n g to
tell w h e r e y o u ' r e g o i n g , h u t
tile bid w i l l c o n v e y to p a r t n e r
the m e s s a g e t h a t you have
positive v a l u e s .
:i)S xxx l l x x DKQ.Ix C l()xxx
1 1
62
Colonie (459-1020)
Cabaret
F r i . a n d S a t . 7:30
23
N
19
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1)
"
H22
•*
•39
kk
12
25^«26
35
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29
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16
ACROSS
FG
,
8
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On Campus
'
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27
1 1nun
6
3
11*
•;ii
Movie
2
1
^Tuesday, Dec. 3rd
by H e n r y J a c o b s o n
UUUfcl UUUUU tJUBW
L i b u u u u u u u u aaiii
L i u t j u u u laoiaiMBiiam
Biama a m a a
UUU blUUWU UUUtUU
UUUUUUU
(JLIUUlUbJiJ
MUOIIJIJH
aaaaaaa
FH|L)AY
by B r i a n G r e e n
"By golly g o s h - a - w o w !
e x c l a i m s the uwn s t r u c k
a m a t e u r . "I s u r e wish I eon Id
m a k e alll those beautiful
moves yoa m a k e . How do
you do i t ? "
"Well, of c o u r s e it's m o s t l y
natural g e n i u s " you reply
smugly (wondering all the
while why y o u ' r e convei"
sing with such a weak p l a y e r
where s Boris or Bobby "•'
s o m e o t h e r ot y o u r g r a n d master friends'.', 1 , " b o m e ol
us h a v e it. and then s o m e
others
(y o u
glance
p a t r u n i/. i n g I ,y a t Ui u
amateu r) j u s t don't."
For better or for w o r s e , t h i s
l i t t l e s c e n e is o n l y a
daydream, albeit a common
one, of m a n y an a v e r a g e
chessplayer. Mostwish that
with o n l y a s m a l l a m o u n t of
effort they could a c h i e v e
e n o u g h p lay in g strc ngHi
that they could win n e a r l y all
their g a m e s . Alas - for the
m o s t p a r t it j u s t d o e s n ' t
happen t h a t w a y .
The fact is t h a t a l m o s t
everyone h a s to study to p l a y
well - and that finding t h o s e
beautiful m o v e s is n o t a
r e s u l t of n a t u r a l g e n i u s , but
ol thorough familiarity with
the t h e m e s of c o m b i n a t i o n a l
play. Happily, while a l m o s t
e v e ry o n e h a s to l e a r n ,
a l m o s t e v e r y o n e is able to
NoVfcMBER 30, 1973
l e a r n ; . i l l it lakes is a
mod icuni ol intelligence and
pa t i e n c e .
All c o m b i n a t i o n s are based on lorcing moves - a c h e c k
nr a c a p t u r e or a threat to
check r c a p t u r e . Your o p p o nent is forced to react to y o u r
move • he h a s 110 time for h i s
own p l a n s . Within t h i s
framework of forcing moves,
it h e l p s to be a b l e to
reeogn iv,e certain p a t t e r n s
that often a r i s e in the c o u r s e
of an a v e r a g e g a m e . For example, if y o u r o p p o n e n t ' s
King and Queen are on the
same diagonal, you should
look for w a y s to pin the
Queen with a Bishop. If that
situation is b r o u g h t about,
the Queen won't lm a able to
m o v e without e x p o s i n g its
own King and hence the
Queen will be lost. There are
several other patterns that
one should be familiar with:
'tn ight forks, double a t t a c k s ,
d i s c o v e r e d a t t a c k s , double
these I h e m e s ; in the com t h i s sou lids complicated.
I here a re s e v e r a l good b o o k s
on the m a r k e t that a r e just
filled Willi e x a m p l e s of all
check, r e m o v i n g the g u a r d ,
queen i ng combi nations,
weak back r a n k s , s k e w e r attacks . tni pped
me n,
/aig/Avang
( move compulsion), and weakened
castled p o s i t i o n s . If all of
para lively s h o r t time it t a k e s
to get t h r o u g h one ol them
you can become familiar
with all of the themes. Ajid
then you'll be at just about
the s t r e n g t h where you can
dream - ' G o s h " exclaimed
the a m a t e u r , " I s u r e wish...''
There is n o t h i n g e s p e c i a l ly brilliant about the following g a m e , b u t it interestingly
displays
many
comb m a t i o n a l p a t t e r n s in a comparatively few moves:
Brian G r e e n
Ed Fox
N-KB3
1. P-Q4
P-Q4
2. P-K3
P-KN3
a. B-Q3
B-N2
4. N-Q2
P-B4
5. P-KB4
O-O
fi. P-B3
UN -Q2
7. KN-B3
P-QH3
H N-K5
P-UN4
9. O-O
B-N2
10. Q-B3
U-N:I
11. I'-KN'I
NxN(u)
12. P-N5
N-Q2
13. BI'xN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Part i of an
;§ investigative report on the
pi:
Student Association
&
of the State University
m
:&:
14. K-IIHUI
15. u-iia
Hi. I ' K I U
17. l'-Kf>
1H. l-*xr'
19. N x P ?
20. PxN
21. B-K4
22. QxB
23. P-RB
24. N-115(f)
25. P x P ( g )
26. N-B6
27. Qli-Nl
2«. R-B3?(li)
29. K(l)-KBl(i)
30. QxQ
31. R x P
32. H-Q7 mid white
P-B5
l'-NS
P-K3!
P-Netc)
PxP
NxKP!
P-Q5(d)
BxB
PxP!(e)
B-lll
PxP
QxB
Q-N2
Q-B2
KH-B1
QxN
KxQ
BxP
resigned.
N o t e s - (a) a unputre a n d
coincidentally it knight fork,
(b) to remove the K from the
Maine d i a g o n a l a s the black Q
-e.g. 14. P - K H 4 P x P ; l 5 . KPx1",' N x P ! u p i n . B u t n o t i o B t h a t
the white K and U and the
black li a r c now all on the
siuiic d i a g o n a l . (c:| the real
c o m b i n a t i o n , id) a d i s covered attack and a pin. (e) a
zwi.schenspiel (in between
move) the white N is p i n n e d
to the NP. (1) t r y i n g to take
a d v a n t a g e ol Blcks w e a k e n ed castled position -he w a n t s
to play N-BB-K7 mate. ( g ) 2 5 .
N-Bfi? Q x N ; 2 f l . Q x Q P x R = Q 11 q u e e n i n g c o m b i n a t i o n ( h ) a
p r e m a t u r e d e s p a i r better is
2H. KR-B1 and 29. Q-N4 a n d
black will h a v e c o n s i d e r a b l e
difficulty t u r n i n g h i s e x t r a
pawn into a w i n . (i) if 29. R-QUI BxPI white h a s p i n n e d
his own knight!
Hopefully, this will improve y o u r c o m b i n a t i o n a l
play. T r y it o u t at the C h e s s
Cove open t o u r n a m e n t Dec.
1-2 in downtown Albany. Kor
information call 462-4442.
PAGE 3A
Natasha Bullwinkle
Never Knew
by Professor Clarence Brown,
Princeton University
The reputation of War and
feareprecedesiteverywhereandis
a part of polite literary folklore. It
is everyone's standard for the u n conscionably long novel, andit vwi s
natural for a New York radio stat i o n to make publicity f o r itself
during II fund-raising drive some
time ago by broadcasting, n o n stop, the entire text o f Tolstoy's
masterpiece. It seems strange that
alongside this rather uncomfortable reputation there should exist
another.that o f being the greatest
novel in the w o r l d . 1 must confess
to the help less banalty of suhscribi ng to this with as the Russians say.
both hands, though I. am aware of
how grudgingly Tolstoy applied
the term " n o v e l " to his work, A
great hater o f putting labels on
anything, above all on his own
creation, Tolstoy
wrote in a
characteristically Olympian note
thai War ami Peace could not be
classified under any of the conventional forms, but wasralher"Whal
the author wished and was able to
expressin the iorm in whichitisexpressed." Period. War ami Peace\
that is to say. is War ami Peace.
Well, not lo worry lurthcr the
question what i l is to be called, let
me stalesomeot the reasons for the
book's reputation. It is great first
of ;J I as a hook of characters. Fo r
psychological realism, Tolstoy is
unsurpassed in literature. The
tormented human creatures i n
Dostoevsky rema in forever in one's
memory.sure:, but it is difficult lo
imagine
R a sk o In ikov.
Svidrigailov. Ihc Underground
Man. or Ivan Kammazov apari
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ma mar
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from the worlds in which they are
portrayed, o r rather
portray
themselves. This is not true o f
Natasha, Prince Andrew, Pierre,
Nicholas, Boris, Anatole, Princess
Mary, and the other principal actorson Tolstoy's stage: theydonot
seem to be characters in a book at
all. and areas free from the confines
o f print as persons whom we have
known in real life. Strictly speaking, we know them a good deal
better than we know our actual acquaintances, lor in the case of the
latter, wearc sometimes ata loss lo
explain why they behave as they
do, bul no character o f War ami
Peace ever baffles the attentive
reader. To be sure, we may feel like
wringing our hands o r throttling
Natiish when she commits the
blunder o f her lite, leaving Prince
Andrew l o r the scoundrel Anatole
Kuragin. hul v e are not in Ihc
sligbtesl doubl why she docs i l .
Indeed, il'wedid not understand all
loo well, il would be hard lo account for ihc almost personal sense
o f betrayal thai every reader feels,
t a i l i n g Ihem. as I jusl d i d . "actors on Tolstoy's stage" poinls lo a
paradox that arises from the
always fruitful comparison with
Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky's novels
aregreal tragic dramasnol o n l y i n
conception and import but in the
quiieliier.il stage technique that he
employed l o r ihe const ruction o f
practically every scene. His novels
are performed, while ihose of
I olsloy are most emphatically
t o l d . And yet. such is Ihc graphic
power of I nlsloy'sstylethatit ishis
c h a r a c t e r s , n o t Ihose o f
Dostoevsky, whom we remember
as having perceived with that
VU&AYS wem'r}
nurrHTTUSTTV
^JrfoiTH£ON£limil
¥
¥
^eeie,G€TAHCLPOFvoiff
I—, self] rHIS IsWKHISLV m
W « « f SOME FANATIC
queen o f the senses, vision. H i s
prose docs not so much describe as
sculpt before our eyes a threedimensional living presence. A n
actorgiven the roleol'Kuluzov, the
stolidly patient old architect o f
Russia's salvation from Napoleon,
would scarcely need other directions than those Tolstoy himself
supplies at the moment when he
must lower his ponderous body,
heavy with ay: and weariness,
onto his knees before the holy icons
to pray for victory in the coming
battle.
Tolstoy omits no
meaningful gesture, and every
gesture tells,
would have it, interpreting, explaining, exhorting, rebuking, lecturingand theorizing, and arguing
the single great thesis ofthenovel
that the great men, the Napolenn:
and Alexanders, ordinarily deemed to be the masters and movers of
history, are in fact itsslaves. What
is commonly thought lobehistorythe battles, migrations, court i n trigues, dynastic marriages, etc.
etc.isa ctually tt lie dreamt up by the
most deceived and deceptive of
men, the accredited historians.
True history springs from the
myriad impulses and events in the
ordinary lives of men and women:
yelling married,havingtea, fearing
death, looking out the window,
hunting a wolf, drinking far more
than is good lor one. keeping an
eye of the servants .humoring aged
parents, sleeping, going to the
opera, musing on the existence ot
Godbut the catalogue, if were ever
finished, would amount to retelling
the story of the best-known
families in the world, the Kostovs,
the llolkonskys. the Kuragins, and
ihe otiters.
l o say thai I oltoy's novel is told
rather than performed remindsone
u l a character in the book who is
usually overlooked, though he is
there on every page: lolstoy
himself:
A knowledge o f his
biography, of course, reveals that
he distributed parlsol hisown psyche amongst several ot the personages in War and Feme, most
notably Pierreand PrinceAndrew,
but I am speaking now of the
Tolstoy whose voice is always in
our ear as the narrator of every
event.
He is massively there,
magisterially viotitling every canon
o f the novel as Flaubert or James
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This great thesis is argued
throughout the novel, in various
•interstices hetween the events o f
war and ihe scenes o f peace, with
Music for clarinet is scheduled
lor the Recital H a l l , Performing
Arts Center. Stale University ul
New Y o r k at Albany, when A n n
Rugh presents her senior recilal on
Sunday. December lJ at .1:1)0 M M .
Assisting her are A n n MeCiarry,
piano: . l a m lerguson. soprano;
and Raul Goldberg, cello. I here is
no admission charge.
II
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TRA FFIC
Mind
JOHN LGENNON
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Works to be perlormed are
St r u v i n s k y V I hrce Solo Pieceslor
Clarinei," Schubert's "Dei H i r t a u l
dem 1-elsen." and the ' T r i o in A
minor" by Hrahins,
Presently, a senioi at S U N Y A .
Ms. Rugh is the student nl Charles
lloito. She is the solo clarinettist
with ho lh the Albany
Little
Symphony and (he Universiiy('oinmunitySy nip In my Orchestra.
*,
• i1
*
*
i^^rWJW
I disconcert is sponsored by the
Music Department ol ihe Slate
UniveiMiy o l New York at Albany.
JOHN MAY ALL
Ton Yuan are Gono
A Specially Priced 2 LP Sal
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''state university of n e w
yorkat albany
u "II uu- a u I T
'ii a v u u u
f u n d e d by student associationthe o i l i e r f i l m g r o u p
Friday, Nov. 30
1ST MEN IN THE MOON
9:15
LC 1
plus:
George Pal Puppetoons
admission to each screening:
$.50 w/tax
$1.00 w/out
Next Week:
T H E C I N E M A OF T H E F A N T A S T I C
j
I
Sat., Dec. 1
7:30, 10 & Midnight
LC 18 j
LC 18
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1973
*
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iscount records
WIZARD OF 0Z
BARBARELLA, DOCTOR T, THE TIME MACHINE
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
, o»S«l»C
Mon. Thru Fri. 10-10
Saturday 1 0 - 7 Sunday 1 2 - 7
i
>n«»iia»ii«»>i«i»ii«Biii
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OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
The Very Rare 1925 version of j
7 &9
Gil BERT O SULLIVAN
I'm ii Wlilui Nul ii Fijihlut
MAM /
EVERY LP. CARTRIDGE & CASSETTE ON THESE
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Sunday, Dec. 2
THREE DOG NIGHT
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COLUMBIA* I I'K •MONUMI Nl ' • I ' l l II A 1)1 I .I'll IA 1M I I KNM'IONAl. • l-N I I l< l»K ISi: • S !'AX • V O L T * MCA*
C A I ' I I O I • A l ' l ' l I-•Sill I I M< • IIAK VI S I » ISLAND* AN< II-1 »A & M • Ol>l-•Mt;M • C'Hi;SS • C'MI-X'K I-R •
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UC*|)UNIIII I * H I Ul SWAY*IMI'UI SI • • ( I I • MOWI S I * KAMASUTRA* U N I * I'OLYDOR* Ml RCURY •
1939 WIZARD OF 0Z j
7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD
7:15 & 11 LC 1
PAGE 4A
*
STEREO TAPES
*
"Jewish-American
Students in the College
Environment JEWISH IDENTITY"
f i l m group
D I-CNIGHT
7 PMJ
l o l s t o y himsell. then, is ihe
great absentee o l any dramatization o f his book. Hut while ihis
strikes me as worth noticing, i r i s
also a measure ot the magnitude ol
War and Peace that il survives the
amputation of it.sau t h o r p tactically unscathed, such is ihe irresistible
richness ot ihc life that remains
even vv hen he is gone.
Rabbi Chazin
of Temple Ohav Sholom
Monday, Dec. 3rd 7:30 SS 259
the
*
SALE ENDS
SAT
¥
¥
¥
¥
increasing insistence, until it is
finally the subject o f an epilogue
that is an essay pure and simple,
without any participation from the
characters at a l l . Needless to say,
this element o f
WarandPeacedocs
not lend itself todramati/ation and
must necessarily hedispenscd with.
Hut i i cannot be omitted from
even the si ighlesl discussion o f the
books, lor in large measure it is the
book. Ucsides. as Auden said o f
Tolstoy's essay on art. one may disagree with his ideas, but having
read ihe book, one can never again
ignore ihe questions he raises.
Jewish Students' C o a l i t i o n - H i l l e l presents
"We've Got Magic To Do"
*
*
•PROGRESS^S^HHM^ffiS
fSemrrJoM MOM, MJOMOOWH/
\iene Yea?/ you HOTTA ^fif
TAW IT ALLUj- M
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STUYVESANT PLAZA
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489-8346
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letters
Quote of the Day
editorial/comment
"I have tried to explain it in everyway I can."
-Rose Mary Woods
President Nixon's personal secretary
in testimony before Watergate grand jury
To Cry Over Split Oil
Tenure: Round Two
T o the Editor:
Would y o u , were you able to do .so, take
CurtSmith will again be considered for tenure next month. In a final
drive toward demonstrating as much support as possible for Dr.
Sm ith, students have begun circulating petitions asking that President
Benezet grant him tenure. The reasons for denying him tenure
originally have never been clearly substantiated; indeed, the very
process of the rendering of tenure decisions has always been a cloudy
secret We urge all students to sign a petition and ask President
Benezet to grant tenure to Curt Smith.
The administration did not deny that Dr. Smith's teaching
recommendations were among the highest ever received. Instead, it
countered this by claiming that it was because Smith taught popular
courses. The Administration overlooked the fact that Smith also has
taught required English courses; but then, why is it a crime for a
teacher's courses to be popular anyway?
The Administration claimed that Dr. Smith's research was not of
such caliber as to qualify him for tenure. Disregarded this time were
the positive evaluations of his work by outside sources; and the Administration added that the number of Smith's publications was not
sufficient. It refused to countat least oneof Smith'sworks inhis total
of publications and attempted to denigrate others as merely papers on
science fiction. Whether the Administration of SUNY Albany has
final say on what is and what is not true literature has not yet been conclusively determined.
For a teacher to be reconsidered for tenure, he must present
"substantial new evidence" in his behaff.Exactlywhatthismeans has
not been made clear. Yet since hisinital considerationfortenure, Curt
Smith has published two more articles and been solicited for a third.
This would appear to constitute significant new evidence in Smith's
favorand make somewhat less tenable the Administration's claim that
his research is insufficient. But then,if the Administrationdidnotgive
full consideration to his former research, why should they want even
more?
Thequestion of tenure goesdeeper than the denialof continuing appointment to one teacher. For the Senate can pass any resolutions it
wishes, all the committees in the University can make any recommendations they desire, but the final deciaon is in the hands of one man
only-President Benezet. The powers of all other bodies are only advisory, and thus, in the end, non-existent. And so we urge President
Benezet, the only man who has the power, to grant Curt Smith tenure,
and urge the students to sign the petitions so that our voices will not be
ignored. Students must have some say in the tenure system, and as of
now, this is the only way for our in flue nee to be felt. Another teacher at
this University was granted tenure largely because of strong student
support. Students must begin to take part in the Administration ol
their school; we must let the President know that decisions about the
future of the school cannot be made by him alone.
Students today have a chance to influence not only the final considerationof CurtSmith, but theentire lenure system of theUniversity.
If our voice is heard in one case, it will not be so easily ignored in
another. The tenure system can be made more equitable, but only
if the students take part in achieving that goal.
IANY
ANN
KDITOH IN CHIEF . . . .
\SMS1AN1 i n Till H i m OK
Ntw.s KUIIIIH . . . . . . .
Assoc IA II. Nl ws KUIIOHS
r i Ai li^
HENNtrri
D A V I D t I KNI K
I, 1>A VI M'AHKlkNOKK
Ol INN VON NOSIII/
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Assoi i A i i AH is Km iOR
Scorns
V.. BUNKER
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ASSOC I A I I S F O H I S I 1)11 OH
I INI1A M ' I.I?
A D V I K I I S I M . MANAC.IH
ASSOC I A II AllVIMIISINC,
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I ' M I.A S H U I O B
( I ASS1MII) AOVtHIISINC. MANAC.MI
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Assoc i A u I K IIMI AI. KDIIOH.S
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AfiviKiiMM. PRODUCTION
ASHIlt
CINDY H U N N H I , Smm.A SC.MI.NKI.IN
(JAHV SllSSMAN
PtioiocHAfiiv EDITORS
Ron MAONII-.N, JAY KOSBNIIMIU
O l K OMIC I-..S AHfcUK All DIN CAMPUS O.NII-.H 326 AND 134 ANIJOUH I'11 ONUS AKfi 457- 2 I')() AND 4572194
Wl A HI". I'AKIIAl.l.Y I I NIJHt UY I KI SlUHI.NI
ASSOCIATION
Every year 5million Ions o I oil are injected
into the ocean from all sources and 4 5'/f of
this discharge stems from ship operations.
Each time an oil t a n k e r takes on cargo, it
must empty its ballast t a n k s o l water to make
room for the oil. Because the oil tanks are
filled with water when the oil has been unloaded, a n d the water must be discharged
when oil is again taken o n , oil residue is
Hushed o u t with the discharged water. Ibis
residue can a m o u n t t o l ' 7 ol the total capacil y o f t h e s h i p . According to the 1970studyol
Critical Environmental Problems, there are
over 3,500 operational tankers ol 1,000 tons
or more. As a result ol routine oil flushing
operations, 530,000 metric tons of oil are
Hushed into the sea annually What is more
shocking is the tact that 207; of the tankers
discharge 90''< ol the nil. I he remainingKO 1 <
ol the tankers lake precautionary measures
to insure cleaner discharge.
(&? tmtut t&lftjtyt
Oil spills resulting from t a n k e r casualties
amount tolH'/nof tanker genera ted spills, yet
neither the international Convention lot the
Prevention Pollution I mm Ships. 1973, nor
present international agreements require the
use of collision avoidance or maneuverability features which could reduce o r ev en avoid
this IS'.'t accidental spillage.
CREDIBILITY
GAP
1
l A Young View of Washington
^Operation Candor': Nothing NewJ
:::•:•:*:*:*
President Nixon h a s retreated to what this
reporter regards a s perhaps o n e ol his last
l i n e s ol d e l e use a g a i n s t
eon turning
revelations ol w r o n g d o i n g in hisudniinisiiaiinn. Predictably. Mr. Nixon's new defense
is an olien.se; the While House calls it
"(Jpcmlion C a n d o r , "
I quall\ predictably, die President's ellorts to quell his critics have enjoyed some
measure ol success, albeit inmy judgment, a
measiue that is both limited and temporary.
1 lie President's latest strategy is Iraughl
w uh two possibly terminal laults. I lie first is
that he is not saying anything new ol substance in his d d e n s e , and indeed has a heady
entrapped himsell in what may ultimately
prove to be ralhei e m b a r r a s s i n g distoinons
ol act and outright u n t r u t h s I he second i.
that public pressure h a s I'm.illy coerced him
to come to his own dclense. t h e bullei / o n e
ol stall and diehard congressional sup
poit ci s h a v i n g been vety nearly annihilated
Ihe admonition that a man is his own worst
law yei ollen applies equallv well in the court
ol |Mihlk optn ion. especially when the man in
question iloesn'l choose to p i o d u c c o i worse,
can't p i o d u c e exculpatory ev idctiec in his
own hehall. I litis the question is no longei
.uic nl piess scciclaiy / i c g l c i ' s oi the While
House's cied ibilily. it i s o n c o l Ml Nixon's,
as (he c o n t l i e u between whal the Piesidcut
says and what Ihe l a d s aie c o m e to light
D A N I M . I'HAI I.
M A I i Ml vi it, Mu HAH UOSI NI KAMI
JHRHV Ai IIHH 111
(iHAIMII I IIIIOH
etTcctive action to improve the quality of
your own life?
by Kim Hindmi:«x-w-W::::::::::rW:::::::^
th.it "Operation C a n d o r " was likely to prove
i i n n c a i i attack on his critics t h a n a delcn.se
ol luniscll. and that consequently, little new
evidence w a s likely t o he produced.
(I ven before lie lell. Mi Nixon made an
uliogct hei curious attack o n loimer At loiney (leneral l.lliol Richardson, a m a n
who. I nun his i ed i emeu t h o m e in .sub in ba ti
Virginia, could hardly do ihe President
lurthcj harm )
I hat is. nl Louise, p red set's vv hal
transpired in I loi ida and ( i c o i g i a . w ilh the
addition that the President succeeded mcontorting the laets in a singularly unsubtle
I ash ion in bis answers to a variety ot
questions. I mm whv he paid only %\ •<>70 m
taxes o n income totalling $400,000 to an
issue n.u iclaled to Watergate Ihe eneigy
(I oi example. Mi Nixon asseiled that he
had sent six cncigy hills to Congress, audi hal
only one the Alaska pipeline measure | l i t t j
been reunited to t h e White House loi his
signature In ihe In si place, live ol those six
hills were niinoi pieces ol legislation by any
reasonable s t a n d a r d s , a n d bad thus all been
passed the day they wete sent ovei. the result
slill would have been a hopelessly m a d e
quale pi u(ii am to deal w ill) the energy crisis.
\ n d secondly, in point ol l a d not one but
two ol the bills had been sent to tin.
Piesuleiil's desk beloie lie lell loi MorulaIhe pipeline measiue to which he retcried,
a n d S 1571), the t neigy Petroleum AIIoca -
Ihe question is wily, il it is within the
meansoI technology, i s s o m e t h i n g n o t d o n e ' '
f he answer in simple terms can be put ma
u o r d m i o n e y (Did someone once say it was
the root ot allevil'.') Oil companies arc not
interested in thequaliivnl your tile I hey arc
interested in making money. S h i p b u i l d e r s
are not interested in inequality ol yom lile
I hey are interested in making money 1 ill u m i n a t e ly . these lactams a r c pow erlul.
I hey have money and tbev make moie
money. 1 hey possess a g i e a l d c a l ol baigain
ing powei and arc capable ol exerting
pressure where il counts m o m government.
Ihe name? Campaign hinds
I h e game''
Inteilcie-No S u p p o r t !
Hairing a miracle, within the neai Inline.i
massive pipeline stretching ho thousands ol
miles will be built o n the mil the in slopes ol
Maska to carry oil to the ice liee port ol
Valdez loi shipment to the 1 ruled Slates
and Ihe w oild I he pipeline will c a m an es
in n a led two nil I lion bai ivlsol oil peulav \i
this rale there
is enough oil umtci the
Maskau wilderness (piov ided estimates arc
Lorredl to last a p p i o x i m a t c h II veais
lllisoil can heellicientlv used lopiofong tin
oeciinaiice ol a eiilieal oil shoiiage. m
millions ol b a n d s can In- carelessly l<»si I,I
Ihe oceans lo e o n l n b u t e to the pollution and
poison in JJ ol oui piecious m a n ue I ile
I his is where you come in-with support;
support for the United Slates Coast ( i u a r d
and support for your Congressman, giving
him the confidence to pressure for strict
regulation ofoil tanker. All that is necessary
is a letter, and hopefully a letter will
become thousands of Idlers Irom an public:
a public who is not going lo s i t c o m p l a i s a n l ly aside while big industry corrupts o u r enviionincnt and degrades the quality ol o u r
lives. I he importance ol public support cannot hv stressed enough. With a strong solid
public behind him. somehow campaign lund
promises Irom large industries do not seem
as necessary t o a man in pub lie office. With a
unified public demanding strict control of
the dotihi' hull-segregated hallast law, it is
more likely tohcellectively enforced. Send a
ui'ssage tu your Congressman,
lell him
lum you led about pollution and enforcement ol laws controlling pollution. Write to
ihe ( oast (iuard letting them know you a r e
in lav oi ol strict enforcement ol the requirements lor oil carrying tankers. Your
mail w ill he read and counted heavily in any
final decisions or reversals of decisions.
,, Ihese people are there lo work lor you. so
hell them do that. 11 you d o not know who
\ out ' niiijiessiiiai) is. phone y oui local parly
he,id .iiia Me is anil ask I hen w rile a teller expiesvmg \oui interest and concern to:
v, mu ( iiiieu -.sinan
e II llousi nl Uepicseutattves
Washing
IX
V i m , ' ( oimnandani
\din I K Salgeanl
Hill Scwiilh Siieel S \\
Washington. D C
Dog Eat Dog
i
, i iiiim
M,i\
I M i r r . s l .. m u m o l M s
,.MII^
-WHIIIUI
ill
mill
III.
11 HI i Nt "( .iiinu-s in I H L ' I M I U K - , " pliipsiNed b \
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Iiilllsv-Jli'lllil
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Now That The
Heat's Off
i
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I lie long and short ol it is that, apart h u m
misspeaking himself, Ihe President said
nothing new . and said it in a lashion that in
my view simply won't p r o d u c e any lasting
improvement in Ins credibility ratings.
KlkiK\
I MIL,hue."
. r n i - i i ' . i l ilisi-.is.-
I.IIII-I llmiil. M I)
I In,,I,,I
FRIDAY, NOVEMBKI^ '•". I''V
Slllik-lll
Hi'..Ilh
Kudos
I'd the Editor:
Much appreciation lo Ihe men and w o m e n
ol SUN Y A who gave their time and energy
in ensure Ihe success of "One o n O n e D a y "
held November 17. 1973. Special thanks t o
Barbara Moldan. her c o m m i t t e e . ar<i T o m
Daley, ace photographer.
We look forward to working cooperatively with you in the near future.
Donna
Si-UKV
On Courtly Behavior
I o the Editor:
I was recently on c a m p u s l o r a visit and
happened to see a copy ol the A S P which
contained a letter Irom D e n n i s Terry,
Because there are many people on the a i m pus and in Ihe cnmmunitywhowoulddisagiee
violently with Mr. Terry. i tell compelled lo
respond. I have followed Albany Slate
basketball lor a long time, including the last
season and lell ihe misleading, and
sometimes slanderous statements ol Mr.
l e r r y deserve analysis lor what they areBUI.I.!
D o c Saucrs over the pa si IS years lias used
the players on the team with whom he
thought he could win. lie h a s not been
wrong very often in the past, a n d it s c a n s ina p p r o p r i a t e to assume now that h e iswrong.
Whether o r nol the players Mr. lerry mentions in his letter have actually had varsity
experience is subject lo question. Playing
lime in my mind docs not e q u a t e with e x perience: one should look at t h e quality ol
the playing lime Surely no o n e who sat in
the stands last veai a n d watched Mr. l e r r y
play evei lell that he had varsity experience
altei he came oil the court. In most eases.
Mi lerry played like an A M I A l e a g u e IV
p layci u ill) a broken leg. blinders, and b o t h
a n u s tied behind his back. And a s loi silting
the bench behind players less talented t h a n
he. Mr. lerry should feel happy t o h a v e e v e r
gone on the conn: at all. Doc should have
played ihe game annoiincci b e l o i e lerry.
\ n y o n e who has evei loUnWcd Albany
Male Baskeihalltand I assume thai includes
Mi l e n y I knows that Doe's o l l e i i s c a s well
as d tense i equues lhal every player o n ihe
coll 11 be "small", so to be looking loi t w o
••ma 11 g n a u l s in a \ eai w hen he bad pisl losi
tlnee nl the smaitesK guaids Albanv S l a t e
vet had eeilainK makes sense
I o the
p a i e n i h e l i c a l c o i u n i e u l . a d d e d b y Mi l e n v .
I ha I w bile guaids weie being so ugh I. I sav
lil \ k " Il wtin't woik. Mi l e n v . and y o u
should have known il beloie \ o u w lole U
I ,ui many people have talked to D o c . i b o n l
highland ol b.iskelball and sineeyou've ,lpp.iu i ilk missed it I hat's w inning bask el ball
lhal aie smaller, lev
p l a m l In k
quick ..s ihe o p p o n e n t s
talented anil i
Init ,\\\\ ,i\ s sinaiiei. bellei colid Honed, and
be He i loaehed
\p|»,iienll\ Doc - . a l - , m
k l h g e i u e . not talent 01 a d o i and il yon
w i-h \ l i l e n v in equate intelligence w uh
eolol a s \ o u have dune in Volu lellei than
\on .ue the bigot, not I )ue
I leel lhal Mi lenv has missed Ihe whole
poiiil ol ihe issue ol success Success has
been ihe k e t o n e nl \lhaiiv b a s k d b a l l ovet
ilu last i s \ e a i s and Dm feels lhal winning
games l u i i t n h n i e s 10 the team's image, ihe
plavci"' individual images, t h e I n i v c i s i i \ \
image .nol lo spoiisiuanship in genei.il
liv.ois* vou have an indiv idlial dilleienee
w uh | ) m as a pel son and eoaeh gives ytui
no light lo peisonallv malign a g i e a i c o a e h .
small plaveis. the best lecoid ol any . i c t n c
eoacll ui New Noik S t a l e . a n d Albany S l a t e
Kisketball
Al HANY STUDKNT PRESS
Get off y o u r high horse, Mr. T e r i y , a n d
accept Ihe fact that you were n o t good
enough to play o n a team w h e r e working
hard on b o t h e n d s o f th the c o u r t arc i m p o r t
tank Htcrc's n o r o o m o n a " t c a m ' f o r p r i m a
donnas, and that's why you're n o t playing.
Earl L. Wclker
Class of 1962
But Ya Gotta Have
Friends
McEnroe
C o o r d inalor of Volunteer Services
Leonard Solomon
Eleanor Roosevelt IX'velopmental Services
Mr l e n y is quite lice to iliink "as a
brotbei'' thai I Hie is a bigol. a n d be would
prohably think thai no matter what happened as long as he was nol p lay ing bo i therein
lies the excuse that Mi l e n y uses a s his
defense (and quite obviously n is the only
l uue M i I c m w ill eve) he accused ol hav ing
A\\\ know ledge ol dele use. because he never
i mlie,iled ilia I he knew thai end ol a basketball court evei existed)
Ma uaime Sautei
riillL-ssnl
I would not buideii ic.ideis
Willi a
[Hohlem ol such staggenng piopoitioiis
eoukl I not also ollei a piaclical solution
t ongress has been cousideimjj a p u n IMOII
lequiiing all lankei s can v me \laskau o il to
be double bulled with oil Links segiegaled
l i u m h a l l a s i e o m p a i l m e n t s I he double bull
ilesign ol laukeis would pieveni spilla^M
hum lankei casiiallieMesuliing i n p m u lined
hulls, as u I leu h a p p e n s when lankeiscol! uh
ui run agiound
I lie segregated ballast
Icature would prevent oil heme Hushed into
the oceans when ballast col ipaitmenls a i e
IIOII Act )
"Operation C a n d o r " began with trips to
Morula and Georgia, hoine states ot two ol
the President's investigators o n Sen. Sam .1
I •rviii, 11 s select commit tee I h us it did not
requite
extraordinary insight to deduce,
even beloic t Ik* P i e s i d e m h a d s p o k e n o i misspoken himsell on tins S o u t h e r n crusade.
emptied. I h e provision h a s been a d o p t e d " "
hut is by no mains o n stable g r o u n d s . It is u n der severe attack a n d pressure from m o n e y
hungry factions involved. And a law might
as well not exist if it is overlooked, ignored o r
makes exceptions if the price is high enough
or the threats severe enough. T h e duty o fenforcing the law requiringall tankers c a r r y i n g
Alaskan oil to have d o u b l e bulls and
segregated
ballast c o m p a r t m e n t s was
relegated to job the United States Coast
( i u a r d . who would have no doubt d o n e a
conscientious job ol enforcement. However,
due to extreme presure from vested interests.
the
Coast (iuard was heckcled into
loileitmg this duty. With no agency t o e n lorcelhe regulations, how effective can they
be? (iood intentions aie not good enough.
l o t h e Editor:
I am addressing this letter to the**university c o m m u n i t y " with the hope that someone
might explain the "Hi-how are you"greeling
p h e n o m e n o n on campus. T h i s normally
doesn't occur a m o n g friends, but is usually
restricted to acquaintances from c l a s s o r t o
people w h o have been but casually introduced. I he encounter is extremely brief
only in passing, really.
Rarely is there time to answer the "How
are you.'" query, I h e person may have
already disappeared. II not. your a p propriate r e s p o n s e h a s b e e n a n t i c i p a t e d . a n d
the other person remarks automatically
"I hat's g o o d . "
K this silualion a result oI lite on campus'.'
Arc people just too busy to stop lor a m o ment (or even l o n g e r ) ' P e r h a p s n o o n e w a n t s
to now your answer how you really feel.
M a y b e they're not people al all who a p proach vou v\uh this: perhaps they a r e
a u t o m a t o n s who have been infiltrating t h e
student body lo i m m u n i z e " us. Tdward D .
Stone., oi some oilier master-planner, may
have introduced these biological units for
sonic well-in ten Honed purpose, lam curious
lo know how others feel about his. o r il they
have experienced u al all.
By the w ay.
My n a m e i s Steve.
and I'm nisi line, lhank-vou!
Mistaken Priorities
t o ihe I d i i o i :
I would like lo know how the resultsol (lie
I ndav's referendum to impeach President
\ i von M til a I led this country. I. along with
many othei students on ibis c a m p u s , d o i n deed disagree fervently with the actions that
on i he loved leader has taken during ihe year
l^t
Howevei. can't the S t u d e n t Assoeialion. and oi (. eiilial Council spend their
precious tune mi iimie important, eauipusoi icnlcd lop u s i,i [lie i i ban try nig loon peach
a piesideni oi deciding wbelhei oi nol to
send a m e m o lo llle New > o i k Vtels coilgialulaling ihein on a line season.' (I'll bel
many ol vou didn't know about lhal!) How
about hiinemu up ilk "iWMr issiieol allotline uioiiev loi llle \ (. I
eoinpelilions
coining up this \ e a t .ii S ( \ 'i Bullalo'.'
I his louinaiiienl means a gieal dull lo all
those locks on campus who pailicipaic in
some lessei-knoun spoils such as billiards.
Utile tenuis. ,\i\d bowline ll seems.i htile
oiiliagcoiis loi a s e h o o l i o h o s i ihe \ssoeiala-ui ol ( o l l e g e I nioiis I ou i iianieii I one
\ v.i i. and iheii ei uue hack ihe I olio w ing lei i n
.ind nol pass ihe bill which will only cost
SOOll" How about it . ( cilll.ll C oillKll'.' Ilow
nineh \\ ill ihisj nday'sv oling eosi-and w hat
n ill it p o n e ' VMuit kind ol liiiit-oul d o \ »tl
. \pect i h is time.! he nri nimuni 2t)', |uM like m
all ol youi othei elections'.' tin ease vou
didn't know . last \ eai a I the C a m p u s ) a ues.
\lhanv Slate look ihe leant title u u h e n o w Iing eoinpelilron. and thus qualified loi ihe
tin.il- re pi e set it ing this region llovvcv ei. we
had lo wilhdtaw because ol "lack ol luilds"!)
So go ahead and eoiigia t u late, oi I ant hastew homevei von wish I be Mels. Nison.
I h e D s l i k o s h l agles, h u t d o it a l i e r t h c c a m p.is issues, IM I \ S | "
D o u g I ewanda
I ti Sole W i-hmesim
t'ht'i'mtiformluiiiwi
an Wi'tlm'Mlay ittuhi. \'ttvrinb?r2Hth,
CWiinil Cuuiuil /*(/vvci/ (/ bill miri'duu'd
hv
S/iie (niinr
ami Harry Ihivi.s to uppruftnaw
0w m'u'xsan
$6tiUM(>. SA Prcsiilvni Stcvf (ictln-r signed the hill into efjt'il
i fsti'tihiv
PAGE THIRTEEN
from
students
programs
the
land
like
to
t h e tapes t o
Binghampton
program*
programs
fellow
tonight on
Americans,
1 speak
to
you
ton.
television f r o m the W h i t e H o u s e
I remained
u n d a u n t e d , for there
are
anyone
interested
in
working
please come t o the R m s i d e
i d e a l s h i g h e r t h a n the c o u r t s w h i c h c l a i m m y
publicity
o n a m a t t e r o f great i m p o r t f o r a l l . p e r h a p s
allegiance
Lounge 5 u n d a y a t 6 : 3 0 .
t h e m o s t c r u c i a l issue e v e r t o c o n f r o n t
overwhelming support
American people.
the
A s I a m sure m o s t o f y o u
H o u s e and convicted hy the Senate
And
so
1
do
for
not
expect
t h i s latest
the
great p r e s s u r e s t h a t
engulf
my
Quad
Dr. J e r o m e G o l d s t e i n will ^ j e a k o n
office,
a b a n d o n i n g m y t r u s t . It w o u l d h a v e b e e n t h e
Interested in Writing
t h e subject of nevratotogy
Interest
Wed,
o n Dec.
Dec
Meetings:
Alumni -
5 a t 8 p m in Brubacher
Photographers
at 7:3 0 p m i n the H a g r o o m . Colonial
Weekend
- Thurs., Dec. 6, a t 9:00pm
Schedule:
f a c t . I a m . as a l w a y s , m o s t
has. a n d s h a l l n o t n o w . base his d e c i s i o n s o n
Refreshments w I I b e s e r v e d .
are
welcome
s u c h c r i t e r i a . I c a n n o t leave o f f i c e , o n l y t o
sored
duties o f my office. A n d though i n thiscase.
cripple future presidents w h o w o u l d forever
A u d V a / o g y Club.
as i n m a n y o t h e r s . I m i g h t q u e s t i o n t h e w i s -
be at t h e w h i m
of a hostile Congress. O u r
Association.
d o m o f the Senate's c o u r s e o f a c t i o n . I have
government
based
n o d o u b t o I the s i n c e r i t y o r b e l i e f i n t h e p a t h
p o w e r s ; t h i s b a l a n c e w o u l d be d e s t r o y e d .
that
may
damage
this
great
will beadhered to.
attend.
3.00
t h e people o f t h i s land have u n d e r g o n e ,
M i d d l e l : .ast
a n y possible insurgents. C u r l e w s h a l l b e i m -
a c r i s i s in t h e
posediil l'M;allerthislime.alltlielightsin
that c o u l d have provoked a
third W o r l d
War.
I
the next m o r n i n g .
h a v e b r o u g h t our nation t h r o u g h h a r d times.
Hut
still
some
people
feel
that
their
l e a d e r s h i p c a n n o t be e n t i r e l y i r u s t e d a n d i l i s
u p t o m e . as y o u r P r e s i d e n t , l o a l l a y t h o s e
I c a r s . N o o n e else in g o v e r n m e n t c a n restore
y o u r faithin our hallowed institutions. Were
I l o s i m p l v leave o f f i c e a n d s h i r k m y r e s p o n -
you
would
truth o f thematter.
never
learn
B u t y o u can depend o n
•;:• o i l e r a b r i e l
whatever
n o b l e t r u s t o n this e a r l h
such e p i i h e t s d i d n o t faze m e . W h e n
*:•: issues, c o n t a i n i n g a r t i c l e s , u n p u b l i s h e d c o r -
c r u c i a l c r i s i s is e n d e d ; t h e l ° 7 f i e l e c t i o n s w i l l
:•:• r e s p o n d e n c e . r e p o r t s , a n d essays I r o m s u c h
be d e l a y e d u n t i l s u c h t i m e as t h e n a t i o n c a n
•:•: l a m o u s
s h a l l be k n o w n a s ' t h e Y c a r 0 :
ol
those
even,
those
thai
century,
years
encompassed
the
perhaps
such
as
Glorious
Revolution. Napoleon's One Hundred l)a\s.
and Caesar's
murder.
desert
you
1 bless
each a n d
night.
C h a p e l House.
3 . 0 0 cum in Bio a n d
average.
Forms
Mitclicl Zoler
D o i n n be d e c e i v e d b \ a n \ r h e t o r i c I h a t i h e
cuerg)
problem
proportion
is
being
blown
on I
I 01 t h e S e n a t e a n d ihe
ol
I'resi-
d e n 1 l o a e i as speed iK a n d rail i c a l U as t h e \
ha\c
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done
takes
more
Mmat ion.
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a shortage
ol
l a | .11. l o i e x a m p l e , w o u l d g r i n d t o
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pi
years
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loo
soon).
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(incidence
m u s l h a \ e been a s t r o n o m i c a l .
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lactoi
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ihe
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started
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lo demand
the
p l u m m e t e d o n the w o r l d m a r k e t .
yen
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a w e e k - l o n g . Vi.OOO c a r c u l
in
d i s a s t e r s , l.ui c o u p l e d l o y e l h e i t h c y l o i i n .111
y e a r in h i s t o r y
(Ihe
will
make
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Republicans \s
D e m o c r a t s w i l l s o o n j o i n the r a n k s u l
I ancasiers \ s
the Y o r k s a n d t h e
\ s . the G u i s e s . )
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the
the
llourbmis
day
We a i e
r a p i d Is
approaching
the
possihlnn ol a w o r l d - w i d e depression.
I he e l l e e l s o l i h e e n e i g s c r i s i s are lelt o n
t h e l o c i I l i o n 1 as w e l l .
didn't
"hif
home
loi
w e n t h o m e last w e e k
I he new speed l i m i t s
most o l
us u n t i l w e
R u l i n g ihe
in the
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Quad
t i m e he f o r c e d t o use n u c l e a r b r e e d e r reac->|:
meeting
of
the
Colloquium
SUNYA
w l l feature
GayAlliance
meetsi
the C a m p u s
C e n t e r tot
•>: l i o n s h i s c o n c e r n l o r t h e g e n e r a t i o n o l m a n
p r o a c h i n g those reached belore
•:*; 10 l o i low h i m . " l - r i l / . I a m c o n c e r n e d a h o u l
c n si s.
|;j;
is
Tuesday
night
meetings
Ihe
•:•:
Science Organization
a i ihe same t u n e a n n o u n c i n g the a c c e l e r a t i o n •:•:
meet every M o n d a y at 6:30 pm in LC
:•:• p r e s e n t e d t o a p h y s i c s c o l l o q t i i m a l S l a n l o r d
ol Kreedei
I hat i h e l ' . S ,
$
20.
£: I ' n i versus - b u t a l i r e i n Ihe l e c t u r e h a l l l o r c -
c o u l d be t h i s " w o r l d p o v \ e i " a n d P r e s i d e n t
K
:$ ed a r a p i d e v i l I n I i n s t e i n a n d the class
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was
lo
be
I he
reactoi
'The
projects."
leader"
cannot
be
d e n i e d . >•:
** p l a n s w e i e a l I i l s l b e l i e v e d t o he l o s l in the
I I O I I K . I I K . i h e P r e s i d e n t reeenilv a n n o u n c e d £;
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Whclhel
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•;•:
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All a r e
Sfudertfs for
Programs
(S.IP.H.)
al
S(l m i l e s
pel
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made
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r e p o r t e d I n :•:•
19.17. n u i s t be
v i e w e d .is s i g n i l i c a u l ,
.1 s l i g h t l y
more
resilient
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even earls .I l i n e .
g
;:•:
the p r o p o s e d
SI \ \ A ,
the
lecture
centers arc
in
sein 1-da 1 k n e s s a I n i g h t , c l a s s r o o m s a i e e s e i
so sligluls c o l d e i a n d r u m o r s a r e U s i n g t h a t ,
dav
iiounce
now.
a
Chancellor
icairanging
lioyer
ol
Semesiei s h i l l i n g classes I m m
consumption
ol
om
l i v e s b e i n g p r o p o s e d 111 a p p . u e n i l s a i b i l i a i v
winter
months
mas
the
.111
Spiing
i h e h i g h I iiel
t o late
which
ta the
the
for
Christian
Meeting.
Improvement
the
We
of
Handicapped
w l l m e e t S u n d a y , Dec 2a t
Affenfion
coffeehouse
D o w n t o w n e r s :
interest
coming M o n d a y
meeting
night
10:00
this
pm
one
ol
the
appichensioil
understandahls
custom
Tennis
Team
siring your r a c q u e t .
wll
receives
w Uh
such
new s. one must a l l e m p l lo v lew i h e p r o p o s e d
Albany
meeting
PIRG
wll
be
organizational
held
on
l o t
presents
8pm
Teatro
Pietn's
Be riken
"Puerto
Fund Raising
Rican
Limelight
ovaitable
We
GayAlliance
is sponsoring a
starting tonight a t 7
student
you
may
specific
have.
A
There is a
Mostly
American
Music alihe
wines
Lots
of
other
College M e m o r i a l C h a p e l , Schenec-
application
forms a n d
is now an
deadSne.
enforced
on
Saturday,
December
b e g i n n i n g at 8 p m Admission
Application
Chinese
Services:
Cemter I n f o r m a t i o n
Campus
Club
in con|unction
Cinemascope
457-6923...Desk
for g e n e i a l i n f o r m a t i o n a n d student
i n tC 3
Intone: tor questions o n u n -
I D.'s a n d
International
rail posses also
of
Tickets: S I without tax a n d
S 50wrth fa*
at d o o i
Sales m a d v o n c e a n d
A l are welcome
Munchkin
Club
•
Indian
Quad
ussoaation are n o t s h o r t on enterScience
Fiction
t a i n m e n t ! Sunday n i g h t , 8 p m there
magazmeisstill accepting stones.ar
Student
"Story
SUNYA Line lor d a i l y c a m p u s
Parsec, SUNYA'S
Form forma-
Movie,
M o t h e r , " o n N o v , 3 0 Friday 8 : 0 0 pm
lides. p o e m s , p h o t o s a n d
w i l b e a c o f l e e h a u s e with
artwork
Maddy
Isaacs a n d Anne M a ne M a r r a in the
D e a d l i n e f o i A p r i l p u b l i c a t i o n is Dec.
skmroom
20. F o r i n . o c a l l M i t c h o i M a r k a t 436-
25c
at
the d o o r
(50c
without t a x i C o f f e e a n d donutsf ree.
0262
available m SS322
Talent
this
Bus leaves Dutch Q u a d at
auditions
for Telethon
TONITE
'74
Battle
w i l be h e l d : Nov 27 4-6 p m , Nov 29
Nevermind,
7 - I t p m , Dec. 7 2-4 p m .
Monolith.
Auditions
ot the Bands - with
Neon
Park,
9:00 1 3 0
Ballroom
Beer
in
The office of Inli-rnalionai
1 0 4 0 urn
Prcxj iams
wi II p r o v i d e
Church on W a s h i n g t o n A v e . Exten-
Ballroom. A p p l i c a t i o n s must b e p i c k -
75cwrtli
sion, Returns after services.
<?d u p a t the CC i n f o r m a t i o n desk or
sored b y I n d i a n a n d Dutch
inCC
bySA
will b e held in the C a m p u s Center
For Pineview C o m m u n i t y
a v a i l a b l e and will seek i n f o r m a t i o n
367
and
the
and wine
programs
inform ation
1,
tree
i n f o r m a t i o n a v a f l a b l e in
events
t h r o u g h o u t the w e e k e n d .
Sunday?
a b o u t w h a t p r o g r a m s are currently
of
Union
tady,
there
events of g e n e r a l interest 457 8692
The
ove 'Seas
Club,
Semester. P o l d e s h a v e b e e n c h a n g -
4630.
(hange
about
Glee
ed a n d
U-Lounge with a live Band a n d f r e e
W o u l d you like to g o to Church
ideas
College
w i l l p r e s e n t a concert
Spring
d o n e e S a t u r d a y night in S t a l e Q u a d
meeting will be d e v o t e d to a n exof
for the
iversify pel iaes a n d p i o c e d u r e s 457-
flagroom.
t i o n come to SS 3 2 2 .
participants lo onswer any
questions
Union
accepting
State Q u a d
SUNYA
former
The
Assessment
is now
events.
S u m m e r j o b s in Britain
to
activity
w i n e a n d cheese p a i t y will tollow i n
overseas
have m v i t e d
what fo do
contact
with C C C , is p r e s e n t i n g o Chinese
tux, SI 25 without.
p i o v i d i n g , o l c o i i i s e . 1 ha I i l a n 1 n n e i I i g h l -
I WINE AND LIQUORS
MEN - WOMEN
| e d s a s well lo discuss the l o c a l B o a r d
Attention JSC M e m b e r s . T h e t e w l l
I
«s
formation
Desk).
All
interested
u p f o i i n d i v i d u a l c o m m it tees u n d p i a
be a G e n e r a / A 4 e e f i n g on S u n d a y ,
ditional
Dec. 2 at 7.30 p m in CC 3 1 5
Mas
ATTENTION
I Lowest Legal Prices Permitted i
I on All Merchandise in N Y state I
i
i
Lounge, C a m p u s Center (near the In
. i n d one w h i c h 1 eu, t i n e s l o e x p e n d i l u r e o I a d eneigs.
iREDICK'S
Also
A full Line of Whiskey and Gin, Vodka,
Foreign and Domestic Wines and Cordials
13 CENTRAL AVE
|
|
434-0474f
Ihruwas
CC
sold.
SponFunded
With Automobiles
EARN EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR
Housewives
- Shiltwoi'Kci
II w i n
h.ne
J - .1 i h i \ s . i \ : i i I ; i h I c . m i l e ; i n s p e n d 4 t o 5 i l ; i \ l i g h t
hours
on
pleasant
telephone
Resident Assistants
Mandatory Interest Meeting*
Red Cross Bloodmobile
in
I ondonulle.
Select u u u
sonal
inHdoni
directories
Slingei l.nuls. West
• (olk-ec
December 1 at 7:30 in LC 1$
*for all interested in 74 - 75 RA positions if unable
to attend contact Roger Wright at 457-8852 at
least two days prior to meeting.
10am - 4pm
Sponsored by JSC-Hillel and Faculty Wives
wmmmwmimm*m^
nTmmm#m*m«
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1973
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, WAS
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
work-
Albans.
Students
Sign
up
Colonic.
McKnowm
'Ie.
deli\ei\
.ilea
to
deliver
Delimit',
Mcnaiids.
Alhanv. Westnieie. and
new
lilsmerc,
Rensselaer.
sinroundingareas.
1 it y o u i d e l n e r y
time to y o u r
per-
schedule
I'lcase l e p o r t o n I R l l i A S . . \ l > \ I M M
1)1 ( I M i l l
R
1st l o i
luring and
I'IUDISC'O
Monday, December 3
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
you must
$5.00
Tuesday.
December 4 a t 8 pin in the Platoon
at l i o n i n i h e light 111 w h i c h 11 w a s p r e s e i i l e d -
GHEEB CS ILCI7E « P f l e e Ctf BCC£
PAGE FOURTEEN
I n d o o r a n d Spring
Coach M u n s e y .
W a t e r b u r y 325. W e n e e d your Kelp
students a r e i n v i t e d t o come a n d sign
K e g . u d less
iins
disiu|aiou
inaimei
than plain air.
M
I h e s i u d e n t reaction lo
1 hese I l l i n o i s is i m a n a his o n c o I d i s s a l i s l a c 11011 w i i h
on all aspects o l
on
6 pm in the S t a t e Q u a d F l a g r o o m
An
a p p e i i i as 1 h o u g h o n e w e r e w a t c h i n g a s l o w
welcome
There will
group
sto rf
" n u c l e a i £;
l o be seen, h i l l :£
so i n n o c c n i l v
Optimist
a •;•:
/v'
< IJSSKHI
(.tudents
w i l l l e l l h i s p e o p l e t o c o n s e r v e e n e r g y w h i l e :•:•
and
State
be a n informative meeting a n d dis
p.ograms
meetings start at 8 0 0 p m
prediction ilia. ' " A
lonnali/cd
A l students who a i e in
They
sheet.
u n a b l e to a t t e n d
Albany
De c
terested in Study Abroad!
its
We n e e d
t o one
Nov. 3 0 t h a n d / o r Dec. 1st,
good academic standing
Attention
:•:• 1 i n s t c m .
was
Con-
waiver a p p i c a t i o n s
3OOOOOOOOO0O0OO0OO0OOQ0O
l . i n s i e i n ' s •:•:
leadei o l a w o r l d p o w e r :|:j
Statewide
pm witli Guest speakers in LC 2.
315 o l
interesting
t h e times listed o n the r e q u i r e m e n t
your h e l p .
the NYP1HG
SUNYA
SUNYA
uost
G a r y Sussman, 4 5 7 - 4 3 0 7 .
ding
G a y Weekend
the use o l
Perhaps
a c c o m o d a t e a v i s i t i n g student a t t e n -
formation call 457 7929.
w i l l be s u f f i c i e n t l y l e w i n n u m b e r t o p e r m i t •:•:
t h e e n e r g y :•:•
Nov. 2 6 a n d continue thru Dec. 6 a t
at 457-4554.
xaooooooao o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Service
rf you a r e tak-
t e r e s t e d i n h e l p i n g o u t , p l e a s e call
c o n t i n u i n g student at SUNYA, a n d i n
interested folk
Community
(SSW 3 9 0 ) :
Any student w h o w o u l d b e w i l i n g to
Fee C o m m i f t e e
BOPOOQOOOOOOOOPOQOQOOPa*
Attention
session
non-speaolists
:•:• I r i e i i d . I r i t / v o n W e b e r . E i n s t e i n first m e n -
as
Beginners
must g o
The
Come join with us in the
sure they a r e in if y o u w a n t t o pass
you
for V a n t a g e II. C o n t a c t Coach Lewis
Christians
of
Make
time,
at least Junior status by Fall 1974,
Evangelical
office
School
eva luaHon
d o n a t i o n for P r o t e c t e d n y l o n , $6.00
A thany
1705,
t h e course!
Students
Qualifications: must be of
linguistics.
•$ m e a n s . In a l e t t e r d a t e d 1934. a d d r e s s e d l o a
I Iv t h e o r s t h a t u n f o l d e d in t h e m o n t h s 10
the
Tower
e d t o D e c 3 a n d D e c 4 If you a r e i n -
In formation
in s o m e o n e else's b a c k y a r d . : : : ;
,
intra
will
in M r s . McKinleys
i n g C o m m u n i t y Service for*>e_second
Fellowship o l the Lord. For more in-
clubs
meetings
Tubs & rr
as
instruction.
due
Attention: Phonorhon w l l be extend-
w h o can not possibly a t t e n d should
to
Service
S o d a l W e l f a r e ) b y Dec. 3 r d .
at
pm in H u m a n i t i e s 3 5 4 , i s d e s i g n e d tor
in
Foil
and
Track c a n d i d a t e s . Fri. 4 : 0 0 P E 125. If
prior
Community
(Mohawk
are welcome
CC 346.
interest
for
inter
competition
Disco follows i n C o l o n i a l Pent, i 2 pm
reactors
l u e l s a l levels a p - % *
held
college
Epic
professional
Obituary"
•:•: e n e r g y t h a n he c o u l d s u p p l y b y c o n v e n t i o n a l
conventional
masses a r e
10:00-12:00,
and
meets e v e r y F n d a y night a t 7:00 pm
A l t e r a series o l n u c l e a i a c c i d e n t s i h c s u r - ; : - :
built
Saturdays
M a n d a t o r y Meet
&:
t o have the:•;•
Al
Society w l l
meet W e d n e s d a y s 7:30 to 9 0 0 a n d
in CC 3 1 5 .
l o o k s l o the:;:-
l a m b . " w a r n e d E instein.
Sun,
Fencing
5335.
days
Attention
S f u d e n f j . l e t t e r s f r o m your a g e n c y
please call Chris 7-5328, o r Ken 7 -
e n s u r e t h e i r sale use. " M a n w i l l l o o k to t h e j j i j
b r e e d e r s as the s t a r v i n g w o l l
State
m a r . " T h e t a l k , w h i c h i s scheduled for
an
open
every T h u r s d a y 5 : 3 0 - 7 : 3 0
M o n d a y , D e c e m b e r 3, 1973 a t 7;45
w ith
Co-op
18 o t 7 30 p m . . Potential a p p l i c a n t s
a talk b y W a y n e O ' N e i l on "Recent
Developments in theTheory o f G r a m -
Record
o n S u n d a y , D e c , 2 in Lecture Center
(2}
am
i f y o u w a n t t o pass t h e course!
ference
two
Papon
D e c e m b e r 3 r d . M a k e sure they o r e i n
SUNY-
H n g t a m p t o n , NY 1 3 9 0 1 .
l.ith.nn.
CC Ballroom
d u e i n the C o n t a c t O f f i c e LCB3 0B b y
Inter-
790):
Sftwic*
of
the C a m p u s W i d e Interest M e e t i n g
meeting.
v i v u r s . ihe o n e s s m a r t e n o u g h
ihiough
D unesticalh . General M o t o r s h a s j u s l
turers.
thai
the
ed.
announced
I r o m G M and a I I o t h e r a u t o m o b i l e m u n u l a c -
landmark
that
m o t i o n - i no v ie 01 t h a t e v e r y o n e w a s u a v e i l i n g
w o u l d have t a n k e d i n the 9 0 t h p e r c e n t i l e l o t
ama/ing
Optimist,
o c c u r r i n g | i i s i u h e u its peak h a d been r e a c h -
a b o v e lac t o r s ( p o l i t i **il a n d e c o n o m i c ) a l o n e
1
knew
injj:
a
p r o d u c t i o n . w l i b I n l i n e decreases i n e v i t a b l e
1
Linslein
increase ever f a s t e r •:•:
t h a n h i s p o p u l a t i o n , w i l l at s o m e p o i n t
I insU'in's i h e o i s
In a d d i t i o n , d o n ' l t h i n k the el l e e l s a i e g o -
lor
simpl\
by t h e Krxmkhaft
emergency
\1.1bs have
hau-
existed.
W h a t l i i n s t e i n g o e s o n t o say i s t h a t m a n . $ :
whose energy d e m a n d s
l o r s a t a t i m e b e f o r e he r e a l l y k n o w s h o w 105$
report.
•j;: u u s c o i c l i c d . I h e s i o i s o l the l i r e is legend o l
llns. I I K
(complicated
Binstein. whose
:;i|
.974-
Interested students must a t t e n d
least
linguistics
w i f e l y use t h e s o u r c e . "
75:
ing ( 1 2 / 4 ) a t 7 0 0
I hese new
s o u r c e s w i l l be n u c l e a r ( h o w ac--;>
R e s i d e n t A s s i s f a n f s f i . p s for
contact Roger W r i g h t at 457-8852 at
;•;• w o u l d c o m e w h e n m a n w o u l d d e m a n d m o r e
•:•: l o l l o w
Very same o n e 1 hat h a d been p r e d i c t e d l o i us
intrigues that
Freud.
Committee
Lounge in the C a m p u s C e n t e r .
c u r a t e he w a s ! I h u t he w i l l n o t y e t he ready t (>•:•:
pm
pm
Students
nest
Mass
llflO
Lounge. S t a t e - Tues., D e c 4 a 1 9 p m
( U n d e r g r a d ) w l l neet T u e s d a y e v e n
The
wman
i n the f l a g r o o m .
overall
t e m p o r a r i l y w h i l e he e x p l o r e s n e w s o u r c e s . : $
Ne
6:30 p m a n d
pm in the A d i r o n d a c k / C a y u g a L o w e r
t u r n a n d w h e n he d o e s , he w i l l d o so onls;:-:
:•:• t h e g e n e r a t i o n o l m a n l o lollosv m e . " w r u l e
i n j j la-etui is t h a t this c r i s i s c o m e n igh o n the
icn v u t r s
reported
Louis
o f :•:; I i n stein s t u m b l e d o n t o a n i d e a w h i c h w a s
in y o u r t i m e
a h a l t in M l d a \ s w i t h o u l o i l . a n d in l i g h t o l
the past
Sigmond
I m a x . and A l b e r t
As
as
feesen
tliis w a t e r .
eneig;
some p o l i t i c a l
laasac
scholars
Willi
n a t u r a l resource e n s ^ n o w
hy
Curie.
in
olonlylwo
:•:•: y e a r s ahead o l t i m e . B e f o r e a n y e q c r j j y V r i s i s •
also laced u nli o u r \ e i > o w n e c o n o m i c and
about
published
greatest need; s h a l l l i v e u p t o m y e v e r y w o r d .
nig
only
Marie
•:•:
a n d need n o t he r e i t e r a t e d h e r e , b u t w e are
I he l i n k .1111.1/
and
relen'ed t o a s B . K . F c a r n o l . A m e r i c a n s . I n r
questionable
I lie p o l i t i c a l reasons l o r t h i s m e obv I O I K
scientists
$: i d e a s w e l o o k at in t h i s
latlirsi
years t h a i c o m e ,
other
ft
Optimist,
a n d a l l l i m e h e l o r e t h a t y e a r s h a l l s i m p l y be
I hank y o u . and g o o d
l l a p p e a r s t h a t w e a r c d r a w i n g t o the end
kraukha/t
19.17 in M u n i c h , w a s c o m p r i s e d
H e n c e f o r t h , :|;| P a s t e u r .
every o n e o l y o u .
"killer."
Ihe
history.
Slates: I shall r e m a i n in office u n t i l t h i s most
In
once,
" I ' v e n t u a l l y . " he w r o t e h i s m o t h e r . " m a n : ; : ;
%
ne\er
in the
and
Pathology
announces a revision/ N e w
English
Da 1 w i n i :
w i l l have l o c u l h a c k o n his e n e r g y c o u s u m p - * :
|;|:
A Year To Remember
of one
to
into
sieps are necessary t o p r e s e r v e a
C a m b o d i a , t h e r e were
those w h o a l l i e d m e " t y r a n t . " a n d
is u n k n o w n
tree, d e m o c r a t i c g o v e r n m e n t in the U n i t e d
I shall
i n l % K a n d a g a i n i n 1 9 7 2 ; the g r e a t e s t , m o s t
I bombed
()/)timisi
•:•: l a m i l i a r w i t h t h i s c o l l e c t i o n o l p e r i o d i c a l s 1
s i i l c t y w i l l he a n n o u n c e d s h o r t l y . I s h a l l t a k e
the year l%K
the
me not l o a h a n d o n t h e t r u s l y o u p l n c e d i n me
When
M o r e measures f o r y o u r
endure a change inleadership.
s i b i l i t i e s i n the fact o f t h i s l a l e s t r e b u t ! f r o m
I he C o n g r e s s ,
I h e kiunkhajt
m o s t scholars, hut recent t r a n s l a t i o n s
t h e c o u n t r y w i l l he s h u t o i l b y a m a s l e r s w i i e l i :•:• l - n g l i s h h a v e m a d e l i s c o n t e n t s a v a i l a b l e t o
i n m y o M i c e , l o be t u r n e d o n a g a i n at 7 A M |i|: t h e l a y m e n , r-or t h o s e of y o u w h o a r e n ' t
Y o u have entered an
e n e r g y crisis a n d s u r v i v e d the w o r s t o f it.
|:|i
View-
F u n d e d b y Student
by Lawrence H . Ton I
U
u
for
S a t . , 10:00 a m , 1 2 3 0 p m a n d 6 . 0 0
a v a i l a b l e in Bio l o b b y .
I am placing an a r m e d
needed
C a f e t e r i a . Indian -Tues., Dec. 4 at 7
g u a r d a r o u n d the W h i t e H o u s e t o w a r d o i l
and come t h r o u g h a d m i r a b l y ,
Studies,
Cewtmvfrir*
S t u d e n t * f$$W
are
Spon-
Speech
requirements:
The Morbid Optimist
a n d to do s o . I must insure that m y decision
nation
TriBvta
*.C?3
l a m a e l i n g t h e best i n l e r e s t s o f a l l o f y o u .
irreparably.
by
to
of
Hear thatyour
r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s have m a d e a t r a g i c m i s t a k e ,
one
a separation
national
Attention
to
informa-
further
to the O f f i c e
Saber,
All
Nonetheless.
Viewpoint
p o i n t 74-75. C a l l M a x f c e 4 5 7 - 5 2 1 3 .
3 r d , 8 p m in t h e CC Assembly H a l l .
it has c h o s e n .
for
Lower Lounge. D u t c h - T h u r s . , D e c 6
take, b i n as y o u k n o w , the President never
on
15. For
7 4 - 7 5 ? Call M a x i n e 457-5213.
politically expedient and populur course to
is
academic
tion, w r i t e
State
rather nebulous charge o f '1iigh crimes and
w i s h e s o f C o n g r e s s a n d w i t h the
5UNY-
overseas
December
official notice
Applica-
two
• .* *
on
m i s d e m e a n o r s . " I a m n o t here to deny t h a t
l y w i t h the
730to
for
have b e e n extended
Albany
o f the
anxioustocomp-
Tuesday,
deci-
s i o n . I c o u l d have s i m p l y resigned, b o w i n g to
h y n o w k n o w . I have b e e n i m p e a c h e d b y t h e
held on
The
15.
ed.
Sirica, similar reactions were elicited. T h e n ,
My
abroad.
Application
deadlines
s h a r e w i t h us o n
10:00 p m . R e f r e s h m e n t s w i l b e s e r v -
Judge
tion
students wish to
Decern b e r 4th i n B O 248 f r o m
over
Study
December
a n y thoughts that
meeting will b e
to hand
foreign
Deadline:
shall a p p r e d o t e
possible
by Barry Bennett
refused
of
par-
t i d p a t e in if they w e r e a v a i l a b l e . W e
We Trust
In
about
theywould
Menands
lo
11st
Hoiden's
M e n a n d s . New
I'lcase d o n o t c a l l , a p p l y
U R D A Y .
Ine
Regional
.IK I l l r o a d u a )
I next
l< M o r S A I
m u t e selection at:
Maikel
I looi)
|)au\ I
York
i n p e r s o n I r o m 10 A M
10 4 I ' M o n t h e
specified dales a n d d a i l v I hereafter.
>AGE FIFTEEN
—
) i
Erratum: Due to a malfunction Tuesday
A va t a b l e
apartment
inJanuary,
off
buslino, $73 indudes a l , own bedroom,
spacious with friendly roommates. Call
CLASSIFIED
Ride needed to Detroit metro, area for
love,
To A l l Eligible Females: stop by the i nfo
Female
Kathy, 1-B93--7172
bedroom apartment near b u s l i n e , $75,
roommate sought to share 2 -
for Salt Lake City, Utah (possibly Aspen,
Colorado). C a l Paul, 436-0 132
LOST 6 FOUND
mmmmmmmmm
HELP WANTED
1968 Dodge Monaco. New tires, 383 un-
used 5
times. $90 including pales
Choir director and organist for Schenoc-
Stolen:
Wards
PF-8 calculator
tady Episcopal Church. Positions may be
Rathskellar
for onu or two persons. 393-0304; 374-
offered. No questions asked. 463-8145
Tues.
afternoon.
Reward
HOUSING
ing accepted. Beautiful co-ed camp in the
Berkshires. Contact: Ftp Rosen, 1 Stirrup
bindings. 160 cm. Very good condition.
Lane, Roslyn Heights, N.Y. - (516) 484-
$35. Call P a u l 436-0132
Male or female roommate wanted for
Spring Semester. Near SUNYA busline.
Two story house. C a l nights. 482-0449
Call 785-8905, ask for W a l y , Room 404
Need School Money - Married college
ment near busline for Sprin '7 4 semester.
couples earn extra money by babysitting.
Furnished. Own bedroom. Rent $62.50 -
$117 per week - car needed - free room
all utilises included. Call evenings, 465-
and
Kneisd ski is, Kodiak bindings, Henke boots
board. University
Family Service
7095
Independent girl wanted to rent large
room in mostly furrished flat. Your rent,
Reolstic component stereo with FAA-AM
length of stay not dependent on other two
r a d b - good condition. $75. Ann, 355-
girls^ Great a r e a . On a I busSnes. $90 includes all. 489-0725
9103
Cassette tape and
, home • 482-8432
Typing done in
0361
type
of carpentry
work
nished apartment
2 bed room apartment for rent first floor
at 598 Third Street. Furnished. No utilities.
On West Albanybusline. Phone 462-6028
Judo ghi - brand new - 482-3967 after 6
PM
Coll
h torn available next semester on busline.
double butted frame, Zeui components,
w/w
carpeting,
$155/month. 472-2115. 459 6552
impossible angles or uhen double
season
the
backcourl. However.
or Uiplr learned,
team a great deal more than any
Happy Birthday
To my cudder,
I
love
produce
consistently;
dividua I
is
season's
scoring
Byron
that
tn-
M il ler,
last
and
rebound
up
your
with love and a kissie-face,
Your b u t t e r * o t r h sweetie
PS. Use that V* ounce very carefuly. It's
that
Doc Saucrs has coached
some time.
Miller
in
Brian -
like
is not mi im-
posing
figure physically, as
stands
at
67"
is an easy-going figure, not stoic
( b i g for
teammate
and
Reggie Smith, nor
he
eo-ca plain
taxes and services
5 I'll
DEN
BUMPER
Business Opportunity
Albany location. Ideal
for a college bar. Asking $5,000. 732-2361
The Pe,U(9 Corps needs over a hun
dred TESL teachers for Thailand.
i
I
Training starts Jan. 74. Train teachers,
f
I
design
I
plus t a x .
call
I J-Haul
Central ''ervices.
Box
921,
York
13201
Syracuse,
Co.,
f
|
call or write Judy Waite, ACTION 26 |
J
Federal Plaza, NY 10007 (212) 264- J
into
virtually
in
any
every
sport,
but
something Doc Sauers continually
hesitant
shot, you know.
I'll take it,
but
and Curtis and all of them, but
cliche goes, lo lei "his actions on
plii niing. 'You know. I don't really
f m not gonna try lo control it o r
Reggie and
the court do the talking,"and il he
know about iliat...it really doesn't
take charge or anything like lhal.
back...all
Ve got w lot ol really good people,
together...things look
about
discussing
it, e \ -
Reggie
(Smith)
and
and
the
Harry
and
we have
Rich are
to do
is get
peilonns the \\a> mostieel he can.
really good
lliere w i l l be ,i lot of noise Irom
Harry
now . and practice has been coming
freshmen;
aloni!. and i b e o n K problem could
3rd
"
SKI
vvhoii ill also see ac
haskcihall
opens
iiijiht
ii»
ai
I ems. S i m l a
Byron Millei ihis \eai
season
t--.vcdlt.-iit shooters and should all
Williams
p o ' i i d c much o l I he w i r i n g punch
i
:
* ^
lorthc.l\
I he
learn
is
html
« nh
ihe
Ha itslct sludciil is cligthle i o pl.t)
ihe
scuieslei
n
u.mi an
w t
I'tohtthlc
re llolden
|
Hindi up in ihe an
a-nlci
is
d'a"
.-'"
Side
lllai
hectl p i a c l i i i n c
Grid Picks
hi
Aa-rdvurt Fat Legs I t i e H o n o i . M i
fertiel,
Ihe l l h i u t l H u m h s h t l l
<i \ k I \ \ | i
i l e h l l . l s c a s o l l i e i ' o t d n l U I I SI
.lis,,
uiui lln- <•.-.< -t\ the gang
didn't
do
Inn
mllcecs. Illllsllinc
Austria
k
|
w
ha,
K
I i c n i i t i h s i i i c ,'innal
per d a y ; taxes & g r a t u i t i e s
I d s , I I C the h c t l e i leant
In. I
Vuii.illi
!
ill
,
l t i ; t l - h l l l ( ! r .M eel is I l e a l lis u n l a n d
,
a ucl.nt
,,
osei H a l i m i n i , i n l l l . i t n e
457-4831 • office
\ otci
111 I I
\ l t i I.,
I In I a l u m s a n H u m : h i d
861-6216 - home
MUtl'I I n . c a l l i n l l H
hisqucsl
Is (
•
o u - i ( I I \ I I W l l I.
is h o t
l,in
Is I
i. .
,,„,
, .,,,,1 , , . ,
\ i h o m e the', h a v i
DM I \ s , „ n
H I M I
Ihe h l l h h l c l i i u s l .
IliVII
|'l.mid
:'
I,
I I,
i
Inn
|.n,
ml
Mail
al
pcilonnc,
ich
lolwaltl,
mil
idei '
I he gimi|! could he
,,\, | „ , tlic leant, cspciialk tiller
| V i e K o o l , i mines up to the tatsits
. „
K
n
I d
all
simne
I en is is hortcliil |,n .,
season hnl
ictuses
ccesslul
in make alls
pteiltclloUs ahnul l h t s i c a i \ li.iin
" I l l e i c ' s Jllst n o H a t lo tell
'
u
'"
ll,t sl
'
'
"'•lvllk'1
lll
"-h>ncn
« ill
hull
plat
« IOUMII t l i c i . n i i p e l . -
Dillc
Under ,ndian
I nCllWHT ^
The Place To Be This Saturday Night.
t
ul
liaslnvn
I cuts JCM nhes him asa ym<l
I ci
sutitne
,„,
•
n
X
,i
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Open Bar - No Cover Charge
HAPPV HOUR 8 - <> PM
,.
,1
I l!
i\
i'
h
"'
I ', |,C, is .1
I al.tl
' ' I'll I an lit,II
i
M,
i •,
i
|
A
A winemahiiut hit will be OIUEN AlWAV FREE at 11:30 pm.
•
i
i
one of the Longest
Bars in Albany
f jukebox
i
pmoaii
l( i.
mam
I
Il
I I l l s I I I ' . I l l , t a n i l , I I ' 'I
i n Ihe I c u i ' i u
led
s|
I i, n u i l l " >
I II I K l I I I , , , , ' ' . I
Thurs., Fri., Sat.-.
Vaicnis
|
,. . . , .,, ,,,,,! I
I'
lh< c d r ,
mill
Mtlk-i
i.,, k ,.l luiuht
a
also miss some games. Huh
Pfihihh
c u
\ UClUlhAll^C
n o i
| \ i , l W U
i
Sally !W*
aloni!
fallen
.
I
Ml sMI
lot i l l , - i c i m i l
( Iceland
ar.im-i
| K W S I K I
i|| i
I
I I I ,,
Ulaiula
. i f .lilt
\ | A
Mike
l | i i l s | i i \
,,„,,,,„, ..uetll.lll
, ,.;t nl;. i,„
hack l i l e i n t u i e s o l I n s . l i i i i i i i c past
and
l u t e Hie uist.k-ii.uk on die iiuatil
I"
a i h l
r i I 11 \ I 11 I I'l 11 \ i.
-
\l I \ M
,,\i
" ' "
Simlct
, , M . ^ , (,,,,
l t l
, \ \
"haul
Mt
, , ,,| : h
,,.. ;
I IMOItl
All t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ; hotel; 2 meals
\,,
. .,. _ , „
t i l
II I S OICI II \ l
$306
Miller
'
Villi I. a a l o c a l h o i l i m n C o l i i n l e .
liu.uei-ks
( o-oi p l a i n \\\ run
Knola,
»ut kui.u out u nh ihe l a i s i l , and
Sicte p l a i e d loiilhall this
I.ill so he has u n i t
I'dc
h a s k e t l t a l l l o t o i l h t h e I n s t sis
IK S
U i m
Scanniuc I lie I'ups ntstei . it is
I u r o a u l u i l l he;i h i g p u i h l u i i ul
Ictus.
.| ) ( , K |
| | k
o h i i o i t s that lhcii mum pttihli-m is
hallpl.ticis
as
i,.,s ,, tamd chance I,„
llnstc.ii
Coach
p m c i c s s . - s so the i l t a k l l l u s i l l I h e
3
itill.tiuaid.
and Valium an- all
piohk'in nl Instil).' niie oi two ol its
J,rampS
Violets ar,- blue.
ANNUAL
And) Curtis!
lonioitois
1
assorted fantastic people;
School of C r i m i n a l Justice
356-1200.
6 4 p.m.
Ih
I t ll
tt
l-s "
I.
Hi.Hit . e n i n c
.; : .
DROPOUT OF SCHOOL
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
CwsAlvfc Int^SIisence
ICH.
I N t U I U I HOTEL AHU AlHTAHf
it.i . |il si a h a d t i n . t i l l
I
ECLIPSE
\
u u i t I I It
D.int'a.is a n d H u l l II
Mill
I.
an
(518)457-7795
ci. . H e
ma Iks I n l a H a m l h a l m u l t I h t m
linllultspci.ilch
We are sorry for any inconvenience
caused by our error.
\ l \ \ OKI I W S i n i l
Happy Hours: 7:30 - 9:00
II Ml In -I
lite mad
~ UNIVERSITY OF PARIS
New Paltz Philosophy Year
Jewish Students' Coalition - Hillel
"A Boy Named
Charlie Brown f t •
Sat, Dec. 1
7:30, 10:00
Q u a l i f i e d u n d e r g r a d u a t B S In Phil, a n d related majors
can earn from 30 t o 32 c r e d i t s l a k i n g regular courses a t the
.University o t Paris (Sorbonne) d u r i n g 1974-1975. The
|SUNY Program Director will help students secure suitable
housing, a r r a n g e p r o g r a m s a n d assist r a r r a n g e assistance
for them in their studies throughout the year. A three-week
orientation a n d intensivo l a n g u a g e review w l l b e held a t
the start. September 15 t o June 15. Estimated living expenses, t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , tuition, a n d fees, $3,000. A d d i t i o n a l information m a y be h a d by writing to Price
Charlson, D e p a r t m e n t o t Philosophy, FT1000, State University College, New Paltz,New York 12561 Telephone: (914)
[257-2696
IC 1 *
L
^ ' :
:
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SIXTEEN
few
siresses. and it was evident when
I h i ; A l l i u m Sunt iiminr inr.sih
t'KI I \
I he Saints ,111
mi
Dan Di-iine lu-iiet pel
cai plups ami a hitudlold h'l
with JSC card- 25c
without card- 5 0 c
be
talking to Byron. He prefers,as the
Dear blimps & blobs of 209 and other
John M o r g a n
b e t w e e n the h o u r s ot 8 a . m .
New
s h o u Id
problems:
Collcjic.
Contact:
ECLIPSE will be appearing at
The Salty Dog this weekend.
Must be US »
Apply now For information
transmis-
F o r l i n t her i n f o r m a t i o n
were around:
there
Pups Open, Too
Youi loving 5-year roomie
Moyerhofen,
he able i n
gas.
Rossi.
portant thing."This i s a t r a i l l h a t i s
"Yeah.we're as good as last year,
"}
Dec. 3 1 , 1 9 7 3 t o J a n . 8 , 1 9 7 4
The ASP wishes to apologize to our
readers and to The Salty Dog Tavern for
erroneously stating that the band
ECLIPSE was appearing at the Polynesian
Restaurant Nov. 29, 30 and Dec 1.
TEACHERS FOR THAILAND
ballplayer
If you manage t o g u a r d your body,
mmmmmmmmm
Bar Maid Wanted
Part-time evenings.
Will train. Albany
465-9002.
y ea r ) .
Have a H a p p y 20lh-(he "right thing to
Cheryl
or
each, $2 l o r 3, $7 per d o / e n
glory, and that "the team is the i m -
maybe better. 1 know we lost Rossi
- *
TOUR
license. We pay a l l l o l l s a n d
pected, thathc wasn't out for the
the
"Yeah, the guys will probably go
Roies ore red,
Krce
sion and havca valid drivers
of
when Quatrocchi, Curtis,
do!"
Congralula tton
N I X O N ! '
addition
d rilled
Dear Shapes, R.N -
Minnie Mo-Jse.
Spring
SHTICKERSSI
I M P E A C H
Braverman, (518) 73 1-8500
a standard
the
to me a I ittle more, and it 1 got the
i l ? ^ ^
Have a beautiful day.
L o n g I s l a n d a r e a . D r i v e a Lil i a n ! truck. Must
with
r e c r u i t e d " freshmen and t h e c o m -
like
Happy B«i ihdu y to you1
NYC
that
made it rather clear, as can be ex-
Miller feels
ehack of Rich Kapner (injured last
and Welchom
as intense as
affect
oilier individual, and that he will be
Ask and ye shall receiv
Happy 20HH
to
probably
his rule ;is captain. Miller seemed
small lor most teams)and at limes
DeaiBotsy,
IS:
transportation
For information coll
drive
Immediate payment. Telephone - Shelley
will
to mold another fine
graduate.John Quatmeehi. As lor
Albany,
l l C l l l g l h - 1 0 i n the last K m u i
Mary Blen Jukosk., 482-5544
pistols, Presentahon weapons,
that his performance
no sped He individ ua Igoa Is, such as
looked to more than last season,
Miller hotb on and oil the court
leader and the finest Dane player
soaking
PERSONALS
SUNYA
Minarture weapons, Models, Curiosa, etc.
teaching.
learn alter losing all o f last year's
Lile is nothing without youi friendship
busline C a l 465 6007
Wanted: Samurai sworch. War souvenirs.
citizen
this
Thanks for a great 19th birthday. I Lovo
(Spain} Complete package, SI99 » S29
guides,
including
in Loudonvile Own
of Europe for less than the cost ot Puerto
write
appliances,
I 482 3967 a h e i 6 PM
in Ma spalomas on Giand Canary N o n d
classroom
ea n try ability to h il from seemingly
aware
Colorie • 1 bedroom apartment for rent,
luary female aparlmentmate needed,
Rico or the Bahamas Jan 6 h to the 13th
(
reboundsorsomesuch statistic. He
one ballplayer w h o will have to
Love.Vi
A week in the sand, sea and sun paradise
and blue $150.
Chart is, 7 8712
curriculum,
averaging twenty a game or ten
be difficult
One more tim e
you're (re)bound to have a great season,
Reasonable. 465-3125
heat, near bus. Available immediately.
Female to shaie apai meet lo
Semester Own room, inexpert
M i l l e r told rne that he really had
As for the team's showing this
after 2
463-4064, Don. 459-3419, Harry Jr.
M a t h tutoring. A t levels. 7830296
played
year, many have felt that il would
yard. C a l 436-1027
Nad ell, 462 4 5 3 I for December occupan-
done
rem o d d my, painting • inside or outside.
I
the same as always."
look for the ball more o r
haven't
Although Miller obviously plays
forwards; however, his quickness
Gilly,
531
We're gonna be good, t h o u g h . "
play any differently."
all
down his role as co-captain, he is
BR, LR, Kitchen, bath, a l utilities, $165.
cellent condition. Tel: 274-3817 evenings
10 Speed
gonna
gonna change me at all. H I just be
we
strong d living talent, helms the tin-
439 5765
Any
at me any differently, and it's not
usual
that
ing a superb outside jumper and
seems dwarfed by taller and hellier
room. Car necessary. Rent $92 50. C a l
Typing Service • experienced, 50a page,
Yohama FG-180 steel-string acoustic; ex-
together for a whole lot o f time.
tion o f winning basketball, there is
Two Apts - 1 1 8 Southern Blvd. Upstairs: 2
Female roommate wanted to share fur-
F M / A M radio wilhspeakers. $100. 436-
be
me. and like I said before, I'm not
year's team is to continue the tradi-
in January. Each have own room. $67.
Typing done in my home, B69-2474
Dueling
peers among the
Dear Kap,
(Agency) 456-0998
$65, c a l a f l e r 7 PM, 372-6051
white
possess in that area. Offensively he
has few
they're all able lo d o it. ..it's not just
You'll g e l !
Two girls wanted for apartin en t o n busline
u til ties $160. Use of cellar and a Hie a n d
might
Dearest Rita,
presence...espeddly in the afterglow.
Downstairs: l o r 2BR, LR, Kitchen, b a t h , a l l
he
(Johnson)
Female reeded to share spacious a p a r t -
1972 Lange ProSkiboots, exatllentcondi-
tires,
basketball
synonomous
make much o f a difference...no. I
don't think the guys aregonna look
ability compensate
weaknesses
4022
tion. Sze 10. New bladers (need foam).
tubular
State
been
any
D i n e opponents, and besides hav-
extremely potent. And it drivesme WILD.
general and specialty counseforsinow be-
Tornado f ibreglossskis with Tyrolia step-in
Two girls wont t o shareapartmentfor spring semester. Call 457-5054 or 457-5055
have
lor
with excellence and success. If this
love, BM
UtiSties included. Call Robin, 462-4511
Lovechildrenand camp? Applications for
and brown. $15. 489-6627
Raleigh 'Competition'
$55/monlh.
from
0353
Excellent condition -pie lined coat- beige
Panasonic RS 2805
wanted:
decades Albany
squads
Irom 5-1.
465-5935 after 5
der hood, best offer. C o l 436-0361
m,
aparlmentmate
bedroom, on budine,
Call Scott, 384-4438
G e r m a n Skis (185), Boots {&6]h\
Female
8320
1964 Pontiac - v e r y g o o d concttion. $125.
2496
Happy Brthday! The poor boy hasto work
and j u m p i n g
Throughout the past couple of
desk, or call, on Dec 1 and wish Richie a
This semester. Spring, W e d . and Thurs.
Riders wanted: Leaving around Dec. 25
formance. Please contact Mike a t 465-
Oscar
by Harvey K u j a n
ed. Call 465-1754, Louise
Tues. a n d Thurs. ittorring. Return 3:30 .
night
Tuesday
Btp.
January: Female apartment mate needRiders wanted f o m Saratoga to SUNYA
Danes Fortunes Weigh Heavily on Miller
p u p w a i summoned
Christmas vacation. Call G l e n , 457-5020
'Wizard of O z ' tickets for any other per-
W o u l d - Ike to trade
the young
needlessly In the middle of a tuna sub. -
Barbara a t 489-2744
TM m e d i a t o r preferred. Call Annie, 462-
FOR SALE
nite,
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
HOME
Of
THOUSANDS
THOUSANDS
Come
OF
down
and
W NSII l \ ( , I O N , i t i i t i l
In n
"ii
LARGE5I selection or e a r r i n g s
ihcin
SI I m
A
I J I H (Si
$3 9 9 , l a x
liriiif/s nvalirif/j
It) alldeficit if."
LAW?
,, I
i Ii c
Unln-rsiii Siliuiil ul
I inns) t u l l he mi campus
omen rpips mamit,
Transcendental Meditation
D i i t i n h i r l i , 197.1 Irnin >> tun In I i
A c a r t o n o t CIGARCTTES
ONLY
oi-
t ep t c t i it i a i t\ c
WukblnKlun
ALSO
mis
I M I H I . S I I-1) IN I l l l -
EARRINGS
you'll EVER sou!
\ M S
I he Omills make iln
i . i k s ,MH) ih,- Kcilskuis i a p i i . i l i / t '
8.
see the
this
for
included
•IbA Control Ave
tor. No l o k u A...
Albony
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1973
noon, lo I,ilk l o s l u i l c n i s planum).'
In enlei Ian
school upon giadtia
l i o n , H I I h i n k l i i g tihoul
tipiiouilnicnls
in
n
I'laicnnnl
Make
Sci
LECTURE by Slrphrn Richtrr
Wednesday, Dec. 5" at 8 P.M.
l.C. 19
I f t t l l VMON
Barmuda
/hi
no//au
Europ.
Coroca/
ITItltlco
Ulgsk-ender/
u / f l
C a
|ir
|? |,j , 1 | i
i ice H i l i n i n i s l i a l i t m huiltlnip I I 5 |
FRIDAY, NOVEMBbiH i(), I'tV f
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVENTEEN
Swimmers1 Optimism Rises with Newcomers
by R o b Geier
l i n n y Van Ryn stood by the
edge o f the pool, eyes turned inward irift fijied'stare o f determination. The rest of trie team mocked
N s obsession, yet felt within them
the growth of that spirit that
possessed him. The mood of complacency
and defeat
that
dominated the team for the past
five years is slowly being replaced
by thisspirit of hope and committment. Optimism is the keynote in
t h i s s i x t h y e a r o f varsity swimming
at Albany.
Such attitudes have been k n o w n
to dissipate into the doldrums of
defeat, but the team's present
hopes seem to be based on a
number of substantial realities.
The team has improved depth and
diversity that is being molded and
shaped by an improved couching
staff.
A competitive squad of
talented freshmen has sparked a
yearning for improvement in the
seasoned uppcrclassmen.
A stalwart of experience and
talent is the team captain, senior
LenVan Ryn. I.en willwork to improve upon his n u m e r o u s past
records, and be a major point
winner in the process. Junior Ken
Weber has caught hold o l t h e "Van
Ryn" spirit and will challenge U-n-
ny in the distance freestyle events.
Sophomore T o m Staples will
provide consistent performance in
short distance freestyle, the team's
weak point.
P r o v i d i n g added depth in
various strokes are lettcrman Les
Puretz, RobGcier, and Jeff Rosen,
senior, junior, and sophomore
respectively.
It is the new members that will
p ush the team into a more powerful
competitive position. Juniors Rick
Masom and Ben Seibecker will
compete afterayears sabbatical as
a result o f their status as transfer
PrT""1 vs?
v ;
students.
Co-captain Masom's
easy going manner and natural
ability to do will will complement
the nervous energy spiraling from
Van Ryn's hard work. Seibcchcr
and Masom will be relied upon for
substantial point totals.
The incoming freshmen are unique in that they come to the team
with talent a n d e x p e r i e n c e
developed in high school and age
group swimming.
Inexperience
with the sport
has been
characteristic in previous years.
Dan Dudley, Kurt Emmerich,
Mitch Rubin, and JackSeidcnberg
should all approach or set many
new school records. Russ Bower,
Rory Rollnick, and Jerry McNamara will add to the team's
depth.
Quinn, Pat Mcgowan, and Jim
Herrick. John is a former allAmerica n swimmer from Adelphi
and divides his time as a student at
A l b a n y Law, and as qualified
m o t i v a t o r and coach at Albany.
Pat, now a teacher at Albany
formerly coached at
North
Carolina
U n i v e r s i t y a n d is
knowledgahle in the fine points of
racing technique. Jim is a University Librarian and coaches Bill
Buckley in diving. Together they
can weather the vicissitudes of
erratic performance and spur the
team to improvement.
S o p h o m o r e diver Bill Buckfcy
will provide more than adequate
representation in a spot that w a s
sorely vacant last year.
P r o v i d i n g the motivation and
training leadership for this sensitive a n d talented group is an expanded coaching staff. Assisting
head coach Brian Kelly who has
been with the team since its meager
beginning eight years ago.are John
S a t u r d a y at the university pool
at 1:00 pm is the fourth a n n u a l
Great D a n e Relays and the spirit of
confidence will he put to the test.
Iwelve schools will participate i n a
meet comprised solely ol relays
testing the team's capacity to put
three quality men into each race.
Keen e .
B i n g h a nip I o n .
"*;•";, •* • • "
•v.
• i-•
•
ji
M*'
• *••.••*'..
WJSFT
Bridgcwiitcr. Coast G u a r d , New
Pall/,
Pittsburgh.
Union.
CoblcskiII. h'ulton-Montegomct-y,
Morrisville. and l u r m i n g d a l c will
all he competing. Can Ihis new
team
ol h a r d w o r k i n g ,
individualistic athletes emerge 1mm
the doldrumsol dclcal'.' A l l p e o p l e
are invited to cheer, enjoy and encourage the process, whatever the
result.
~\ ••„, g $ ^ g "
The Swimming Team rounding into shape
Black Leaders Rarity On Court
by Bill Heller
Basketball is thought by many to
be one of the most progressive
sports concerning treatment ol
Blacks. Alter all. a look at the pros
shows Black coaches and Black
front oil ice men,not to mention the
great n u m b e r of Black players something hard to find i n o t h e r p r o
sports.
Does that mean that basketball
is void ol racial problems'. 1 Hardly,
toi many people. I hey sec q u o t a
systems on rosters, stereotypes
hindering Black leaders, a lack ol
Black floor generals, and showcasing whiles lor white audiences
And some see it right here at
Albany.
II there is one sport that sticks
out at Albany nvel the years it is
baskelhall. Guided by the hasketb a l l g c n i u s o l Richard
Sutlers.
the Great Danes haven't had a losing season in nearly Iwenty years.
During that lime, there was
a n o t h e r thing, besides losses, that
Sutlers' t e a m s didn't have a lot of:
Black players.
Ihis happened
because the University, until recent
years, h a s been while.
Understandably, therehave been
changes in the basketball t e a m s , a s
more Blacks came to Albany a n d
joined the team. How well has
S a u c r s a d a p l c d to Black
players',
on the o t I t i h a n d . i l he has treated
people a s equals, h a s he had a n y
a d a p t i n g to do'.'
I here have been charges, (until
recently, behind the scenes) ol not
having
Black
guards.
Black
leaders, and ol q u o t a s and show •
casing. Arc they valid''
One lonnei Black playet loi
Sailers Icels there's a quota system
Be Above the
Hassle
Staying in New York can be a hassle
- a n d an expensive one.
Avoid the hassles - stay at
Sloane House Y M C A , Convenient to
e v e r y t h i n g , coud facilities, caloturiu,
complete information center,
gymnasium.
A n d the $5 student rate
makes this trip
inexpensive
C o m e to t h e Cityl
SldANE
i iQusr
l i l t CUtXfltUlt.UM.jl -'Ml /'
jfre w«%t i4ni strum.
N.rv. Yuri, t.ity IUO<n
f ? l VI 0 9 6
on playing time. He said that substitutions were ' u s u a l l y a white for
a Black or a Black lor a Black and
rarely a Black lor a while,"
He also discussed stereotypes
about Black players: Blacks are
selfish
on the court"...not a
stereotype...a good e x a m p l e is
Byron Miller, who's very unselfish." - Blacks can't control or
lead a t e a m - " I [eel Iliat's what Doe
Hunks...there have been no Black
playirtgguards." I l e a d d e t l , concerning showcasing whites, that "It's
just like I h c p r o s . It's a while llniversitj here. You have to have
while guvs out there to gel the
crowd."
I his same player, along will]
other l o n n e i Black t e a m m a t e s , see
the problem ol Satie!sadju,sling to
Black ballplayers. I lies Icel thai
Saucrs is making Ihe a d | u s i u i e n t .
hul -.l.iw I\
I lu'v also l e d thai
S'llieis is uolvel leadv In have hvu
Black g u a r d s mil the team 01 to
have Urni oi live Blaek.soul on the
courl al Ihe same nine
h would he haul lo talk ol any
oven 1.1 a sin on Doe Salter's I cam.
One reason simply being that on
Ihis year's squad, eight ol thirteen
p layers are not while.
S a u c r s views Black selfishness
on the court a s something in
people's m i n d s : "I think a lot ol
people think Black kidsare selfish.
I hey're used to playing one-on-one
in I he playground. But the kids we
have here have really developed
into team players.
Byron and
Reggie (Smith) have come a long
way."
Is there a q u o t a system on playing tunc here'?
"I nevei even
iluiuglil about it." Doc said."1 ny
and give my talented players a
quota ol playing lime."
Regarding the idea ol showcasing whites • in the p m s . "Ii
wouldn't hnilici anyone il thev
Mailed live Blacks I don't think
'keeping
Ihe while eiisloinci
N.IIISIICS' csists in Ihe I .1 St '"
llnw about l i c i t " "I |iisl li v and
have Ihe players I need mil ilieie I
don't think about plavcis heme
Black oi while
I hope I nevei
tin I plav loi Ihe situation ."
I uiiiing In Ihe touchy issues ol
ATTENTION COMMUNITY
SERVICE STUDENTS
THERE WILL BE NO INCOMPLETES
GIVEN THIS SEMESTER
AGENCY LETTERS: Due December 3rd,
sent to Mrs. McKinley, SCHOOL OL
SOCIAL WELFARE
PAPERS; Due December 3rd, bring to
CONTACT OFFICE LCB 30B
GROUP EVALUATION SESSION:
Schedule at Contact Office - 457-4801
You Will Not Receive a Passing Grade if
Your Requirements Are Not Fulfilled.
'JOIJO
ii.ni Y u u l l i MiMtiil, l m
I.K.ihly
WE REALLY MEAN ITI
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Black
guards.
Black
Moor
generals, and Muck leaders, Siitiers
is very candid lo say the least. I he
wily Muck playing guard S a u c r s
has had was I onnic Morrison I rum
l%3-&7, A s l u r o l h e i Mack g u a r d s
or Mack Door generals. Sutlers
simply stales, "We haven't had any
good e n o u g h . "
Bauers & Minis Help Wrestlers to Success
by Vinny Reda
If this year's co-captains have
anything to say a b o u t it, the wrestling team a t A l b a n y State should
enjoy o n e of its finest seasons ever.
Both Larry M i m s a n d Doug Bauer
feel that this year's squad will
better last season's fine 8-3 dual
meet record and possibly get a few
highe
finishes in their three
scheduled major tournaments.
Their own individual wrestling
skill and dedication also make
Bauer and Mims key leaders
toward achieving these goals.
Coach
Joseph
Garcia
strongly
supports the team's
choice of captains this year. He
says, "They show o u t s t a n d i n g
leadership ability. In early season,
due t'omy administrative capacities
(Garcia i s S U N Y A Athletic Director). Mims and Bauer have been
responsible forgetting the y o u n g e r
men acquainted w i l h o u r p r o g r a m ,
and
in getting the practices
organized. They would never blow
[heirown h o r n s . b u t theyhave been
an immeasurable aid to the team."
Doug Bauer jokingly s h r u g s oil
the idea that his role i s o n c ol importance. "I guess you could iust
say I lead Iheexercisestroni nine to
time." he says.
Ga reia's version is more positive.
T h e r e isn't anything that Doug
Hitler won't d o lo help this team,
or th is school. Anv lime where he
cam olunlecr l o d o a job lor ail) ol
Ins lellow athletes and c o a c h e s he
will d o u.
lie makes hiniscll
available to the wrestlers when they
need some help, and often makes
a r r a n g e m e n t s a n d appointments
for visiting high school athletes."
Bauer's point l o t a l a s a freshman
was Ihe highest on
the varsity
team l h a t y c a r . l . a s t y e a r h e h a d a n
8-.1 record but felt he wrestled badly, having failed to make an improvement.
His teammate and
close
friend
Frank
Herman
s a y s / D o u g starled working for
this season as soon as last season
ended. He did a lot of running,
weight training, and finished third
in a very difficult tournament over
t h e summer. He's ready to make
this season a real good one."
Coach Garcia leels lhal Doug's
weak spot in ihe past has been his
balance, since ihe strength and
speed were always there. In practice Ihis year he leels lie has seen
definite improvement in Ihis area.
Larry Minis' weak spot has
never been balance or any thing else
asa wrestler. Bauersayswith some
admitted e n \ \ ."Larry isextremely
hard to take down or reverse
because he is able lo control his
weight s.i well." Mims' second
place finishes in both the S i a t e U n i\ersit\ Championships a n d the
New York Imilalional last year
lx-.it nut thai lact.
Sa\ s Ga tela. "Minis is more ihe
qiiiel type, but in Ins own wa\ he
possesses sluing leadership qualil\ He gets the |oh done tan I l-l
dual lecord), is ,i real q u a l m
wrestlei in all lespects. and has
great concentration. He's the type
you count on for a win in a big
meet."
Mims is pleased with the quality
on this year's team. "We are better
this year," he states, "and we arc
going to show just how much we've
improved.despite the fact that the
SUNY conference and the New
York Invitational will be much
more competitive t h i s y e a r . "
Both Mims and Bauer are particularly looking forward to the
meet with the University of
Rochester on February sixth.
Minis says, "We tied them t h e y e a r
belore and last year we were
leading through the lower weight
classes and I hem lost the meet in
the heavier matches by a point or
two. Everyone is looking forward
lo thai meet this year, especially
sine e we h a v e
stronger
h e a v y w e i g h t s . " And
Bauer
adds.'We really hope lo get up lor
them t h i s y e a r because il would be
u*r\ rewarding lo beat them badly"
Bauer agrees w iih Mim's | u d g ment ol the team's capabilities
"We have a lew guys this year who
should lose lew il a n y d u a l meet
matches." he says. "In the past we
haven't needed many wrestle-oils
on ihe team to establish \arsit\
positions
Sow we have 25 guys
oui and everyone isbeingchallenged It means two ill ings One. we
will have more depth than in
precious veals, so illnesses and inI u ncs w il I not hurl us ,is much
Secondly,a lotol peoplearenow
pushing others for spots, and this
added competition will pay off
later. When you wrestle-off there is
a lot of tension, just as there will be
in the later big meets.. In the past
we haven't been conditioned
enough for tournaments. Thisyear
we will be."
About their teammates? Take
Walter Katz for instance at 118
pounds. Mims: "He did really well
last year a s a freshmen. He's very
agressive and will be even better
Ihis year."
Ethan Grossman wrestlesat 134.
Bauer "Hedidn't wrestly much in
high school so he was only so-so
last year, but he's much improved
Irom what I've seen in practice."
And on lorn Horn (158), Bauer
says, " H e was excellent in practice
hut he did not commit himself on
the mat enough inmeets. He lost a
lew in the lasl period last year.
Willi a litllc more aggressiveness
and the added moves he has picked
up. he'll be a real asset."
Minis is also happy about ihis
sear's freshmen and he's eager to
help ihem come along: "We have a
couple ottreshmen hattling al I 26
pounds.
Victor
Gagliardi.
w h o ' s from my hometown ( l . u c a .
N.Y.) and Brian .luhrev w h o are
reallv
c o m i n g along
kick
lavvrence is impressive and a I least
temporarily laken the |77 p o u n d
position Imm b l a n k Herman |ft-2
I.isl v e i l )
We gel sonic line
treshmen each vcar When Iw.is.i
freshman (Mims is o n e of only two
seniorson this year's squad) Jimmy
Nightingale helped meconccntratc
when Iwasnervousbeforemy first
match. He was captain that year,
and now I'd like to h e l p o u t g u y s i n
the same manner. But first they
have lo be prepared and determined Ihemselves, and o u r guys
thisyear are."
M ims points to Don M ion (190)
and Rudy Vido (heavyweight) as
iwo veterans w h o are also
prepared.
He feels that if the
match comes down to the last two
matches this year. Albany should
emerge the victor.
If II docs come down to the last
iwomatches. however, you can just
about hcl lhat two others have
done a good deal lo sel up the victory lor Mionand Vido. Bauerand
Minis a re proving i ust lhat important lo ihis year's learn, and wilh
their line supporting cast, may
never lei a n o p p o n e n t gelcvcn lhal
lar.
Track
Indoor
track
track
meeting
and
this
spring
Friday.
N o v e m b e r 30 al l o u r o ' c l o c k i n
I' I
125. M l c a n d i d a t e s m u s t
. i t l e n d . II u n a b l e v oil m u s t c o n l.ict C o a c h
Munscv
Engineers:
Find out about the Nuclear Navy.
I he subject ol Mack leaders is
relatively meaningless, l a s t year
Reggie Smith co-captained the
Danes a n d thisyear he and Myron
are co--captains. I here are only
three reluming regulars lor ihe '7.1
Danes. Miller. S m i t h , and Harry
J o h n s o n , all who are black and
ihey will lead the team. S a u c r s
MIS \ "It's their leain this year
I he j believe lhat."
lias D o c Sutlers had t o c h a n g e .
lo ad.ipt. in Mack players'.' SHIRTS
answered. "I dunk thai all in\
pla vei s ,in' mil i\ iduals and
dil Ioceii i because ihe\ "re individuals, nil) necessarily because
.il iaee What I've had tu adapt lo
is a new geneialioti
long hair,
b e n d s , outlook ..II hie "
I ndotiblvillv, an Auieiiean
spoils siiiKliue tvpilivtl in the past
b\ baseball lu.ug "a game lot
( .uK.isj.Hi males" has a long way
lo go
I he spoils establishment
h.i-s been slow lo change lew oi no
HI;ick managers. Mack olhcials ,.i
ltl.uk owncis
( ompi.-iiiive spoils, whelbci at
Uh.im .0 m \ a u k e c Siadiutu
sliuiikl In- simpU ih.n ettinpetiliv.
ILusi.tiis oil alhclcles should be
l i n a l on litem mil i , m leliguiit.
HI .iit\ othei csliaiteous lacloi
I 111111 titnaleh . \ \ e h \ e in a wotld
\\ heie i l u l is nol a Iways ihe ease
wliete people use bias and pielitdiee .is siibstiliik-s loi :eason
Spoi is is mil iuik|uc t i o m socle
tv. \ Ibaus is nol imupte In otbvi
places. As mentumed in live I'M si
part, u here h u m a n s internet Iheie
an- bMimm p i o h l u u s Oui niily
hopes ate education and mi
ileislaudiug.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER
97 'A
SEE
Please s e n d inu illuatrnled lilainluiu
NUC1.EAH N - V Y
THE NAVY INFORMATION
TEAM ON CAMPUS
Name.
TUESDAY
Street.
Clty._
Telephone^
8ohool
Stale
Zip
Age
Graduation Dato
Suml To Ollic.il P i o u i a n m O i l "
Navy Hitciuil'ii'l Si,Oh
111 Wanhinc/lon ftv»
Albany. N Y I . : . ! ! "
I'HlbAY.NOVEMBKH 30, l'»7
4
If you think you have the ability and desire
to master nuclear engineering, the Navy's
Nuclear Propulsion Program has openings
for about 200 outstanding college graduates. There's a Navy Nuclear Propulsion
Officer ready to give you all the details on
how you can become someone special in
the new Navy.
DEC. 1973
AI.HANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINETEEN
spo
l/rUESDAY
ALBANY
ipCCC
J
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 30. 1075
Stale University ol New York at Albany
Cagers Open Season Tomorrow
by Bruce Maggin
Tomorrow evening a young and
vastly inexperienced Albany State
basketball team will open up their
73-74 varsity campaignat Williams
Gone from last year's squad arc
five seniors including all three
guirds. This will put the pressure
on R c g g i c S m i t h , B y r o n M i l l e r a n d
Harry Johnson, who are the only
returning vetcrens.
Seven new
players grace the roster and it will
he Coach Richard Sauers j o b to
shape the team into a formidable
unit.
The problem on the team is
naturally at guard.
Freshmen
Mike Supcunowiez, Ed Johnson
and Gary Irevett have all looked
gcxid in spots but they have a [ s 0
been
very
inconsistent.
Supcunowic/, a local hoy from
I.in ton High.led hisschool in scoring and has a line outside shot.
Irevett. another local product
from Scotia, is a good playmuker
and a line dribbler. l:d Johnson is
the quickest man on the team and
has an excel lent shot. Sauers says
" H e is going lo be some player."
Rich Kapner. up Iroin the j u n i o r
varsity, is a dillcrent breed ol
ballplayer when compared to the
freshmen. He is morepoised. Rich
is not spectacular bin he gels ihe
job done. Unfortunately, he is now
suffering from a bad charley horse.
Doc Sauers is slill unsure as to
who will start at guard but he is
c o n f i d e n t t h a i someone will
emerge before the year is out.
Uiok lor Ed Johnson and Kapner
lo slarl in tomorrow'sgame.
If A Ibany is going anywhere this
yea r it wil I have to get a strong perlormance from the reluming
towards. Doc Sauers is concerned
about the Danes'Tcbounding with
most o f the opposilion'sfront line
having a hundred pound advantage over the Danes. "I feel Harry
and Byron can still average in double figures in rebounding." Harry
Johnson w i l l handle the pivot but
faces the awesone task of playing
against centers much bigger and
stronger than him. He will have to
endure a great deal o f punishment
under the boards. Harold Merritt,
who did anoutstanding j o b on last
years JV will be Harry's backup.
Co-captains Byron Miller and
Reggie Smith will be counted on
heavily to put the ball in the hoop
and perhaps more importantly
provide the team with that much
needed leadership.
Miller, last
year's AS!* athlete of the year,
musl contribute greatly under the
boears.
Rounding out the Danes lineup
arc Jose Alicea. Mel Brown, and
Ron Edmonds. They all could see
more act ion as the season
progresses but right now. they will
make up the bench. I'ele Koola
will play JV hall Ihis semester to
keep himself in shape for mext
semester, when he becomes eligible
lor ihe varsity squad.
Ihe Danes have scrimmaged
ugainsl
Hartford, AIC
and
Southhampton and came out
about even, point wise. Ihe team
looked the best when itranbttthad
trouble slowing down, lomierly a
Dane strong point.
Doc Sauers doesn't care lomake
any predictions lor the season " I
/f.
Ihe team, however, doesn'l get
any help from theschcdulc. W i t h a
young team, it is an advantage to
open up at home but Albany must
play their first three games oa the
road ynd they don'l return home
until right before finals'litis hasto
put added pressure on the team.
Ihe schedule itself is a tough one
with the Danes competing in Ihe
rough SUNY conference,
With
live out o f the eleven members in
post season play last year.this w i l l
not make things any easier.
Brockport is the favorite to lake
the conference title as only A i l American
Ron G i l l i a m
has
graduated.
Ihe Golden Eagles
possess three men 6' 9" or taller.
I'otdam and Buffalo Stale are not
too far behind Brock port in talent.
I he lo ugliest teamson (he schedule
will probable be llarlwick and
Siena, who Albany plays twice.
Former D e a n I. M o y e r Hunsberger, whose resignation touched off
a furor
by Clifford B. Lcvinc
Cagers performing one of their drills. A l b a n y opens tneir season
tomorrow at W i l l i a m s .
by Kenneth Arduino
recent
memory,
the
Albany
years.
C o a c h Joe G a r c i a feels
SUNY
heavyweight
champ,
w i l l have to heal out t w o new-
ha 1 tie it out, B o t h arc p o t e n t i a l -
that il the team stays free of i n -
Rudy Vido.
K u d y came i n t o
comers lo l a k e Ihe j o b l h a t w a s
ly t o p talent and ihe c o m p e t i -
S t a l e wrestlers open u p their
j u r i e s and academic a n d
per-
his o w n last year w i t h a 12-1-1
left vacant by the d e p a r t u r e o l
t i o n between the I w o w i l l i m -
197.1 c a m p a i g n this S a t u r d a y ,
sonal p r o b l e m s . l h e l e a m s h o u l d
record, his o n l y loss c o m i n g : t o
graduate Jell A l h r e c b l .
prove b o t h wrestlers.
i n the A l b a n y
at I
he able to have an e x t r e m e l y
p m . T h e wrestlers w i l l be hard
line season. Unlike past teams,
pressed lo f o l l o w
experience is a key w o r d .
triangular
in ihe
foot
steps u l the t a i l sports t c a m s a s
L e a d i n g the returnees, is c o -
U n i o n s H o w i e Benedict.
At
Hack also i s c o - e a p l a i n D o u g
Bauer,
Wall
Grossman,
lorn
Kal/,
Ethan
Horn,
Ken
IW
lbs,
transfer s t u d e n t
Albany
Don
I his year's schedule includes
lias
Mion.
such p o w e r f u l learns as
U i s t year he was forced l o sil i l
I'osl.
Dartmouth
o u t due l o the transfer rule,
Along
with
and
these
captain U i r r y M i n i s .
Mimsled
K n i c k n n c i unci I-tank H e r m a n ,
l i e ' s ready l o go now a n d w i l l
ponents.
resurgence in Varsity sports.
ihe team last year in pins luid
l i t i ) u g h these men arc veterans
be a key a d d i t i o n .
season w i t h the S U N Y
lias done an o u t standing j o b I lie
i h e i r positions ate not
last Iwo years.
scenic.
I he e i g h t returnees arc the
Also back is
totally
A l 12d i w o n e w c o m e r s , Vic
K n i c k n i y c i at 150 lbs
(iagliardi and B r i a n .Juhrcy . w i l l
Albany
pionships,
the
(,W.
R II .
duel
they try lo continue the A l b a n y
largest g r o u p l o return i n reccnl
op-
finishes the
Cham-
N.Y.
Championships
Slale
and
the
NCAAs.
I h i s weekend the first m a j o r
tournament
is
liiangulai
ihe
Albany
Last
vein's
w i n n e r . U n i o n has to s k i p tins
one
due
lo
academics.
Last
year's second place team D a r t m o u t h returns a n d must rank
as A l b a n y ' s loughest c o m p e t i tion
I ending
Maccabinh
Dartmouth
(James
is
winner,
C h u c k 1 stin. a l UMI His
mittees are in the process of interviewing prospective candidates to
fill the position of Department
Chairman in the departments o f
matheimatics, physics, computer
science and chemistry. These committees are responsible for the
preliminary
i n v e s t i g a t i o n of
applicants and recommendations
to the Dean of Science and
Mathematics, of those who might
besl fill the positions.
Some departments are indeed
mak ing progress in llieir quest, yel
il seems that Ihe fall 1974 semester
may begin wilh the search cumin ill ees st ill searching lor chairmen.
In actuality, there are no linesopen
al present. Ihis means thai at Ibis
l i m e . Ihe a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
of
S U N Y A has not
allocated
provisions lor Ihe position and
salary ol even one such department
chairman, lei alone lour.
According lo IX'an Cowling ol
ihe School ol Science and
Mathematics, SUNYA's proposed liudgel lor die 1974-5 academic
year w ill ask lor approximately ten
additional lines. Il appears that
S U N Y A may end up with a budget
dle.
A l o n g Willi D u i l n i u i i l l i , R I M
and I c h i m i n College w i l l c o m pete
I cum
inouili
( i a i c i a sees l i t i s us a t w o
compeiion
and
ticipants.
wilh
Albany
L a s l year
Dari-
the
par-
Albnay
finished a d i s s a p o m t i n g t h i r d ,
one and hall points b e h i n d .
I his weekend's m u l c h should
nluwbky
Dr. Louis 1 . Benc/et is soon expected Ingram his approval and a Mow the
A l u m n i Association lo begin construction u l their conference house by
May. 1974. The Alumni House, m a l l probability, isgoing to b e b u i l t o n a
site lo the downtown side o l Indian Quad, in I runt ol the stand of trees that
is north til the Indian Quad parking lot. I he selected area is now covered
wilh silt Irom ihe lake which was dredged over ihe summer. Hene/el'sapproval will come about only after much debate, often hitler, concerning
where the site should he.
l i v e sites were considered by live Alumni Association and by the Environmental Decision Committee. Ihe EDC. founded two yearsago, consists ol faculty, administrators, and students interested in maintaining
satisiaclory ecological standards on campus,
According to David W. .lenks. president ol the Association, the Alumni
were concerned with I aiding a site thai would be on campus, economical,
and that would meet am environmental standard* I be 1' DC set. He said he
wanted the House close in a Quadrangle calel ena as the House will not
have e.xlensivc kitchen laeilities. and close to the pod mm so aslo be easily
aecessahlc by all campus members .lenks also wanted a scenic site: one
viewable from both I'erimetei Road and the main campus
\ controversy .nose when Gary Selwyn, a student representative on the
I DC. declaied the wh.de site selection was ,i larce. and lhal ihe Alumni
\sMiciation mils wanted the alnic mentioned site. He said lhal they did not
si-i ion sly eonsidei the o die i loin I he sell -ace la inied instigator also charged
that the I 1 >(' was imtneised m polities,and that mam ul ihelaeully voted a
puiliculai way because ol then desne lo obtain leniiie lie said the selected
site is in the lake area, ami thai aiea. lie argues, should be lelt alone
Selwyn said t lummy, ol ihe loui sites had then advantages, lie suggested
putting the Mu mm House tin ihe olhci side o 1Perimeter Kd.. near parking
lol numbei seven He said lhal thai site was a head) ecologically destroyed,
ami easiK v isible lot entering v isitois, lenks argued against that site explaining lhal sewei and powei laeilities a ic loo tar away and the cost would
use beyond the Association's planned % 175,UEHJ expenditure ol the House.
Selwyn then suggested a thud site, acioss IVi uneler Kd and the lake, lie
said lhal llie land iheie was all cleared I'm Ihe lieldhouse, bul the Stale had
inn mil id money Sclw vn ui.unlaiiu.xj thai since it was already ecologically
ilestroycd . consliueiiou may as well take place there lenks responded that
since die lieldhouse was not built, ihe same const ruction problems existed
as with ihe otliei site .k-nks also aigned thai he believed the Alumni House
should be pari n I I been mp us, and not shoved nil into an unohscrvablcaiea
is not autonomous from ihe rest o l the university. In fact, be argued that
sixty per cent nl AA's kinds go to university related functions such as
scholarships, library additions, various funds and leaching awards. He said
that with the expected Alumni fund increase the AA hoped to spark the
construction o f ol ieldhouse.Jenkssa id. 'This campus needs a fiekihouse so
bad it hulls.", and Selwyn agreed when he said, "The students would behest
served if the Alumni Association pressed for a lieldhouse."
I he Alumni House, it appears, wil I be built on the first site, but several of
Selwyn's safety proposals have been approved by the I: DC and accepted by
.lenks. Selwyn's safeguards include a maximum of seven parking spaees.a
single driveway, a nature trail between parking lot seven and the House (of
which Jenks said. "That would be great. That would be fantastic.**), and the
T DC en urn raged an arboretum and garden, use of natural vent ila lion and
solar eucigv (il possible) and Ihe right ol ihe L D C to view any furthercxpansinn.
I lie Alumni House, according to Dr. William ( i . I- loyd. lonner Chairman nl ihe lluilding Committee ol SUN YA's Alumni Association, w ill
•pmvide meeting and conference laeilities lor campus groups, community
pinups, and alumni, and will provide an minimal hnspitality center lor
alumni, and university use in Us iclalmnsvv ilh externa I groups and visitors.
the I louse w ill also serve as the repository for memorabilia significant In
SI \ i A and vv ill prov ide nlliee space Ini alumni relations "
Henry M Madci'n 7 . present ( bat mum ol the building Committee, ma
lellei t o D i InnScoii. ( l u i i i i i . i n n l ihcl DC. said that die a i eh Heel vv ill he
emnuiagcd lo "make the pio|ecl ecologically sound, and to design a
building lhal is eoinpalible wilh the sui rounding env iron men t " I he Alumn i Association agrees dial the House must be distinctly modern so as in In
in wiib ihe campus, however, they hope it will have a "warmer" atmosphere
than ihe iesi nl the campus now conveys,
Ihe nrehiteel is I D be chosen ihis week, .lenks is hoping lor an en
v no ii mental showpiece, which will probably please (iary Selwyn. but not
dissuade him trom lollowing his environmental convictions in the future.
LVcmWr4.IV
give sonic indication how a d vanced A Ibany is a h e a d y .
Selw MI'S lav o I He site was neai ihe \S esletn \ sen tie entrance, jusl south
ul the gvin l b ' said il was neai sew ei ami pov-vci laeilities, the looiball held.
,nid IIIV iev\ nl llielake .lenks. and nthei I I »( me tubers, believed, howe\ei,
dial lite LoristniUion al llus sue would dcslioy Hie thin lavei ol trees
shielding the ami pus I nun ,i lew comiueicuil build mgs on Western \v e
Uwn sewage would have in IK pumped uphill, increasing the alteadN
I muled costs
Se l w v i i M n i . i l suggestion wastheennvei.sioii ol ihe Waveih Place, an old
home, pist n i l die south side ol die campus leaks said thai llie old home's
iestoration would he cosily and a ncecssaiv, expansion would dcslioy nianv
11ees Also the lovvnnl (iuildcilund has zoned lhal land icsideniial. and the
\ U KnVMiville llomeow net's \ssociiilion is set in cnloree thai in ling
lenks also emphasized dial the M i n i m i are pan ol the campus and it
would not be light lot the in to beanywheieel.se He explained that the A A
jwhich calls for only three or four
new lines after it goes through
legislative review. Possibly, none
of these vacancies may go to the
Division of Mathematics and
Sciences.
A l l SUNY centers are allotted
the same financial resources per
full-time-equivalent student by the
Slate Legislature. But President
Bcne/et has the final say as to how
these funds will be spent. According to Dean Cowling, 'some people" a re pressuring the university to
lor mu late new programs and
d e p a r t incuts. E n v i r o n mental
Studies, for example. Yet, how am
the administration justify the
development of new departments,
which require at least one departnienl chairman and one other insiruclor. when the university cannot even afford to adequately staff
ils established ones?
I his fall. 31 per cent ol the
Ireshman class enrolled in biology.
Calculus classes are admitting up
lo sixty or seventy students pel seclion, and there have been talks of
ba\ ing to s ion teach die course as a
150-studeni lectureclass in orderto
accommodate the rising number o r
students who wish lo take calculus.
1 here is a notice posled on the
math bulletin board in the Earth
Science building concerning the
application for possible graduate
student asustantships lor ihe coming spring serrcsler. Yet,according
to Cowling, the badly understaffed
math department will probably not
receive ihe funds necessary to grant
such assistants.
I he solution does not lie in the
culling *d (acuity but rather in
placing the opening nl additional
lines as lirsi priority in ihe budget,
'Some people" aredemandingthal
new departments be Innned.
"Some people" in the community
wani the College ol General
Studies to oiler them more courses
which can lead to a degree. But
whit aie these "people"*' 1 bey do
nol seem to be the majority ol lulltune-equivalent students lor whose
benelii ihe university has been
allocated binds.
I he using need loi stall in the
Division ot
Mathematics and
Seiences seems to stem Iroin the
eonlhetmg lads thai SUNYA was
established basically as a liberal
ails university bul in recent years,
more o l its students have decided
in major in math oi science. Little
lias been done in accommodate
these additional students, and the
laculty has complained that their
leaching will suiter in large classes
I he lac! remains lhal no lines in
die low departments .tie mimed I.I le Iv a v a l la b le
A nd ,
although, die laculiv positions
u h ich w ill be vacated in these
departments by those who have not
been granted l enure will del in lie ly
he lilled by new (acuity, a n y o l die
vacancies may be used lo add new
la cult)
in otbei departments.
In this ease,
the Division ol
Mathematics and Sciences would
have even less lacully next year.
lie will
give D o i i M i o n all he can h a n -
•UJJV
VVrestie-offs this week to decide who wrestles Saturday
aver departmental replacement procedures.
by Lee Levin
Following the resignation of
Arts and Sciences Dean I. Moyer
Hunsberger, a search
News
committee
was
Analysis created for ihe purpose of investigating
prospective
candidates Ibrthat vacated post. In the
interim, the deans of the various
schools within the college of Arts
and Science have assumed the load
of Hunsberger's work. They have
not, as of yet. reached a definitive
decision on any possible designate.
Since that time, lour department
chairmen have left their office, as a
result
either
ol
voluntary
resignations, or some ol the other
internal cleaning processes of this
university.
Each ol those
departments has formed us own
search committee, also with the intern o l arriving at a suitable
replacement for their head posl.
these committees have been
searching outside ol this university
for candidates lor the position and
none has ol yet. settled on a
siiiislactoiy prospect.
Ai present, the four search com-
Alumni House to be Built Near Indian Quad
Albany Matmen Host Triangular
W i t h the most veteran squad in
Suit UnivtrJiyolNi» Vort il Vfcwy
Lines forNew Math and ScienceProfs in Doubt
have a good team as sooni as we
am get it together. There isn't
anything we can't d o . " The team
obviously will slarl maturing as the
season progresses. How fast they
mature w i l l be the key. But Doc
Sauers has the knack for teaching
basketball. T w o years ago Sauers
was faced with a similar situation,
having to'replace four starters,
Thai team matured to the point
where they would have had an
N C A A bid if Byron Miller wasn't
ruled ineligible. Ihe situation this
year will be tougher with freshmen
on the team lor Ihe first time.
As lor the Williams game itself,
i Is a lough place lo open a scasona s
the Danes I ootid out Iwo years ago.
Il'sa very smallg) in and Ihe young
Danes w i l l have llieir work cul out
lor them.
Vul, 1.x No. 4?
A view of (he proposed Alumni House site near I n d i a n .
Ihe overall student body of
SUNYA has been incieasmg over
| llie yea is. and il seems only natural
•gilhut additional faculty is needed in
under lo cope with the situation,
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