Binghamton Bursts Booters' Bubble

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Binghamton Bursts Booters' Bubble
by Nathan Salant
" D i s a p p o i n t e d , Yes. Discouraged, n o . " T h a t was C o a c h Bill
Schieffelin's reaction the d a y after
his b o o t e r s were eliminated from
the N C A A T o u r n a m e n t by visiting
B i n g h a m t o n . The g a m e itself w a s a
2-1, d o u b l e overtime m a r a t h o n ,
a n d very reminiscent of t h e first
meeting between these two clubs.
The difference, however, was the
o u t c o m e . The D a n e s played their
hearts out, but they just did not
click the way they had all season. In
fact, it was actually one of their
poorer showings, but that is what
t o u r n a m e n t tension and pressure
are all a b o u t .
It was quite a g a m e , a n d d o not
let a n y o n e tell you any different.
Over 2,000 fans braved the freezing
t e m p e r a t u r e s , biting winds, and
c o n t i n u o u s snow, a n d they all got
their money's worth. Both goalies
put on exceptional performances,
especially Albany's Henry Obwald
who was super in the nets. Defense
a n d missed opportunities were the
order of the d a y , a n d the style of
play.
At times, the game resembled a
hockey game, especially d u r i n g
those frequent periods of time in
which o n e team would d o m i n a t e
play, while t h e other
tried
desperately to clear the ball.
The g a m e itself w a s a true battle
between evenly matched teams,
and opened with
Binghamton
d o m i n a t i n g play. After a b o u t ten
minutes of allowing the visitors to
bang away at the Albany net, the
Danes got il together and reversed
the play. Ten minutes of Dane
Domination followed, but the
home team tailed to score. Soon,
play became fast and furious, with
excellent end-to-end action.
With 15 minutes gone in the
game, Obwald was caught on the
right side of the net, a n d Bob
Schlegel found himself the only
man in the way of N.Y. State's
number-two
scorer,
Charles
Uneweaver. His blast was stopped
by Schlegel. a n d the fans gave
S c h l e g e l a standing
ovation.
Minutes later, Uneweaver c a m e in
on a b r e a k a w a y , and Obwald
slopped him this time. Several
Dane drives were also falling short,
as Goldstein kept the Binghamton
d o o r shut.
It was a long cold Saturday afternoon for the soccer team
find-to-end action continued,
until with just 3 minutes left in the
hull, l x r o y Aldrick was fouled at
the 30-yard mark. The resultant
direct kick was booted a r o u n d in
front of the net, popped up in the
air, and was headed into the goal
hy Schlegel. The crowd went wild,
and it looked even better when the
half ended 1-0.
1 he second hall was characterized by more end-to-end action. Hie
D a n e s came out s m o k i n g , but were
cooled off by Goldstein. The tide
reversed itself, a n d Binghamton
began a five-minute p o u n d i n g of
the Dane net. A lull in the action
followed, and t h e n both t e a m s
began t o play sloppy soccer, failing
to complete passes or look for the
open man.
fact t h a t time had supposedly been
s t o p p e d . T h u s , the Danes were
deprived of a direct kick at the
Binghamton net with the possibility of a s c o r e highly probable.
Binghamton overcame this sloppiness first, and l o o k a d v a n t a g e of
the Danes' continued p o o r play.
With 15 minutes left in the game.
Binghamton began lo blitz the
Dane net. and Marty Friedman
heat Obwald two minutes later lo
knot the score,
The first overtime period saw
both t e a m s come close, but fail to
score. By the start of the second
overtime, it was obvious that both
teams were fro/en and tired. You
could sense that the winning goal
had lo come soon, as the players
were almost d r o p p i n g in their
tracks. With 2:30 gone in the second overtime, Binghamton scored
on a Dawson breakaway, and u
was all over.
I he Danes came right back after
the goal, sparked hy Leon Scdclian. who was playing his finest
game ever. A Hurry of shuts in
front of the Binghamton net
brought the crowd lo its feet, and
twice the Danes appeared to have
scored, only t o have Goldstein
make the save. Edgar M a r l i n e / was
deliberately tripped up on the
breakaway, but the officials failed
to notice what would have given
the Danes a penally kick.
lor
Icon
Sedclian.
Sieve
(.'arisen.
Dale C o b u n e .
Mark
Solano, and Cliff Wal/er. il was.
"the last g a m e . " All live are either
seniors or ineligible next year, and
will be missed next year. I c o n
played the best game of his career
here ibis past Saturday. Cliff,
broken wrist and all. played a line
game, t o banc and Solano have
been steady performers all season,
and Carlseti has done a superb job
us backup goalie.
II soon became obvious lhal this
game was definitely going to overtime. 1 he lans began heading for
the coffee stand, when the only truly controversial play occurred.
With just ten seconds lelt in regulation play, a Binghamton fullback
committed a foul and rewarded the
official wilh some four letter
words. I he ret called time out to
tell the scorers that this player had
a game warning, but the timer
never saw the time out signal, and
never slopped the clock. Alter a
consultation, the officials decided
that time had run out, a very
strange decision considering the
Arthur Bedloid plaved an outstanding
g a m e , as did
Bob
Schlegel. a n d ihey will have many
more in the future. Alter all. the
Danes will be retaining their eight
I reshmen and two s o p h o m o r e
starters lor next season, I his year
they gained the experience and
learned how to work together. No
one expected them lo win the
nationals, much less gel into the
t o u r n a m e n t in the lusi place, but as
Coach Schiellelin said. "We have
come a long way this year."
Yes. Coach, this is the start id
something big. I he lans can eagerly await next year.
Gridders Finish With Sweet Victory Over RPI
by Bill Heller
The Great Danes closed out I heir
first year of varsity football with a
28-3 win over the RPI Engineers
Saturday. The victory meant a 7-2
record for Albany, and a 4-2 edge
over varsity competition.
Although only l-H going into the
g a m e , the Engineers had played a
very tough schedule, a n d were actually picked to knock oft the
D.ines hy the Knickerbocker
Newt
a n d the Times Union. And while
they held the Danes to a 3-3 tie at
haltluue. it was only a question ol
lime before the wishbone would
work.
Albany completely dominated
the second hall, scoring lour I l l ' s
and limiting KIM to II yards total
offense. J o h n Uertu/zi, who had a
very poor lirst hall, gui the Danes
u nt racked with exec lien I execution
of the triple option.
Scoring in the Inst ball was
limited to two held goals, a V.3varder by KIM's Gary Mangels,
a n d a 2d-yardei by Vinnie Pierce.
I he Danes, who were completely
shut oil in the first q u a r t e r , made
t w o long drives in (he second stanza bul c a m e up with just three
points
I lie hrsi Albany 1 D was a 7Kyuid drive in seven pl»y*>, capped
h) a In-yuid.lohri B e i i u / / i run. On
t h e very l wo play* be I ore licit u/zi's
scoie, Glen Sowalski broke u 2nyard run a n d l o r n DeHlois a 23yardcr.
Obviously fired up, the defense
immediately got the ball back for
Bertu/zi. Don Mion picked off an
K 1*1 pass and returned il to the
Engineers' 37.
The Danes quickly got a n o t h e r
six when IX' Blois busted over from
t h e t w o . seven plays later. A l a k e
e x t r a point, try lor two, went
nowhere, hut the Danes led 15-3.
The fourth q u a r t e r started with
each team unable to move the hall
With the clock beginning lo make
Engineer lans edgy. K 1*1 laced a
key second and one on their own
2V I hen " I m \ " Ilollowa;, personally look charge, first slopping
a n oil-tackle play lot no gain, then
sacking the KPI quarterback for a
15-yard loss.
On the next possession, lieitu/zi
hit Bob Baxter loi a 35-yard score
on a loutth and live. Ai the 6:00
mark, D i v e Ahonen replaced Berlu/yi, and guided the Danes 54
yards lor then final score. Il wasn't
until the last twenty seconds ol the
hallgame that Kl'l Imally got then
lust firm-down ol the hall.
I he wm must have been verv,
satisfying fin Coach f o r d , who
had taken abuse h o r n none othct
than Kl'l head coach D u e White,
lor scheduling palsies like Siena.
White had remarked altei Albany
hurled Siena to an assistant Dane
C o a c h . "Why don't you schedule
Uansingbtirgh's J W I hear they
h i m : an open game." lowurd the
e n d ' ol this game, s o m e Albany
players were mysteriously misnam-
ing RP1 as Dinsingburgh High.
Statistically, the Danes were
balanced well on the ground. Bertu/zi rushed for 70 yards, followed
by Sowalski (64). Marvin Perry
(54), and DeBlois (53). Bertuzzi
also hit on three ol six passes for 67
more.
Il would be hard to single out
one person on the I >a lies as responsible lot the team's success, but the
plain l a d is that when J o h n liertuzt\ did Ins | o h . the team operated
like a smooth machine
('ongiaiulations go to the whole loothall program, and the course (hat's
being pursued loi loolball at
Albany
Next year Drexel and
possiblv Holstia will be added to
the schedule, as (he Danes will
move up (he ladder ol siuallcollege
loolball.
b y Glenn von Nostitz
Governor Nelson
Rockefeller
told a gathering of 500 invited
guests in the Ballroom Wednesday
afternoon that the Slate University
of New York must become a
"creative force in the future" by
becoming closely involved in the
solving of c o m p l e x problems such
as the energy eirsis and lood shortages.
Rockefeller's speech here was
part ol the 25lh anniversary
celebrations of the S U N Ysystein,
which also included an elaborate
luncheon at noon paid lor by the
University and a panel discussion
in the Perloiming Arts Center on
"I he University and tin Human
Condition: Perspectives DD the
liiiure."
1 he Governor's talk
came
amid speculation (hat he mav soon
resign to bead a national Commission on Critical Choices lui
America, which he described in his
speech. I -.a liter in the day he had
told reporters at a S o u t h Mall
dedication that the possibility ol
resignation was open. Il has been
said thai resignation would allow
Rockefeller lo devote lull nine to
campaigning loi the Presidency,
and that direct ing the Commission
would keep him in the public eve.
Kockelellei's speech was prefaced by
remarks from
SUNY
Chancelloi f i n e s t U. Boyer (sec
adjoining
story) and
John
Roosevelt, son of the late President
and member ol the Board ol
1 rustees. who introduced
the
Governor,
Rockefeller
described
the
national Commission in depth, and
explained that it has a m o n g its
membership the Secretary ol the
I reasury. the lour leaders ol C o n gress, corporation prosidcnisand a
Nobel Laureate. It may soon have
Rockeleller a s Us head il the
speculation a b o u t his I uture bears
out
II will "help anticipate and shape
change rather than be overwheitn-i
cd by it" the (ioveruoi remarked.
He added that the Institute will
work closely wilh the national
Commission on Critical Choices,
and will become the i c p u t s i t o r y l o r
all Co in mi ssi on studies, papers,
panel reports and commission
leconimendalions In short, it will
be the national
Commission's
work mg a r m
Coaches l-ord, Armstrong, and
lhe crew ol gi ad assistants that help
out. can relax this winter Ihey
took a very y o u n g club and guided
it lo a 7-2 mark in varsity level. And
while the offense deservedly gets its
praise lot breaking almost every
Albany record in the hook, it was
the delense thai jelled as the season
wore on. In the last twelve quarters
ol loolball, the Danes gave up
three points,
As practical examples ol what
the
N a t to n a 1 a n d
State
organizations could do together,
[he Governor cited the energy
problem and lood shortages. He
feels that with a little foresight a n d
planning both problems could
have been avoided
A c t i o n at (he KIM c a m p u s S a t u r d a y . T h e g r i d d e r s h a v e c e r t a i n ly c o m e a l o n g w a y In f o u r y e a r s .
.
Rockefeller Optimstic In Talk Here
I he lour-term governor also announced the creation ol a SUNY
InstuiUte lor Policy Alternatives
which Willi identity and analyze
emerging economic and social
problems in ordei to "help develop
and weigh altei natives lesponscs
lor the stale and society at large."
I he d e f e n s e
was led
by
llollowuy. Rudy Vido, and Prank
Villanova on the line. Ken Schoen
and Don Mion at linebacker, and
safety .lelt O'Doiinell. who managed to come up with an interception,
in this, bis last game.
•
" W e have suddenly become
overwhelmed by the energy crisis"
he told the g a t h e r i n g . "The world is
in an absolute ti//y about a subjecl
which had any g r o u p ol professors
sal down a n d studied could have
been predicted long a g o . " A n d
studies and r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s bya
the Critical Choices Commission
G o v e r n o r Rockefeller s p o k e t o University officials, faculty, and politicians here Wednesday
and the Policy Alternatives Institute could have alerted the nation to the impending crisis.
He also spoke ol the food shortage which has hiked the price ol
almost eveiy market commodity.
"The country," he said.'was taken
to the cleaners hy the Russians in
the wheal deal
Ihey
"learned our system" and then
went ami look advantage ol us.
" I he only trouble is that it is a
little expensive to work that way."
.iwi.l Government cannot enjoy the
"lux iin ol dealing as i it the past" he
said in his speech to college
presidents, legislative leaders an'd
members ol b o a r d s ol trustees.
" W h a t u e need" he s a i d . " i s p l a n ning"
"We live by crises" but we
will have to learn lo plan lot the
l u t i u c . h c a d i v s e d . flic new SUNY
Institute and I he national Commission have been designed to aid in
this planning effort.
I he Governor, who is generally
e n d u e d loi the creation of the
gigantic SUNY system, was very
warml> applauded at the close ol
lus speech. Only a lew students
could be seen a m o n g the gray and
balding heads, and they were mostly student government leaders a n d
c a m p u s n e w s p a p e r reporters.
In a lime of
considerable
pessimism and retrenchement,
Kockelellei is blatantly optimistic.
He said I hat this i s o n e o l the "most
evening periods in history" and
thai "loi all oui problems, I am o p l inustic that i hese problems can be
made understandable, I he) can be
solved "
lie is also optimistic about the
h u m e ol America. "Wc used to he
the country that the world looked
lo loi iisnioi.ilv allies, loi its ideals,
loi its concepts" the Governor said.
He believes that ihe'day is coming
when we a i e going to gel back into
this position,"
I hat seems lo be I the idea
Nelson Rocketed lei
is carrying
around the country lately, and il he
decides lo run lor President, thai
will probably be one of his most
olleu heard messages. He wants
America lo
"return to a role ol
leadership -in terms of the realistic,
long-term interests of all peoples."
Il is a message wc may all he hearing a lot ol in the coming months.
Boyer Also Speaks
by Robert Dielu-rd
Wlnle
Goveinoi
NeUon
Kockelellei
was the
piinciplc
spcakci ,u W e d n e s d a y s SI N , i
25th anniveis.nv celehialions. I niversily Chancelloi Irnesl I Hoyet
also had some inipouaiil icinai ks
to make.
He told the g a l h e n n g ol invited
C:iicsis that altei a prolonged period
ol rapid growth the tiiiiveisiiv is
now
e in plia sizing
educational
quality and excellence in teaching,
lie mentioned the recently n a m e d
Distinguished I caching Prolessors
as examples ol the kind ol leaching
the University, wants anil rewards,
HONer praised the increase in
educational quality seen d m ing the
past lew veais. and pointed out a
number ol "substantial signals ol
success"
Ac c o i d i n g
lo
the
Chancellor
-scv eial new Phi He la Kappa
chapters have been approved.
A huge number ol Guggenheim,
I ulbtiglil and othei fellowshipvure
being awarded cveiv year,
-Internationally renowned faculty have been alliacted I t o i n a i o u n d
the world, including
Nobel
1 aureatcs and other prize-winners.
•I he SUNY Press lias received
widespread popular acclaim lot the
significant
b o o k s it
has
published.
-Manv important scientific discoveries have been made during the
past l e w u c a r s h y SUNY scientists,
and the total value ol research
grants continues i * * use steadily
- I he Slate VetctmaiS. College
and College ol ( eia lines have been
recognized as the best in the nation
in then lields.
- Manv
indiv idual
academic
de pa 11 men is are achieving national
and international acclaim- S U N Y
Albany's atmospheric
Sciences
Research Centei has consistently
received woild attention.
-SUNY is a leadei in innovative
education, pioneeiing such conc e p l s a s ' - t olleges Without Walls"
a n d college courses loi penitentiary iiiiualcs.
I he
thai although
Chancelloi
stressed
the Univei-it. has
Left to right: The Chancellor; John Roosevelt; and Mr.
Rockefeller.
t h.incclloi to the campus Hcnezcl
been m existence since ivz-ih. it has
been the " p a s t ten ol twelve ycais
iliai have made all the dilleicnce,"
s l A V s lapid expansion did not
begin until the early l9hU's. He I ore
that lime Ihe system consisted
primarily id loosely coordinated
tcachet's colleges,
Also speaking it" the 25th anniteisarv g a l h e n n g was SUNY
Picsidciil l o u t s I Itenczet. who
welcomed
the Goveinoi
and
u,iuitcd
lolm k e n n e d )
in his
iciuaiks. who at a While House
reception loi Nobel l a HI tales, said
thai there had rievei been such an
assemblage ol intellect and talent
in the White House 'since the lime
I hom.is .lellerson dined
here
alone " He likened that gathering
to the large number ol distinguished prolessors, administrators, a n d
political leaders who met in the
ballroom Wednesday afternoon.
Dickey's Disappearing Act
by Gary Rlcciar'dl
SASH Press Service
The circus has come and gone in
Cortland, and so has a tidy sum of
allegedly stolen funds. Hubert
Dickey.a Cortland Collegestudent
and former co-ordinatorof a committee whfch sponsored! " 1 e Cortland appearance of the Hanneford
Circus, has been charged with
grand larceny in the third degree.
Dickey has been charged with
the theft of $300 from Cortland
College's Circulating Fund Circus
checking account, and the case has
been bound over to the grand jury.
Dickey was in the custody of
Cortland's County Sheriff for
several days. Bail bond has been set
at $5000 and cash bond at $2500. A
campus fund drive was undertaken
to raise bail money for Dickey's
defense.
Bettveen July / |md 20 of this year,
Dickey deposited $2,525.95 in the
Circulating Fund account. The
Cortland student government has
since received copies of 15 checks
which Dickey allegedly cashed
from the account since late July.
The sum of the largest check is
$300.
In early October, Dickey was
scheduled to appear before the Circulating Fund committee to detail
what he knew of money found missing from thecommittee'saccount.
He never got to explain anything
to the committee. An hour before
the scheduled meeting, Cortland
Director of Campus Security
arrested Dickey at the urging of
Larry Summers, student government president.
Asked by a Cortland newspaper
reporter if he could live with the
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consequences of Dickey's arrest,
Summers remarked, "lam."
Two days'before the scheduled
committee meeting, a college vicepresident informed Summers of
discrepancies in the Circulating
Fund account. The following day,
Summers contacted Glen Mauncy,
a member of the college union administrative staff, who is partially
responsible for paying bills consequent to the appearance of the
Hanneford Circus.
Mauney has since stated he was
"willing to wait" for Dickey's
p r o m i s e d e x p l a n a t i o n of
descrepanciesin the account before
considering legal action^
After being briefed'of the status
of the account, Summerscontactcd
Dickey. Dickey refused to meet
with Summers then, saying his full
explanation would be forthcoming
at the following day's committee
meeting.
Summers didn't like that. The
morning of the following day he
contacted McHugh. and McHugh
put out the word on Dickey.
Dickey was arraigned for grand
larceny at about the time he had
been scheduW to speak before the
committee.
Summers instigated the arrest
because he was afraid Dickey
might "skip town." he told a Cortland student newspaper reporter.
Paradoxically. Summers was
aware of ihe account's discrepancies fully three weeks before the
arrest and belore his talks with
Mauney. according to Cortland's
newspaper, The Prt'n.
NEWS BRIEFS
CAIRO EGYPT (AP) - Israeli and Egyptian generals conferred on ihe
cease-fire linedeep inside Egypt today in efforts to break the deadlock over
troop withdrawals along the Suez Canal, a U.N. spokesman reporied.
They agreed to resume talks Wednesday, he added, but gave no details on
the results of the'." hour meeting.
The agreement to meet again was interpreted as a sign of progress.
;Before the meeting, at Kilometer 101 about 60 mileseast of Cairo. Israeli
officials had said the talks might be suspended if no break-through were
achieved.
A collapse in the cease-fire discussions could mean Israel and l-gypt
would enter the Geneva peace negotiations scheduled to begin Dec IK v-nh
their forces poised close toeachother in thecanal zone. This would tene
open the risk of armed clashes that could poison the peace talks
ATHENS .Greece AP( • Greece's new conservative military rulers hau'
begunpu'rging the military and police commands after ousting I'rcskleni
George I'apadopoulos in a bloodless coup. The new regime, headed In 11
Gen. Phaedon Gizikis, indicated it was junking I'apadopoulos' pledge lu
return to limited parliamentary government next year. Papadopouh.s Die
former army colonel who engineered the 1967 military lakcmei unreported under house arrest and the government began rcinm nip I. nil
lure from public buildings. No disturbancesanywhere in Ihe eomim ». K
reporied.and tanks and troops were withdrawn from Athens
I'HNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP)- Government forces repelled Imu insurgent attacks early this morning on positions along H ighway Ihitvu-en
IMinom Penh and ihe sea. military sources said.
Seven government soldiers and 22' Khmer Rouge insurgents wen 1 ilkil
and 15 government troops wounded, ihe sources said.
WASH INCH ON (AP)- President Nixon mined today in dim
support lor his solution to ihe energy crisis, and declared lli;
range goal is to put this country "in a position wherenohodv c
lifeline."
Speaking ol a convention ol the Seafarers International I i
CIO. the President reiterated hsigoalol making the nation sell energy by 1980 and linked it with el I oris to build a strong meiclia l i i i
I he United States will "never be dependent on another pan i I tin
when there is a crisis," il his proposals succeed. Nixon said
I lie speech was Nixon's first public appearance since h is nan
television address Sunday night in which he unveiled his plans t
the energy crisis.
Al.UANY. N.V. (AP) - I lie slat e is mil yet prepared to ask
reduce class hours or I he school week to conserve energy an I
Department official said Monday.
"II we were asked lot recommendations tomorrow , we would
initio, adjustments, cutting hack on nighttime an weekend ;u a1
example," said St; nicy I Rutin, head ol a special depai lincnl l.i >
energy conservation in the schools
"It's our responsibility not to erode our educational pmgi.ou
to keep the youngsters in school.,*' said liuub. associate com n, n
educational finance and management services
llul he said that if the problem becomes more acule"we wi.nii
ask for more drastic measures "
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Bio 248
!'l/i
S.A. lawyer
Leventhal In conference wHh a client at the law firm office of Levenlhal and Rosenbhim located on Madison
practice is quite time-consuming,
she enjoys working with the university students. "None ol us are that
far removed in age from the student population," she says. "We
can all relate in one way or
another."
Asa student at the Stale University of New Yoik at Buffalo. Ms.
I even ill a I was an officer of student
government .and was also very acme m the then-current court
battles, where she furthered her interest in law.
Although I ucsday nights from
seven to nine o'clock are reserved
as the time to seek their legal advice, very often there are just too
many people, resulting in calls to
schedule appointments, if the
telephone conversation is not sufficient. I heir advice is free to
SUNYA students, and given
willingly. II a court appearance
becomes necessary, a fee ischarged
with consideration to the fact (hat
they are students.
II a student is anested for disorderly conduct, loitering, public
intoxication, assault (which could
be considered as a Tight between
room males J. shoplifting, or traffic
offenses, for example, the lawyers
will arrange bail, call the student's
parents, and deal with the
bondsman "Ihe main objective is
to paj the bail and get the person
out as quickly as possible," Ms.
Leventhal says, "We fee! that the
student is much better oil in the
school environment than rottingin
jail."
I hev will also advise the social
or political groups on campus concerning any legal question. II a
problem goes beyond t li e i r
capacities, the team ol lawyers will
point the student or students in the
direction ol someone who can help
them,
Ihe most common problem encountered is land lord-tenant
relations. I here may be conflicts
concerning paying rent, or,
perhaps, not receiving services contracted lor. Sometimes, something
as simple as speaking to the
landlord nicely will satisfy both
parties involved. Several students
sharing an apartment might run
into difficulty if one or more
choose to leave, or il they try to
break the lease or get back a security deposit,
Student Lobbyists
Are Gaining Momentum
NORTHWAY MALL, COLONIE
PYRAMID MALL, SARATOGA
— Pre-Med Pre-Dent Society
see-.
Ms.
levenlhal says that
although ihe linn's regular law
r
IMPORTANT MGGTIMG Of
Tonight
I he firm is hired on an annual
retainer with an informal written
contract. Its lour members are
San lord Rosenbiuni. who is usually
the representative at the school on
I ucsday nights; A. Linda
I.even thai (she and Rosenbiuni
were the original partnership hired
by the S.A. lour years ago); Jim
Perkins, a young man six years out
ol law school; and Paul Kiet/man,
who graduated law school a year
ago and now makes many of the
linn's court appearances
I he lest issue lot the Association
tlor meily the N > Student I obby)
is ihe deciirnilai/alion ol inariluana Howcvei n is ihe aim ol the
assoeiation to deal with oilier student interests including volei
NI W YORK (API- Mayor-elect Abraham l> Ikamesaid Mnmf.,
w ill meet Dec 3 with leaders in Nassau and Westchester count u '
the New Yoik
( n \ suburban transportation problems
fie will meet at It) AM in bis Municipal build ing of live wnl
County Executive Ralph Ci ( a so and Allied Del Hello, exo mo
Westchester, now mayor of Yonkcis
Heamc said he would "establish an ongoing dialogue on nan i
and other interrelating needs ot the meti opolrlail area," and .old"
was Hire they could "work together loi the best inlcicsf r>l di
ALSO TODAY:
What do you do if you live offcampus and you're having difficulty with your landlord'.' What
happens if you're arrested lor
loitering and you are two hundred
miles from home'.' Who can advise
you il you are seeking a divorce?
Ihe Student Association has
hired the services of Rnscnblum&
levenlhal. Attorneys at I.aw, to
provide general consultation and
legal advice to any SUNYA fulltime undergraduate (although
nigh I students, graduate, part-time
students, and faculty will often use
their services.)
In early September of this year.
just when the new harsher drug
laws came into effect in this state, a
couple of Ithaca College students
got together and decided that it was
time lor the students of New York
It) have some say in the New York
State legislature. Within two
months, Andy lelsey and Kenny
May. co-founders of the New York
Student Association have been
organizing the most effective student union ever witnessed in this
slate.
State
Schwann Cat. 2s8 tc
by l-'uilh Schottenfeld
International
National
UNIUERSITV BOOKSTORE
Levanthal is Part of Team to Help Students
registration, state wide textbook
taxes, and regional and local
issues. Ihe NY.S.A. had their first
convention on (he weekend of Oct.
12-14 al Ithaca College withaboul
twenty schools in Since that time,
the association has grown to estimated four limes that size, with
membeislup insludingboth private
and public schools. Andy lelsey
has just completed an extensive
iwo week tour ol the state visiting
colleges in both upstate New York
and the New York City area, The
result ol this trip is more effective
lines id communication between all
colleges and Ithaca College, which
is the coordinating oil ice lor the
n \ s ii li is the hope id ihe
N \, S A thai all member schools
w ill be able lo pledge their
res
ces. however limited, lo the
association in order to set up a lobby in Albany to deal with state
legislators.
Ihe next statewide convention
of Ihe NY S.A. will be held in New
Yoik City (tentativelyat Columbia
University) on ihe weekend of
December 7. All schools are being
urged to send at leasi one delegate.
I he
continued
growth and success ol the
N V. S.A depends on evei y school
in the state l*or details concerning
the convention oi anv further information about ihe association.
wine oi call ihe VY.S.A., c/i
Student
(im eminent
Olhec,
Allan Spivack. \k\\ 1*7*. State
Quad. 4S7 472H
Avenue.
When these problems necessitate
legal action, students are encouraged to go to small claims
court, where there is no need lor a
lawyer. I here is a morning and
evening court once a week. Ihe
charge is minimal (about $3.1)0).
it's inlormul. it requires no rules of
evidence, and an immediate decision is rendered."Students usually
do well in small claims court." says
Vis. leventhal "It gives them a
great sense ol satisfaction lo work
w it bin the law system."
Students have sought advice
regarding the new drug laws, their
lights in a separation or divorce, or
in phone biff disputes. 1 hey have
come lor help in the academic
sphere concerning transfer credits,
incompletes, or contract complaints No one is ever turned away
it they can be helped. A twentylour hour emergency service is
provided in the event ol a sudden
arrest or personal crisis.
Ihe hrm of Rosenblum &
I eventual is located at 7.12
Madison Avenue, and the phone
number is 40.1-1107. Il is easily
leached, even by those students
wilhoula car. by using the Diaper
Hall bus and walking!! lew blocks.
ATTENTION COMMUNITY
SERVICE STUDENTS
THERE WILL BE NO INCOMPLETES
GIVEN THIS SEMESTER
AGENCY LETTERS: Due December 3rd,
sent to Mrs. McKinley, SCHOOL OF
SOCIAL WELFARE
PAPERS:
CONTAC
Due December 3rd, bring Lo
OFFICE LCB 30B
GROUP EVALUATION SESSION:
Schedule at Contact Office - 457-4801
RENTALS AND LESSONS
AVAILABLE
You Will Not Receive a Passing Grade if
Your Requirements Are Not Fulfilled.
HILTON'S HAS IT
ALL!
WE REALLY MEAN IT!
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
! €mnD a m i \
*••••••••••••••••••••••••••*•••••••••*••••
Mss Woods Testifies NSA Pushes For Student Union
By H«rty F . R o t o r t h i l
Associated P i c a Writer
by Philip Senas
W A S H I N G T O N A P - President Nixon's personal secretary. Rose Mary
Woods, testified today that she had listened only to one part of a
Watergate-related tape recording that the White House says is missing an
18-minute segment.
During Miss Woods' testimony, U.S. District Judge John J . Sirica said
that subpoenaed White House tape recordings were to be turned over to
h im later in the d a y . ' He gave no'details o f the transfer of .the controversial
tapes, long sought by federal prosecutors.
Miss Woods testified that she transcribed the taped portion of a June 20
1972 conversation that the President had with aide John S. Ehrlichman in
his old Executive Office Building office.
The red-haired secretary said she then also took down a portion when
H.R. Haldeman first entered the office and all three men were speaking.
She said she listened to the tape only long enough to becertain Ehrlichman
had left the room.
The White House says 18 minutesofNixon'sJune 20 conversation with
former chief of staff Haldeman is obliterated by anaudible tone and no conversation can be heard.
There were published reports over the weekend that Miss Woods would
testify that she accidentally erased the 18 minutes but questioning had not
progressed to that point in a one-hour morning session.
Miss Woods testified that last week she twice listened toaduplicateofthe
June 20 tape and said "we listened to what has been called a I. of other
names - a mistake."
She offered to explain but was interrupted by Watergate prosecution
force lawyer Jill Volner, who was attempting to establish what portions of
the tape' Miss Woods had listened to.
Miss Woods, who has been President Nixon's personal secretary for 23
years, was warned of her constitutional rights to remain silent and to consult with her lawyer as thequestioning began. It was only the second time in
the federal court tapes hearings-which resumed today after a two-week
recess-that a witness was so warned, The other witness was Haldeman.
Miss Woods said that she was under the impression that theHaldeman,
portion of the June 20 conversation was not included in the prosecutor's
subpoena for nine Watergate tapes. The White House has said that two of
the nine lapes do not exist, a disclosure that led to the hearing in Sirica's
courtroom.
Miss Woods repeated testimonyshc gavepn Nov. 8 that on Sept. 29 at
Camp David, M d . , she was given eight tapes to transcribe. The first of these
was the June 20 meeting.
But she said that when she got to Camp D a v i d , Alexander M . Haig J r.
phoned her lo say thai she was not to type the Haldeman portion of the
June 20 tape. Haig is now Nixon's chief of staff.
" I took the message from Gen. Haigand 1 thoughl. thank heavens, I don't
have lo type Ihe rest of it," she said.
"When I testified in court on Nov. 8 I was still under the impression thai
ihe Haldeman portion of the conversation wasnot subpoenaed," she said.
She said the President was in her cabin for 5 to 10 minutes on Sept. 29
when she complained about how difficult it was lo hear conversations
accuratel)
Miss Woods testified thai the President listened for about five or ten
minuicsand said. "Idon't sechow you'regettinganything.'... lie mentioned
hearing two or three voices and said he didn't |sce how 1 was get ting any of
it."
Asked whether she listened to the portion involving Haldeman and the
President.
Miss Woods said:
" I did listen to the first part o l it so I could be sure John l-.hrlichman was
gone Irom the room. I listened only until they talked about something involving Ely, Nev., where Mrs. Nixon was born."
At that point White .louse lawyer 1-eonard Gunnel asked lor a bench
conference and shortly thereafter Sirica recessed the hearing for lunch.
Sirica had suggested last week lhal the subpoenaed White House tapes be
turned over lo him.
M M
MMMBM
Indian Quad
brings you- the first Annual
.^e of the
V* ^
Ve
Monolith
Nevermind
^
**</*
(formerly Skin)
If the leaders of the National
Student Association have their
way, college administrators will
soon be bargaining not only with
unions of janitors, secretaries, and
professors but also with unions of
students.
For the the third straight year,
talk of creating a national student
union wasadominanl themeatthe
association's annual National Student Congress.
Delegates passed a resolution
declaring unionization of students
to bea top priority and establishing
a three member task force "to investigate and work towards the unioni?ation that express interest in
unionization."
The resolution also declared that
N.S.A. would "be the national
collective bargaining agent on
campuses subject to the approval
of each individual campus."
As a first step, Ihe association's
new president, Larry Friedman of
Queens College in New York City,
said he wanted lo prepare "model
'contracts' between students and
their schools" lo help students
prepare to "cope with ihe realities
of faculty unions."
Ihe students had al least two
goals for creating a union:
- - Resuscitating ihe moribund
national studcnl movement.
- - Meeting the challenge ol
faculty
collective
bargaining,
which student leaders lear will
leave them oul in Ihe cold.
Ihe students generally agreed
lhal Ihe national student movement that dominated the I960's
was dead. "We arc here in Miami
Beach fin die funeral of the student
movement." said Ron Iihrenreich.
the o u t g o i n g
NSA
VicePresident,
Delegates tell lhal the creation
ol a national student political
organization such as an individual
member national union ol students
which, is whiii most European
countries have, could turn some
student energy back to national
issues.
Concern about the clfects of increasing liieully unionization was
also apparent.
American
Federation
ol
l e a t h e r s Representative
Israel
Kuglci told one session ol slmlents
lhal students and lacully shared
such areas of common concern as
class s i / c , physical facilities,
academic Ireedom, ami ihe overusc o l
graduate
trenching
assistants lie said the A.I- I. hasa
slogan
"What students want,
teachers need" ami that it "advocates lliat students iHgani/iie
ami bargain mi then own uvci
issues that concern them and gel
ml ol the shameful luciidc called
student government."
Alan Shark,chairman of the student senate at the City University,
said the union's suggestion that
students organize and bargain
separately really means t h a ' *hey
want students to bargain over dormitory rules and student ' services
and let the faculty take care of
promotion, tenure, curriculus, and
class size.
He suggested that a student union
could negotiate over such things as
student evaluation of faculty
members, grievanceproceduresfor
students treated unfairly by
professors or
administrators,
grading policies, class size, and
academic freedom.
"There is
n o t h i n g in faculty collective
bargaining lhal involves protecting
students," Shark said.
"Faculty
unionization is lo protect faculty
rights'
Ihe way to counter that, he and
others argue, is for students to
form their own unions. While most
of the students supported the idea
of studen unionization, many
questioned whether N.S.A. is the
best organization for crealing a union.
In thesix years since it stopped
taking money from the Central Intelligence Agency, N.S.A. has had
to devote much ofi tsenergy to simple financial survival. In the years
immediately after its C.I.A. ties
were revealed, N.S.A.'s deficits
grew to half a million dollars.
Over the last few years N.S.A.
has reduced that debt to the point
where it is now down to $25,000.
Even so, N.S.A. endured another
financial crises this year, mainly
because i l d i d nol gel the support
Irom private foundations that it
had received in ihe past
Outgoing president l i m Htggins
suggested lhal the Association's
financial resources would really
only allow it to carry on its mosl
basic programs, such as pioviding
l n I o r ma t i o n
Io
student
governments, providing legal inh u m a t i o n and assistance
lo
students, and running its annual
congress. Any other activities
would have to he financed with
f o u n d a t i o n or
other ouisidc
lu'nds, he said.
II N S A . wauls lo unionize
students. Iliggins argued, M uiusl
"create an independently linanced
iiigaiii/alimi, capable ol political
action, democratically constituted,
anil supported actively' by ind i v i d u a l members, II N.S.A.
c r e a k s another
unsupported
political organization, I believe wc
would he doomed to minimal and
Inigmeuled support anil cvcnlual
il issolutuin."
lie
also
aigucil
lhal
to
be
politically clleclive, such a studen)
union
must
build
support
by
providing service* to its members.
Higginsargued that N S A . rauS|
work
through
student
governments because they have
funds and recognition by their universities.
O t h e r s disagreed. In (act,
N.S.A.'s ;status as an association of
student governments was one of
the' things that made some critics
question whether it could serveasa
j u m p i n g off point for a student union.
"Student
governments are
bankrupt," said Ehrcnreich, last
year's vice-president, who split
with Higgins. "You can't woik
through
student governments
because
they don't tepresent
students"
Critics also pointed out that unionization had been declared a top
priority at the last two \ S A.
congresses .but. very little hail actually been done about 11 |hey
blamed
this on the NSA.
leadership and the association's
"top-down organization " Iliggins
responded that advocates ol unionization themselves had been
unwilling to do the haul work that
is needed.
What made this yeai ditletcnl,
some observers said, is the tlueatol
faculty collective bargaining and
the fact thai this N.S A congress
ended on a nolo ol units lather
than the divisiveness lhal has
afflicted the association loi thelast
six years.
Ever since I9h7. the seal il IkC I A . disclosures. N s \
gresses have been the stc
angry confrontations hcivu
lie
association's leadership .in
affected radicals, blail s i
and gay students
Friday, Nov. 3 0
9:00 -1:30
BEER (40 kegs) - 2<k a glass
WINE (2 kinds) - 45c a glass
ADMISSION
%
75c with tax
$1.25 without
College ID or tax card required
PAGE FOUR
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED FOR
ALUMNI PHONOTHON
Phonothon has been extended two
I
more days:
December 3 & 4
and we need your help!
If you can help
_caJj_GgjxSussmgn - 457H 4307
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
* HOW IN ^^S^/S^m^
* PROGRESS
\ t e ^ SALE ENDS
SAT. NIGHT *
5MERICS."S LBRGEST DEC! 7 PM $
: COAST TO COSSTKECOED STORES •
3OT OPEN m s i u m s M T m z k & z m t
*
*
59
6.98
LIST
STEREO TAPES
VC'SliglllltUlS
ol
III'
*
*
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*
*
*
*
*
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I his year's congiess I.IM
in much the same was uiih HI|ilS
,!! lis
attacks on lliggnis .md In
blacks and women I iin Mi
denl struck Iliggins .""I > "thel
called him .1 tin isi .md ••
Ilk
Semite
At
on.
p...i.i
delegates voted i " i.ill
stall's rcsignat
Hut the ciingless 1 i"l •'.
display ol imils will) Hi. .1.
endorsing
tin
ien> « ' '
*
*
*
*
Is' 11'
shootings, animals
I" 1
resistors the release " I 1 1I11.1I
prisoners 111 Smilh \ ici ".'• imla
h o y c o l t n l (ill I In win.' b i i . i n .
producers rclnsal i " m i 1 " 1
the United Faun « ' if
l-llcdllian vs.is "S'i'sl
elected piesideni when 1
|tn opponents ssiMidi' "
il.iiseil
him
I I " ii'
piesideni, Kemis W i l l ;
studcnl liiioiii I.)"' '
I llllcgC III I He)'.HI ->.'
acclamalioliallei -ill In
withdrew 111 Ins l.i\ni
Neon Park
CC Ballroom
*
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WAR
Dolivoi Iho Word
UA LA12B F
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. IM.HMS,.. ( T . . M . . W . . . S T . K A M A S U . K A - UN, , PO,.V,X)K * M.-.KC1.KY *
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Mon. Thru Fri. 1 0 - 1 0
Saturday 1 0 - 7 Sunday 1 2 - 7
|Jll8t AllOVll Mllllu
Eat in. Take out
WE DELIVER
Hours: 6 -11 P'"
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, l')V:<
GILBERT O'SULLIVAN
I'm a Wiilor Nol a Fighter
|y|AM 7
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, v s , , n L , A . , i»i f -M()NllMINT«IMllLAIM'LPIIIAINTKRNATIONAL«i:NTKRI»RISl>STAX» V O L T " MCA*
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('AIMTOI.»AIMM.L«SIILLILK^
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l/ULUl
Closed Monrloy Night
THREE DOG NIGHT
Cyan
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EVERY LP. CARTRIDGE & CASSETTE ON THESE LABELS ON SALE
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ELTON JOHN
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¥
Quote of the Day'
"1 think Gerry Ford was acting as the handmaiden for Nixon and Mitchell in orderlo
rid the court of Justice Douglas."
Rep. Jerome
Waldie (I) - Cat.)
Wasted Words
letters
Games Countries Play
G o v e r n o r Rockefeller, a m i d t h e glory of his A l b a n y m o n u m e n t s , t o o k t h e occasion last
(SrmUn ^Ulajj,*
W e d n e s d a y to c o m m e m o r a t e t h e 25th anniversary of the State University
s y s t e m . C h a n c e l l o r E r n e s t B o y e r w a s i n a t t e n d a n c e , a s befits a m o n a r c h o f s u c h a
splendid creation.
W h a t m o r e u n p r o d u c t i v e ! w a y i s t h e r e t o h o n o r t h e t w e n t y five y e a r s of S U N Y e x -
WE'LL KNOW THE FUEL SHORTAGE
HA£rGROWN CRITICAL WHEN...
istence t h a n t o collect a g r o u p o f hack politicians andl starched trustees t o c o n g r a t u l a t e t h e m s e l v e s o n t h e w o n d r o u s d e e d s t h e y a r e I p a r t y t o ? Is t h e r e a less fitting
t r i b u t e t o t h e s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y o f t h e S U N Y s y s t e r r t h a n for t h e s e n , e n t o c o n g r e g a t e a s R o c k e f e l l e r h o n o r s h i m s e l f a n d h i s stuffed s h i r t c o l l e a g u e s s u r r o u n d e d b y
this, his m o s t prized p y r a m i d ?
/ T O 1 6 0 0 PENWSVLVttNlA
I
1
WI&TMtE kBOUT-TMAT.
G o v e r n o r R o c k e f e l l e r h a s oft t i m e s d e c l a r e d t h a t h e h a s b u i l t m o r e t h a n a n y o n e in
h i s t o r y s i n c e t h e P h a r o a h s . T h e n it is fitting t h a t such a g l i t t e r i n g e v e n t s h o u l d o c c u r
w i t h i n t h e s h a d o w o f w h a t h a s b e c o m e t o be s a r c a s t i c a l l y k n o w n a s R o c k y ' s
T o m b s t o n e P l a z a . T h a t b o t h this u n i v e r s i t y a n d the S o u t h M a l l a r e little m o r e t h a n
mausoleums
on Rocky's
way toward
the Presidency
a c c e p t e d . W h a t a n h o n o r it is t o b e a n a r c h i t e c t u r a l effigy
has already
been
widel>
foranegotisticalgovernor
w i t h p a t h e t i c d e l u s i o n o f power..'
Whatever t h e cost t h a t S U N Y C e n t r a l wasted on this o s t e n t a t i o u s e x t r a v a g a n z a ,
t h e r e c a n b e n o d o u b t t h a t it c o u l d h a v e b e e n f a r b e t l e r s p e n t o n t h e i n t r o d u c t i o n o f a
n e w series o f s c h o l a r s h i p s for s t u d e n t s . T h e 2 5 t h a n n i v e r s a r y o f S U N Y s h o u l d h a v e
b e e n used f o r s o m e t h i n g c o n s t r u c t i v e , n o t m e r e l y a s a s t a g e d s h o w . W h a t b e t t e r way
t o s t r i v e t o w a r d a n e w e r a in h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n t h a n l o r ' the g o v e r n o r t o i n i t i a t e n e w
financial a i d s o n t h e o c c a s i o n .
H i e c o s t o f a c o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n h a s risen c o n s i s t e n t l y
a l o n g w i t h t h e c o s t of s i m p l y e x i s t i n g in this s t a t e , a n d we c a n n o t b r i n g o u r s e l v e s to
t h e s t u d e n t s h a d b e e n safely s e n t h o m e f o r T h a n k s g i v i n g , n e e d e d that h a n d o u t l u n c h
m o r e t h a n s t u d e n t s need t h a t e l u s i v e s c h o l a r s h i p .
fori s c h o l a r s h i p s c o u l d be t h e o u t c o m e of
s u c h a n o c c a s i o n , t h e n a t least the m o n e y c o u l d h a v e b e e n m u c h m o r e wisely s p e n t r e opening some of
Not only was there very little sharing, but
what aid the West was giving they used
politically In Il)5d the U.S. refused a grant
lo help I gypl build the Aswan dam because
\i.ibs a i e doing what ihcv want s\ iih "Iheu
oil." I hat Westeriicoinpamesdiscoveieil ihc
oil does not entitle them lo own il
Otherwise, how would Amcncaiislecl Ihcv
hail lo pay Wah rcgulai lees because il u a s
an Italian w h o discoveied \ n i e i i c a '
b c l i c v e t h a l t h e p o m p o u s p o l i t i c i a n s t h a t p o l l u t e d o u r h a l l s last W e d n e s d a y , a f t e r a l l
II n o t h i n g so a l t r u i s t i c a s n e w m o n e y
To the E d i t o r :
I would like to reply to the A S P editorial
of Tuesday, N o v . 13. 1 know thai the
editorial was written not to attack anyone,
but simply to c o m m e n t on the effects of (he
fuel shortage in U.S. I a m , therefore, attacking neither the writer, nor the ASP itself.
which I feel has demonstrated both lairness
and wit in its headlinesof articlcsand letters.
However, the above-mentioned editorial
was naive of political issues and insulting lo
a group of people that I, and others al tins
university, identify with. Ihc editorial calls
the oil politics ol S a u d i Arabia and "nthei
countries in the region" an act ol b a i b a n it
not o n e ol " o u t r i g h t
i n t e r n a lionn I
blackmail." l o call a political action haih a r u u s a n d present arguments in s u p p o n ol
that statement would be presenting a poinl
ol view. However, simplv lo cull someone
barbarous in an oil ha ml manner and pass mi
In other topics is a n instill llowevei.lcl us
esamine Ihis insult as il il were an opinion I
am glad Ihc ciliton.il recognizes lhat ilu
rational culture. Now, however, when o n e
part of the poor wo:ld puts some limits on
what it was previously practically giving o u t ,
ttie Western countries scramble in confusion
and fright, trying to reduce speed limits and
turn off l ; ghts. If some of the energy the U.S.
had been' devouring had been used in other
pans of Ihc globe for the past 50 years, where
some people have no electricity at all and
others have no food or clothing - would
Western economics be so advanced? If there
was more equitable distribution of world
resources would the gap between rich and
poor he so vast? England through most of
the l')th century produced more coal than
the rest ol the world. The U.S. and Germany
caught up by 1900. Was any of ihis wealth
shared to help give water, energy or food lo
Alnca ami Asia'.'
t h o s e a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r s h i p lines w h i c h h a v e b e e n s q u e e z e d o u t
b y p e n n y p i n c h i n g a d m i n i s t r a t o r s w h o t i m e a n d a g a i n d i s p l a y their c a l l o u s d i s r e g a r d
for t h e t r u e i n t e r e s t s of a n i n s t u t u t e o f h i g h e r l e a r n i n g .
M u t u a l b a c k - s l a p p i n g n e v e r solved a n y p r o b l e m , a n d o n e t h a t s o d i r e c t l y affects
s t u d e n t s - a n d in fact, all N e w Y o r k S t a t e r e s i d e n t s w h o p a s s i v e l y s a t h a c k while
R o c k y b u i l t h i m s e l f h i s o w n m e m o r i a l - is o n l y c o m p l i c a t e d w h e n
self-important
b u s i n e s s m e n c o n v e n e for, k u d o s . W e h a v e yet t o sec t h e g a r i s h l u n c h e o n ( w i t h a n a p p r o p r i a t e l y e x p e n s i v e wine t o c a l m t h e t h i r s t ) t h a t g o t a s t u d e n t t h r o u g h s c h o o l .
Rambling On
W e ' r e g e t t i n g u s e d t o l i v i n g in t h e d a r k . T h e g l o o m i l y lit c o r r i d o r s of H u m a n i t i e s
e c h o with faceless f o o t s t e p s a n d w o r d y w h i s p e r s . It's a l m o s t like living u n d e r g r o u n d .
In t h e d a y l i g h t w o r l d a b o v e u s , life g o e s o n ,
f a m i l i e s d o n s w e a t e r s . There will be n o C h r i s t m a s l i g h t s this y e a r .
T h e e n e r g y c r i s i s is with u s a n d is m a k i n g herself felt. O r s o m e b o d y is. All a r o u n d
u s t h e w a l l s of o u r t e c h n o l o g y a r c m o v i n g in o n us. A n d y e t . is t h a t all'.'
lt'!> i n t e r e s t i n g t o n o t e t h e c o u r s e o f e v e n t s ol t h e past lew m o n t h s . W a s il o n l y last
s u m m e r t h a t the i n d i g n i t i e s o f W a t e r g a t e really c a m e t o light'.' It s e e m s like e o n s a g o .
l o d a y , W a t e r g a t e is a w a y o f life.
It's i n t e r e s t i n g
thrown
ago.
- n o , frightening
i:A Young View of Washington
C a r s m o v e a little m o r e s l o w l y ,
- to w a t c h w h a t ' s h a p p e n i n g .
^Congress Passes Crucial
Test On War Powers Bi
'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'''•'•yh) Hon llt'itdrcn
Congress has
( p o w e r b a c k to the m a n c o n d e m n e d t o p o l i t i c a l d e a t h just a l e w s h o r t w e e k s
I h e w o r d jhas g o n e u p : w e m u s t join f o r c e s ! b e h i n d o u r P r e s i d e n t , the O n e w h o
is t o lead u s f r o m i h c d a n g e r s of , i h e p r e s c n t . T o d a y w e c a n o n i z e y e s t e r d a y ' s S a t a n .
It's i n t e r e s t i n g - n o , p a r a l y z i n g - t o see t h e a c t i o n t a k e n t o meet the e n e r g y crisis. N o
g a s o n S u n d a y s , r e s t r i c t e d t r a v e l . A s o c i e t y built o n m o b i l i t y must a d a p t to a s e d e n t a r y e x i s t e n c e . S u d d e n l y o u r s h r i n k i n g world l o o m s large a n d f o r b i d d i n g before u s ,
l o d a y , w e slip b a c k o n e - h u n d r e d y e a r s .
G a s a n d oil c u t b a c k s . W h o g e l s hit hardest'.' You c a n bet it isn't large i n d u s t r y , m a -
W A S H I N G T O N liy the slitnmusl "I
m i n i m s . Ihc Hnu.se tit Kcplcscnlalivus lasl
week (Novernbei 7) joined the Senate in
n v e n i d i n g the President's veto ol itie "war
powers resolution" aimed al restricting
presidential powei to commit U.S. lorces to
loieign conflict without congressional a p proval.
j o r a i r l i n e s , t r u c k i n g c o m p a n i e s . It's this small b u s i n e s s , t h a t i n d e p e n d e n t a i r l i n e . It's
t h e u n i m p o r t a n t i n d i v i d u a l w h o m u s t sacrifice. O r b e s a c r i f i c e d .
If t h e p r e s e n t is a n y i n d i c a t i o n of t h e future, t h i n g s look g r i m i n d e e d . This e n e r g y
crisis j u s t m a y d r a i n t h e n a t i o n o l its final r e s e r v e s .
O h , hy t h e w a y , w h a t h a p p e n e d t o W a t e r g a t e , M r . N i x o n ?
A N N K. BtJNKhh
E D I T O R I N ClllEC
ASMSIAM TO n i t KIMi»H
HAHKV HfiNNI I I
DAVID I.J-.HNIH
Ntws EDITOR
ASMMIAII NlVVS t.llllOHS
...
(JUNN VON NOSH 1 /
( i iv Km iOH
EDITORIAL PAUI KDIIOK
NANI Y AMI A I ion, DAVI: HAIOOI NOUI
.
ARIS EDITOR
NANI V MM I in
1 i si il. DAVIS
A.VMMIATI AHIS KmroR
KI;VIN DA Nil. u
Sl'OH IS Kill KiK
BROCK MAUOIN
AwuciATt SHIR i s KEIITOH
AnvmriMM, M A N A M K
ASSOC I A l t Al)VtR||MN(i MANA<;tH .
( I A S M H M I ADVERTISING MANAI.H*
Til HNM M Km I OH
AvsociAit TECHNICAL EHHOH.S , . . .
BtlMNtM) fVlANAMH
C R A H I T I KIHIOH
ADVIMJMNC, PRODUCTION
Right mi two counts, wrong on the most
important thud count: liy only lour votes,
the Mouse mustered the required two-thirds
majority (2K4 to 135) t o r e b u l l the President,
ending a three-year light lo put war making
poweis back under Congress' control. I he
Su'eale margin was a predictable 75 to IK, 13
voles'inore than required.
Kl'.N AKIMJINO
1.INIIA Mil) .{
I.INIJA Dl.SMONII
PAULA SCRCIOR
DANIKL CHAM.
M A I i MtfYRK, MH'HAHI. KOMNIKAUII
JliRKV ALHRIUTII
W U N D V AamiH
CINDY HI.NNM I, S I M L A SCIIHNKHIN
OAKY SIISSMAN
riioHM#RA**Hv EDITOR*
Ilms ilns leporlei is lorced to eat his
words. In a column several weeks ago (see "A
Woid on Wringing Us logctlier"), I wrote
thai the wai poweis proposal was likely to
pass Congress, was almost sure to be vetoed,
and that there would prohably he insullicient votes in the House to override the
vein.
Ron MAONIRN, JAY ROSHNIIIIRO
Ol'H DWIC'feS AMI'MM All h IN ( AMI'US UiNUK .(26 AND i.14 AND DDK |>|ION 13 AHI 457-2 190 AND4572IW. Wl AKI I'AHIIAI.I.V I'll NDIUI IIV lllli 81 UDI.NI A.SSIK JAIION
l-or once, the crow I a m lorced to eat is
altogether palatable, lite war powers vote
provided one ol the most crucial tests ol
Congress' willpower in some months, and
the blow il dealt to what is left of the
President's cloulion Capitol Hill is not nearly
so significant as the positive side of that coin
- Congress' determination at long lust to sec
lo it that the United States does not plunge
into annthei "liiini.-d" w;ti wiilu
minimum ol public tleba tc
n.ihlcd il'
I wo impoilanl l a d
.•In,l.in,.
lo o v e r c o m e
lis eaihei iclm
M, K, |H
poweis legislation. I nsl. Sfi
liiined t h e Democratic inaioi i
Mi
Nixon
Ihc evlciil I
President's Waleigalc piohk-i
In their decision lo a b a n d o n i
their decision l o a b a n d o n him i l l u
uncleai Kepresentalivcs look
separate llien vole on the \\
I"
I loin
i h c I'lesideiu's d o
llowcvei, elections are tiesl w
poweis legislation piesented
poituiulv loi Republican
leasi o n e clean break with
i.l
I'l
almost ccilainly will prove
ab,In
than an asset in then iipcoinuii'
( R e m e m b e r , Ihc President did not \»>'
loot III Virginia t o aid Mills Godwin
successful bill lor (ioveinoi lasl m i l
with food reason: lie wasn't iiiviicil i
Ihc second lactor c o u t n b u t i n g •
Presidents rebuff in the House »,isiln
naboul o! several llheraltcpicscnl,il'*' •
had earliei opposed the will poweis res
lion o n Ihc cloudy reasoning thai iigavi
Presidenl new wiir-rnaktng poweis I.I
Ihan restricted him. A m o n g III e hli. i.
were
Bella S. Ab/.ug a n d I ll/.iln
M o l t / m a n , both ol New York City
I h u s il was the unlikely coinbinaii""
a m s e r v a l i v e Kepuhlicans joining hands «
liberal Democrats that enabled the 11""''
deal the President what this icpoiiei icga
us his worst legislative deleal evci
I hat economic iianvictioiis should noi
h.iu' political s i n n g s is ,i tenable political
value. However, il this is ihc writer's value
then I put the question Did UHI wrile a
similai editorial when a bill was IUIUKIUCCII
lo Congress telling the Soviet I nioii uu
gram a n d n o preteremial Hade status unless
Ihcv mod died then iniemal poluics to suif a
icii.un p r e s s u r c g r o u p i n ihc I s ' II this u.inol d o n e , then appiellllv llic unlet llnnl
that in some cases lite cconoiiiu picssim iliisiilicd in poluics. II so. whv is il uniiislilKs
in the A r a b case''
I „ i i | loday iiiosi o i l p i o d u c i n g c o i i u i i i c s
n, ihc \ i a h woikl own less I h . i n s n pci lent
ol die companies exploiting Ihc "ll Ihc
latest clamoi h c l o i e l h c wai ft.is ih.il Ihcs.
11 nun lies w anlcd si pel cent "I ihc NIUH-- in
iheu c o i p o i a i i o n s I his incansiliat up uniil
now Ai,lbs have piacticallv biTugiwng.iw,n
ihcir oil Instead ol sclluic H a s i
pletelv
theirs.they have been onlv collccliuga I " ' 1 "
l e i o i l i c i s u s e i l . i l will 'Slid lot whaC \SInd
pielercnllal treatment w e n Ihcv gelling
•\lici a century ol llinisli colmu ism
Igvpl's indusllial base lost ihc hltle U h.nl
built up beloic ihc adsciil ol ihc Itntish
When Ihcv Icll. I gvpt had
i n " ' « " h I U ''
IV nllcs that dldn'l woik and a i oiiuliv ue.n
In dial had glow lb and expansion as.i goal
aul was willing loliglu I
I 1 ', I S I
ed laic in "niodeini/ing" ihc M " l ' " ' ' ' " '
llhe supposed lllsllllc.ltioll h o coh.niahsln
,„ H | neo-coh
ilisuii While H look oil and
olhc, icsotliccs
he Middle I a s , il Icll
inissiouaiics and schools lo spiead icligioli
and \ i n c n c a n political s u m , , - bin
icchnologv
c olhc, leihiucal skills
ncccssaiy lot Aiabs lo manage Iheu " w n
lesoiuces. It's line that Alah couultles
received dollals and lu.ishcd pioducls in
lelurn. bin nothing thai Hugh enhanci' then
leal independence
II (he energy crisis shows anything, rt
shows thai exploitation has been going '"i
to, years. People talked about the huge gap
between developed and underdeveloped
countries, between luxuiy and starvation in
the world. Hie situation was a t t n b u t c d lo
vague criteria ol development: the West was
simply more civih/ed - ihey had a more_
I gypi would mil |oin the Baghdad Pact. All
an! u.is ,ul when I gypt became triendly
.villi IIK Russians Yet this was not called
HI.ii km.ul. il was called lalional policy.
A Question Of Rhetoric
T o the Editor:
I list these few brief p o i n t s m a n a t t e m p t t o
defend my position in "Higher E d u c a t i o n "
( A S P , Nov. 13) as attacked in a letter by M s .
Marleen Barr ( A S P . Nov. 16):
(1) Ms. Barr asks rhetorically, " W h a t is
w r o n g with stimulating communication o f a
physical nature?" I never once in that article
implied that anything was w r o n g o r improper with such communication. I a d m i t
not being able lo survive physically o r
emotionally without it. My point w a s t h a t a s
the primary means of c o m u n i c a t i o n a t a u n iversity it is just plainly inadequate.
(2) Again in a rhetorical question, M s .
Barr asks, "How oftcn|do professors concentrate on triviality instead of intellectual
growth'.'" I welcome this opportunity to ask a
lew of my own rhetorical questions. Are the
names of seventeenth century A M H ! a r tists trivial? Is the metre in Chaucer trivial? Is
the origin of R o m a n religion trivial? Are t h e
names Melville gave t o characters of h i s o w n
imagination trivial? I could myself p r o d u c e
m a n y students w h o would a n s w e r y e s t o all
these questions. W h y they are here is
beyond my imagination (the degree d o e s n ' t
even get o n e a j o b these days).
(3)My complaint in the article w a s n o t s o
much a b o u t the school a s it w a s a b o u t t h e
sttittenis.
1 feel there are teachers w h o s e
knowledge and understanding I can effectively a n d enjoyably t a p . My wish is t h a t
t h e r e w c r c more students with whom Icould
a s profitably c o m m u n i c a t e . M s . Barr c o m plains that "the 'Jniwniiy
is t o o big, t o o
bureaucratic and t o o f a r g o n e . " I c a n ' t h e l p b u t
wonder whyshe remains here, tuition a l o n e
lor a B.A. or 3 . S. averages a b o u t $3,000.
M.A.Mejtzer
Reading Between The Bars
•x-wW'X-^XAWrby Krancisca L . Senhouse. : .;£&:
aren't we reaching out lor them to give them
understanding instead ol cruel and i n h u m a n
I n u l k w\w\\ IIK- Ai.ihs. mil at desperatreatment? We must motivate them to alter
tion wcni 1.1 u.u lui ihc liiurth lime, they
their behavior a n d performance. These men
v..ic , .ilk'd HI,in.MI,il. Ii^htm^ mil M| pride
want to be achievers, so we have to monitor
utsicul ,,l iiiii.Mi.ilK acceptingdetcat When
their behavior through training. Man can g o
ilii/v « t n i.iiHin.tl ,uul used then resources
Irom a passive-depender.t role to an active
uiviv.nl i>! .initio it-* hiuif! .ibmil political
and meaningful o n e .
th.uie<. ilkv. w fit; called barbaric! I hey were
I hese men are in the same situation a s a
• .ill1 tl h.ii b,ii u mil because lhc\ denial lood
I he world we now live in iseonsidcred to
eh ild when h e d o e s wrong and is locked in his
U' ilu- M.n\ niu. bni iiHucnicnce to mololists
be a civili/ed o n e . I h e American society is
room. I he dillerence here 1 however, is lhat
wini how have io d i m ; at sc inph instead ol
s.nd t o h e l r e e a n d moral. Hut w e a l l / i g r e e
the child has in his room a color I V, all kinds
Ml How d u e l these \ , , , h s are
lhat this society ol ours has within it a series
ol toys and is able to call out ol the window
ol contradictions. We are not lice, hecause
lo his liictids, il he wishes.
w e . n e restricted hy irrelevant laws. We are
1 he men ol C'oxsackic prison are required
not equal. I his society is not moral hecause
On ihc I l i s Special last month. Kiny
upon entrance lo the prison to submit a list
u adheres to a prc-slaled set ol values,
I .ii s.[| vm|, 'Wv tinn't want lo d e n \
ol names o I those persons who will v isit and
u h e l h c t right or wrong, ignoring the tact
\nicik.ihs .uu ul i he ii needs, but om needs
correspond with them. No o n e outside ihe
thai Ireedoin should allow us the choice ol
nitiM .iKo he umsidercd " It K ama/nig that
said hsi is allowed lo write or visit. Special
oui own set ol values, he it right o r wrong.
.iltci tlu iie.iimeiii \ i a b s received h a m the
permission m u s l n e granted lo minors to
I he aforementioned C'oxsackie prison ( isia
W s l thai lhc\ still iliink ul \nieiiean and
even correspond with ihe\inmatesand their
place ol conlinemenl lor criminals. As
I lunpvMii h t u l - I lie emotional.pialHies .
mail is censored tor fear lhat an inmate
pitson is delincd in the dictionary. u is not
I'^e pmle lhat Huv ,ne eiilki/ed lol. work
might reveal his leelingsol the c o n d i t i o n s of
surrounded hs high walls, hut the high imboth w.n-. .is pi ul e in spues lighting in spite
his present dwelling. Ihey are deprived of
pregnable walls: which exVsl in the hearts
"I ihe m k K MI ihns ii inspire ucneiosit\.
the right lo disclose iheu displeasures. Ihey
and altitudes ol the guards. Ihe imprisoned
I IK It is j d e e p seiist , , | s a U \ l a e t U H I U l g h are deprived ol the right to express their
men, at ( oxsackic are given n o visihle
uit' - . . i . u i u i e II .H w h i c h h e n e e d s . N u t t o d o
Ice lings-. What h a s happened to freedom id
scope in which lo grow. One counselor
•<> 's' I'litiais it- tlu diclalcsol pmle. Km it's
speech a n d Ireedom ol the press, and isn'l
claims lhat ihcv a i e not hemg rehabilitated.
,1 c in, Iwolkl I t.i \e,,ls \ i a h s u e i e piomis(here also a law a b o u t tampering with Ihe
Ihcv arc in " l i m b o . " 1 imbo, in the dicctl iiisiki .iikl ii dul not eomc \t»w ihev a i e
mail'.1
iioiiarv.. is del ined a s a place id neglect. I r o m
.'
;• lo pl.iv tlu u.inie lh.il ,ill n.ilkins ha\ e
Ihc Warden has approximate!) three
m\ recent- and vers short \ isil l o ( ' o \ s a e k i e I
been pl.iMii)' .itivwav I he\ aie (ioine to use
vcais helorc retirement so wh> upset ihe a p have
iioirccd
p s \ c ho logica I and
Hi. II oil mini Mtumalls m tlevelop then
ple eai t hi approximate!) three sears hew ill
phvsiological neglect- ps\chologieal neglect.
inv ii k on nil ie bin .Hsu in share u w nil
have onlv to mow the lawn id his suburban
because ihcv a i e no visible signs thai these
• Hilt i s W h o n e \Mlliii|i In see IllstlCC d o n e
h o m e - s o why in.vtitute any type of changes
minds ,uc being Heated, and a physiological
Nabil k h o m y
loi these outcasts'.' Alter all. these are only
neglect, because there are no signs ol
numbers Iiom one lo nine a n d that's not
pin viva I activitv 1 saw approximately 100
much t o remember. Ours was the first tune
men in a yard which contained tour basketlliiit these imprisoned outcasts wereallowed
ball hoops averaging twenty-live men lo a
live entertainment.
h.isket Ihe men were standing around loafIhc entertainers were locked away lo
ing, waiting lor llieir turn out ol limbo.
dress until show time
I hen they were
I
hev
were
deprived
even
the
chance
logel
I n Ihe I thiol
h II rued down lo the siage so as not lo upset
close
to
an
outsider,
(iranted
that
these
\ l \ loornale and I painted out loom (his
ihe prisoners. I h e performers were not
human beings have broken laws. Granted
weekend I \eivone w ho .•onimcnled on IHII
allowed lo wave or do a n \ other type of
thai ihcv have committed nuirdei a n d rape
w oi k st'eiucil nunc concerned withwhethei
movement which would upset the prisoners
.mil loblx-d. bul ihe laci still remains that
we liad eolk'ii peiuiKsinii HI wnh wluit the
oi .iitiact undue attention. Also, prior to
thes ale human beings. 1 hev're confined
-.. Im.il would do to us than with how the
performance ihcv were instructed as to
with
the uilcnlioii ol lehahililation.
m looked 1 ni.ilK vse ilecided to saj the
winch dances a n d what costumes were
Rehabilitation- meaning "to put into good
Inllt.w ill}' t o t h e s l l k l e i i l b o t h
acceptable al such an institution. Anything
condition oi u> icstore lo loimal tank " We
V\t , n e pi n p l e n o t l o h o t s . a l i d w e s l m t l l d
ilia i was loo flirtatious or could stimulate the
ean
all
agiec
llial
these
men
were
not
b
o
m
inn hlindh lollt>w niles Iheie ate m a i n
inmates had lo be eui out ol the show. The
niiudcieis.
lajiists
oi
robbers.
1
hese
crimes
Innlisli iej.'iil.ilions Ik-ie iati^H)[! Iiom a hill]
show
was interrupted
b e c a u s e the
were
iiiainK
due
lo
environmental
comnn li.nnsieis. tuities .mil candles in ihe rtiiuri
auditorium had t o be cleared hy a certain
plications and due lo society's ignorance and
in |niaI i oniiul by ihe Studeiil Associalum
time In actuality, this was because they had
human weaknesses
nu*i how much uionev each Quad Hoaul
to change the guards.
Abraham Maskow, a psychologist, says
IM.IN eain I nless we revolt agamM unI hese men weie happy lor t h i s o p p o r t u n i that man is motivated by deprivation. He
IIei CSS.IIV i out ud ol out lives il w ill pel MM
l>. loi ihe chance lo see a little of whal the
says
man
is
a
wanting
animal,
lhat
man
has
a
Keiueiiibei. this is nune t h a n o u i school.)I is
outsidet world is involved in. So why this
set ol basic needs M a n has lo eat and drink,
nui home O w l disobedience docs not mean
deprivation'? Isn't it enough l h a t they have to
Man
needs
salel>
Man
has
an
ego
and
sell.ii^ani/inj.' tallies to chanye the world; ii
eai. sleep and wake at a predetermined
esteem
I
he
men
m
question
have
the
same
means sellini; out on \ o u i own lo do whal
nine ' Isn't it enough that they aretrealed as
needs
we
have
Ihey
wanl
what
we
want.
H U M be done We ate paying$l UKJayeui loi
lieaks observed, watched a n d guarded?
Ihey
aie
locked
away
Irom
the
civili/cd
mil sieulc iiihicles. we musl mil allow a
Whal about o u r actions in the so-called
woi Id because ihey are considered lo be a
iHiicaiuiacv to stop us Iiom making litem
lice, moral world whicli propagate rape and
menace, the) are considered inlerior. Hut
liveable St), lellow hiinians, please learn lo
fohhei) daily'' When a man or w o m a n is
some day these men will walk a m o n g us
question the validity ol what you are (old lo
ousted Irom his o r \ h e r position or is forced
again S o who is responsible l u p i v p a r e litem
i\u so lhat ihc next tune someone tells you
to retire, alter extracting all ol his o r her
lor llieir return? II we consider ourselves
"no" \ o u can ask ' w h y not" As you stare ut
knowledge of specialization a n d he o r she
superior
beings,
then
il
goes
without
saying
whtieuess think how much more pleasant
can't lind a job a n d is considered dead in the
thai
we
are
the
ones
responsible.
So
why
are
chestnut and grape could be,
business world isn't this rape, robbery a n d
we instill ing in their minds hatred and
murder...
hostility
to
all
ol
the
outside
world'.'
Why
Sherwin Williams
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1973
/-.(/. now: Oi' Monday November 5, (he
liurundi
A\triamDanceTroupeperformedal
i'tixsuvkie
I aval tonal I'etial Ins-tint t ion on
lilaik SididaniA
Da\. In this ankle,
f'ranii\i a Seniumse gives her impression itf this
lurrvt iiniHil institution as related to moral
Giving The Rules
The Brush
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVEN
J
llSSFAYETTE
itlfnSUSUffH1
RADIO ELECTRONICS
^SS^SSSSP END OF SEMESTER SALE
Record Review:
Butterfield And Oldfield
PANASONIC
COMPLETE FISHER STEREO
SYSTEM
TAPE RECORDER
(2) FISHER XP-65 3 WAY
SPEAKER SYSTEM with
AC-BATTERY
BUILT IN CONDENSER
MIKE
AUTO-STOP
ALL PUSHBUTTON
sculptured grills.
Reg. $109.95 each.
it AH Comes Back (Bearsvillc
BR 2170) is Butterfield's second
outing with his Better Days group.
Unfortunately, the question arises
of whether the group is still seeing
better days, or if the state of the
Union is taking its toll on their
music.
$
FISHER 180 AM-FM STEREO RECEIVER; 20 watts of power per
channel R.M.S.. Reg. $249.95
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complete with base dust cover and cartridge.
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SHARPE
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NOW
22
NOT E X A C T L Y AS P I C T U R E D
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Solid M a t e , large precision
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tuning d i a l , complete w i t h
batteries, earphones
and
SPECIAL: $ 7 9 . 9 5
telescoping a n t e n n a ,
^
SAJJ PRICE
Price f > 9 5 $ A V i
$14.95 y
ALBANY, N.Y.
79 Central Ave.
462-9501
PAGE EIGHT
A STEREO IN EVERY ROOM!
*5
GLENS FALLS, N.Y.
C0L0NIE, N.Y.
SCHENECTADY
Technically, the sound of the
music is belter than ever. The band
is probably the tightest one Butterfield has put together. Butterfield's
blues harmonica is approaching
the rawness of his earlier albums,
;is he seems to be bringing it closer
to the microphone. Geoff M u l daur is putting a new edge on
Butterfield blues with his frequent
country slide style guitar. But
something that worked well in the
first Better LXiys album seems to be
missing in the second oneIt eomesdown to this: the album
is suffering from malnutritionWhile it is receiving very guod
ii mounts ol fine playing ability and
technical excellence, it is missing
something that is preventing it
from "becoming all that it is
capable of being." Diagnosis: intake deficiency. Specifically-lack
ofgoodimaterial.'lhis has left the
album with a rather bland taste foi
the listener, who walks away thinking it's "just another pop blues
record." Without a complete!)
balanced diet. Better Daysdoes not
get the propei nourishment and its
al huin performance lacks th$
spnik and qua tit) thai are vwthin
its potential.
I'iirls ol the album were luck)
enough to receive some o| tins important l a c t o i
" I oo M a i n
Drivers" has a lot ol the M»i\c"
that the old Hutierfield songs li.nl.
and lansol the Blues Band will ap
pimate Butleitield's tine l o i m
harp blowing llnoitgtuuit the sonj!
On " l t \ (ielliim llatdei to Sm
vive." I he band lays down some
FRANK'S
Living Room
PITTSFIELD, MASS.
707 Upper Glen
Northway Mall
141 Erie Blvd.
42 Summer St.
792-9992
459-7550
346-6111
4991420
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
by Bob Riedfeiger
Paul Butterfield must have been
in an optimistic frame of mind
when he dropped the old "Blues
Band" title for his current group's
"Better Days" moniker. After
releasing several loose and disappointing albums that are best
forgotten, Butterfield managed to
pull himself together again. This
process of getting back in shape led
to a strong album appropriately
titled Better Days featuring his
group of the same name.
respectable "pnp-soul-rock" (i.e..
Billy
Preston's
Outa-Space
keyboard soundl and special credit
should go to Ronnie Barron who
wrote the song and who put out a
mighty good vocal.
One part ol the album got some
good material hut not enough to
put it on the top. "Louisiana
H o o d " could have been the best
cut on the album. It opens with a
simple yet seductive rhythm that
whets the appetite and gives cause
lor risingexpectations. Ihe listener
discovers, however, that
this
"tease" is the core of the song. His
frustration peaks as the song closes
and all he is lelt with is a catchy
beat but no lollow-up or development. At this point he may have to
resort to some hard blues-rock like
Slick i /V/jeers where he knows he
can be sure id releasing the pent-up
energy, which was started by a
good heat, in a totally complete
and iherclore. very satishmg.
song ()i he mas take icliige in a
dependable old Hutierfield Blues
Hand album
Hut the rest ol the album was not
.is lortiin.ite as the above songs
1 he ol he! six pail 1 , require
tlospilali/.ilnm and inleiisue care
I here is no doubt thai "Pom Hoy"
really needs help liellei I>a\ssa\ed ibis song h u m expiring completcK In being wise enough in lei
(icoll
Muldaill
,ing lead on lllis
weak song rathei than Butterfield.
In the past sew'tal veal's, il seems
thai when Btitieiheld lues a slow
song he imposes the agon\ ol a
man being qualleicd In horses nil
slow iiuiiioiil iinall those wliuh.ne
ears In listen is ,i tedious cv.lie heeoines
In
I sing \ l i i l ,1,1111 on ie.ul allows -Pool Hoy "til
\ irlualh use lioni the dead. Inn to
an evlicineh h.nl and mostly dull
condition
\nolhei siikh m l is the tiileciil
anil allium tall. "Il Ml < nines
ll.uk " \bo\c a tango l l i u l u n .
Billlclllcld demolish.His Ins 1111i
n .John a
ike.i song winch
is mole than I m minutes seem like
iwo .inn .i l u l l
I Ins illlghl be
pel ii
, , , i i i n n ii,l.ilil,
l„-,.,nse
il
III,
I,.is,in
was
111, s o n , ' was " l i e o l the
".ill I I I I I , ere.n-
.n
, , ! I,, i m so lasl
l u l l tins is n o t die
,,.,
"Mist seem
| he h i i , s , , , | . , e , h , l . i h l ,
.,
but the music is even more predictable, and undergoes very little
change or variation until the fadeout ending. Butterfield has pulled
this before. Translated the song
seems to say. "You are getting
sleepy, etc...You will wake twenty
seconds before the song is overand
remember nothing in between now
and then." Actually, you don't
have to be told not to rememberthere is nothing to remember.
Then there are the other afflicted
parts. "Win Or Lose" is album filler
material loaded with more of those
deja-vu blues lyrics. They're from
the "You're gonna live, you're gonna die. you can laugh and you can
cry" school of lyrics. Authors Bobby Charles and Butterfield, I'd
guess, are trying to avoid the mess
.John Mayall gets into when he
starts to sing contemporary and
relevant blues 'lyrics-like about
television. I he music of "Win Or
l o s e " is upbeat but that never
guaranteed a good song. "Small
I own I,ilk" becomes noticeable
when \on happen In see that Bobby
( hailes wrote il in collaboration
with Kick U i n k o ol the Band.
" l a k e "inin Pleasure Where You
I md 11" is some more of the "popsoul-roek" wuh vers little special
ah,ml il
Peihaps I've been unlair in examining /t •!// Cniiics Hack. I must
a,linn im disappointment with
the album is unobjectively encouiaged by m\ enthusiasm foi the
eailiesl Hutierfield Blues Band
albums Mihiuigh these songs were
n,'\ci .is light, cusp, and polished
.is llellei U i \ s . each sung had imuieili.uA and a sense,,! spunlaneiu Musi ,,l all. these snugs had a
special, exciting character ol their
own On // - I / / ( omn Hack, the
songs need suine more ol this.
Olhciwise the songs become milislinel
I heie .ue so me situations where
iinohifusivc
music mas be
,1,'siie.iMe
llui
"unobtrusive
music" docsn'l mean It can't be
good music And il I say that
liihiilm llclh I Virgin VR 1.1-1(15)
In Mik, (lldheld is gieai music in
.tuilv In thai shouldn't be mis
i.ik, ii I I ius was loi a condellinal
In ,, sense il is sinnlai to
, Li ,.u .iliuiisieul | . i / / il eau betun,-,! i i,i the point whele sou ale
, . , , u ,,i ,i hut no distracted In il
P
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1973
The main current of Side 2 is
English folk music and even a folk
tale. Al one point there is a vicious
grumbling, sounding like someone
vigorously clearing their throat
and mouth of lumpy farina. These
arc the noises of the Piltdown mana supposed prehistoric
'man,
whose bones
were found in Piltdown, England in I 9 I I . In I953,
the Piltdown man was revealed to
be a hoax. However, heisaliveand
well on Tubular Bells with a "mori-
tl
176 Quail St.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1973
34-01 Molt Ave.
Far Rockaway, N.Y. 11691
212 337-0500 or 212 471-0100
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
bund chorus" befcad him.
' ~
Throughout die a l b W O M f i e l d
plays various combinations of
organs, bass, electric and accoustk
guitars, flageolet (an instrument
similar to a recorder), grand piano,
and glockenspiel. He makes his
transitions from soft accoustk
music into heavier electric and
back again so that the continuity of
the piece is kept intact. Some of the
music is soothing-and refreshing,
particularly where he uses Sally
Oldfield and Mundy Ellis as a
chorus. There are" other parts
which provide sufficient scratching
for the rock itch.
At
times
OMIKM
is
a
bit
repetitious, which may be another
reason why Tubular Belli is good
studying music, but Oldfield discontinues these repetitions just
before they become annoying, and
turns our attention to another
theme or instrumentation. He
seems to sense how far he can push
the listener and how much can be
tolerated before they criticize him
for padding his music. The total
effect of each piece tends to
deemphasi/c the repetition that occurs and it converts repetition into
an acceptable reinforcement of the
mood.
Tubular Bells, with its structure
of flow, is an entertaining study in
mood change and the manipulation of music for creating a setting.
It is not the most spectacular most
innovative rock albumto have ever
been produced, but it certainly is
worth several listenings.
/$KH6€tHc6*t$ tie Opening of
27H**e
RECORD TOWN STORES
THURSDAY, NOV. 29, 1973
OUR p n i n U I C
NEW U U L U N I C
CTflDC
O I Ulf L
LOCATED ON KARNER RD.
(ROUTE 155) A ALBANY ST.
V« MILE SOUTH OF ALBANY-SCHENECTADY RD. - NEAR KMART
OUR
NEW
LOCATED ON
COLUMBIA TURNPIKE
NEXT TO JOY DEPT. STORE
RENSSELAER STORE
ALSO
SOUTH GLENS FALLS
SARATOGA
MIDTOWN SHOPPING CENTER
ACROSS FROM JOY DEPT. STORE
HILTON MUSIC
IN THE NEW PYRAMID MALL
FANTASTIC SPECIALS AT ALL 4 STORES
THE LARGEST RETAILER O F RECORDS
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OUR POLICY IS T O OFFER T H E
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VALUABLE COUPON
THIS C O U P O N W O R T H
$l-oo
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY
to work in a unique summer sleepaway program tor emotionally disturbed and mentally relo.ded children and adolescent... Sponsored by
Maimonides Institute, the oldest leading organisation under Jewish
auspicesconducllng schools, residential treatment centers day treatment centers and summer camps .or special children. Interviews begin
In December tor summer 1974. Fo, Inlormatlon and application, contact Immediately:
Maimonides Summer Residential Program
Dull) 7:30-9:00
The music is enjoyable and easily
accessible on the surface. Dot you
can appreciate it on other levels as
well when it is the sole object of you
rattention.
Somewhat classical in structure.
Tubular:
Bells is an excursion
through different instrumentations
and themes written and performed,
for the most part, by Mike Oldfield. Each side is one whole
"piece" with a number of changes
of mood taking place during the
course of the playing.
The more exotic of the two sides,
Side I comes off as music to accompany you as you experience a
strange and distant land. The
music itself isn't extremely strange
hut il is very suggestive to that
effect. Sounds of bells and mandolin arc among the most important colorings to this side of the
album. Curiously, the piece leads
up to Vivian Stanshall (of the Bonzo Dog Band) introducing, in all
his British eloquence, the names of
various instruments as they are
played.
TOWARDS THE PURCHASE OF ANY CODE " K " ALBUM
OFFER GOOD THRU DEC. 1 AT ANY RECORD TOWN STORE
Our L o w Price $4.49
Mfg. List $5.98'
%
teas
PAGE NINE
Math tutoring. All levels. 783-0296.
W A R M YOUR
COCKLES
with Dean Swift
fancy
Sniffing
Snuff. Send name,
etc.
for
free
samples.
Dean
Swift Ltd. Box
2009 San Francisco, Ca 94126.
MS in Ed. with 5 years teaching high
GLASSMED
school English seeksworkltoUuppbrtigrad
studios. Researching a n d writing skills
g o o d ' . Contact: S. Metz, 112.Chestnut
St., 12210.
Rings for Christmas-every style; wedding,
engagement, etc., large discounts from
NYC jeweler. Order now, delivery, 2-3
weeks. David, 482-0448.
MM
HOUSING
FOR SALE
MMNMRMMMMMMMW
1959-40 Gibson single pick-up, hollow
January Female apartmentmate neededcall 482-3967 after 6 p.m.
O. What d i d the uncooked soofganiah
body, 6-string, electric j a u guitar. Excelent condition, collector's! item. S1S0.
Call Joel, 438-7521 offer 9 PM.
Wanted: Female to share apartment for
spring semester. Own room, inexpensive,
say to the baker?
STUDENTS:
Free
transportation to NYC or
Long Island area. Drive a UHaul truck. Must be able to
drive a standard transmission and have a valid drivers
license. We pay all tolls and.
gas. For further information
call U-Haul Co.. 356-1200,
between the hours of 8 a.m.
& 4 p.m.
'
on busline. Call 465-6007.
Realise component stereo with FM-AM
radio. Good condition. $75. Ann, 3559103.
Male
vegetarian
and
dog (non-
vegetarian) seek clean mellow apartment
Judo ghi • Brand new - 482-3967, after 6
p.m.
Yahama FG-180 steel-string acoustic; excellent condition. Tel-274-3817 evenings.
or country house (north of Albany towards
Latham) Immediate occupancy.
Prefei
Remember OJ
communal living group. Marty, 489-7121
University Prol. needs a place to stay 2-3
WANTED
nigh ts a week (Tues., Wed., and
mmmmmmmmmmu iw w •sometimes Thurs.} in or near campus area.
Wonted: Samurai swords, war souvenirs,
dueling
Cafl Dr. Fricke. 457-8396 before 6 .
pistols, presentation weapons,
miniatrue weapons, models, curiosa, etc.
Moving out oi your apartment? We need
Immediate payment. Telephone: Shelley
one with either 3 or 4 bedrooms starting
Bravetman, 518-731-8500.
December or January. We are willing to
take yours, we will pay $15. 482-6030.
Wanted: Babysitter to take care of baby
2 bedroom apartment for rent first floor at
some, days
like
598 Third St. furnished. No utilities. On
someone who hoshad experience and en-
West Albany Bus line. Phone 462-6028
joys babies, located near university. Call
after 2.
or evenings.
Would
This ain't no time to quit now chief
The Staph
Business Upportunity
Albany location. Ideal
for a college bar. Asking $5,000. 732-2361
482-0301.
Two apts
tady Episcopal Church. Positions may be
for one or two persons. 393-0304; 3740353.
Downstairs: I or 2 BR, LR, kitchen, bath, all
utilities $160. Use of cellar, attic, y a r d , coll
436-1027.
MMM
Need School Money • Married college
couples earn extra money be babysitting.
Bar Maid Wanted
Part-time evenings.
Will train. Albany
465-9002.
118 Southern Blvd. Upstairs: 2
BR, LR. kitchen, bath, all utilities $165.
Choir! Director and Organist for Schenec-
______
SERVICES
Typing done in my home, 869-2474.
TEACHERS FOR THAILAND
T'ie Peace Corps needs over a hundred TESL teac'iers for Thailand.
Training starts Jan. 74. Train teachers,
design
curriculum,
classroom teaching.
citizen.
write
guides,
Must be US
Apply now. For information
SI 17 per week • car needed - (ree room
call or write Judy Waite, ACTION 26
and board. University Family Service
Federal Plaza, NY 10007 (212) 264-
(Agency). 456-0998.
"
assume a lease. If you contact us a n d we
HELP WANTED
Professional typing done-
Reasonable
rates. Call 283-5792, 459-7905.
L7123.
at Creative Work Service
-__-__.-
Talent
call 589-9770, or 212-582-6464
auditions
for Telethon
7-11
P M ; Dec. 7,
2-4 P M .
Auditions w i l l b e h e l d i n t h e C a m p u s
*••••••••
Center Ballroom. A p p l i c a t i o n s must
b e picked u p a t t h e CC I n f o r m a t i o n
Quad
JEWELRY
Come
OF
down
and
Wed.
4
BARRINGS
see t h e
LARGEST selection o f e a r r i n g s
y o u ' l l EVER see!
ONLY
far
included.
264 Cent.al Ave.
cor, No. Lake Ave.
Albany
UNIVERSITY OF PARIS
New Paltz Philosophy Year
Qualified undergraduanSSiin PhH and related majors
can earn from 30 to 32 creditstaking regular courses at the
University of Paris (Sorbonne) during 1974-1975. The
SUNY Program Director will help students secure suitable
housing, arrange programs and assist or arrange assistance
for them in their studies throughout the year. A three-week
orientation a n d intensive language review w l l be held at
the start. September 15 to June 15. Estimated living expenses, transportation, tuition, a n d ' fees, $3,000. A d ditional information may be had by writing to Price
Charlson, Departmentof Philosophy, FT1000, State University College, New Paltz,New York 12561 Telephone: (914)
257-2696
Interest
Meetings:
Alumni:
Albany
State
Cinema
always a p -
Dec. 5, 8 PM, B r u b a c h e r Lower
REFERENDUM
Guideines.
Colonial
Quad
preciates a n d accepts suggestions a s
P . O . B o x 1130 DD, 1400 W a s h i n g t o n
different
Dec. 4, 7 P M
A v e n u e , A l b a n y , N.Y. 1 2 2 2 2 .
fashion? The Book Book, a d i r e c t o r y
d a y , N o v e m b e r 2 7 a t 7;00 in Bio 2 4 8 .
Adirondack/Cayuga
O u r speakers will b e Ms. Pat Rooney
Lower Lounge. State: Tues. Dec. 4 ,
a n d Dr. L e o n a r d Lupinsky o f the Pre-
9:00 P M , F l a g r o o m .
Med
or D e n t a l School is urged to
come.
Fair
73
faculty-Student
Resident
75:
Ass'istantships
for
1974-
Interested students must a t t e n d
applauds
Association
generous donation
rheto
Gamma
of
a
hundred
what fo do
haphazard
Munchkin
for its
n e e d e d to assist students
Club:
Indian
Association
to t h e Student
A m b a s s a d o r Scholarship Fundi
Volunteers
W a t c h this space.
Coffeehouse
MOOOOOO«NMMfMeOfl
Quad
co-sponsored
will b e held Sunday,
Dec. 2 o n I n d i a n Q u a d Flagroom, 8
-official notice
PM.
Starring
Anne
innnnnnauuiBimiiim
Marie
Maddy
Marra.
fssaacs a n d
Refreshments,-
18 at 7:30 P M . Potential applicants
at the Farnsworth M d d l e School with
w h o can not possibly a t t e n d should
a
Fraternity
announce
contact Roger W r i g h t a t 4 5 7 - 8 8 5 2 a t
programs. C a l Peggy Mason at 456-
a p p l i c a t i o n s a re now b e i n g a c c e p t e d .
least
6010,
A p p l i c a t i o n b l a n k s a n d more infor-
m e e t i n g . Qualifications: must b e of a t
m a t i o n is a v a i l a b l e in t h e Lobby of
l e a d Junior status b y Fall 1974, con-
Like Arts
W a n t to help
Fri. 10-12. C o m e i n , or f i l l it o u t a n d
Desierto,
the Biology B u i l d i n g .
tinuing student
your environment? Then c o m e l e a r n
d r o p it in the " G r i p e B o x " i n the Lob-
Thursday, N o v . 2 9 a t 7 P M in LC 1 9 .
two (2)' days
prior
to the
a t SUNYA, a n d in
g o o d academic s t a n d i n g .
CheMistry
Club
will hold
a
wide
variety
of
extension 6 7 .
'N Crafts?
music, fun.
challenging
Got a gripe? Bring it to Grievance
Committee. Office hours in CC 308
Spanish Club and Department
a r e M o n . 1:30-3:00, Tues. ! - 2 , a n d
Spanish
to m a k e j e w e l r y with PYE. N o v . 2 7 ,
by of t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r ( a c r o s s f r o m
7:30 P M , FA 2 1 7 .
Info Desk).
McLaren), t o n i g h t , 7 P M , in C H - 0 7 3 .
Evangelical
Christians
Attention: Phonothon
will
be ex-
Information
Services:
tended
to Dec. 3 a n d Dec. 4 . If you
C e n t e r I n f o r m a t i o n Desk f o r g e n e r a l
are interested in h e l p i n g o u t , please
i n f o r m a t i o n a n d student events: 4 5 7 -
Fellowship of the Lord. For more in-
call G a r y Sussman, 4 5 7 - 4 3 0 7 . W e
6 9 2 3 . Infone: for questions on univer-
f o r m a t i o n call 4 5 7 / 9 2 9 .
net-d your h e l p .
sity
He w i l b e i n B.A. Room 227 a) 1:30
All students signed up for the Cross
Support your environment!
P.M.
Country
Ski Course d u r i n g Interces-
now recyding on campus. Placecans
sion will meet m the Women's Aux-
Business
Pi and The School of
a r e co-sponsoring Jack S,
Parks, Vice
Chairman
of
General
Electric C o . o n N o v e m b e r 28, 1973.
policies a n d procedures: 4 5 7 -
4 6 3 0 . S U N Y / A Line: for d a i l y campus
There is
a n d p a p e r in a p p r o p r i a t e a r e a s o f
Students interested in a p p l y i n g f o r
your
the
the subject o f n e u r o - o t o / o g y on Dec.
Dec. 4 at 8:30 p m. Those signed up
recycling facilities on your q u a d - call
Program
3 r d , 8 PM in t h e C C A s s e m b l y H a l l . All
for classes during the regular session
Lynne Jackson a t 7-8569.
November
a r e welcome to a t t e n d . Refreshments
will meet on Tues
Jerome Goldstein will speak on
p.m
Pathology
the workshop fee of $9 0 0
Audiology
Club.
trash
room.
If there
a r e no
Dec 1 1 , a t 8:30
will b e served. Sponsored by Speech
and
A reminder to bring a check for
Gerda
Lerner, Professor of History
a n d Co
UOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOft^,
-
The Psychology
Honorary
interested folk
a m e e t i n g will b e held o n
A friendly ear? A
p l a c e lo rap? Call the 5 3 0 0
Rutgers
University
Camden
Assistant
problem
Dean
lo
Brent will b e on campus on Thursday
Nov. 29 f r o m
make
Director of the Women's
sue
University
Mrs
College
Give a call
anytime
Record
every Thursday
Co-Op.
Open
5 30 7 3 0
Discussion w i l l b e f o l l o w e d f o l l o w e d ,
(Please note: GRAFFITI
For Tuesday's
jFor Friday's
DEADLINES
paper-10 p.m. Sun.
p a p e r - 10 p.m. W e d .
26. U p to 15 credits hours
York State S e n a t e a n d Assembly. I n formation
and
WOODSY O W L H O O T S :
before
application
People need fish,
fish need clean water.
forms
a v a i l a b l e i n C C 3 4 6 (Studen (Association Office) or b y calling Ken Stokem
a t 4 5 7 6542.
Students:
of
due in the Contact O f f i c e LCB30B b y
African
and
Afro-American
Studies
Community
(SSW 290):
Service
Papers
are
December 3 r d . Make sure they are in
if y o u w a n t to pass the course!
People urgently n e e d e d in the Scene
a n d Costume 5hops to h e l p b u i l d sets
OF 01.
d a y , e v e n i n g , 01 weekends a n d f i n d
Attention
Students:
are
Community
Service
Letters from your agency
due in M r s . McK in ley's
(Mohawk
Towe r
office
1705, School
of
GIVE A HOOT DON'T POLLUTE
Social W e l f a r e ) by Dec, 3 r d . M a k e
N O EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. Come
in
influences
OOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOQ&C
clubs & meetings
SPOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Ce rc/e
Wednesdays
Francois
at
8
PM,
choosing a
meeting
I I'M lor an inloi.n a l yiou p
idiiol oppo i l u i n l y
"'""td
with (Glee
tonight in Fireside Lounge
lo.
rim s
Illlyoiie
an
con
Channel
17,
will
Schenectady
meet Wedrv lisday, 1 JO i.i 9 0 0 unci
foil
10 (JO IV 00, l o r
Sutu, duys
1/00 EM 39
State Fencing S ociety
Important
Hi.-
society o l l e n
col leej «
ii.tig " upectn <ely
intel mid i,n l i a
CO. ,i petit.. Ml
us
well
us
IBM printout
November
Albany
17
28
Fern
for
sheets
WMHT
Avenue,
Call l o r r y Krone 356-
Volunteers n e e d e d tot the Still
Senior C i t i z e n s
Group.
Brite
People
desperately n e e d e d tor outreach for
Thursday- Free Admission
|
Sat. and Sun.- Discount with ID 1
This Week:
Listen to the sounds of:
handling llyeis, working a c a i with a
el..
lor Comp.
Volunteers
proofreading
before
inline m e s
a b o u t C o f f e e House.
(Aisoc.
NEEDED
meets
at 7 , 0 0 ,
you like
Drop by BA 1 l 5 o n lliu.sd 3ynig.li tsut
sake , mill „
Club
*h« l yui like, win
career?
Physics
Lounge, Rm 129.
ACM
Internship
so
Attention
out all that Theatre is besides a c t i n g .
A . e > >ouinte lasted mdiicu ss.ny social
Munchhin
do
Ballroom Sponsored b y t h e Women's
Come to the PAC a n y lime d u r i n g the
State Quad
Legislative
must
Studies Program a n d the D e p o r t m e n t
a n d costumes for WIZARD
Secretary,
Le
Women
on W e d . , N o v .
any
If we can'l h e l p , we'll refer
soineom; who can
i n A m e r i c a n History
Middle
with
9 A M 1 I 3 0 A M Fa
appointments
Coughlin,
Sw tlchhoard
School of LawPeter R.
on
28 a l 7 3 0 PM in t h e C a m p u s Center
300000000000000000000000
N e e d a friend?
SASU
a v a i l a b l e for w o r k i n g with the N e w
Studies P r o g r a m a t S a r a h Lawrence
Ma-
Bunuel
events of g e n e r a l interest: 4 5 7 - 8 6 9 2 .
iliary G y m (2nd floor), on Tuesday,
Dr
by
Campuis
meets every Friday night a t 7:00 PM
Sigma
directed
is f r e e .
Albany
in CC 315 Come join with us in the
Delta
of
present t h e film Simon d e l
i e d b y D r . M a r v i n D'Lugo. Admissk>*n
r e v i e w session f o r C h e m 121A {Dr.
Earth
Today is the last day to submit self-nomination forms for I Central Council seat
on Indian and I University Senate seat on State, forms are available and due in
CC 34b by 5pm today.
on
in a
Beta
256.
10am - 3pm
pillars
Biological
Honorary
Chapter
Tired o f t r y i n g to f i n d
books
the National
Beta Beta,
W e d n e s d a y , N o v . 28 a t 3:00 PM in SS
CAMPUS CENTER
MAIN LOUNGE
The
the Campus W i d e Interest M e e t i n g
on Sunday, Dec, 2, in Lecture Center
Quad:
used
of u n d e r g r a d used books, is c o m i n g .
State
Pre-Dent Advisory C o m m i t t e e .
interested in a p p l y i n g to
** *
Attention
Community
Service
Students (SSW 290): If you are taking Community Service for the second
time, you must go to one group
evaluation session. They start on
Nov. 26 and continue through Dec. 6
at the t imes listed on the requirement
sheet.
the students- b e a w a r e o f your rights,
your
on Tues-
sura they are in.if you want to pais
the course!
a n d protect themlll
Indian
Sodety,
speaking system All those interested
Much)
,in helping with the outreach a n d the
hold a business m e e t i n g for noi
PAKSIC.
cations of n o w o l l i c e r s o n W e d . , No
Magunne.
28 at 4 PM in D i G o l d b o g e n ' s o i l
entitles poems pliutt s, t i e d a i t w o i k
ELECTIONS on STATE & INDIAN QUADS
SUNYA
s Science
fiction
is still accepting, stones,
Resident Assistants
Mandatory Interest Meeting*
4:30 - b:30pm
December 2 at 7:30 in LC 18
*for all interested in 7 4 - 7 5 RA positions if unable
to attend contact Roger Wright at 457-8852 at
least two days prior to meeting.
Residents of Indian Quad will be voting
for I Central Council member
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
sity r e g u l a t i o n s as d e s c r i b e d b y S t u -
suggestions to: A l b a n y S t a t e C i n e m a ,
C i
PRESIDENT NIXON
PAGE TEN
r e a d y to serve y o u . J u d i c i a l Board
considers cases of v i o l a t i n g o f univer-
6, 9 : 0 0 P M , C a f e t e r i a . I n d i a n : Tues.
Pre-Denf Society
jors w h o a r e interested in joining Psi
for I University Senate member
is a
Pre-Med
Junior a n d Senior Psychology
to Impeach
Residents of State Quad will be noting
Board
organization
to w h a t you like to see. S e n d your film
College will speak on Black
|
Judicial
Lounge. Dutch: Thurs. Dec. 6, 7:30
Funded b y S t u d e n ' Association,
THUftS., NOU. 20
All., NOU. 30
represented
P M , F l a g r o o m . Colonial: Thurs. Dec.
Everyone
of CIGARETTES
$ 3 . 9 9 , fax
Quad
student
There is a n i m p o r t a n t m e e t i n g o f t h e
Med,
ALSO
A carton
Colonial
J u d i c i a l B o a r d is established t o a i d
SEIDENBERG
THOUSANDS
** *
dent
Desk o r in CC 3 6 7 .
The
CAST YOUR VOTE
* Thursday, Nov. 29
* Friday, Nov. 30
'74
w ) | b e held: N o v . 27, 4-6 P M ; Nov.
29,
O F THOUSANDS
meeting, please coll Ruth Shtrry 456*
5742 or Sister Claire Botvin at
Providence House 465-7485,
** *
Editing, Writing, Researching
HOME
A. Give me a bake.
Deadline for April publication is Dec.
20. For Info call Mtchor Mark at 4360262.
YOUR IDEAS TAKE FORM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1973
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2'1, L973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
j
^ • L p ^ M L f l a a V H
I H T B a a V a ^
BaalaaaW P R E S S
/
,
!
GWcfefersiYo/wtflr Schedule Will Change Things
by Bruce Maggin
For coach Bob Ford and his football team, 1973 was an interesting beginning for varsity
football here at Albany Suite. It
was a year of continued success and
improvement with the DanestoUvlly dominating their three club
rivals. Albany finished with a very
respectable 7-2 record.
D a n e ^ n t h e i r final game against RPI.
Albany Is hopeful for a
Perhaps Albany was too
successful. The Danes were caught
in between a schedule that was just
too easy. Four years ago. nobody
could have predicted that the football team would be able to make so
much progress, I he program just
advanced quicker than the
schedule, I cams that Albany was
playing almost evenly in previous
years were blasted oil the Held tins
year. Coach lord feels that the
schedule had a bad effect on the
players. 'Some kids fell that they
were super ball players alter those
games." However. Albany's
schedule will start improving next
year with all ol Albany's
obligations with club teams ending. I he Danes will play RIM.
Platishurgh. Kl I. Curry, Nichols.
and Brock port. Albany had booked Drexel loi next year, but they
announced on I hursdav that they
were dropping football. Albany
has had the problem oi finding
schools with open dates, as many
of the better small college teams
book three to four years in advance. R ight now, the team is faced
with three open dales, but there is
talk of playing some really fine opposition.
Ford is not sure where the football program is going. "1 feel the
team will eventually level off."
This will probably happen when
Albany meets teams like Ithaca
and Cortland in '75 and "76. The
Danes will be al a distinct disadvantage before the team even takes
the field: Alhunv has only two fulltime coaches, white the teams the
Danes will he lacing have as many
as five lull-time coaches. 1 here is
slill the never ending problem ol
money and recruiting;.
Also, there is a problem with
fans. I lie students who do come to
the games have known nothing but
success over the last lew years. In
lac!. Albany has not lost at home
since 1171. I he Danes have gone
nine straight games at University
lield without a defeat. Will the fans
he able to accept losses at home
when t lie caliber til the competition
increases' I hat is really had to
answer.
three starters, so the future looks
good, light end. Bill Adams will be
the toughest to replace. Also
graduating, will be Jeff O'Donnell.
Dom Pagano, hirry CJuihan and
four-year veteran, Vinnie Pierce.
Much must be said about
sophmorc quarterback, John Herlu/./.i, who really pulled the team
together and displayed excellent
leadership. He handled the
wishbone-1 with great perfection.
I his year he started throwing the
ball more frequently with good
results.
last week the squad voted then
outstanding players. Iv O m a n
was voted top offensive lineman.
Marvin Perry was picked as the
lop hack, l o r d calls him
"phenomenal" and savs. "He
Mucks like a mail man." I he top
delcnsive lineman is Kudv Vido.
who really catneonovei theeotirse
ol ilic year, lord feels thai thepros
should U>11k al Rudy nevt yeai
when he is graduated Anne Will
was voted the best delensivcback.
As lor the season ilsell. the
Danes displayed a wealth ol la lent,
especial!} in the running corps. I he
team is lelalivelv, young. I he team
lost onlv five p la vers, including
Perhaps the star ol the team is
Coach lord. Innisell. His loin
years as coach made lyotball here
al Albans what ii is today. As tor
ucxl war. l-ord lecls, "I lie team
has a p ret is solid nucleus. I he big
questions are: Will . •ivoiic stav
health) while al school, and will
live team be willing to work in the
nil season?"
tougher schedule next year.
Alleged Danes Discrimination Probed
by Bill Heller
This is the lirst part of a two
part series. In my three years ol'
covering the Great Danes, I
have heard and seen a lot of interesting things concerning
racism at Alhany. My goal in
writing this is to enlighten people, but most importantly to get
the facts out and the myths
buried.
The series will be
limited to football and basketball, the two sports I regularly
cover, although I regret I didn't
have the lime to extend it.
Baseball was supposed to be included but Coach Burlingame
is away on sabatical.
What is racism in sports?
The term itself involves many
aspects especially when applied
to the world ol the athlete.
Racism can be slacking
Blacks in certain positions, outright discrimination, a quota
system, or playing whiles solely
to appease while dominated
audiences. Kucism can also be
an excuse, and nothing more an excuse for nol playing, not
making a team or not performing well.
Although sports at Albany
are small college, they often
m i r r o r s i t u a t i o n s in the
professional leagues. Because
ol thai, comparisons to the big
leagues arc pertinent and may
throw added insight to the
world of SUNYA.
I he most intelligent remark I
ever read about sports was by
Howard Cosell in a Playboy
interview.
Cosell said that
sports is a microcosm, a
miniature society in itself. Just
as there is conflict, racism, and
ugly situations in the outside
world, there are these things in
sport.
As long as there is
human competition in sports,
there will be human problems.
"He'll never get
tired. He's a
Supernigger."
Although I had been vaguely
familiar with the idea ol slacking in loolball, I never really
thought about ils implications
until I interviewed Carvin
I'ayne.
C a r v i n was a
sophomore halfback, a good
one, who has since lelt Albany.
"Ol course you
have no
Black quarterbacks. What do
you use a Black lor'.' (live him
the ball and let him run, run,
run. He'll never get tired. He's
a Supernigger."
Is it true'.' A look at the pros
reveals a chronic absence of
Dlack quarterbacks, also Black
centers. Besides Willy Uinicr,
one is likewise hardpressed to
come up with Black middlel i n e b a c k e r s , the defensive
quarterback of a team. W h y - i s
it racism, slacking, stereotyping Blacks as unable to think,
unable to lead'.' And what of
Albany'.'
I o begin with, there have
been two recent Black quarterbacks on the (ireat Danes:
Kick Petty, who played quite a
bit two years ago, and Don
Whiiely on this year's squad.
However, neither were permanent fixtures.
When Petty surprisingly
didn't come out lasl year, people wondered why. The year
before he had split the quarterback job with Bill ITanagan; he
figured lo have a good shot al
being number one.
Immediately Ihere wercrumorsbl
racism, file same Mr. I'ayne
inlormed me thai Petty didn't
come out because Coach Hob
l o r d would never go with a
Black lor his top quarterback,
false.
Upon checking the story,and
then verifying it with Blacks on
the team, I learned thai Petty
gave up loolball for two
reasons.
I he biggest was
academic; Petty wauled to
g r a d u a t e a year
early,
something football would interfere with. Also, he was having trouble adapting lo the new
Wishbone, as did freshman
Whiiely this year, whohussince
moved to end on his own request.
l o r d says that everyone who
goes out lor loolball is Healed
equality, regardless ol
racc,
color, creed or money. "When
everyone comes mil, we ask
I hem what position they want
lo play." In general, f o a l feels
lhal "in lour years here, we've
had tremendous relationships
belween our athletes.,.We've
also had Black leaders." Along
llvese lines, he cites Ron Gardner, Marvin Perry, and liny
"I haven't seen
any racial problems
on the team."
Ilolloway as being "excellent"
examples on this year's squad.
I inning to Ihe pros, l o r d
says. "I think there's enough
pressure on a coach lo win...I
can't believe Ihere'd he a pro
coach who wouldn't start a
Black quarlerback who was
belter than a whiteqb...lle'd he
in danger ol being fired."
Concerning Ihe notion ol
placating while crowds, and or
while owners by forcing while
players into the lineup, he
stales, "It might be. I like lo see
a gieatgame. I don't curu who's
playing. Iliere have been some
clubs throughout their history
that have been extremely resistant to letting Blacks play, like
the Boston Red Sox in
baseball."
"Maybe ihe lack ol Black
quarterbacks goesu lower levels
like high school and earlier,"
l o r d continued. "Maybe then
Black kids are stereotyped into
positions when Ihey're very
young. Also, there are no Black
quarterbacks to emulate lor
y o u n g k ids., .only running
backs and ends."
Goodman Lawsuit Against Kendall Dismissed
by David turner
and Glenn von
Nostilz
Former Assistant Professor
David Goodman's $100,000 lawsuit against Associate Dean
Richard Kendall has heen thrown
out of court.
State Supreme Court Justice
Hdward Conway, presiding at an
Albany County Special term,
granted a motion to dismiss
Goodman's complaint hecause
Kendall was acting in an official
capacity, and he is afforded in that
capacity "absolute privilege with
respect to statements and conclusions such as contained in the
letters and statements" that were
Goodman's basis for action.
Goodman had attempted to sue
Kendall personally, rather than officially.
Conway also ruled that thceomplaint failed to allege special
damages with particularity and
that the charges were therefore "insufficient as a complaint in action
for a prima facie tort."
Not Ihe end
Conway's decision does nol
represent the end ol the legal controversy. According to Cioodman
and his lawyer, Sanlbrd Softer,
they will he taking other action
within the next tew months against
Kendall, although they maintain it
is still premature to announce exactly what they plan to do.
"Kendall is nol oui of the woods
yet" Goodman said in a recent interview.
Ihe former assistant
professor staled that there arc
"several alternatives" lor him to
lake, and that "we've got a long,
long time before this is all over."
Soffer feels that Goodman still
hasagood case, and said hcwilldo
everything possible to back his
dient. Comments iheattorney: "If
he didn't have a good case. I
wouldn't have taken in on in the
first place."
Kendall refused to make any immedtitle comment on the case, and
asked that reporters address any
questions to him in writing.
out that Kendallcoulddo anything
he wants without fear of reprisal."
Administration spokesman Ted
Jennings said that while there can
be no official comment on thecase
by the administration, since "The
Administration isn't really involved in Goodman's case so it
really shouldn't have much to say"
he acknowledged that, "the University is pleased that the case has
been settled, if indeed it has in fact
been settled. Of course the administrators are not lawyers and
we don't realty know if the ruling
closed the issure." Mr. Jennings
emphasized that he couldn't speak
for the President's office and that
the President should not get involved in the issue.
The Response
Reaction to the dismissal ol
Good man's case was extremely
guarded, as students, faculty, and
administrators were careful in their
expression ol opinion over both
ihe meaning ol the decision and its
possible future implications on the
entire tenure process.
Vice-President for Academic Affairs Philip Sirnlkin said he
hesitated to comment on Judge
Conway's action lorlcarol prejudicing any possible appeal on ihe pail
ol professor Cioodman, should he
decide to act in lhal direction.
Siroikin did reiterate his agreeinenl with Conway's beliel that
Kendall was m laei acting within
the scope ol his employment as
history department chairmen, "il
was his job lo transmit his
recommendations concerning
tenure on any candidate, and the
judge obviously fell that he was in
the process of doing this when
Goodman issued his charges,"
Sirotki n si id.
Professor Carolyn Waterman,
ihe controversial teacher ol the
Psychology department who just
Goodman's first slop on the grievance trail was In Vice President Lewis
Welch's Office for University Affairs,
last year received tenure, commented that she was nol surprised
at the court's decision.
"The
court's decision", Waterman said,
"was quite consistent with its
policy ol always ruling with iheadnunislration on any issue." They
have always sided against opposition to administration dominance.
I iny Ilolloway, a junior
defensive tackle, has been on
1 ord's squad for three years.
lie said, "I haven't seen any
racial problems on the team, or
Black players nol gelling playing lime."
" I Ins \ear. there's a lot ol
guys. Black and while, who Icel
lliey should he playing more."
I iny commented. "Coaching is
nol an easy thing.
there'll
always be complaints Irom people not playing. But thal'sgood
they wouldn't he loolball
players il lliey didn't want lo
play "
"Von can'l look al Ihiiigsand
say the coach is a racist. Look
and see what is behind your nol
playing - what does Ihe other
player have lhal you don't'.'"
there was one lasl question
lor Coach l o r d :
Would he
start 22 Blacks if they were bis
best players?
"I think I
probably would," ford said.
"My objective is to win."
On tridiiy...Basketball and the
Doc... and some touchy issues.
she contended.
Stronger language came from
Dr. Curt Smith of the English
Department, whosecase lorlenure
is up for review this month. "It
shows, as far as the courts a re concerned, that the University must
resolve itsown alfairsand leavethe
courts out ot it," Smith said. "It's
only obvious by now that all
reform in the tenure system must
come from within the University."
In his statement. Smith cited Judge
Conwa y's explanation of his decision to dismiss ihe case.
Conway ruled that Kendall is
given an absolute voice with
respect to any statements such as
those thai were in ihe letters thai
served as ihe basis loi his refusal to
recommend Goodman tor tenure,
In addition, Goodman's ease tailed
In prove t'hal specific damages had
been inclined h\ him as a direct
result ol Kendall's decision. In a
prima facie toil, ihe judge said.the
plaintiff must show lhal he lias
sustained a specific loss as a d ueci
i estill of I lie d etc nd anfs action and
ill.il he. thi' plainlill was nol at
I.mil as well
I i'Kill Kotitc Hud
Smith
maintains lhal 'Viol
leceiv nig leniii e. is. in iisell. a
seiious inuleiial dcpiivatiun
I he
legal i otile seems hopeless UH him
It's worse than hopeless
I It em m e
eases lhal lliey (ihe Adniinistra
lion) win. ihe w oi sell w ill gel loi lis
5
in an\, future court action." I Ins
ease eleaily shows lhal aie simplv
uo checks ami balances on ihe Administration, and serves to point
Vice-President for University
Affairs Lewis P. Welch was quite
apprehensive about commenting
on the Judge's ruling. He did say
that "Goodman seemed to have ex hausted all the official channels
open to him. though 1 really can't
be sure...Certainly Kendall is
pleased with the decision...but the
Administration doesn't have any
opinion out ihe events." "I'm really
not thai familiar with his case."
Welch continued, "and I really
don't have any personal opinion
other than that he used all the
proper channels tor grievance."
Welch outlined the "proper
channels" as a series of five sleps,
the first louihcing statccontrolled,
due lo the lacl that all those involved in deciding a grievance,
from Welch's office to the state
wide Ol I ice o I f-mp loyee
Relations, are state employees.
Hie fifth and lasl recourse is for
outside arbitration, which n
Goodman's case meant thecourts.
Never Had u Case
linallv. Barry Davis. VicePresident ol the Student Association summed up what appeared lo
be Ihe prevailing mood, by saying,
"Idon't know if Goodman ever had
a case Most crucial to the issue is
whether (his will haveanv bearing
on the activities of ihe Search
Committee which is looking for a
Dean ol Behavioral Sciences. Hie
Seaich Committee, if il is, as I
believe, eousideimg Kendall or the
posi, will have lo look al the
evidence lhal ihe nidge saw vers
e.itelullv I lie com I nun have dismissed ihe case not because ol the
merits ol ihe ev idenee. bill because
he was acting ( Kendall) tin del the
scope "i his employment He was
protected b> the courtsltoin te.illv
uclciniiiung ihe wilitlnv ol Goodman's eluu ges
'I ,iin noi lamiliai with ihe
details "l his case i"k now whelbei
Kendall did act wioiiglv in his
handling ol ihe issue, but the
chaiges aie sei uius enough lhal it*
ihe Sea'ch Cumin nice is consul e-i ing him. ihe) ought logivel lie
whole mallei a thorough investigation." I >avis concluded
Kkh.idKen<l.ll.f U ni.er!ll.loryl)e,)»rln,en.ch»lm..n, W ho\*onhl S <lefe..» e «U»l..sK;ood n i«nsl»wsul.
Erastus Coming's Albany Budget... see page
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