Wrestlers Finish Fourth In SUNYAC Vido Heavyweight Champ

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State University of New York at Albany
Tuesday, February 20, 1973
Wrestlers Finish Fourth In SUNYAC
Vido Heavyweight Champ
Page 15
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lleavywciglit Uudy Vido won his division at the S U N Y A C .
Dane Athletes in the News
ficras
m.'-::A, M
i
Danes rebounded after Wednesday's P i t t s b u r g h loss lo beat Oswego before a small crowd.
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24 Hours of Entertainment
St
Danes
Tigers
Swimmers
Whip
St. Lawrence
Page 14
Page 14
Meaf Plan Increase on the Way In?
.page 3
Tenure: Smith, Wheelock on the Way Out? ...page 4
Extend
Streak
Page 14
Schermerhorn, Students Talk About Tax
...centerfold
Alumni Association Part IV:
by R o n n i e Fallon
Working Together With SA
The
Alumni Association,
Accrue 9 Hnn in
in turn,
turn
The Alumni
T h e A l u m n i A s s o c i a t i o n has a
helps many student groups. The
Student Facilities Fund, w h i c h
was started b y the A l u m n i in t h e
1 9 4 0 ' s and 5 0 ' s , recently was
used t o p a y for t h e renovation
o f the S n a c k Bar in t h e C a m p u s
Center.
very close realtionsliip w i t h t h e
Student
ident
Association.
Mike
S A Pres-
Lampert
h a s des-
cribed titis link b y c o m m e n t i n g :
" W e ( S A a n d A A ) serve p e o p l e
who
have
been
benefitted b y
improved ways can b e utilized t o
share this experience, it would be
beneficial t o b o t h t h e university
and s t u d e n t s .
Alumni
same
Institution—tills
school."
Mike L a m p e r t see t h e s t u d e n t s
and
Alumni
different
The
as individuals at
stages o f their
Associations
lives.
services often overlap.
As has been n o t e d ,
Association's
"Operation
C o n t a c t . " In
this
program,
students
Alumni
b r a n c h meetings
in their h o m e -
the
chase t a x cards. T h e c o n t i u u m
also
relation-
a
on
sider
These
make
u p the
that
campus
on
Alumni Day.
occasions
most consistent g r o u p i n t e r e s t e d
groups b e c o m e
in university affairs. T h e pres-
'he
ident of I lie University a n d t h e
b o n d Ihey possess.
help
and
common
students
and A l u m n i a r e
always present.
The Alumni and S t u d e n t Associations realize
this close lie
and have worked together in t h e
past
in many
ways. They co-
o p e r a t e in t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n of
homecoming and other
special
events. This fall t h e SA lent t h e
Alumni
Association
$ 5 , 0 0 0 to
finance their fund raising activities.
At t h e beginning
semester
of
this
t h e loim was repaid.
Many
o f them are
successful
educators
in
different fields and their lectures
would
lend
much
to the stu-
d e n t s ' studies.
Possible
ways
the
could help the Alumni
At p r e s e n t , b o t h associations
have agreed t o form a c o m m i t t e e
<>f 2 s t u d e n t s and 2 a l u m n i t o
s t u d y a n d draft a s t a t e m e n t of
the c o n s i s t e n c y o f t h e 2 g r o u p s .
This c o m m i t t e e will also s t u d y
the possibilities for further n e w
means of cooperation between
the 2 g r o u p s .
student theatre productions o n
S o m e areas t h a t have n o t been
the road to Alumni meetings in
service t o tlie Association. Stud e n t s are also needed t o speak to
Alumni groups as was mentioned
earlier.
There
are also
more
imaginative and enjoyable programs that
t h e students
could
initiate. One that was mentioned
was
the possibility
of taking
practices."
Israel claimed its fighters fired o n t h e Libyan Airways 7•>occupied Sinai . Wednesday o n l y after t h e jet's Prenri ' " i "
disobeyed orders t o land. B u t in Cairo, t h e plane's rte i '
Deputy Prime Minister A b d u l K h a d e r Hatem said E m , , h 7 "
evidence t h a t t h e p i l o t ever w a s in r a d i o c o n t a c t will,' th, I T
fighters. T h e Egyptians p r o d u c e d a tape recording of n,
"
• pilu
conversation.
Israel's air force boss said h i s j e t fighters had n o t me-,
i show
down t h e airliner b u t only tried to m a k e it | a ,
Mi
Gen
Mordechai H o d said t h e plane w a s flying over ' the
military area in Israel.'
for n e x t y e a r .
VIENTIANE
Committee,
b y Executive
Director
after 111,,
l,\ units
t h e Waverly Place p r o p e r t y t o
Patroon
posed of S t u d e n t A s s o c a n o n and
R o o m , which lost over $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0
the classes of l ' ) 7 3 , ' 7 4 and ' 7 5 .
including
period.
prices, m e a n i n g an average price
A l s o a n t i c i p a t e d a t t h e Friday
m e e t i n g is a decision o n selling
tions,
pose a A7c hike in meal c o n t r a c t
the
the
same
four
year
com-
An affirmative decision o n the
deal is p r o b a b l e .
M e a n w h i l e , q u a d profits have
increase of S2f> per s t u d e n t . T h e
ranged
between
$50,000
and
According
t o SA
President
Mike L a m p e r t . Waverly, I n c . is
Board is e x p e c t e d t o a p p r o v e t h e
$125,000
p r o p o s a l , b u t not w i t h o u t some
This m o n e y
l o u g h q u e s t i o n s b e i n g fired b y
F S A t o subsidize losses in o t h e r
lion,
student board members.
areas.
e n o u g h m o n e y t o purchase it at
The 4'? increase is i n t e n d e d t o
FSA
per q u a d
per y e a r .
b u y i n g t h e p r o p e r t y in order t o
lias been used b y
hold it for t h e Alumni Assoca-
Directors are r e p o r t e d l y
not
have
this t i m e . Waverly Inc. will then
hold
the property
until
the
food
p r o b l e m . That would b e t o turn
A l u m n i Assocation fund raising
the
efforts
years.
over
l h e past t w o
Student
President
Mike
A s socat ion
Lampert
has
some q u a l m s a b o u t t h e rise, b u t
thai
it
is
"not
un-
if
feel
over
thereby
drain
quad
on
possibly
reasonable."
t h e hike
bookstore
operators,
t o this
does
considering
costs
a solution
which
a c c o u n t for a nearly 1 0 % rise in
thai
e report.,
management
Waverly. I n c . . a consortium
during
necessary
Reports from the s o u t h said g o v e r n m e n t t r o o p s were i
toward t h e Mekong River from t h e t o w n of Paksong
said they evacuated t h e t o w n at 1 2 : 1 5 p . m 15 rninu
cease-fire, in t h e face o f heavy shelling and ground at la
of the North Vietnamese 8 t h R e g i m e n t .
"poor
in C a m p u s C e n t e r F o o d O p e r a -
N o r b e r t Z a b m . is slated t o pro-
O t h e r observers, h o w e v e r
North Vietnamese a n d P a t h e t L a o t r o o p s captured
southern Laos today after t h e cease-fire began at no,
heavy attacks o n g o v e r n m e n t p o s i t i o n s s o u t h o r the
informed sources r e p o r t e d .
" T h e r e have been massive v i o l a t i o n s , " said one source
Laotian military s o u r c e s gave guarded confirmation
fire violations and the size of the a t t a c k s .
on
O t h e r major losses have been
cussion o f a p r o p o s e d b o a r d hike
feels
\f
t o b e dis-
t o private
ending the
profits,
making
future
and
have
revenue
to
board
ity of doing this, however, is still
Hartley,
be un-
uncertain.
contract
During
low
years
their
FSA
t o t h e deal b y J o h n
Vice-President
Management
t h e past
enough
off
Several s t i p u l a t i o n s have been
attached
would
il
hands.
hikes u n n e c e s s a r y . T h e probabil-
quad
produced
take
condition
Director's m e e t i n g .
and Planning. O n e
of t h e sale
conclusively
D i r e c t o r E. N o r b e r t Z a h m is e x p e c t e d t o propose a 4 %
increase in meal c o n t r a c t prices at this afternoon's F S A Board o f
for
is thai
profits were not used t o subsi-
some $2 million in q u a d profits
Lamperl
establish
dize major losses in o t h e r F S A
and o t h e r assets have been used
llial llie S t u d e n t Assocation lias '
run o p e r a t i o n s .
t o subsidize thai same a m o u n t in
lull legal a u t h o r i t y t o use man
dalory
lax Ices for b u y i n g real
t h e Waverly Place property t o
estate
with
student
the intention
of
"holding i t "
activities, which
serve as justification
Lampert is e x p e c t e d t o o p e n
SASU Conference Here
Senate Meets, Discusses Grading
This Weekend
utilized fully a r e t h e counselling
their h o m e towns. This type of
services o f t h e
program would b e successful in
A l u m n i Association. O n e of t h e
making the t w o groups aware of
National
their c o m m o n b o n d .
T h e S t u d e n t Association of t h e Stale of New York ( S A S U ) will be-
A l u m n i ' s most valuable possess-
WASHINGTON
I m i l , t h e University Senate met
h o l d i n g a legislative conference here in Albany ibis S a t u r d a y through
in special session t o d e b a t e p i o -
undei graduate
A l s a k a s senators have i n t r o d u c e d a bill authorizing ll„
of the Interior t o grant all necessary p e r m i t s for the pro,,,,,
•d Al,,sk.,
pipeline and barring any further court action thai e„ i"! ,l,,|;n
construction.
T u e s d a y , F e b r u a r y 24 through 27
posed a m e n d m e n t s t o Bill 1<>
icport styles iiscll as the C o n n -
were
the
cil's " i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s " o f Bill . ' o .
vaguely,
s t u d e n t s a n d legislators t o meet a n d discuss issues c o n c e r n i n g t h e
which r e l u m e d S U N Y A t o con-
Despite
The U.S. Circuit C o u r t of A p p e a l s fur t h e District ol
recently ruled that t h e pipeline c a n n o t be built became
•'- null
would exceed t h e limits specified in t h e 1920 Mineral I e
An aide said that Stevens plans also t o i n t r o d u c e an „„,,'.„ M„g Ai'l
the act.
S t a t e University s y s t e m .
dilional A-L grading, and which
sevcial
was passed ai llie pievious scs-
t h e Senate
sjon,
report
placement
TROY
272-4004
Troy, New York 12180
Albany, New York 12208
STUDENT DISCOUNTS IS OUR POLICY
BOOKS ORDERED FOR CLASS AT DIST. PRICES
GOOD SERVICE
FINE VAR|ED
%W{m
XE
Hi There
AN
CANDLES SPECIAL
Numerous
m e e t i n g s and w o r k s h o p s have been scheduled
Highlighting
Ernest
t h e conference
Boyer a n d F i a n c e s
daily.
will be speakers such as Chancellor
Kcppel.l'otmei
U S ('omniissionei of
Ual
(;<
, 7
Y
r , . *!'" " ' • " ' W ' t h ' ' " - ' ' • ' » - N i x o n ' s ,n
Zts
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" a l " , r ! " " " ' " ' " " r : local welf„r
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Tt,""*,
» ' " N.XMUI Services L „ w
bus Iniw',',",","!'""" 1 '
' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' * ' " William T Sn
: I.
Stale s nub!,',. r ' ' ' " ' ! 1 " " ' ' " 1 ' " " " " f " r »w«"pi"« changes ,
,0
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fund,,,,, r ,
""' '" '" WMem, including slate I.,!,..
' " " " " " " " ' " - " " " n f e d e n , ! share „f welfare
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•"•i'-riipi(.(j inurijer
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Wi h
'"•••iVed at the R e d •
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IB71 ,!,,., ,l i
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" " K 0 o n Wesl HUtl, Stree
' " ' I , after the h o l d u p and gun duel,
11
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li
a
nothing
dilTeienl
t h e hills
dangerously
by
ol adopt
says
winded
Ai t h e beginning ol die sess u m . Ptcsldctil
loins
Beuezet
briefly addressed the Senate o n
lhail t h e
the m u c i n
situation
icgaiding
" 1 the i c p o i i
specific i n s t i t u t i o n s and t o w a r d s
O n e of t h e m o r e i m p o r t a n t
colleges and
t o r k s h o p s will h e c o n c e r n e d with
by
llie
Academic
previously
on
u n d e r g r a d u a t e grading.
Aiucndnicni
It), passed by a
voice v o l e , defined
llie giadua-
passed
Bill ,U>. t h e
was extensively d e b a t e d
which c o n c e r n e d
aid which
Bill 12 defined t h e meaning ol
All o l h e i meetings will b e held in t h e S U N Y A C a m p u s Ceiilci
no suhslanlive c h a n g e , a l t h o u g h
id t h e close ol t h e lusi week ol
now
classes."
is
given loi a " D " giailc unless il is
discussion.
to gain Ion ua I i ci. i,gun ion b y Cli an cell, ,i Boyei soon
balanced h y " A " oi " B " c i c d i t .
Jacklei
Bill . t o h a d instituted a so-called
Bach Mai Food Fast March 21
c u d n u n i h c i s ,nc being
M
passed
aliei
inluuliiccd
14. b o l h
"I
untied Congiessional iitaciior. o n
..-nous"
slnui
lulls
which
picveni
a financial
llie ciiciimstaiice iinilei
mged
by lacutly bill by flic RcgisliMi's
which,
icspcclivcly,
iiiiniiiuuin
oil ice
lull-lnuc s t u d e n t s could he ex
uncompleted
Aincndiiieni
"I"
II deletes
pel led
grade. .11111 was passed by
llie Senate o n what appealed lo
l,,i\
be
ibe
gcncialK
accepted
p a n and
Bill I .t s t i p u l a t e d a p a n
lust
luinling
lb.il
a n d . sccondh . llial a stud\ be
"Ins p e i f o i m a n c c
ow n siudcui aid Mlualion loi live
below an
Is coiisislciilly
acceptable s t a n d a r d . "
In a i i a h z e
ought
last loi t h e lebuilding n) But li
dill utg ditini'i limits o n the nlglil
ate
siiy icscives t h e nglu l o dismiss
I i o in
Mai Hospital
ol llie lasi
giades
any sliitleul.. il
AssociaUino
Bach
Mai the laigcst
health
IIIii»ri
nicnibei
"We mean \ li
was tics
lui\
lime,I
bombing
{in llie ii'ii'iu peace setilcincnl I
, aid-,
liming
sleuth
( hnsliu.is
US
W l m , ' tills
A u.i
p.isl
wide cam
Ini llie Vicin.tiucsc people
and \ i,,11.111. e l o w a u ! Nixiui in iw
needed
i " icbillld tin'
« l . . . igi.'is noI I " .'.il diuiie
I be in..
I V\.',li,i-,,la\ M.inli
!|
| , i p.itiiiip.ilc one iiiusl sign
1
University G e t t y
i
PINE HILLS PIZZA
Complete Automotive Repairs
| Mini
j
tu In.
/ ,,tn ID I! pm
Sundiiv
9 • " " i"
Saturday
7 ,n» to J ,un
' ' f31"
I
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS
I
I
,
1 0 % n i l m i .ill l.ihni a n d p . u i s w i l l , litis .ul
I
j
I i " c oil I illci w i t h m i l l l . i n g c atiij l u h c ( S i n u l . i y s n n l \ )
j
I
C o m p l e t e A s s o r t m e n t of A u t o m o t i v e Supplies
I
PAGE TWO
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
S A V E T H I S AI)
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
nooooooooooooOOOOOOOPOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP
NEW PIZZA PLACE
129 WESTERN A V E N U E
I
I
t h e on t a n i p u s
S I u d e n 1
.Hid i l l I h . ' ' I l . i i
up on Hie dinu.'i hues In M a u h
lite t iiiliiuui
n , liulude lepicseiualivcs
IMPORTANT! There will be a meeting of all ASP news
reporters Wed., Feb. 28 7:30 PM Room wil1 be announced.
,,.,i,.i, i-. uiidciH.n i " i.ii'-e I he s t
,t,
Ins academic
SINY.Vs
lall ol I'H.t He stated t h e study
and b.ll 14 staled " I b e uuivci-
l.i, d m in Indncliina
in
Congu'ss.
organized
lalioualc ihai it was i n a p p i o p n
I'xphuned o n e Coa
iniciest"
hcloic
lie
utuveisin
t u n c s t u d e n t could h e expelled il
in iLe Ahlcii Hall I owci I onuge
lo assign
pinch
llie
"lake
hills
taken now loi a Match 21 loud
fin llie Kcgisliai
two o n u s e s ol
actum S U N Y A ought lo lake t o
defined
fin
iheir
aid lo education bills " c o u l d be-
||e suggested
then
and
"as one
allowed
with
feet." Bcnezel warned that con-
In b e assigned not
nig I'liinpaigii. is holding a Vic
And Vigilance C c l c h i a i i o n
student
Il
the New York Stale Ihiivcislt) S y s t e m ' s Student Associations, hopes
" X " giadc
funding
lo vote
icgistcicd l o i 1 I oi Icwet c i c d i l s
ciedil
finili
"students
"pail-lime"
giadiialion
inning llieic was a
away
individual
lion ciedtts assigned each k'ltei
no
u n n . Aliei
tiou index w a s d e l e t e d .
guide o n t h e A-L scale. I b c i c is
S A S U , the miaul o i g a i u / a t i o n funned In c o o r d i n a t e t h e cl'foits ol
ledei.il funding ol highei e d u c a -
llie d e l e i n i i n a l i o n of t h e gradtia-
IcgislaMisai the l.egislalive Office Building and the Capitol Building
| | | | 1 | J | L . ,,'| ,|,e B a t h M . i l ichuild
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, !''/•
winch
qualitatively
picssed opinions thai
icgaiding w h y
ought
b y voice
Council
to all the Stale
universities a n d most have indicated thai Ihey will send delegates.
,1..Il.ii lo He' B.nh Mai I invif.cn
\ Kebel I mid bu , H'iS peisoli
*^*^™^™^*zzz
K nl
senalois
asked
defeated
several senaieis e x -
picpaicd
extended
l„,s,.,..,l
I s \ li.e igiecd i " i h i i u l e one
1•
questions
The
were
votes aflei
trend
M l ,tli.
NKW Y o i t K
guiding.
Both
on
repoii
„,„,l, , „ „ .
8
repot I
and finally passed. O n e passage
been
guides
.
the UAC's
l o a tepoil
Meal
.
adopt
progress warrants such a c t i o n . "
llial t h e S e n a t e
•limits in a d d i t i o n
have
by Mike McOuire
„
moved
C o u n c i l . i n l i o d u c c d live amend-
Invitations
ALBANY
,
Jacklet
sludy the financing ol higher e d u c a t i o n .
llial
M « t » r t h e witnesses speaking „, a ),,,,„„„
' h u r s , h , y , c r e e d that t h e s L e
,
,
»ul b e y o n d that thev off
,1 „
proposition
J o h n J a c k l e t . C h a i r m a n ol llie
,,
" " " ™ " f W e a r , , ! before t h e Assembly ways a n d ,,„•
' * « £ > £ ^ S e n a t e finance c o m m i t t e e t „ defend
„,
l o o s e d .t.M.rmlhrm o p e r a t i n g b u d g e t for fiscal 11.7., ,1
controversial
Icbiuaiy
Undergraduate
T u e s d a y , llic final day of the cont'd ence delegates will speak with
EnVi r0
Aliei a m e n d m e n t I I ' s passage.
afternoon.
I (location a n d c u r r e n t C h a i r m a n of t h e G o v c i u o i ' s Task F o r c e t o
Legislative Ihogiaili and ntliei iclaicd topics
D?»m„ ,
, ,r"'
"»<-'™ation Commiss
•, I I . ,
D a m o n d said Thursday t h a t h e will submil leg.s
, •
d ^ Mielhng o u t h o w t h e $ 1 . 15-billmn environment
1(1
')!' spent.
Among other ih,m,
,|„. |)U| w i | | „,c|U(|„
Z .
T h e p u r p o s e of t h e c o n f e r e n c e is to provide an o p p o r t u n i t y for
o r i e n t a t i o n I'm legislative p r o c e d u r e s , l o b b y i n g l.i I K S . discussion ol
ALBANY
C
us ON F R I D A Y FEB. 2 3 FOR
5§£A
Monday
State
WHATEVER THE REASON FOR LIGHTING UP
UCHT UP WITH A NEW SANPCASTED CANDLE"
0UTASIGHT
by G a r y Ricciardi
T h e ease was taken t o t h e c o u r t s by environmentalists wl,
pipeline, which would carry w a r m oil, would cause
ecological damage of Alaska's frozen terra,,, T h e „,„„
decision is e x p e c t e d t o be taken t o t h e S u p r e m e C u r l L
government which wants c o n s t r u c t i o n to begin
would
for using
he lax monies
and
320 River Street
813 Madison Ave.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
PERMANENT CASTS
Associa-
participation in the Alumni fund
A BOOK BOUTIQUE
JOIN
student
years
beaded
tion are equally varied. Student
JTJaoA —
ALBANY
465-1301
many
this a f t e r n o o n and o n t o p of (he
Budget
Other Action
S 4 0 0 . 0 0 0 loss over t h e past four
meets
agenda
is e x p e c t e d
o t h e r losses.
o f t e n c i t e d , a n d critics b l a m e its
Associa-
Board of D i r e c t o r s
FSA
Angry denunciations of Israel e c h o e d a r o u n d the world t,
the shooting d o w n o f a L i b y a n passenger jet at a cost i,l ,„" 1°'
100 lives. President Nixon a d d e d his voice indircctlv t „ n ' , " " '
rebuke.
''"'""* "'•
infor-
raising drives would be a key
faculty m a y c o m e and g o . b u t
the
valuable
university.
both
m o r e aware of
continuity
provide
alumnus'
source of guest lecturers for the
t h e SA
president addresses t h e Alumni
ship is apparent when w e c o n I hoy
tradition
that area. This
The Alumni are also a great
A l u m n i a sense o f reality.
T h e y can get a clearer view of
'
SINAI
help the graduate get settled.
be very i m p o r t a n t , since it gives
students
an alumnus
mation a n d advice that would
t o w n s . T h e i r presence is said t o
activities o n C a m p u s . There is
that
would
to
take advantage of A l u m n i
of t h e s t u d e n t - A l u m n i
from
contact
Faculty-Student
tion
International
area and look for e m p l o y m e n t ,
he could
ac-
officials
programs a n d A l u m n i can pur-
can
wants t o move t o an unfamiliar
pro-
gram
company
t r y t o meet
their particular n e e d s , b u t t h e
Alumni
The
to a new area. If a graduate
S t u d e n t s a r e also i m p o r t a n t in
the
edited by D. Seth Ross
T h e b o o k s t o r e is o n e e x a m p l e
by Glenn von Nostitz
also help t h e
new graduate b y orienting h i m
and have an a t t a c h m e n t t o t h e
B o t h Director David J e n k s a n d
.
could
FSA Directors Debate Board Hike Today
NEWS BRIEFS
inncTiD his
tiie experience.
a v i w r i o n n a If
I f new
n a u r an/1
ions'is
and
lust a b o v e
Madison
Theater
4890137
We deliver locally, Open 5 11 p.m
CLOSED MONDAY NIT '
1
Mills l u l l M i S l i o n .
' Jl> i
'
PAGE THREE
.'.
Cerebral Palsy
Students Speak Out on Tenure Cases
Curt Smith:
by Chris Masterson and
Stacey Jarit
The tenure case of Curt Smith,
a member of SUNYA's English
Department, recalls the cases of
o t h e r professors in various
departments at the university
this year.
There are supporters who alledge the professor is qualified.
There is a bureaucracy that has
rendered decisions more negative
than positive. And there is a man
on the way out.
It has become a familiar tale.
The specific tenure case of
Curt Smith began drawing attention several weeks ago when the
professor decided to present new
evidence to Acting English Department Chairman. Donald
Stauffer - evidence that, he felt,
would benefit his cause and did
eventually lead to a second vote
by his departmental peers.
Alan Wheelock:
by Jay Hashmall
In the continuing conlro
versies surrounding the hiring,
promotion and tenure practices
at lhis university, there has been
uncovered a tradition winch has
spurred much criticism and re
sentment from students in and
around the English Department
There is an unwritten depari
menial policy, allegedly exlending from academic tradition
across the nation, lhat forbid
The first vote by department
members ended in a 20-20 deadlock. The second tipped the
scales to Smith by a vote of
35-19.
It was the latter vote that
buoyed the hopes of Smith's
supporters. The elation was to
be short-lived because Acting
Chairman Stauffer soon responded with a negative recommendation.
And the case began its ascent
through the multi-layered bureaucracy.
Interested students visited with
Ruth Schmidt, Associate Dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences, to discuss the case. Her
recommendation, ultimately,
was a positive one.
I. Moyer Hunsberger. Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences,
was the next recipienl of Smith's
case. The Arts and Sciences
Committee discussed the merits
of granting Smith tenure after
professors from teaching at the
same institution from which
they received their doctorate.
This policy has recently come to
light as Mr. Alan Wheelock, an
instructor in the English Department, is obtaining his doctoral
degree from SUNYA at tlie end
of this semester.
Allegedly fur (Ins reason, Mr.
Wheelock can no longer teach
Albany State students, but instead musl find employment
elsewhere in the already overpopulated lob market.
hearing Smith and one of his
former students - Michael Lippman - speak and field a variety
of questions.
The vote of that committee
composed of both faculty and
students, brought more bad
news. It was uniformly negative.
Smith was told Dean Hunsberger's recommendation and an
explanation of the committee's
vote would be forthcoming.
As of this writing, it has not
been received, and Hunsberger
could not be reached for official
comment.
While they watched and waited,
the supporters of Smith met to
review the evidence of his case.
They feel he is qualified because
of the interest his courses generate among the student body,
because they claim he ranked
fourth among members of the
English Department last year in
publications and awards and. finally, because of his "continuing
A group of concerned students
who have studied or are presently studying under Mr. Wheelock.
have come together to express
hitter resentment over Ihe loss
of such a fine teacher Marty
Schal'fer, a spokesman for the
group, ridiculed the policy as a
silly bureaucratic tradition and
stated that Wheclock's leaching
effectiveness is "too good to give
up." And when speaking lo the
many students who have taken
Wheelock's courses, there seems
to be a feeling of near unanimity
in this praise.
The student group, though, has
accepted Ihe fad that their
teacher will not be rehired However, they do wanl to register a
24 hr. Service
loud complaint as to why he is
FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICE nol being rehired and inform Ihe
English Departmenl specifically
LOWEST CAB RATES IN THE AREA:
and Ihe University as a whole of
SUNY Campus to Albany Airport-$3.50
the tremendous mistake lhal is
SUNY Campus to Colonie Center-S2.00
being made. Professor Donald
SUNY Campus to Northway Mall-S2.00
Stauffer, Acting Chairman of the
additional passengers only S.25 extra each
English Department, offered
Our other rates are equally low- Call for quotes
nothing bill praise on Wheelock's behalf and sialed lhal the
DIAL
refusal to rehire him is "not a
reflection on his performance at
all." The unwritten depart
Northway Taxi
456-5 2 X9 4I
i
I'l
scholastic growth" which supporters say, is mirrored in his
broadened research and in the
number of "professionals who
seek his work and advice."
But his backers are uncertain
mental policy of not continuing
the employment of instructors
who have received their doctor
ates from the same university is
the entire basis for not considering Wheelock's appointment,
furthermore, Stauffer agreed
lhat this is a good policy as it
would create an "unhealthy
situation" for both the professor
and the university as a whole if
there was not a transfer of students to another college when
they began to teach. Ruth
Schmidt, Associate Dean of Arts
and Science, Division of Humanities, concurred. Dean Schmidt
sialed lhat this policy prevented
what is known as "inbreeding"
allowing fresh ideas lo enter not
only the department but the
mind of the professor as well.
However, Dean Schmidt hinted
lhat il was good as a general rule
bul not necessarily as an absolute policy. And if one flips
through a faculty catalogue you
can on closer examination discover a few exceptions, discounting the overabundance of
administrative and counselling
personnel with post-graduate
of what Hunsberger's recommendation will he
not in
mention the final ouleuim' n|
the case. Il has slill in go i,, i u .
Universily Committei
|'„,
motion and Tenure in. i, ]VM
dent Benezet foi final levi™
degrees from SUNYA I licit is
no official universiH p>li \ ,|
this nature.
A few students also sngjk-su-J
lhat the "quota system' micl.i
partially be a motivation in it,n
case as in many othciv .M .,ui>
pus. But both Prof Slaultei .ind
Dean Schmidt denied in.ii n.i,
was so, although each dep.nl
menl is making .1 spe, ml r,.n
to seek out ninnuiu iik-inli-i.
and
An Experiment For The Week of February 26
The XEROX Machines will only be available from
10 to 11 and 2 to 4, daily.
The DITTO and MIMEO Serv ice will be run only from
for
I.KUIK
Mr. Wheelock. I wli :.i
his leaving enliieh mi H • ,.1
lhal he will he uhl.iimm' , .
lorale from Albam n M '•
Commenting on 1 Lis ii.uliii "
slated thai "11 is ,1 date! ;
since it presumes .111 inrei :. r .
bul thai II sinipK dors n,>i ,>. ...
due to the lack "I |oh ; ;
I unities."
And there 1 nigh I he 1 ' .1
college and post-gi.idu.in' v.
would hold lliis lo he 11 1
will be done at 4 pm, except jobs totalling over 1000
CLIP T H I S
The Heartbreak Kid
If y o u ' r e in the m o o d to
interview a prodigy, you might
try t o talk t o Jeffrey Soreff;
Jeffrey is a s t u d e n t at Harvard
University w h o enrolled
there
last fall - at t h e age of 13.
As t h e y o u n g e s t s t u d e n t in
Harvard history ,
obviously
Jeffrey
has been
bombarded
with q u e s t i o n s a n d interview req u e s t s from n u m e r o u s r e p o r t e r s .
As a result, he has a p p a r e n t l y
d e c i d e d not to talk to any member of t h e press w h a t s o e v e r .
A c c o r d i n g to Boston's Real Pa
per. t h e Harvard Crimson is the
last n e w s p a p e r t o have caught
Jeffrey off guard: it interviewed
him briefly last fall, and then
passed
along
some
of
his
thoughts.
Jeffrey r e p o r t e d t h a t he was
i n t e n t u p o n developing a heart
attack m a c h i n e which he said
would use microwaves ( q u o t e )
" t o induce a heart attack at a
d i s t a n c e . " He is said to have
explained that you could use the
device t o eliminate p o p u l a r political leaders w i t h o u t
making
m a r t y r s o u t of them. Jeffrey is
r e p o r t e d t o have told t h e Crimson
( q u o t e ) " t h i s would be a
useful way of slowing d o w n a
movement."
T h e 13-year-old is said also Lo
have explained that he plans t o
join such
diverse
groups
as
S.D.S., Young Americans
for
F r e e d o m , the Young D e m o c r a t s
and
the Young
Republicans.
Said
the
Harvard
freshman:
( q u o t e ) " I t ' s n o t that I agree
with t h e m , bul I would like t o
get a sampling of their p s y c h o logies. "--Zodiac
50
FURRY
*****
On learning lhal H.ro .1
exist any 11M1c1.1l urns'
icy cniiceiiiing tin m.' ^ • ' ^
Ph.D.'s. the sludeni .
has decided lo peiih
Prof. Wheelock h. h'l u
I
will he collecting ien >' •
Wheelock's loimei and ;
students hn a primweek in Ihe ('(' lohln
The Albany Slmlnil
2 to 4. Any ditto or mimeo jobs brought in by 3 pm
, -
tions. In the English Dep.11 inn-ni
there are currenlK five v.i .,1, ...
(including Wheelock I .m.I "\
next fall we will have s.q: ••!••.
as to the validity ol ihe •>' :!
allegation.
lrue
HHnaaffiHHgg
women
Telethon Raises Record $440,000. Many S t e n t s from SUMYA Worked To Make The Event A Success.
LITTLE
ANIMALS
IN
JETT'S PETTING ZOO
/'«. ..
n o t publish on Friday M.in-I
1 9 7 3 , in h o n o r ol ihe int|n '«<
week's vacation.Hesvides. Hi. i
staff is sick and
I
«
being
the lasl one. mil
1
here
UNTIL FEB. 24
AT
COUPON
1
I
I
BUY 2
I GET 1 FREE! I
IMPORTANT*.
There will be a meeting
with this coupon . . . either
of all ASP news reporters
I MIKEll'ttl Jfa
on Wed., Feb. 28
|
at 7:30 P.M.
I
Room will be announced.
I
SUBMARINES
OR
EXPIRES MARCH 3
Good at all locations—Open 7 days a v
EASTER
IN SPAIN - $275
TWA offers Students & Family
9 days on the Costa
Del Sol for the Unbeatable price of $275
* Taxes included
Trip Includes
- Air Fare
- Deluxe 1st Class Beach Front Hotel Double Occupancy - Private Bath
- All Breakfasts and Dinners
- Welcoming Sangria Party
- Flamenco Evening
- Farewell Feast With Wine and Champagne
- Sightseeing
- Tips and Transfers
Departs JFK April 15 - Returns April 23
Call Pat - TWA Representative
copies which must be brought in a day in advance.
Appointments may be set up for Xerox work totalling
over 1000 copies with the Student Association
.^Secretary.
funned Dy student
PAGE FOUR
a
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Taks the Bus ON
SATURDAY
Thank You for Your Cooperation
""•"•
COLONIE CENTER
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
607-432-6890 For Info
call colled now
Brochures & Applications sent to you
Limited Seats
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
J
NIXONOMICS: Higher Education and the Axe
•
I
IT
ion
f '
I(
A
• % Mr \gm
ft* C t e p f c s f e s
I:
""JExchin? JBanan :n>xtt o c c r y
1
A v e gmv -iir- t-udf*r
3.it£ urhni
fztrS
tie «mi irhxz
1
fib firey tmzche*
iunxlmf
whavtr.
far
Gie
hud&Z'ne.
QSEX
frr-rt - s n e "
JBUX
i r » ^ xif rwis y e a r s
pf 3k* i e v irsttf
iff S n u o c i n t
ix
ins
asusszizBL
nssx
VASHDSCilOK.
Tw
iselk m
D £
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6
Bh:mia
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nnx
a r t Slk-C
WJIT.
it
puis?*
30 t»i TijriiOiTHinf 4oe
x* s n a e d
sta^B?
ix 5 » E B J
•
n case you haven't noticed Albany
5r:ax
yv»r
trcuna
Capital D i s t r i c t C o a l i t i o n t o Sign the
1 9 7 4 am:»xixra 3»
;aK: y~air
T m
Agreement
ple's
-Lfia.
Dsdsx»* i»uiig=e: a m o ™ i n a r
inits
mmiEiarziur.
luirwvf
K?V*
DIG n n w n u f g d "•:-
i i » fits: : s n r Wr_r E H B
ma*
pmiMK-E
ix
ir.
soon)
Bfaf
1 97 s
scan? lausHsn r a n t
j-LE»*"f
'-nan
figure
$k&es *
priirniiri.'
TIM?
xtiax
piafofyt
B e ii caxiyx
N o w is sponsoring a Peo-
Forum
aS
Offirs
m|
Trj*
c y r r p:a-r.
Hpfflnnnaet
mara&aaf
"».:
xtii'v*
iiogHHtrc
powirol* a t i i
tf
DM
o:
'-traii'lii^
-tut
:
I>eKp::*- m a n n * prositt-mj ri£"**
TTrtUTis
ii'jz
ali
i»*ffr.
z-t pmy
I?"i
yver
mOfil
pr*eu
wrct
$~. , ' r U\
dwm$
r
i*zn
IT lisprrtIT "wTi-f
:
MAJORS & MINORS
-:trr
IK:-:- ::i
"*";at.:-+
: • : i.: UD»I>:
r.rfii*-
'Jtn
(SbmciLriiin
i.v.
rriecriar.iH^if
Rattcirtf
^ti*
h t ' f tr-*«t*c
5*-:*u- : i
w?
axe
Kim' iTir
V !
W
>'. «r. a
next
tnjpn*-
February
to a tour of
m : - ;r *
26, 3 30-5 00 P M
Will
leave from SUNYA at 3 P M. Meet at
eauca-iyi
tit':
Humanities
:••' ; r ' M t
Tt;a-
call Fred Bockis, Puis , at 482 0827
"'•.'-
.^axnirupira: i-.ii
floor
Lounge.
:-.n -.••TOf
iiLiapf:
T
:
;
h
*2 TtfM< T-45V CAUL fT 'PEACE WFTH HONOR/"
llrt
rr
Bierfest
on Monday
fhat's
Everyone
Car and the C i t y "
and
h£a.-:M
i«**ei
hl»nt«Ji;iA(
*•.--*
*
ca'Df
•*T\»ej
a-? v x n i i f
:.u: LT^ £ > I
zm
un»ati.££Ci:'!
eveiy
? UTil III
a:
LXDWtiDjrij; -J
arj.-i
prcoc^e-c
-:r*-r:r."
c;a: i
"' >•
LSI-
0?f:c*
of
C':«-x
L t * i s n ' i -snlhng t o
:<r. h s i a f i * h n * ;!*rrj
„-/i bcK-urataai
Toe Coiamn-
•'•-• F . . . F m i d i n g
r
rxic •:•:
combai
' K-r
In
faa
L* Eird;ng
and
.1
tee'-.'-ire
Has
Monday
aevej
t & n
A i lent ion
A M hut
*
-K : ;
' ' *
Prc-meds,
Pawlnwski
eis
in Health
Predents
will
speak
on
Sciences on Tuns
(J,.iy, Fob '?! at / 00 n m m Bm :><W
•-*"• ^ ' " T - i '
*rr..
8pm Friday, February 23 to 8 pm Saturday, February 24
Community
Services
Campus Center Ballroom
TAUNT
HAPPINESS tS SHARING
University Singers
Randye Kaye
John Cimino
Sonny Boy Choir
Larry and The All Stars TELEPHONE
NUMBERS:
457-5935
457-5938
Writers
r
*
Rock
is near I
Party,
March
oglaz live w i t h o u t
sculp-
crime
snow
Room dinner, skiing,
further
Sch
°
o1
* *
pi use
PHOENIX.
Niitioiitfl
and
De
Honorary,
,n (epH'ii
demonstia(t)
a creative
Math and have
113,
arc
Sludenls
Rafters Coffee House every Sunday
at 8 30, ai Chapel House. This week,
open
forum
MMJ-,1
interest
Campus
mtormalion Husk, n i brought
In C C
308 t h e office
Ihuis
2 (HI 3 00
II ynu would
try
aunndmg
oin next meeting on
Coalition
r,
214, Linear
n«ii
d
School
and
i )i
of C r i m i n a l
Justice a n d
I S
M i
ii) ,i' i " i i l . i l by M i .
I )nM<hlfi
it I Ii i ', Ui
Itsh
MM i ' K
OH i..'
•.rmul.i sur.pl>
<*t\
i Hu! I n i |
Appli. „i,.,i,.,
tic ,i siijnr-il nlalRiiieni
.on.i .(ilin.sMon.
application
largest
Imal 11 <. f.n i l i i y . you must sign up cm
[jinni'i linns biMwenn now and March
is Monday,
Ma
i ii 1 ••
Sabbath
Services
II
UFO
and Saturday nights at 7 30 and 9 30
Phenomena
PM
Dinner
1 rrst show
served
at 6:30 before
Ave . across from
investigation
teams.
6:30 PM. For
call
J i m Sefton
on
Aerial
Lapidus
gional Direcotr
ihe Aegean
credits.
Instutute. Earn transfer
For details
see Professor
Pohlsandor,HU-332.
II y o u have a
background
Big Brothers and Big Sisters are
and are a ser-
of U F O l i t e r a i u r e , call
needed in your communities. Give a
couple of hours a week to a child in
need. Call Big Brothers - Big Sisters
Whatever
Northeastern Re
Happened
documentary,
interested
of A A V P , will speak
Albany,
to Baby
is available to
weight
Discover
Fid a
watchers
of
of Rensselaer County at 274-2630, or
wriie
237 Fourth
Streel, Troy, NY
12181.
how a mere ion
on The AAVP and SPA, Where do we
sorial operation can rid you of many
go from here? Tues. Feb 27, ED-335
pounds. Watch this space for further
ai 4 PM Coffee al 3 30 A l l faculty
developments.
WHAT TO DC
and graduate students inviled
Anyone interested in performing al
People
New
from
Society
non-violence
2,3.&4
the Movement
for
a
Rafters
Coffee
an; holding
a Macro-
House
on March
Cnleeriat -189-8573.
The topics
will
here
House
Emcampent
at
Chapel
on campus, please call
The Aldenberry
Festival
British
Lounge
For more infoca//
in
The seventh annual
Northeast-
ern Intercollegiate Folk Music ComMay 3-6.
al
Hamilton College, C l i n t o n , N Y . Com-
$1,000
masterpiece of
at 7PM in the Alden
Maine
AMI A Basketball Captains Meeting
un Monday. Febiuary 26 at 6 30 PM
be held
of that
remarkable h i m w i l l be shown Friday
envfif pel
night
will
Film
saiue. The Green May. This
uMies, and sexism
petition
International
is pleased t o announce the
presentation
sonal oppression, visions of new soc
in p n / e money.
(he CC Assembly
Hall.
Bond
The Second Annual Student Corps
for Rehibibon banquet w i l l be held
Money will he returned for all leagues
on Monday
(1|
and
Hall dining
room
for
Al l-Strff
teams will
be selected
Leagues I. II and I I I . Any quest-
ions
call
I), (T Ik in.
7 72'0
or L.
I ishrnan 7-3016.
non members
b 30PM in Ihe Alden
A l l members and
are invited
Formal
dress is recommended but noi requir
r>il
Only
every
I inlay
and coinpenii..-i is limited In Ihe his!
i, ,n
10 A M l l r a d
application
Cotleon, Clinton, NY 13323.
KMII-HJ
t null,
Shabbal
beyond
fullows
ami Kosher
Sriluiday.
Education-
ihe gym).
I
l o Box 144, Hamilton
the Friday
loin h snivml on
Ihis week's tlieine Jewish
Where is it Going?
will
Mrs, N.um,! Rosenthal, i|m-v ,pi'.ik,M.
Sp.iiisi'i-H oy .ISC
f T o w e r East... cine cum laudef
10. Write loi mint mat KM I arid
M i l I i i . All ! i n
ivnisttv mi'tntjeis wiMnan.-.
Photo/Camera
Club will be h.ivm
an Miuam/ahnnal
meeting, Saluida
I i-b. 24. in ihe I neside Lounge a!
I'M.
A l l members
attend.
are n*|ue<ited
l
. . . .
This Sat., Feb. 24, at
I el)
publicity,
pi.-as.: call
/ H 0 / 2 . oi Donna
BURT LANCASTER • DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG
JACQUELINE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES
VAN HEFLIN
MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON
LLOYD NOLAN
Babel
m Will
4
of beef
pUchefs
%
February 23 and 24
Admission $.50
Workers are working free
LC 7
7:00 and 10:00
$1.00 without
and 1/2of profits are being
$.50 with state quad card
given to Telethon
For those looking lorward to seeing Cat O'Nine Tails
next week, it lias been rescheduled for a later date.
2H . discussion o l
HOUSH from 3 00-1 00 P M
ALSAWY SVJVUri PRESS
FRIDAY, FEBRUAR'
Group
2 7 2 - 0 6 5 8 for an a p p o i n t m e n t .
Hall, old SUNY campus For
ilnuiaO. all at Chapel House (on the
ihn Gospel of Si Luke will \n- held ai
Chapel
Teams. T h e
more info, call 462-9033.
should at turn J
(ItuSMims,
Wminesday. (-at)
information
T h u r s d a y in
is n o w i n t e r v i e w i n g f o r
ious student
Ihe back of
^
,n ( X J / 0 Anyone
I mil.i Wem-,1... k
Sludy
scientific
Located at 393 Washing
100 appln anls. Application deadline
-f A .M'luhl, l t.iti.
oi booths
every
Investigation
Guinness on Feb 23 and 24. Friday
is April
nun
2H. al 1 Pi I'M in
HI l•• • i[ M<«ci Willi
ynu H.ive
Co-op
Albany
arday
'i Brown-
Fan wiil hi* 1*****1 - n W.'.lne.ii.iv
irilHriHli.il
C o l o n i a l Quad Pent-
Monday
457-8987.
Record
Alec
iiMiht al / 30 PM iLreative) and Sal
An iii<|.nii/,it« ...ii i n w i t i i n i .i State
advertising,
Study
house every
i ul lege studenls who are amamui (i.e.
INTERESTED FOLK
2H .ii Ii I' M
Bible
Soviet J e w r y .
February 26.
ing and the Music of Music
ih.• t:,,iti|Mi*, C:i
10-12.
Study in Greece this summer w i t h
Our Man in Havana w i t h
Dance with
I nl>'., ,.
from
438-3806.
Film Society is present
HENWAYS
,;,.,,|,iv
Friday
from
f r o m 11-1
n o w have tapes t o o !
The Griffin
and
Deadline for
hi
I.. ,'t / . .Ii • Ifl , i "
and every o t h e r
or
from 2-5,
f r o m 2 - 4 , Wednesday
2-5, and 8 - 1 0 , T h u r s d a y
by Student Coalition for
Someone
State Q u a d F l a g r o o m , 6 - 8 : 4 5 . We
pennon will include free workshops
I
Grievances.
CC 3 4 6 on M o n d a y
Tuesday
at
Sponsored
ihe
Albany community.
To participate.
lobuild Indochina's
in
Your
Gricnvance C o m m i t t e e w i l l b e
t o Israel? F o r
at
t o attend.
A i um
Homblowei
• I I
Dr.idli
Mai Hospital.
hlnp
from
more
no/u collecting
Algebra, .uul MUM
Applicaimn", may he
horn
Judy
are encouraged
call
Joel
Monday,
Funded by SA.
on the women's
for a March 21
in
I 12.
to emigrate
457-8758
Peace project 457 76b7
now
laken Calculus
gram ,)M' it. -vt I
^opmentally Handicapped Children
b n * on llifi
hke m find oul mora about Phoenix,
ajrviin
WPTR Ballroom Coverage
In
A i l material can ire left m
Plinemv
I in-
i .HI. tii", tin itt-c English Honors Pro-
WSUA 24 hour coverage
youi
ai Iwork
Hun's am Mon Wed '1 DO b 00, lues
now A m
h» Pi Mu Epsilon ihc
Math
heimi
IU)
Neil Brown
Jon Guttman
Eric Joss
Ian Brecher
Dave Seligman
Don Frament
Peter Haley (FSA)
Ron Daniel
Sue Pierce
Judy Condo
and
Members
h e r father? Is i t a
information,
on
All
to w r i t e a letter that pleas f o r
permission
Liberation
2 6 at 7 : 3 0 in CC 3 1 5 . N e w
Air
concert, ice skating, and tobogganing.
Martin
and Artists suborn
pot! t r y .
Bach
Applications
In CC 3 1 5 at 7 ; 3 0 P M .
short
al 489 8573
Ma'lnllottu / 'i.'.'H
*
al
Feb.
will be a
W h y must 3-year o l d N a o m i G h e r n -
loud lasi tor thuljeriefii ol rebuilding
nblaiivcil
(Sat 12 noon to 8 pm)
l d w 0 0 d
members are urged t o a t t e n d .
Membership.There
'73 starting Friday at.8:00 P M,
ton
ul ( . m l n.m.bnrs
also
PIES
W
at 9 p in Call
Anyone interested m performing
Ont'ii
e
your
Draper
of 3 2 in Math and a 2 7b overall i i
t 0
bowl
nil
iimtips
e m i i w above L meiii Algeltra
admssofl
$1.00 adults
$.50 children
night
to
liM-.ilay I .'binary 27
leminars J<« M.ninu)
TELETHON 7 3: HAPPINESS IS SHARIN
"LitHe Nell"
held
ing
Fllen 7 4727
Cunt(tr
a i i i r d far
S:;ip5^^ii^«W
Claudine & Ron
or combination)
purtnn.itly
-.^t
m i t t * * **.r ? Ul
*JJ*
"_:i*
There will be a general meeting of
Coalition-
ganorol m e e t i n g o n S u n d a y , Feb. 2 5
"The
League 4 needs three people (male,
female,
ihn
:.."
Mandatory!
struggle w i t h guest speakers f r o m the
day, Feb 26 m I I U 290 Plans will be
foi a future
ere
Students'
Jim Croft, Dave Seligman? Then save
Weekend
Peter
ara Brooks, R o o m 3 1 2 P A C .
Women's
Jewish
Plavey, Tom Daley, Path Di Nardo.
Patroon
Tuesday
call
McEntee 4 3 8 - 1 4 6 3 or contact T a m -
Monday
•HILLEL
and
all interested German students, Mon
made
r
9°
800
LC 4.
Info
Achtung! German Club meeting lor
7 30 p ni
W*-c - i t - * K«-"U
f " ^ *
28.
Feb. 2 5 , 7 : 3 0 P M
Don Frament, Dave Jenkins, Harriet
Winter
Rehearsals
1 3 . For Credit
Feb. 2 8 9 P M Indian.
Those Meetfngt
a ski trip to
February
May
Ian Brecher, Judy
money and come to Telethon
needed for the Early
Group.
7 : 3 0 - 9 : 3 0 P M and concert Sunday
2 6 , 9 P M Colonial, 10 PM State.
Lampert, Sue Pierce,
the Rafters Coffee House rail Coleen
'iiani
1 "' XIKiliMfl
*-cutBXi;»i
first
"*-&*^-a *"
nxli.;
i
in skiing the Lauenttans?
is holding
meeting,
"The
local Orthodox Ch'irches an Monday,
niacr
t*f Ci_**r: tc UO*TI"
KT "1 ftf
ed m Russian Culture
". ' "-TH
Hr-vewr
Otf " - I * LBCTSfttS*
club
Canada, firsi vacation. Come to the
Russian Club invites those interest
uric iTi^rtaw- : / $ ' £ :jih.f.iT
lii* j r y n o u * vear
Interested
Ski
1,8 0 0 PM, LC 1 Free admission
*-au£:a-t:ii
Mike
1.2.3.&4
PYE presents two more films horn
:i*:tp-fcnsi
V. Li*at
Tiar^riT-f
TTI*
kiz*-
h i m at the a n d Refresh
*.: : . i n :»ff— *./! iii-t
.--t'm.: :-•" i '.'*PI
" '. i r ims
i^tiC UJ* t,ml i t
to 1
ments and daycare w i l l lie p r o v i d e d
i'-vii
to throw a pie at Eric Joss,
Schraeder,
ture,
Aire We Breathe", Thursday, March
-if £rxKicnrnr O i -
Emc bffiur?
meet in LC 2, every Wednesday nighl
a I 7 30.
*'»'»*TII1 irai 11*: 'in > t»«T; IGC
i:n**rnin
and 9 P M A l u m n i .
come, beginners or experts We now
Step
10 d m
arr
- : :IH- utM : • ' '
wel-
the Man Builds, Man Destroys serins
hm enAtit fc* if IC»M
l-.i-warc
2 4 , at t h e E i g h t h
be a short
are always
and unions,
p . m . at 1 W i l l e t t S t . T h e r e w i l l also
IF-*"«^TI :»: r
p—vtc* [***no* ta m a : i
tl>-laifefl
fetoera
morning
a+oii:
ocxmmg b i o a n d e r t a t s n
parEUsur?
non-unions
Coffeehouse, I t ' s f r o m
O S * « T^1
3-D xij*
iar
February
". t
this Saturday
participants
XKHa-cra^Eac* a a i n t ! ^
tiuap*':
d:»m>u
Hrsaier
cast
Stare Outing Club is alive and well.
New
concerning
ffs:
& poLmcs
PEACE
tea* 'max naif irt* u??: airreas?- IT
ZM-OX:
Sunday
Dutch
Condo,
i n i r . itK
JOT n ^ r H r
places.
Want
.. Music
times and
305, Whitman Hall, 457-3073.
Jack
xiaf
at the following
groups contact Mary Causland, R o o m
Feb.
mg&s?
5uxtdin|;
i a -iH- iats r w t y e a n
•EXCL"»
»5*ff
^ : i.-nm»
3«er.irtc
-wxffirs
a ^
ment}
All Interested persons or
Accompanist
Meetings w i l l be |held In
dining halls (ox, Indian 4 + 2 base-
volleyball
Wednesday
xc 3 »
S3-4I b n i J u x s s $1 -f u i l i i p x
-
t3Dd) a n c BBeSSawe:"—>'<*' | i i u i i d i o j
VOI-
ft »
is s p o n s o r i n g a coed
tournament.
!
i'l
|
4 + 2 Interett
T h e Women's Recreation Associat-
\i
ttmmmuigtggg*
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVEN
w
.' N
srts Bnd !0!Suf0
Mandatory Tax Still With Us; Stud
Sutt Univtrtlty of New York it Albtny
Friday, February 23. 1973
{<
<
h(i
Shaw - Still Latent?
\\
K'2K9C m&- ^ ^ ' • ^ *—**• • » • ' ••• -,rw~•*•' »
-*^w*m*."XMD<
i ill ^ I m j i l
iI
! i-
by Audrey Seidman
...
I "/ would never allow any of i
i
A believer in mandator)' student tax is senior Sharna Berzin.
"Basicalh I think this campus is
truly apathetic and 1 don't think
they'd get anything done without student tax. Students probabls wouldn't chip in to help."
She is dissatisfied with how lax
money is spent but really
doesn't have am suggestions
This week the roving reporter
and photographer were sen! to
gather student opinions on the
Student Tax issue. They consulted various students, ranging
from S t u d e n t
Association
officers to the "student .on the
street."
i
i
I
by Ann E. Bunker
I
w
Editor'i Soie
The folkwmg information wei "blamed ,". j
hn lee tun Ian TiiesJat on "How Mcndot"r\ S;
i
&
9
'of
Assistant ( •inpi- ill-.- '• :iit
Student
Association
Lauiu
Leopold lavors a mandatory lax
"Students benefn nioie thai
Ihej 'call.'; " she said She be
lieves !t:a- "slndfiii: would hat;
nothing ;..• do n this campus il
theie we-; IK. marida'on lax
Stic added ilia' students . 'uic
iippK
' . » ' i: la>. W j ' l r '
i-
I
'J,;';
can prove •maiiciai tieec
prow ihai ;he\ . iuld nevt- us;
then la> .a'.. "Ili; .in; i.-as i|
I was! ' ' •• i Human wa •»
cause a :>-.-•.-.>! w >uic havt i
So;1
pil\
v
.'i
• r
> it. j ii;-i
Ifs:
jliC
v. , Milt
I: -.ji.;, , j s ; s I o .ugiit t h a t m a n d a ' . o r x •
r-oii „>"
Wit! !',esf H - J i S ' j i e S e n a t o r Rivji.aid S.'.•. •
• dr p >-.:ti •• rrprdnig mandatttr;. stuJ'.-i '
ciMd'i' i ! ullaw ".aiidatoix student a.tix
Se-,j' • Sen--ineihoin who refers to hirhse
sell ' d : • "!!ie was me) use it " Thn ugh
unties and publications he finds obie.ti ma''
j£
'" 'L.i.-. t'it ;i 'w-defuncl "Sweetfne"
>
g
' I would nevei all v. an> of rn> Jiildi-.'i ' c
being Jisinbuted "
1
X
5
" " L n . ; :iir •" 1 and '~2 Torch >eaibook
"A K s'! ate JisciaLt
"1 i.now in-.'wa\ societv's doing todax '-•..: I .
In
Sieve Mt-u'i Chapman 'I the
Executive Blanch budge: ( nn
mmee ol S.A > 'led ' .- a ; iluiilary student lax. "I w ,rt. in the
stud-.i : government " he said
"aiic I sr-. n >u muct ,.x nione\
is wasied 'i :rivoi IJ; itni as • >•
how iiiiiup; ait created nisi i
gel then shale of Ir• t- pie ' Stevt
believes u.ai rnaru student:
Juii : take full advantage •' then
lax Hi iriey "I found It.a: .' 'lie
ic^em election llial j nunine- • '
students not -ith didn ' pi.t. .,r
then lax .aid bui did: ' evet
know whal il v as
v
5
j|
X
Jf
jj,
"
I
i
*
•
" " L J I . C speaKers lunded b\ Student Tax
I i.n 'w whji all "I the lees go f.ii H ' '
pi 'bab!> w.'uldn'i have been anyone killed .o V
^ " P ' * « t s "lin-se cu\' .ause mote nanr. and hi." j o ; .
w .uld pi 'Pdbls lu'.; been out ill V'iclhair ; : •. •
When asked il b> his icmaiks he nieai I !i..o
ihaispeakeiselecn.il sliould be coittioilrj S-. •
">es Absoltoelv Vou can't go all \ u: w .
11; teels that suj .ensotslup i s i i d f ^ : . "•
enieis . :lece is snlticienth JevclopeJ '
i
x
5
i
*
V
The Senatoi teels Ihal peisuns who obit-.i • '
cites Hn example of a Vietnam vetetan w ho ».,•
"He was a wai heio and he had to put o . 1
against Win should he not get his Jegie; il h; T h e S e n a t o i teels ih.il d i s s e n i i u i i p o :;•-' a:
' l*em iiistiation isn't t h e isai s o u h . j . ; : . '
I was in On- wai w h e n I w :o seveiiieei. '• • •
i j i . a d j this is an o b l i g a t i o n t h a t s o u haxe
i
Mil
Ihoinas Bailey's supeihly believable euliaiice as I'eikoll in Acl II
.jsiiked ihe .how . Iiipiied 111 the wai he ieluins to Ins wile and home
Io "eu|o\ hi, " Ilowevei he is im.iwaic thai his wile and daiiglilei
have given .isshiin to an eneui) ollieei. Obviously by the script,
1'eikoii docs not we.n ihe pants in lu.s house and is manipulated by
his wile llowe\ei. m action, Catherine, his wife, was presented too
weakly loi the audience Io calcb the lull llavoi ol I'erkolf's
situation .mil llnis lost the inlegial aspect Ihal Ihe sluing idle oi
women play. On the oilier hand, Nelson Avidon's portrayal of
\
I leshman Dennis Gitlei voied
I ii I'; rnal.dalon lax Although
hr ''clietcs Ihele n "n,,• ., a |ix
1
"' '-'g'
J
" .-a'llpas" he
S ipimmoK U n
Cji.iiibci|i
want! I" l.eep student !«s nisi,
dill •-', "I J in ! see II,r ai'e:
native
she said sin ;>t be; -••
the ! -nds .0! a...i!i;p!.s! j ,
b u ! l e e ) : s e h ; w ; " ; ' .h
•I
UK
Ahltlat.
. r':
l^iuij
heed
"I l i e \
PdltC
-!.C
b'
b e l l ; ,t
! .:
u!
'u' C .
';-.,•; ' h e ' r w •jtj
'ax
'
'"••'«'
jhj
(
' t
|,,.r
" Mid c o r in,
i,
M.t
...I , , ; , ; . ;
'1
•TI.,!,;',
10, Hipl
.01 i
• 1
!ak;
!
s a
;-. • ,!,, I'm,
Il ''IL.
l!n S;-I:J|OI leels llial mandated lee -,.;p,
should not be allowed on out -late ..nip,.expenditure of Hinds The bill passed Ihe Sei
status id Hie legislation to outlaw mandalon !.,
"I in holding i!,e bill In i.icl. I could eel il •
.Mil I •.;•;• it :hc\ wain io change then due.
n r a . I'm gomj; to put it oui again and it'll pa-
be less w iltn 'dl
Mr ;
' ."lcg.!.lll;»e
' r!
'1 •••
'no
jj
'
|
jj|
*
|
i
It Jt 1!
•!,. t '
!;
bou:.c- in a :t-sp unable was
She would like ihe S a, i "lake
pail m polllka! .i. oiliei ' isend money i
Ind icriin«
"We're not |usi nto loi social
puiposct " she i.au Lauia is
vite-piciadeni ol In. Coalition
a student aclivisl g n u p
Mioi us by Gary Dcuistli
**^K>mcimKmMm»vm*mm*m«**«**
PAGE EIGHT
Lt
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
by Andy Rafkin
The comic (l.U. Shaw play Arms and Ihe Man opened Wednesday
nighl. February -I in the Performing Arts Studio Theatre. It was
presented with good will and taste, but left nv feeling as a tickling
latent, snee/.e does with sensation but with no response.
Shaw's sciipt was heauliliilh handled by diieclor I'dwaid Mcildus.
Ilowevei. Arnn limy have been too large an iinderlakuig I'm his cast.
Ihe sciipl n, il ihe actor's chai ,icien/al ions hioughl the .icliun to
Us loinaiiiK onclii.snm.
b'un iiiul 'iii Utin is sei in the home of lliilgaiian l.iinily. the
I'elkolls Iluii newly acqinied wealth and ciilluie alloids then
daiiglilei Kama, oppoiiiiuiiy io form iiimantic ideals about soldieislnp. love tinl iiliiniateh loin ihe belief llial the "woild is really
el
nis." Mihoiigh she is engaged io ihses notions emboddied in a
noble lool Sei gins she , oneionis and lakes a I alley to a n is tie Swiss
sol die i HI n i ii, hi i a I lei hid nig linn I loin soldiei.s and llnis saving his
hie l h e | lesi ol ihe pi.is clinches I his basic conflict by coiiiiasling
,ni,l mi, iiiiiiielinc ihe I'eikolfs seivanls lifestyle and the I'elkolls
.iinl then noble a, ipuiiiunces' hlesiyle
I
lei loi theie to he , onli.isi ilieie inusl be sluing chai.ieleii/ations I
ake ihe , onli.isi appaient. It was here I ho i I lell .Ions' was
bu lopsided In A.i I .in eneins soldiei (Bltinebli) enieis Kama's
bediooui. Ihe suipi's words well define Ihe differences between the
• hai n Icis. I'.in1.1 goes to Ihe open, is a ineiiibei ol the noted I'elkoll
l.uiilK . and hei house has a sl.uicasc and a library. BIUIKIII is an
uiicoiilli. fugitive piolesslion.il soldier who carries chocolate candy
in his holsiei Nevertheless, both characters seem to blend, weie
C'liiloiiahle in each other's piesenee, and then lines often weie
iiiicoiivmciiiglv delivered. I lell tins Insl scene was intended as the
eiiihiso ol I In.- play's cnillicl. hut was presented almusl as a social
$
,: uU;'l,l
g' ,»ups ' 1 j j c sai.:
!>;• ipll
to go fo o
>
FRIDAY. FE
Sergius as a Dudley Do-right with a large dash of the character and
the egotism of Mary Tyler Moore's Ted Baxlei was comically
delightful. His romantic balling eyelids well suited his idealistic
self-mocking speeches. In addition, there were Iwo line characterizations of the household servants done by I'elei Berlin and Christine
Cole. Unfoiliinalley they loo weie de-emphasi/.ed hy this pmducnous's ill balance.
The pieces loi an excellent show weie all present, good direction.
good script, good comedy, and a basically good casi Io piesent these
pieces wilh. Hut somehow it was difficult to gel a total fulfillment
from Anns anil the Man because of the show's lack ol integration.
There weie pails where the total image of the sciipl comes thiough.
so as an organic theatrical whole Arms anil ihe Man only partly
succeeded. I goi the feeling Ihal some great dramatic tension was
happening on the slage, thai latent tickling sneeze,but the relief', the
consummation, that luscious snee/e nevei occurred. Neveilheless. I
say to a si ill enjoyable production, "(iod bless You."
A.S.O. - Hindemith Excels
by liene Klinghoffer
Forget the cold, forget the ice
-
last
Saturday
was
Albany
Symphony night, and the audienEe turned out at the Palace
Opening with Janet Rowe as
in
Vivaldi's
"Winter,"
taken from his set of four violin
concerti,
spots, the good things happening
chestra emitted a sound that was
more than made up for this lack.
surprisingly warm, a sound that I
Especially
wish the ASO strings could pro-
violas, which for a change were
duce a little more often.
not covered up by the double
Paul
Theater as usual.
soloist
jSnthusiasm. The rest of the or-
"The
Seasons,"
the
ASO was reduced
to a small
string
Ms.
ensemble.
Rowe
entered the spirit of the music
almost immediately, and gave an
excellent reading that was full of
Hindemith's
"Mathis der Maler" which fol-
places with the percussion sec-
lowed is described, at best, as
tion. Hindemith was himself a
extremely
violist, and knew exactly what
separate
difficult.
lines
Its
many
culminate
the instrument is capable of
in a
structure that can probably be
the viola section seemed to be
called
with him all the way on Satui
Neo-Gothic.
The
ASO
day.
pulled the whole thing together
quite well, and although there
were a small
number
of
raw
The ASO was again reduced In
strings only for Benjamin Urn
The Weekend's Music
The
"Summer of '42"
Albany
presents its 1973 "Family Concert,"
featuring
Symphony
Along a misty, lonely beach on
"Summer of ' 4 2 " stars three
chosen
League of Arts
Albany
Orchestra,
Julius
generate both
it
manages
excitement
to
and
Hegyi, conductor, and the win-
The Brown University Chamber Choir, a twenty-five member
walks slowly among the sand-
exhaustive search: Gary Grimes,
tions, in the Main Theatre, Per-
group from
pipers. On this solitary morning
J.erry
forming Arts Center, State Uni-
Department appears in the Reci-
stroll, he relives the summer of
Conant. The Mulligan-Roth pro-
versity at Albany, Sunday after-
tal Hall, Performing Arts Center,
1942 when he was 15, a boy
named Hermie, on the threshold
beauty
of manhood.
as the "older
Thus begins "Summer of"42,"
a nostalgic excursion for some
also
stars
a
blazing
named Jennifer O'Neill
woman" of 22.
marking her first dramatic starring role.
Legrand's
poignant
theme won the l l )7l
Academy
it
Award for Best Original Score.
is a simple human
comedy
Michel
with a timeless feeling, as Irue
Robert
today as it was then and will he
Technicolor
film, which
tomorrow.
Friday
the
Only
the
calendar
I
I
I
•
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
v
l.
at
State
** *
MOT' Friday Afternoons
concert
the
Jon
band at
Markjohn
10:30 I'M in
Memorial
Chapel
Visconti's
CI u
Debussy.
Revel.
eastern New York, Assistant Prolessor o! Theatre Jerome llanley
Tickets
are
S3 with
special
Prior
be
a
the
band's
cartoon
to
festival
midnight: EAST OF EDEN
shown.
Guitarist-
songwrilei lion Maid & reednian
Johnny
Almond
prominence
fust
crime in
in ilm country as
May-all's
blent
icali/e
ilicii
<ii d i d
own
unique
& lolk
|a/.z . etas
"Westward
H o ! " a Library
round-up of programs including
live old westerns p r e s e n t e d j n
tribute t o tbc c o w b o y on his
70lh birthday in films, a talk on
the western novel, an exhibit,
and a western piny tor children
will be presented al A l b a n y
Public
Library
beginning
Tuesday. February 2 7 . T h e festival
which is free and open Lo
all
will be held at l l a r m a n u s
Bleet-ker
Library,
19 Dove
Street.
" T h e Western Novel — o n e
mirror of t h e P a s t , " will be
discussed at a non-lime nroiiram
music is boih tasteful and
a E O a a t J f III.1! Ill ml! Jul! riJuaauIQQEBIDi
V
'u irtnrxrri X T -
y o r k a t albany
W)
1 chaikow -Is-.
lo Romeo am! In;
the rest
ot
the piotn.uu
i
listener. H sounded more like n
overture lo Romeo and Julii i
divorce!
Phrasing,
tempi.
tuning were awi\
was unfortunate
,i: :
.IP i i'
that ,i
i ••;
on T u e s d a y , F c b r u a r v 2'i
Jack V a n D e r h o o f , a pro:
history lit Russell Sage
A u t h o r of " T h e Tun
Ni
F a s t , " a n d " A Biblmiir. pi,
Novels
related
l
Frontier and Col,
,l I I , M M
D r . V a n D e r h o o f has p n - p a f
l i s t o f w e s t e r n n o v e l - , w i n , I,
be d i s t r i b u t e d a l I n s .II
Thai
eveinna
'Tim-iliTMll
liatige, " a Hoot (iilisoti el.,
will oe s h o w n at n pin
.successive T u e s d a y mulils,
Library will preseni ".lus
Hides A g a i n , " March II ,, '!
Mix
western, " R a n g e l-'eu
March 1 ,'l starring Buck ,J,»
and J o h n Wayne, " H e r o e s if the
R a n g e , " March KO wiLl K e n
M a y n a r d , a n d "Silver o
lire
S a g e , " March 27 a rare I'.l.'l'.l
H o p a l o n g Cassidy movie, T h e
films have all been selected
r e m i n d e r of t h e " g o o d old d
w h e n t h e " g o o d G u y s " rod, lb,
range p r o t e c t i n g the weak and
bringing o u t l a w s t o justice. The.\
never d r a n k , rarely s m o k e d , and
used their pistols only when
forced t o . T h e y were clean
living, q u i c k on the draw, lall ,,,
the saddle, a n d b a n d y will, ,<i|„
and fists.
Union College presents
The
Mark Almond
Band
Beginning Friday. March 3 0 I F G will present the complete Bergman trilogy
THROUGH
A GLASS DARKLY
will be presented twice on Friday M a r . 3 0 , „ .
WINTER
LIGHT
will be ihown twice on Saturday Mar 3 1 i t and THE SILENCE
twice on Sunday April l i t . Admission to each flint of the trilogy will ba $ . 7 6 w i t h
student tax card, $ 1 . 2 5 without. Advance tickets will go on sale tonight at I F G
screenings. A set o l tickets purchased in advance will be $.26 less expensive than
single tickets bought at the door. Sets will cost $2.00 with student tax and $ 3 . 6 0
without. While these advance tickets are not tor reserved seats, those holding advance
tickets will be admitted to the lecture center first allowing them first choice of teats.
Only a limited number of advance sets are being placed on sale starting tonight
Tickets for the BERGMAN
TRILOGY: March 30 through April 1 will be on sale for
$ 2 . 0 0 w/student tax, $3.60 w/out at the dour of Lecturo Center 2 6 starting at
.TTmTWTWTmrrrirCTrrjpanri^
PAGE 2A
the
Westward Ho!
Friday, February 23
LC25
7:30 ONLY
evening. NIGHTS OF CABIRIA
its conceit
almost hate to say ilr,n >.. -i
even
is secretary of the club.
T h e view t h a t w o m e n should
a l w a y s play a s e c o n d a r y role is
also prevalent in m a n y p o p u l a r
religious circles of t o d a y . In
Christianity this view is generally
s u s t a i n e d by t h r e e passages from
Paul's
letters.
These
very
passages have b r o u g h t charges of
male chauvinism.
Is this t h e p r o p e r view for the
t r e a t m e n t of w o m e n for Christians'' T h e place t o look fur the
a n s w e r to this q u e s t i o n is [he
New T e s t a m e n t . T h i s b o o k is the
very f o u n d a t i o n of Christianity.
T h e r e are t w o
important
s o u r c e s o n w o m e n in t h e New
Testament: 1 ) Jesus' attitudes
and actions, a n d 2 ) Paul's attit u d e s and a c t i o n s .
ct." Alter such .' positive rc\n •••
of
ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS
next week:
finding
"Overture
by
By Paul Stewart
F r o m earliest t i m e s w o m e n
have b e e n placed in a s e c o n d a r y
position t o m e n , E x a m p l e s of
this are o b v i o u s in t h e concubinal p o s i t i o n s of w o m e n in
a n c i e n t China, J a p a n , a n d their
subservianl role in t h e ancient
t r a d i t i o n s of India.
p o i n t s which m u s t be recognized
to understand
a n d properly,
a p p r e c i a t e Paul's p o s i t i o n .
First,
all New T e s t a m e n t
writings, including Paul's letters,
are e v e r y w h e r e r o o t e d in t h e
Jewish Law a n d P r o p h e t s , or t h e
Old T e s t a m e n t . Paul himself was
of t h e Pharasee b e f o r e his conversion, which m e a n t that he
diligently observed t h e religious
law a n d was trained in o n e of
the finest rabbinic schools of his
time.
In t h e b o o k of Genesis we are
instructed t h a t a m a n s h o u l d
rule over his wife (Genesis .'J: Hi).
In Genesis 2 : 1 8 we learn that
w o m a n was m a d e to be a help to
man. But on e x a m i n i n g these
passages we see t h e y are primarily
meant
for
married
w o m e n . Women w h o are single
or widowed aren't directly included under these rules.
ten middle-oi'lhe-road style
p e r formed
performs
ITALIAN NE0-REALISM
admission:
$.50 w/student tax
$1.00 w/out
rolling along in the laniili.n llni
Molison,
s t a t e university of new
u U
brought off at least pleasaiith
manner.
iru'u trtrTT-rr-u ti g-n-ry
V
sitting up front, the piece was
wise fine program ended in M.:-
Hi
U
the vantage point of a lislenei
at
Brown, the choir
Chauvinism Reconsidered
I seriously dnuhi :I,I
al SI.50.
the general public will be
influences until the;
EBEBHODQHBO
for
they could hear. However, from
for
band. Maik-Aliuonii won I sh.illei your caijiriiii?'. and (hey
won'i 1'iaj
nerves wnli
ill,
itnpiovisalioii
bog down:
A l l Welcome
the people m
student tickets (and school IDl
not
the international
film g r o u p
on
whether
Saturday, February 24. Tickets
" I inning Point" hand,
Come to us f o r your next rush party or college mixer
Directed by Robert
by the Brown Club of North-
Union College will present in
was singing, bin i
who is director of choral music
The choir is being sponsored
Yukikn Saegusa. piano.
the m.iinsla) s ol Join
Free Keg of Beer
Albany,
Billings. Foster, and Ives.
will
Fridays at 5:15
at
works
$3.50.
This week GffNel
Free Live Rock Music
Dehra
wonder
dci
1 ICII. I
February 23, Friday, 8:30pm.
Office
are
University
Brown Music-
piano. Donna Cohen, flute, and
appearance
Open Weds, thru Saturday 7pm
Fridays 4pm
Box
the
Man. clarinet, Julie llaiipiman.
opens
Albany
SI.
winners
Almond
•
i
i
the
The Best in Live Rock
i
i
i
i
at
directed
The Ontario Si
Beer & Reek Garden
i
i
i
tickets
(51X1457-860(1.
the
297 Ontario St
• (at Madison Ave.)
•
Alban
•
•
•
Mulligan
Cinema.
changes.
Tickets are $2, with student
Sludent
ago for others. But lor everyone,
and an open door to a generation
State
noon, February 25, 3:30 p.m.
he
ilic
it,
ners of the 1973 student audi-
duction
poetry
enjoy
they fly.
an
Oliver
and
the back of the hall gol [<it'ii|<'\
newcomers,
and
Willy Brown seemed I
feeling. And when they do jam,
a summer-colony island, a man
Houser
after
the
controlled, yet
ten's "Les Illuminations." I'entu
stand
Paul Harvey News
noticeable were the
basses, the latter having changed
symphony
Religion Today
Sat. Feb. 24
Union College
• 10:30
Memorial Chapel pm
Tickets:
$2.50 Union students
$3.50 all others
l l c k u l s available In rsclrenettaUy
U n i o n College b l u d e n l
Activities
O U I c e , A l b a n y : V a n Curler'l Mum..
128 State St.; l i n y ; Music Slia'k.
97 Congress S I .
For m o r e I n f o , Lair 3/0 u l l a
J e s u s - H e b r e w s o c i e t y in J e s u s '
day and age was definitely male
d o m i n a t e d . We need o n l y n o t e
to prove this t h a t it has been
recorded that t h e priests of that
t i m e daily p r a y e d , " L o r d , I
t h a n k you I was not born a
w o m a n . " Also, o n l y m e n held
the right t o d i v o r c e a n d could
inherit p r o p e r t y .
T h e passages in t h e New Testam e n t illustrate J e s u s ' a t t i t u d e s .
We will o n l y look a t t h r e e here.
In H e b r e w s o c i e t y of J e s u s '
p e r i o d it was t h o u g h t t o be
below a m a n t o speak t o a
w o m a n in public. We find rec o r d e d , in t h e fourth c h a p t e r of
J o h n ' s Gospel, Jesus publicly
conversing with a w o m a n near a
well. F u r t h e r , he takes the side
of I In* w o m a n ( a n d justice ( in
the " i h r n w t h e first s t o n e " epiMid*' in t h e eighth
chapter.
Finally, he says t h a t Mary " h a d
chosen t h e b e t t e r p a r t " by listening t o his t e a c h i n g rather
than doing t h e " w o m a n ' s w o r k "
of t h e h o u s e , in t h e t e n t h chapter of L u k e ' s G o s p e l . This was at
,< t i m e w h e n learning a n y t h i n g
o t h e r than h o u s e chores was
frowned u p o n for w o m e n . T h e r e
are many o t h e r e x a m p l e s like
these w h e r e Jesus t r e a t s men and
w o m e n n o t as s e p a r a t e classes,
but as b r o t h e r s a n d sisters alienated from O u r F a t h e r in heaven
Certainly Christians can do no
less than follow his e x a m p l e .
St. Paul -Paul's a t t i t u d e s o n
w o m e n a r e f r e q u e n t l y believed
to be s u m m e d up in t h e following passages from his epistles:
1 ) " A n y w o m a n w h o prays or
p r o p h e s y s with h e r head uncovered d i s h o n o r s her head -it is
the same as if h e r head were
s h a v e n . " (1 Corinthian:. 11 .))
2) " W o m e n s h o u l d keep Ml.-nt
,n t h e c h u r c h e s . F o r t h e y are n o t
p e r m i t t e d to speak and should
remain s u b o r d i n a t e even as t h e
law s a y s . " ( l C o r i n t h i a n s 1 4 : 3 4 )
;i) " L e t a w o m a n learn in
silence with all s u b m i s s i o n . I
permit no w o m a n t o teach or t o
have a u t h o r i t y o v e r m e n ; s h e is
to
keep
silent." U Timothy
2:11-12)
There
are t w o i m p o r t u n l
T r a d i t i o n s of t h e p e o p l e fit in
here t o o . In Paul's d a y in t h e
time when Genesis was p u t on
paper it w a s n ' t c o m m o n for
y o u n g u n m a r r i e d w o m e n t o be
on their o w n . F o r this reason it
is likely t h a t Paul never ran into
such a s i t u a t i o n . So does y Christian find no t e a c h i n g regarding
them?
Quite t h e c o n t r a r y ! We here
direct o u r a t t e n t i o n t o t h e life of
Jesus himself, which w e have
already discussed.
S e c o n d l y , t h e s e passages cannot be i n t e r p r e t e d o u t of their
cultural a n d historical setting. It
was a period w h e n men and
w o m e n sal in s e p e r a t e groups in
the congregations.
Frequently
w o m e n might engage in gossip or
a t t e m p t to interject c o m m e n t s
across t h e r o o m t o t h e m e n , w h o
An article in Eternity
magazine last J a n u a r y raises s o m e
interesting p o i n t s . It was w r i t t e n
by Dr. a n d Mrs. Radius, b o t h
avid s t u d e n t s of t h e s c r i p t u r e s .
T h e y point o u t t h a t these passages c a n n o t be justifiably isolated t o prove a p o i n t on w o m e n
w i t h o u t u n d e r s t a n d i n g t h e cultural setting and n o t i n g o t h e r
relevant passages t o o ; for ins t a n c e , R o m a n ' s s i x t e e n t h chapter where Paul greets twenty-six
people w h o are his personal
friendsten of w h o m are
w o m e n . He e n t r u s t s t h e letter t o
a certain P h e o b e , w h o holds a
position in the c h u r c h , that of
deconess (R.S.V., New American, and Jerusalem translations).
Also, t h e r e is a reference t o
o n e n a m e d J u n i a or J u n i a s . It is
Junias in s o m e ancient manuscripts and J u n i a in o t h e r s . T h e
King J a m e s
translation
uses
Junia.
How is this significant? Well, if
this person is J u n i a , we m u s t
understand her t o be a woman,
for t h e feminine quality of t h e
name designates t h e o w n e r ' s gender. F u r t h e r , this J u n i a is called
an apostle which places a whole
new light on s t u d i e s of w o m e n
in t h e early ehurch--especially
when placed against o u r three
scripture references.
There is a great deal of o t h e r
information on this subject, and
this is only a small part. I h o p e
I've kindled y o u r interest t o
look f u r t h e r on y o u r o w n .
What works in t h e medical
l a b o r a t o r y d o e s n o t always w o r k
in t h e clinic.
Said a n o t h e r w a y , a m e d i c i n e
which cures a disease in animals
m a y n o t cure t h e s a m e disease in
humans.
However, medical science h a s
established t h a t m o n k e y s a r e
m u c h like m a n physiologically;
and m i c e a n d m e n are p s y c h o logically-socially-- similar.
So w h e n o u r n a t i o n ' s National
Institute
of Mental
Health
s o u g h t t o create a m i c r o c o s m of
t h e total h u m a n society, it p o p u lated its " s e p a r a t e w o r l d " with
mice.
What h a p p e n e d t o t h e m relates
to y o u .
T h e y call Dr. J o h n C a l h o u n
" L o r d of t h e M i c e . " F o r five
years he has been " p l a y i n g g o d "
in a s e p a r a t e world of his o w n .
He t u r n e d back civilization's
clock
a n d s t a r t e d over. He
created an Eden on e a r t h - f o r
mice. A Utopia in which t h e r e
was p l e n t y of everything-- p l e n t y
of food, perpetual fair w e a t h e r ,
I e m p e r a te
el i m a t e ,
freedom
from all natural enemies, total
isolation from disease germs. A
paradise for mice.
This Garden of Eden for m i c e
was first p o p u l a t e d with f o u r
couples in space a d e q u a t e t o
comfortably a c c o m m o d a t e 1 6 0 .
During t h e first t w o years t h e
mouse
population
increased
from t h e original eight t o 2 , 2 0 0 .
As t h e confines grew c r o w d e d ,
s o m e mice began t o segregate
themselves into groups of a b o u t
a dozen each a n d t o reject
o t h e r s . T h e rejection of o t h e r s
turned
t o violence
toward
others. T h e rejected reverted t o
sexual aggression.
F r o m this p r e o c c u p a t i o n w i t h
sex, per se, the social " o r d e r "
disintegrated and was d e s t r o y e d .
That is to say, any instinct for
" l a w and o r d e r " was negated by
carnal passion until a t i m e when
the social order had d e g e n e r a t e d
completely.
This m o u s e c o l o n y had everything a m o u s e c o u l d need and, at
first, e v e r y t h i n g a m o u s e could
want.
After that there was a conspicuous loss of sexual interest. Ultimately the m o u s e p o p u l a t i o n
became passive and lost all interest in sex.
Dr. Calhoun observes t h a t their
needs were supplied; t h e r e was a
total absence of s t r e s s - e x c e p t
for that stress which t h e inhabitants themselves generated within themselves. He says this was
a p p a r e n t almost from t h e beginning. They were " n o t c o n t e n t
to be c o n t e n t . "
A formal a n d detailed r e p o r t
on w h a t h a p p e n e d t o t h e m o u s e
c o l o n y is included for scholars in
two
current
publications--a
British p u b l i c a t i o n , " P r o c e e d i n g s
of T h e Royal Society of Medic i n e , " a n d t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l journal, " T e c h n o l o g i c a l Forecasting
and Social C h a n g e . " Space limit a t i o n s allow n o m o r e t h a n a
synopsis here.
At a n y time in t h e past five
years, particularly as their p o p u lation dwindled, it was assumed
t h e mice might have reverted t o
normal social relationships. But
t h e y did n o t . A p p a r e n t l y , by
then, they did n o t r e m e m b e r
how.
T o d a y , from the peak population of 2,200 only five survive.
A n d t h e y are all females.
Grievance Committee
Refrigerators: The Cold Facts
Finally
there
is a
grievance
cidumn.
This column will try to
deal
with
issues
thut
many
students
have
expressed
con
cern about
Future columns
will
deal with the
dorm
residence
situation,
I he
library,
and
the pro motion
and
continuing
appointment
problem
lo nana a
few.
Many
people
have
e\
pressed anger and confusion
at
the refrigerator
policy.
We have
asked Marc Chazan, the Student
Association
Business
Operations
Administrator,
to explain.
The
column
that will follow this in
traduction
dues not reflect the
opinions
of Grievance
Com
mittee.
It's the explanation
of
the policy makers. If you have
questions
about n or
anything
else write letters to the grievance
column c/o the A.S.F., or come
to the S.A. office
in
Campus
Center
346 on Monday
from
•J:>, Tuesday from 2 -/, Wednes
day from
2-5 and H 10, and
Thursday
from
12 2. At these
times nonirone
from
grievance
committee
will be there
You
can also call 457-6543.
The pos
nihility
of weekend
hours is
being considered.
Flease
make
use of us. And now the guest
column.
It has c o m e t o m y a t t e n t i o n
that there h a s been s o m e ques
tion in t h e m i n d s of s t u d e n t s as
to the reasoning b e h i n d o u r cur
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
were discussing s o m e i m p o r t a n t
issue. It was in t h e s e s i t u a t i o n s
that t h e y were o r d e r e d t o silence. O t h e r w i s e t h e y were perm i t t e d to speak in t h e c o u r s e of
the worship.
lord of the Mice
rent
refrigerator
policy. T h e
most frequent c o m m e n t involves
s t u d e n t s ' desires t o purchase
their o w n refrigerators instead of
having t o lease t h e m from t h e
university. A great deal of research was d o n e o n this q u e s t i o n
by t h e C o m m i t t e e on Refrigerator Leasing, which last spring
o p e n e d the refrigerator c o n t r a c t
to c o m p e t i t i v e
bidding. T h e
c o m m i t t e e , c o m p o s e d of five administrators a n d four s t u d e n t s ,
including myself, found s o m e
very
convincing
reasons
for
maintaining a policy of leasing
refrigerators only. These reasons
are
(1 ) T h e refrigerator u n i t leased
on c a m p u s , which is t h e m o s t
economical unit available with
regard to cost a n d electrical
usage, sells retail for a b o u t $ 8 0 .
Should an individual s t u d e n t or
a g r o u p of s t u d e n t s p u r c h a s e this
unit, h e / t h e y would assume t h e
following expenses: yearly inspection, which could run from
$10-15 per i n s p e c t i o n , and all
repairs. T h e $ 2 0 per year that
the s t u d e n t pays t o lease a refrigerator covers inspection and all
m a i n t e n a n c e charges, with an
additional service being t h e avail
ability of a repair m a n o n campus five days a week.
(2) T w o or m o r e s t u d e n t s intending t o live t o g e t h e r for m o r e
than u year usually feel that they
can reduce costs by splitting t h e
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
price of purchasing and maintaining a refrigerator
among
themselves. In point of fact, t h e
$H0 t h e s t u d e n t s pay t o purchase
the
refrigerator
just
m a t c h e s t h e cost of leasing a
refrigerator for four years. T h e
o b v i o u s difference is the undet e r m i n e d costs of m a i n t e n a n c e ,
which falls u p o n t h e purchaser
but n o t u p o n t h e leaser. Additional p r o b l e m s that m a y arise
for
the
purchaser
include
possession of t h e refrigerator
during the s u m m e r a n d finding
time t o t a k e it o u t t o be fixed.
Leasing a refrigerator eliminates
these p r o b l e m s .
( 3 ) If t h e c o m p a n y that n o w
leases refrigerators t o the university were also allowed t o sell
units t o s t u d e n t s , t h e units sold
and leased w o u l d be identical.
This w o u l d b e necessary because, as I m e n t i o n e d before,
this u n i t is the most e c o n o m i c a l .
What would s t o p s o m e o n e from
replacing a damaged unit which
he o w n e d with a leased unit, a n d
t u r n i n g in the damaged unit t o
t h e university a t t h e e n d of t h e
leasing period? Of c o u r s e , t h e
units c o u l d be n u m b e r e d , t h e
color changed, e t c . , b u t t h e fact
remains t h a t this w o u l d c r e a t e a
s i t u a t i o n similar t o t h a t of furniture or h o t plates; periodic
i n s p e c t i o n s w o u l d have t o b e
m a d e t o check for illegal refrige r a t o r s that s t u d e n t s m a y have
p u r c h a s e d o u t s i d e t h e university.
T h e necessity of m a i n t a i n i n g a n d
limiting the type of unit presently being leased I will n o w clarify:
(4) The refrigerator units that
are now being leased use a mini
m u m a m o u n t of electricity for
starling and operating in comparison to other units on the
market. This was an i m p o r t a n t
requirement in d e t e r m i n i n g o u r
current policy. Very often superstructures such as d o r m i t o r i e s
are subject t o faulty electrical
systems caused by c o n t i n u o u s
overloading of circuits. M a n y refrigerator units, despite being
t h e same size as those leased on
c a m p u s , use a great deal m o r e
electricity. This is especially t r u e
in t h e starting of a refrigerator,
for getting it down t o t h e p r o p e r
t e m p e r a t u r e is the largest electrical draw in the unit's o p e r a t i o n .
(5) T h e present specifications
of o u r policy allow for a substantial a m o u n t of c o n t r o l in t h e
distribution and m a i n t e n a n c e of
t h e leased refrigerator units. A
p h e n o m e n a l a m o u n t of work
w o u l d have t o be taken o n (if
the policy allowed the p u r c h a s e
of units) with respect t o : a )
making sure privately o w n e d
units were inspected, a n d b )
making sure each unit o p e r a t e d
within safe electrical b o u n d s .
Allowing electrical usage t o get
o u t of hand could result in
b l a c k o u t s and in severe cases
electrical tires may result.
PAGE 3A
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1972
.,:#mmmm&miWimmi
. -.'.....
I
preview/leisure/'preview/leisure/'preview/'leisure/'preview/'leisure/preview
Crossword Contest Rules
The Vice Squad
Puzzle solutions must be submitted to the Albany
£
"Ask the ASP"
Student Press office (CC 334) by Monday, 12 noon
following the Friday that the puzzle appears.
Name, address, phone number, and social security num-
Friday, Feb. 23
Saturday, Feb. 24
Brown University Chamber Chorus: at
8:30 p.m. in the PAC Recital Hall, $3.00,
Students $1.50.
Student Recital: Joseph McGauley on the
violin. 8:30 p.m. in the PAC recital hall.
Free.
Telethon 7 3 : for the benefit of Wildwood School for developmental^ handicapped children. From 8 p.m.- 8 p.m.
Saturday.
Telethon 7 3 : continued from Friday
night until 8 p.m. Saturday.
Arms and the Man:«:30 p.m. in the PAC
Studio Theater, $2.00.
ber must appear on your solution.
Puzzle solutions will be drawn at random until three
correct solutions have been chosen.
Henways: "Babel" providing the music
from 8:30. $.50 cover charge.
Each of the three winners will be entitled to a $10 gift
certificate to the campus bookstore (not including tunnel
service). Certificates must be claimed within two weeks of
notification.
Arms and the Man: 8:30 p.m. in PAC
Studio Theater, $2.00.
No one working on or for the Albany Student Press is
Sorry, only one entry per person will be accepted.
2
3
i»
5
lit
I
20
Movie Timetable
1r
2k
"Heartbreak Kid"
Fri.: 6:45. 10:45
Sat.: 7:30.9:45
"World's Greatest Athlete'
Fri. and Sat.: 7:00,9:00
Madison (489 5431)
• 2Z
"Summer of ' 4 2 "
Fri. and Sat.: 7:30,9:30 in
LC 18
Fri.
and
Sat.: 7 : 0 0 . 9 : 3 0
"Poseidon Adventure"
"Rocco and His Brothers"
Fri. 7:30 in LC-25
Fri&Sat:
Fri.: 2:00, 7:15.9:30
7:30,9:30
Sat. Matinee:
Sat.: 2:00, 8:00. 10:30.
Aldenberry Cinema
Roy
Bean"
Fri. & S a t . : 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 1 0
Sat. Matinee:
Off Campus
(462-9033 J
"Our Man in Havana"
Starring Alec Guinness
Fri. and Sat.: 7:30, 9:30
1:00
Delaware (462-4714)
"Judge Roy bean"
Fri.: 7:15,9:25
Sat.: 2:25, 6:55. 9:20
Cine
1234 (459-8300)
"1776"
Fn&Sat:
Gryffon Film Society
1:00
Fox Colonie (459 1020)
"Jeremiah Johnson"
Fri.: 7:30,9:30
Sat.: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10
"Man ol
7 : 0 0 , 9 : ill
l.a
Mantha"
Fri&Sat: 7:30, 10:00
"Getaway"
Fri&Sar
7:00, 9:30
30
31
51
•
52
1
55
56
17
1
6o
62
W
By EDWARD JULIUS
1.
6.
10.
1**,
15.
16.
17.
19.
20.
21.
22.
2<+,
26.
27.
28.
}2,
3**.
35.
36.
37.
36,
39.
Andrew
The Second Down
57
59
Si
is
If you're sure every way of
reasoning with her has been
attempted, perhaps y o u should
try ignoring her. A bit of cold
treatment and she might realize
what she's doing. Y o u say she
keeps y o u entertained. Perhaps
(consciously or unconsciously)
y o u are encouraging her to continue her antics. In which case,
not paying attention to her
actions may at least persuade her
to t o n e d o w n a bit.
P.S. We think y o u s h o u l d t a k e
our advice because a s i t u a t i o n
like this is n o t h i n g t o " m o n k e y "
a r o u n d with.
also see them when they talk
about other things. R e c e n t l y I've
found a situation where this
dislike of people has struck very
close to home. N a m e l y , in job
interviews, I have been having to
talk about m y experience, education, qualifications, e t c . This
makes m e very uncomfortable,
as y o u can probably imagine.
The worst situations are where I
think J have some g o o d points in
relation to the job being discussed. (Building myself up in
other wordB). That really makes
m e squirm. D o y o u have any
suggestions as t o how I can feel
c o m f o r t a b l e talking about m y self?
T h a n k you very m u c h .
"Self-ambivilized"
Dear "Self-ambivilized",
Dear Ask the Asp,
Most of m y c h i l d h o o d close
friends were t h e k i n d w h o never
stopped
talking a b o u t
themselves, always enjoyed bragging;
in general, they could never d o
e n o u g h to build themselves u p in
the eyes of o t h e r p e o p l e . As a
result I have grown t o dislike
p e o p l e w h o talk a b o u t themselves (or at least he wary of
these p e o p l e ) , especially iT they
seem to hi1 saying h o w good
they are, h o w smart they are,
how cool they a r e , e t c .
F o r t u n a t e l y I've f o u n d t h a t
with
my b e t t e r friends this
d o e s n ' t m a t t e r t o o m u c h , because 1 see enough of t h e m t o
form my o w n o p i n i o n s , and I
T h e line b e t w e e n conceit a n d
self-confidence is n a r r o w , b u t
you must realize t h a t t h e r e is a
distinction. And y o u r aim is t o
gain m o r e s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e in
speaking. Perhaps y o u r
best
course of action
would be
t h r o u g h those b e t t e r friends y o u
m e n t i o n . If you can discuss t h e
p r o b l e m with t h e m , y o u will
have m a d e t h e first s t e p in talking to o t h e r s a b o u t yourself,
R e m e m b e r , they will n o t take
what you say as bragging a b o u t
yourself . . . they are close to
you a n d k n o w b e t t e r . When y o u
find that you can talk comfortably a b o u t yourself t o y o u r
best friends, the transition to
talking at job interviews should
he easier.
Fiction:
!tl
ACROSS
"Pete and Tillie"
"Judge
"The Green May"
Fri.: 7:00
Alden Maine Lounge
JO
initials.
RJOHNSON
is Richard Johnson, AJOHNSON
and LJOHNSON
is Lyndon
Johnson,
by Linda D e s m o n d
™
liv
1 •
42
Circle Twin (785 3388)
Towne (785- 1515)
IFG
Example:
Johnson,
last names are preceeded
3B
M O
58
Fri. and Sal.: 7:15, 9:30
Identical
Everyone has been writing to
you a b o u t problems with their
boy friends or roommate's girlfriend. What d o you do with a
s u i t e m a t e w h o thinks she's a
m o n k e y ? She lurches through
t h e d o r m m a k i n g o b s c e n e noises
and t h e suite c o n s t a n t l y reeks of
bananas. This isn't t h e worst
part . . .how can a n y o n e t a k e a
shower while " T h e A p e - W o m a n "
is swinging on the shower rod,
screaching at the t o p of her
lungs.
This is n o t a put-on. We really
can't even bring friends i n t o t h e
suite because she harasses them.
And dinner is a total disaster
-with her pawing through her
fcx>d looking for edible morsels.
We have tried t o reason with
her, to no avail. We like her
-sometimes s h e keeps us entertained. But life is miserable. We
all c a n ' t move o u t of t h e suite-and who would take an Apew o m a n in as a s u i t e m a t e ? What
can we d o ? We have no c a g e ! If
you d o n ' t believe this letter is
sincere, you can c o n t a c t a n y o n e
in Melville-Steinmetz a n d they
will verify this c o m p l a i n t . We are
g(r)o( w)ing bananas,
Sincerely y o u r s ,
N.N.
Dear N . N . ,
35
37
39
12
Hidden
in this puzzle
are the mimes of all tiii vice
of the United
States.
They appear in all
directions
vertical, and diagonal; they can be spelled backwards and
total of eight directions.
Letters can be used more than
Answers; Adams, Jefferson, B u n . d i n l u n , t i e n y , t o r u p k i n i , d i l l i '
Buren, R. Johnson, Tyler. DJILIS, I UIHHHI-. Km'), Btut-kmndiie. M j
Johnson, Colfax, Wilson, Wheeler, A r t h u r , I leiidnckv, Mot t o n , SI
Roosevelt, Hobart, Fairbanks, 'jlitr rn,iii, M,ir
II, ( uoiitji)..-, uawe:
Garner, Wallace, Truman, BaiMey, Nixon, i_. Johnson, H u m p h r e y , A ^
29
3*
w
11
23
•20
33
5k
"Sharnus"
"Avanti"
Dear Ask the Asp,
26
1»5
Colonie Center (459-2170)
SUNY Cinema
lio
9
19
25
32
Cinema 7 (7851625)
8
jA
"
27
Hellman (459 53ooj
7
18
17
"Airport"
Fri. and Sat.: 7:30.10:00 in
LC-7
Note:
ASP Crossword Puzzle
1
Tower East
Directions:
presidents
horizontal,
forwards--a
once.
Baxter's Cafe:Mixed Bag of poetry, films,
music with Heat Ray and Friends. 9pm
at 810 Madison Ave. Free.
Arms and the Man: 2:30 p.m. in the
Studio Theater, $2.00
On Campus
*****
eligible to win.
Sunday, Feb. 25
Family Concert: conducted by Julius
Hegyi, 8:30 p.m. in PAC Main Theater,
$2.00.
N o t e : Letters t o " A s k the A S P "
can b e s e n t t o CC 3 2 6 .
SI T R U C L I NTONI
LMAH
AMNI
XAFLOCMORTONN
LJ
E F F E R S O N O S S A D A R
L A S O N I
XONMANAMMRE
A G E R R Y L N O S N H O ) A E N
DRWGFI
HLEAYOONRDR
N A T E D A N E M L N ) R U S A A
1 Y L G N I 1 O N O Y L H O H W G
X Y E R E G R R S D R T Y H A E E
1 E V E V V A N B U R E N L L S G
NRELEEHWI ALI LALNA
R H S Y R O I D B K N A C C I BN
APOT]
LLORGCKLKUOA
HMORSNHAAENESRSRM
TURORABRWNAMREHSU
R H N U E V O L I DJ W S B U G R
A N O S N E V E T S N I
KPMOT
Prepares for P u b l i c a t i o n
Soprano L i l y
Glance Through
Corruptible
Arabian Region
S h e e t of Glasn
Devotee
H i s s Swenson
de Plume
Year Henry VIII Took Over
Customary
Caused by E a r t h q u a k e
Competent
Adolescent
I l l i c i t Love A f f a i r s
Take a n d ' S t o r e Away
Mr. Ponti
Silent-film Star
S h i e l d Knob
Game Show C o n t e s t a n t s
Entreaty
Zero
ho, Trimmed Away
'i l . Di urns.l
'*2, Shi p Servants
W , "Mad" Cartoonist
**5« Pointed Toole
"6. Petty Tyrants
'+9, Film on Copper Coins
52. Take Out
53. Samoan Warrior
51*. Departure
55. Self-love
58. Prench M a t h e m a t i c i a n
59. Converse
60. Pronount p],J
6 1 . P o l i s h River
62. Pood
6 j . More Sound
DOWN
1. Chess G r o a t
2. English Novelist
3. Matchless
**# Prefix! Touch
5. Lost Woight
6. Widespread Pear
7. Australian Pish
B. Boy'0 Nickname
9- Accumulate Rapidly
10. Backbones
1 1. Immanuel
12. E n g l i s h T h e o l o g i a n
13. Famous Anthropologit
18, Chief Norae God
23, Sundry Assortment
25, Wateryi comb, form
26. Publicized
2 6 , P r i s c i l l a and Abbe
2V. Duty
30. C h r i s t i n a s
31. Oscillate
32. Vandals
33* Leave Out
'}h. Baseball Team
37 . Manner of Spoah l rig
38. Wife of Henry VIII
<*0. Chess Piece
'H. Abhors
"O. Restaurant Employee
'***. "The Road t o
"
k6. R e l i g i o u s Groups
1*7. S h e r i f f ' s H e l p e r s
'lb. Conti n e n t ( a b b r . )
'*9. Spanish Conjunction
50.
51.
52.
56,
Chopped Down
Pork Prong
F i e l d s ' Biography
Exclamation
57-
___ Na Nb
t8
It was d a w n She o p e n e d her
eyes; t h e girl t h e y called Mara
T h e first r a y s of t h e S u n had
entered t h e small o p e n i n g at the
m o u t h of t h e cave. S h e had nol
slept well o n t h e h a r d rock floor
of her s h e l t e r , h u t she was not
allowed t o c o m p l a i n . Living a
way from t h e village in c o m p l e t e
isolation for a week was pari of
the c e r e m o n y T h e ground felt
cold against h e r hare skin and
she shivered.
This was a special day for Mara
Contest Winners
Irwin Kroot
Carolyn Spring
Eileen Hahnenfeld
(Solution lo lasl week
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because it was the la.sl day of her
week When she returned to the
village that night t h e r e would be
a great (Vast and much rejoicing
Mara imagined I be pride that
would he nil the races of her
family
Mara, t o o , fell proud
because of all the jtirl.s "i the
Village she alone had heefl cho
sen by the l e a d e r to be sacn
liced to Iheir beloved K od ol
SUtiligllt T o jinn (Jod in l b s
Colden Chariot would make her
sacn-d and bring great honor to
her family and all their des
cendent.s
Mar;, s t o o d up and untangled
her long hlack hair from the
holy heads that the Leader h a d
placed a r o u n d her neck She
crawled out of the cave's open
irtg a n d wenl in search of s o m e
herbs lor morning meal
It was a beautiful day T h e Sun
.shone h n g h t l y on t h e dry and
barren land Mara looked u p a n d
smiled God was pleased, and o n
I he next rising of t h e S u n s h e
would ride across the sky in l b s
Golden Chariot While she a t e ,
Mara read from the Sacred Hook
that the Leader had given her to
study he lore her journey This
Book c o n t a i n e d the history ol
her p e o p l e a n d the people from
the time h e l o r e She read with
wonder t h e s t o n e s of those
a n c i e n t people who, through
their ignorance, had destroyed
their
civilization
T h e early
people were savage and did n o l
believe in G o d T h e y p l u n d e r e d
the precious Eur'th and many
people died from disease a n d
starvation T h e y lived hi u slate
of e x t r e m e violence, always at
war, always killing. Mara was
glad that G o d had taken revenge
tin those a n c i e n t barbarians a n d
thai her people had evolved into
a civilized race S h e closed t h e
book and s t r e t c h e d .
It was still early. T h e Leader
would not c o m e for her until
alter the Sun had left. Ho Mara
decided Lo take a walk near the
water It was her favorite place
lo be alone T h e b r o w n waves
lapped gently against t h e sand
As she dipper! her toes into the
advancing waves she t h o u g h t
a b o u t a passage she had read iti
the Book " A n d when G o d of
the Sun created t h e Waters, they
t e e m e d with Life " Mara could
not imagine a time when Life
filled t h e stagnant waters of the
Karlh
Mara was so engrossed in
t h o u g h t that she did n o t notice
an object in die sand and a sharp
edge caught her fool While she
soothed
her w o u n d in the
foaming water, Mara picked u p
the object and studied it in
lenlly It was a bottle of a very
strange shape Mara t h o u g h t that
all hollies were made of clay,
hut tins was a substance she had
never seen before ll was hard,
but s o clear that she could see
through it Then she noticed
some faded symbols on the sur
face of the bottle She picked up
a stick and tried lo copy them in
the sand COCA
COLA
Mara started to walk back to
her shelter Idling the strange
find with colored pebbles thai
she found aa she walked "I'll
give ll t o my family u» u pre
s e n t , " she thought.
WSUA640
This Week:
Happiness is Sharing
WSUA will broadtail continuous coverage of
Telethon '73 beginning Friday February 23 at 7am.
10th Anniversary
Saturday Night, February 24: WSUA celebrates its
10th Anniversary *****
Saturday Night of Gold
will be giving away pri/es
Listen to WSUA and Enjoy!
Ileal the new music ol the week with Gary Lonschein
I uesdays Imm Noon
Sports Line
I pin
Sunday nights at 8pm
phone 457-6443
/iew/arts/preview/arts/preview/art
Ross Hunter's "Airport"
by Larry Menkes
The producer, Ross Hunter,
brings to life Arthur Hailey's
best-selling novel Airport. He lias
brought together twenty-three
academy-award-winning actresses and actors. "Airport" is a
powerful suspense drama Ihat
takes place at night during a
seven-hour period while an international airport in the midwest
is plagued by a crippling blizzard. A mired airplane is blocking a vital runway and a second
jetliner is trying to limp back
home after surviving a mid-air
bomb blast. The audience will
feel the jarring tension of the
explosion as if experiencing it
first-hand.
The film revolves around the
contrasting roles of the characters both at the airport and in
their personal lives. The characters each stand at the critical
poinl of their personal lives and
the decisions which they must
make are made in the tensionfilled setting of the airport, bach
decision that they make will
have serious repercussions on the
lives and the decisions of I he
others.
The characters are familiar
ones, but the performances of
the cast make litem rare. Helen
Hayes, as the innocent old lady,
has once again proven that she is
indeed the first lady of show
business. She exists in her own
oblivious and happy world. The
methods of world-wide travel
which she uses are only outdone
by her description of them to
Mel Bakersfeld and his assistant
(Jean Seaberg).
Dean Martin, as liern Dcmcr-
est, the pilot of the bombinjured jetliner is seen in a role
far removed from his Thursday
night booze sessions on NBC. He
exhibits a great degree of sensitivity in dealing with his pregnant mistress, who is also his
stewardess, as well as the passengers for whom he is responsible.
Burt Lancaster's performance
of Mel Bakersfeld is of the same
c a l i b e r as his a cade myaward-winning porlrayal of "Elmer Gantry." His "thc-hellwith-you" attitude earns the
audience's respect ami admiration. In his role, one sees lite
problems of a man conljonted
by adversity on all sides a man
watching his hie crumble around
him.
The Director George S e a l o n
used a refrigeration system and
other techniques on the set during the filming to make the
conditions as real as possible.
This movie has received the high
esl ratings from many reviewers
l! is put on hy TowerEasI
Cinema in LC 7 at 7 p.m. and 10
p.m. Thursday. Friday and Saturday.
university concert board presents:
SAT, MARCH 3
PALACE THEATRE
DOORS OPEN A T 6 PM
Tickets go on sale Monday February 26 in CC Balcony at 10 am
Only tax card tickets will be sold on February 26, 27 and 28.
They are $4.00 Only 4 tickets per person accompanied by tax
cards and ID will be sold. Only 900 tickets will be sold per day
TheAlbumBag
by Bill Brina
A recurrent problem that all
reviewers must live with is the
threat of creeping staleness: one
hears so much that is so similar
(and of so little worth) that soon
the ability to react with
unalloyed enthusiasm to a new
artist gets frayed away. It's
doubly delightful, then to herald
the debut of a new artist (new to
American; ears, at any rale)
who's simply brillant. The
man's name is John Mailyn &
his album Solid Air (Island
SW9325, distributed by Capitol
Records) is simply one of the
best
(and
most
totally
unexpected)releases of l l )7.!.
The packaging is stunning; the
songs (mostly original) are
blessed with skipping, lilting
melodies and simple yet staitlingly vivid lyric imagery, John's
vocals are fascinating and the
playing (by assorled English
jazz, folk, & rock luminaries)
impeccable.
sold at the Palace Theatre for $8.00 beginning Thursday morning.
With the proper exposure and
intelligent promotion, John Martyn
could be a full-fledged star.
However, Island will have to do
more for him than they've done
so far: he's been 'packaged' on a
tour with Free & Traffic. The
former is a prototypical English
hard-rock band (albeit with an
occasional gill lor producing
interesting music) and Ihc latter
is a once-outstanding super-band
fallen on h„id times lately, so
John's in danger of getting lost
in the shuffle for a while yel.
liu I fear n o t ; s o m e d a y ,
somehow, Mailyn just has to
break through.
PAGE 6A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
_
Collegiate Poetry Contest
COLLEGE STUDENT'S POETRY ANTHOLOGY
The NATIONAL POETRY PRESS
announces its
SPRING COMPETITION
April 10
I'd simply love lo know where
this man has been
his music
Hows, swings, bounces, darts
around u n e x p e c t e d l y , and
casually tosses off all kinds of
seemingly incongruous but perfectly fitted influences, from the
folk melodies of the Scottish
highlands to the oddly syncopated rhythmic nuances of the
Carribean. livery sone is pin
together differently, with different niateiials. and achieves a
unique mood: yel the whole
album hangs togclhei exit emery
well. John know, exactly what
he's doing.
Marlyn's singing is lulh as
inleiesting as his mnsii is lie
can slur, moan, ami nimble
when the snug demands n
hissinging on the title cut and on
Skip James' long-foigotlen "I'd
lalhei he the Devil" .Hlesls lo
that, 'by his balladic delivcij is
suave,Tiiendly, and veiy mellow
His guilai playing is Heel and
lull nl l e e l i n g , and his
ANY STUDENT attending cutler junior or icnior college is eligible lo submit
his veric. There is no limitation M to form or theme. Shorter works are preferred hy lite Board 'it judges, because of kpacc limitations.
F.adi txienl must he TYi'ED or PRINTED on a separate sheet, and must
bear die NAME and HOME ADDRESS ut the student, and the COlLEr.E
ADDRESS as w e l t .
MANUSCRIPTS should he sent to the OFFICE OF THE PRESS
NATIONAL POETRY PRESS
3210 Sclhy Avenue
Los Angeles, C a l i f .
90(134
Rensselaer Union and
Festival present:
BETTE
MIDLER
TONIGHT, FEB. 23
AT 8 P.M.
R. P. I. Field House
All soars reserved*. $5, $4,
$3
C.iJI 270 6262 U > luMhci l u l u n i x i i n «
Now on sale ut Nearest Tick citron locations
Sears & Macy's, Coloniu Center
Hette Midler makes it happen - tonight!
(RIM l-ieldhmisc al XI'M. Tickets $3,4,5)
" Abo.iutiful movie!
mor,
growing
up
A blend of hupains, and
life's
" A touching memory piece! The f i l m unravels like
"Majesty on f i l m ! It is wonderful
<i bolt
told
of
satin
in simple, precise,
toughtful,
experiences! Jennifer O'Neill is touch-
measured sequences... Michel
irujly perfect!"...! m
posed one of the most beautiful musical scores I
MAI.A/INI
Legrand has com-
-1
in an almost unforgettable way!
Jennifer O'Neill is super!"...WABC TV
have ever heard in a f i l m . " . . . Hi x RfcEU
Gait MacOermot
iCoinposei of the rock musicals
"Hair"
&
"Two Gentlemen
ol V e r o n a "
Performing
excerpts from his secular
& religious music
Sunday Feb, 25, 1973
5 p.m.
Tile Cathedral of All Saints
South Swan at Elk St., Albany
funded by tludonl tax
THE SEP
Tfl STA1 UP FOR ALL
2 + HOURS OF
• TELETHON
The closing date for the submission of manuscrinu by College Students is
At
Bus tickets will be sold next to ticket sales at some hours.
1
arrangements - particularly of
Danny Thompson's double bass
and
of J o h n
"Rabbit"
Bundrick's keyboards - are just
perfectly right
On
All seats are reserved. If there are any tickets left after the first 3 days, they will be
paklF
Students $2
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
SUMMER OF >42
Friday, February 23 and
Saturday, February 24
LC 18
7:30 and 9:30
$1.00 with tax and ID
$1.50 without
tickets go on sale at 6 pm
LC 18
PLUS SHORT FEATURE
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 7A
: i • 'irrwntrrrjrilwiffi
f £ FEBRUARY
STEREO REDUCTIONS
s, Schermerhorn Voice Opinions
FEBRUARY IS THE TIME TO BUY A STEREO
AT LAFAYETTE
Wren
FAMOUS BOWMAR
SHERWOOD
THE M X 5 0 BRAIN
70 WATT (I.H.F.)
FM-AM STEREO COMPONENT SYSTEM
FEATURING
1. Sherwood-$7100 FM-AM
$19995
RECEIVER
2. INTERADIO - 2000 2 WAV DELUXE
SPEAKER SYSTEMS "BY BOSE"
$15990
ot $79.95
1.BSR-301X
_ TURNTABLE
95
i l PACKAGE
FEATURES:
NEW PERCENT KEY FUNCTION
O M N I . . . CONSTANT
FOIL FLOATING DECIMAL
A D D S . . . SUBTRACTS
MULTIPLYS . . . DIVIDES
AC OR BATTERY
COMPLETE WITH
NICAD RECHARGER
VINYL CARRYING CASE
$
m
*54
414 80
$0095
rd Schermerhorn prior to
1
raphy and anti-American
£
cl) begun the explanation
ing proponent in pushing
stem
ds mil I" mandatory lax
a n ond to the funding of
Janet Taliaferro would not pay
a v o l u n t a r y sludenl tax.
Referring to the interests ol
Black studciils on campus, Janet
said, "a lnl ol the activities thai
an- offered don'l pertain lo
lliein." She would like tn sec
IODIC aclivilies on campus relating In lilack culture. She
dne.sifl ilniik the in.i-.ses ol
Mack students aliend most campus acltvll lev
95
S thai kind of garbage was
RANGER/TENNA
SAVt 7 0 0 ON A
PANASONK DELUXE PORTABLE
CASSETTE RECORDER
#RQ409
DELUXE
8 TRACK STEREO TAPE PLAYER'
Scotch
MAGNETIC
I fin Hobby Scale, there
|
thrown oul of the window
*
ad kepi his mouth shut we
|
le subject lo censorship and
j?
phalically.
ssiun "
idenl's mind, at the lime he
jthe problems lhal we have
8
v
1
jg
TAPE
NOW
1/2 PRICE
SPECIALS
$
ftSO-IMM POtTESTU 7" $ 1 9 9
REELIEG.S4.il
NOW
I
#203 1100 DTMMANGE
LOW NOISI 7" IEEI
(EG. »S.M>
DOW
*3OS
NOW
AC-BATTERY
BUILT-IN
CONDENSER
MIRE
#17-7449W
ORIG. S79.9S
39
95
I "be forced to pay it." He
refused lo pay:
as morally and principally
AUTO-STOP
ALL
PUSHBUTTON
jy a placard and run oil In
I
I
n and what he sees as filth
Rflatcd legislation lo icsinci
coinmiiiee. On the curieni
*
*
&
n in ihe nation's problems:
SPECIAL PURCHASE!
PANASONIC
RS-282S STEREO
CASETTE
STEREO HEADPHOHES
CHECK THESE FEATURES:
10'
COILED
CORD.
STUEO-MOHO SELECTOR
SWITCH. VOLUME CONTROLS. FREOUENCT RESPONSE - 10 TO 15,000
"HOME ENTERTAINMENT CINTER" WITH
AUTOMATIC REVERSE CASSETTE TAPE
RECORDER, AM-FM STEREO RADIO. 2 WAT
AIR SUSPENSION SPEAKER SYSTEMS.
COMPUTE WITH RD-767] TURNTABLE
PACKAGE
REG.
SAVE
»32»s
#282
#7673
$289.95
42.95
$332.90
Diane Peck, freshman, voted
for voluntary tax. "I think there
are some kids who can't afford
the tax or that can find better
use for the $60 a year," she said.
"Just because the university says
they can afford it doesn't mean
much." Diane believes that she
personally gels her money's
worth oul of student tax, and
would pay il. She did mention
lhat she heard thai a disproportionate amount went lo athletics
and if so says it "should be
equalized."
mVersity."
$191
i
at I'm nut going to let H oul
at In change it, lo hell Willi
5
&
5
I
I
I
AMPEX
HI FREQUENCY
C-60 CASSETTES
Stephanie Ahrams, a sophomore translei from Rockland
Community didn't vote. "I don't
know much about all of this"
she said. In comparison lo Rockland. Stephanie says "there's a
lot more here. I'm glad they
have movies and things like
lhal." If lax were voluntary she
said she would pay it.
Si-nun Joel I ustig.S.A t'ompliollei could itnl. as all giadualing sciinns. vole in Ihe icleiendiuti. bin docs lavoi a voluntary
I.IX. "because ihe compirullorr
would have one-thiul Ihe work
lie has mm."
Also a SCIIIOI is (,.u\ Ku ciaidi.
Luhloi-in-i hid ol ilo I.SV I vc-ii
il eligible, C..iiN s.ml "I wouldn't
have voted hcc.itise I ilimk sluileni giiveiniucnt lieu- has absolute]) iioihinc io do wiih the
sludeiils and loi lhal icuson u
was couiplcleh iinievaiii. l-'roin
ihe view ili.n Ihe IS/' is I untied
In iii.niil.iioi\ siiidcul l.i\, (,'aiy
s.ud. "11 » r dulli I h.nc uialidaloi) sludenl las we d have In
CUI down a lew pages and clll
oul a lew seniles, bin we'd
muddle through,"
"I don'l think lhal ihe Sludenl
Association can function without mandatory sludenl lax."
said juitioi Richie Wellon. "1
don'l ihink il nccuis lo a person
to pay something like thai unless
it's pail ol the bill." lie believes
that lot the most pail sludenl
lax money is well spent, although he would pin nunc
towauls publications and less
towaids special inleiesl gioups.
Tin- M.IIHI.IIOI \ Student
|
Tax irli-ii-iiiluni included m laxi week'', Student
Assuciation
r h ' , iu in mi-1 us s, nil,' cl.irilic.itinn. Ila.sii ally. 111.111d.1tur \ student i.ix will continue hu t w o
[in,re y e n s , until ihe next i cti'ii'iiituni.
Hie ii'lru'iiiliiin ill.il was inn iiuilil mily In- binding il .Ml per u-nt ul the eligible voters
$
NOW
95
249
REG.
$1.49
NOW
f£A
..ist ballots. In this case, II KM v o t e were needed Irom the Ircsliin.in. s o p h o m o r e .mil
|iinioi i lasses c o m b i n e d . (July
I 12.1 balluf.x were cast, uO short ot the necessary c o u n t .
Tlicicl,ire, I he ii-leieiiduin itsell was inn valid. No in.iiiei which way ibe results w e n t .
SORRY, LIMIT
10 PER CUSTOMER
si.mis i|iio, in this i ase mandatory i n s , would c o n t i n u e .
Ii so happens th.it those w h o did vote, favored m a n d a t o r y tax by a 2. to I m a r g i n . T h e r e
wen- S2H votes lor ado pi ing ,i voluntary l a x , and 7 9 6 again si the change. T h e r e were nine
voided ballots.
S A L E I N EFFECT F E B R U A R Y O N L Y
COLONIC
PAGE 8A
ALBANY
7t Omni Kn.
SCHENECTADY
QLENS FALLS
707UH>watonSinM
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PITTSFIELD
42 luMW Butt
3
AMHERST
I t 6- PUM.I.1
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
I'm the same reason ol not enough votes cast, t h e t w o constitutional a m e n d m e n t s were
\mtttt
tf|v yjgoprs
m i « «I^P»^
vMkrv »*^P^^BP
v***
*^^in nB^pv
23, 1973
not passed, although approved by a majority of voters.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
Big Brother and Paternalism
Release of POW's No
"An Idea that Is not dangerous Is unworthy of being called an idea at all.'
Oscar Wilde
ate & letters /
Time to Celebrate
by Douglas U Comte
by Robert Mayer
The Absurdity of the Affair
A group calling itself tlie "Campus Coalition" is very angry this week.
And justifiably so. Many of the Coalition's members used to work on the
now deceased publication, Sweetfire which had some $3500 left in its
budget when it folded last month.
According to Coalition members, they were told that the left over money
would be donated to Medical Aid for Indochina in order to rebuild the
bombed Bach Mai Hospital, and for the Attica defense Fund.
The money was to be donated through honorariums for speakers from the
two above organizations: William Kuntsler for Attica Fund and Noam
Chomsky for Bach Mai.
The money, however, could not be appropriated until the speaking
engagements were formally arranged. Temporarily, the money from the
newspaper budget was returned to the Central Council's budget.
The arrangements.' for the two speakers were soon concluded. But
around that same time Central Council voted its entire remaining budget
(including the Sweetfire money), consisting of over SI 0,000, plus an
enormous sum from Concert Board, to offer the Allman Brothers Band a
grand total of $36,000 to perform at the Palace Theatre one night in
March. The concert will cost tax card carrying students $4 to attend, and
$8 for outsiders.
Meanwhile, there is no more money left for the Bach Mai or Attica
Speakers, and the Student Association Emergency Spending Line now
stands at zero.
The absurdity of the whole affair is obvious. To spend $36,000 for one
band for one night, including money originally promised for rebuilding a
civilian hospital and aiding poor people with legal advice is an obscenity.
This is, indeed, an insult to the entire University Community.
We await an explanation from Student Association leaders.
How to Avoid o Board Hike
It n o w a p p e a r s i m m i n e n t t h a t t h e F S A B o a r d o l D i r e c t o r s w i l l a p p r o v e a
4 % b o a r d h i k e this a f t e r n o o n , m e a n i n g a b o u t $ 2 6 d o l l a r s will b e t a c k e d o n
V/£ GETTIN6- WORSE . . .THEYOUST ARREST OUR t o Ayt o uf irr s mt egal la nccoen tsruaccht ab i lplr. i c e r i s e s e e m s e n t i r e l y r e a s o n a b l e . F o o d p r i c e s , a s
M&OSC0PE WRITER TOR NCfT REV£N-\m HER SOURCES
a n y o n e r e g u l a r l y s h o p p i n g in s u p e r m a r k e t s k n o w s , h a v e r i s e n d r a m a t i c a l l y .
Captain J a m e s R. Shively stepped off
his plane arriving from t h e Philippines
and told reporters and t h o s e w h o came
out to w e l c o m e h i m a t Travis Air Force
Base t h a t , " W e w a n t t o let t h e sweet
molecules of life flow over our b o d i e s . "
Navy LI. Cmdr. Everett Alvarez was a
prisoner of t h e North Vietnamese for 8'4
years. He had been shot d o v n over t h e
Gulf of T o n k i n in 1904 and t w o years
ago his wife remarried after getting a
divorce. Alvarez told a c r o w d , " F o r years
and years we d r e a m e d of this d a y , and we
kept faith — faith in G o d , in o u r President, and in o u r c o u n t r y . "
Within t h e next few weeks, ail fj'9'2 men
will have left their prison camps of
Vietnam and r e t u r n e d h o m e . T h e y will he
quickly wisked away by military information officers whose job il is t o keep
most information away from t h e hands of
the press. Presumably, they t o o will talk
about their faith in President Nixon, God,
and their c o u n t r y .
When t h e first m e n came off their plant'
from Hanoi and landed at Clark Air Force
Base in t h e Philippines, t h e r e was not a
reporter a r o u n d t h a t had dry eyes. O n e
reporter there w r o t e , " I t did not m a i l e r
whether t h e war was moral or n o t . Let
the editorial writers argue a b o u t that. It
did not m a t t e r t h a t the grey-faced m e n
stepping off t h e hospital planes from
Hanoi had, perish t h e t h o u g h t , dropped
bombs on innocent civilians
if, indeed,
(here are a n y i n n o c e n t s left in w a r . "
Of course there are people in ibis
c( tun try w h o will honestly perish the
thought of tons of b o m b s dropping on
innocent civilians. But then o n e c m easih
gel side-tracked, espouse more rhetoric
on the n a t u r e of t h e war, a n d G o d knows.
we all have had enough of thai from ,.11
those editorial writers.
*****
Yet F S A Board rates have r e m a i n e d stable.
B u t F S A s t i l l lias n o t p l u g g e d t h e o n e b i g g e s t d r a i n o f i j u a d p r o f i t s , w h i c h
I
The Waterman Lesson
1
ttWiWftvAW:
T h e Waterman case is finally over.
It has been some four m o n t h s since the
Psychology Department o p e n e d t h e castby delivering its negative r e c o m m e n d a tion. They said that l h e beleagured Assistant Professor should be denied both
tenure and p r o m o t i o n , and for Dr Carol
Waterman the future looked unpromising
Then followed Department Chairman
Teevan's letters of transmittal, and the
publishing of the "Waterman P a p e r s " in
the ASP.
And t h e invective against her became
stronger. Her o p p o n e n t s labled her re
search "trivial". They said she was unable
to work well with her colleagues And
they claimed she was merely a " g o o d "
undergraduate teacher
Fortunately for Waterman, not many
people believed the critics. Not even Dean
Hunsberger of the College of Arls and
Sciences, who fell compelled t o approve
her for both p r o m o t i o n and t e n u r e
T h e Hunsberger decision
surprised
everyone, since he had made s o m e rather
unsympathetic statements a b o u t her case.
He received her s t u d e n t s u p p o r t e r s cooly,
and downplayed the i m p o r t a n c e of the
2300 signatures collected on petitions
No o n e expected him to say " y e s . "
That was the turning point in the case.
Everyone
expected
Associate
Dean
Melvin Bers to back Waterman But The
most i m p o r t a n t influence on Hunsberger
appears to have been pressure from stu
den Is a n d the p r o p o n e n t s of "strong
undergraduate teaching". Waterman's stu
d e n t testimonials were all uxfremely
favorable, and it was obvious t h a t she ia a
t o p undergraduate teacher. T o deny her
t e n u r e would have been t a n t a m o u n t t o
denying the i m p o r t a n c e of good under
graduate
teaching
Hunsberger
flatly
stated in his transmittal letter t h a t he
by Glenn von Nostitz
•:•:•:•:•:•:•:-:•:•:
could n o t , in good conscience, d o t h a t .
T h e main issue was teaching ability. T r y
as they did, Teevan a n d t h e d e p a r t m e n t
could n o t m a k e a sufficiently big issue
o u t of research. Waterman effectively
defused t h a t issue when she revealed t h e
Science Citation Index figures.
And her reasearch wasn't really all thai
bad in t h e first place.
Last b u t n o t least. Waterman w o n be
cause of t h e strong d e t e r m i n a t i o n of her
s t u d e n t s u p p o r t e r s t o keep o n pushing.
They claim that they would n o t have
been dismayed even if Hunsberger, t h e
Faculty Personnel C o m m i t t e e and the
University Council had all v o t e d against
her. O n e s t u d e n t leader later c o m m e n t e d .
" T h e idea of giving u p never e n t e r e d our
minds."
That Waterman ultimately got her way
is really quite amazing. T h e r e have been
m a n y c a s u a l t i e s on the t e n u r e a n d p r o
motion
battlefield
this year, and
Waterman stands alone as o n e of t h e few
survivors She is o n e of t h e r e m n a n t s of
the Light Brigade.
is t h e m o n e y
transferred to cover h u n d r e d s ol t h o u s a n d s ol dollars worth
of
such
losses
in
areas
as C a m p u s
Center
Food
Operations
and
the
Bookstore.
In s h o r t , w e c a n s e e n o j u s t i f i c a t i o n
lor raising b o a r d rates while such a
drain on t u n d s exists.
One
alternative
appears
to he to turn
operators, w h o presumably
the bookstore
over
to
private
w o u l d possess the expertise to avoid m a n y "I
the management blunders now experienced.
N o l o n g e r w o u l d cjuad p r o f i t s b e u s e d t o c o v e r e x c e s s i v e b o o k s t o r e lossi-s.
Perhaps a hike could
have b e e n
avoided
il s u c h a c t i o n
had already
been
taken.
"Happiness
Telethon
tomorrow
' 7 3 kicks oil tonight
night at that
is Sharing"
,d K P . M . a n d c o n t i n u e s
same time
nonstop
is. i n d e e d , o n e ol t h e bright
s p o t s in c a m p u s h i e h e r e . Livers
y e a r it c o n v i n c i n g l y d e m o i l s t r . r e s - t l i a t s t u d e n t s d o , in t a c t , m a k e ,i m a j o r
c o n t r i b u t i o n t o t h e c o i n m tin i t y. L a s t y e a r o v e r $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 w a s r a i s e d , a n d t h i s
year's co-chairmen
hope
that
The
slated
to
monies
are
d e v e l o p m e n t ol h a n d i c a p p e d
this a m o u n t
can he siguilieantly
•»>
Wlllowbrook
to
the
surpassed,
School
lot
the
children.
T i l e s l o g a n is. " H a p p i n e s s is S h a r i n g . "
S h a r e a little a n d h e h a p p y this w e e k e n d . Call
make
vuiir
pledge, oi
mall
,i d o n a t i o n
In short, there would have been n o
pressure on t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . Her stu
d e n t s u p p o r t e r s say that t h e lesson they
learned from t h e past four m o n t h s of
activity is t h a t using such pressure brings
results, and as we p o n d e r t h e o t h e r
controversial tenure eases utill remaining,
that is a very good lesson t o have learned.
Technical
rob
hounded
tdilor-in-Chief
'jiiiv ricciaidi
News
iinn e bunkei
mindy altman
kdthy eckerle
Off Campus
b o h m a y oi
hdiry Schwartz
m I') 11)
Editorial Pajjes
(jlenn von noitttz
Arts
jndy pal ley
bill I I I I I I . I
Sports
bi uce m.Kjyin
ken j i d u i n u
Preview
leslic d a v u
Editorial Uouril (Ifturminen policy.
is fur o u r o w n g o o d , o f c o u r s e , s o i t ' s
l i v e s .is W
see lit.
As our government gets bigger ,md
higgei it is treating its citizens mitre and
more like children -bo\s and girls in
i apitble id making u p their own minds or
exhibiting an> sense ol self reliance or
responsibility .All laws, rules, regulations,
and stand.iids se| up b \ government
agencies designed to proieel the individual horn himself are manifestations of
ihis paternalism.
h s been with us for a long time All the
laws concerning crimes without vii-iims
are
ex a m p i e s
If I d e s i r e t o s m o k e
dried
Albany,
*****
Unfortunately t h e fanfare and headline:
surrounding t h e return of these n u n ha:
served to blind m a n y from some hornbl«
realities. What a b o u t t h e m o r e thai
100,000 w o u n d e d m e n w h o gel in
red-carpet t r e a t m e n t down t h e corridor
of s o m e
Veteran's
Administratis
hospital? Many who have lost then arnu
and legs c o u l d n ' t even drive a new Ford i
they received o n e .
dinish
b | i Inill
liar i y wemei
Circulation
ion wood
Exchange
mark litcoHky
Photography
lay rosenberg
ddvld shiw.ky
luMtlod , J y
Mmium i.,.
Office: CC:l2(i
Advertisin>
linda mule
hndd desinond
Kred Shadid, a former soldier, n o w in .
VA hospital in Chicago, said, " I ' m gl.nl h
see the Tormer prisoners accept the ward
robes, automobiles, anil lifetime ticket
to major league baseball parks, but wha'
about m e and t h e m o r e than l u o n u i
wounded like myself w h o returned to ,
pale
welcome
wild
only
sears
phil iTijik
debbte kaemon
sheila schenkein
ijdiy 'juvaiwin
Classified Ads
cathy rjdntik
Graffiti
ruth iibley
P h o n o : <1&7 2 1 9 0
•,!
.Mil.
lb
id
us w h
ti
will
oi
n we have those that N i x o n s a y s
lion Pilner, an ex-draftee and a m p u t e e ,
is bitter towards his c o u n t r y and himself,
for ever fighting in Vietnam He told a
friend in u Denver hospital, "1 see these
guya gelling off the planes with red
turpels, und new carh, mid smiling, and
then I look at m y life and feel thai no
one really gives a d a m n and after the
li-w hundred
but in reality
omething near 50,000
who
mntry, gone u n d e r g r o u n d
ell tin
jail, rather than fighl in a war
I'll Ihey did not believe. Our Pre
t says he will refuse t h e m a m n e s t y
aiioiis reasons. It would establish a
foi
dent,
lie claims. But Nixon never
prui
me lor accuracy, and was soon
u as
in In ned thai other presidents, including
Business
Ad Production
WM JOHNSON n
. m i l ill--
ability p a y m e n t s . "
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
It s e e m s if y o u cloak your misdeeds
with high sounding humanitarian'objectives y o u can get away with anything.
Government "standards" forced upon
business lead n o t only t o higher prices for
t h e c o n s u m e r , b u t also t o a lessening of
variety and quality in t h e goods produced.
A d r u g c o m p a n y , for instance, has little
incentive t o p r o d u c e a really innovative
and s u p e r i o r p r o d u c t , since an F D A
b u r e a u c r a t m u s t approve it first. Civil
servants look u p o n e v e r y t h i n g innovative
with grave suspicion (playing it safe is t h e
way t o get a d v a n c e m e n t in t h e federal
b u r e a u c r a c y ) so the p r o d u c t will n o t be
a c c e p t e d , or else it will be p u t through an
expensive series of tests a n d e x p e r i m e n t s .
Ultimately Lhe drug c o m p a n y m a y decide
it is just not e c o n o m i c a l to produce
a n y t h i n g really innovative. Milton Friedm a n , well k n o w n free-market e c o n o m i s t ,
recently pointed o u t in a
Newsweek
article t h a t this kind of g o v e r n m e n t intervention has probably kept life saving
drugs off t h e m a r k e t for years, resulting
in m u c h higher drug prices as well as loss
of life a m o n g those w h o could have
benefited from such drugs if they had
been i n t r o d u c e d s o o n e r on the market.
Under
paternalism
(an i m p o r t a n t
characteristic of welfare statism) the gove r n m e n t can take care of y o u r health
needs and r e t i r e m e n t days and may even
buy y o u a nice marble slab when y o u
finally kick the b u c k e t . N o , we haven't
gone quile that far y e t here, b u t it's an
idea t h a t appeals Lo m a n y .
But you d o n ' t get s o m e t h i n g for nothing. R e m e m b e r , w h a t t h e g o v e r n m e n t
subsidizes (including its citizen), it can
m a n i p u l a t e If Washington must pay for
your health needs, then they can and will
m a k e sure you d o what they think is
healthy for you. T h i s w o u l d give governm e n t still further incentive to censor T V ,
movies, and books {for your o w n good,
of course) and make rules deciding what
food you can eat, drugs y o u can Lake, and
which bicycle >ou can ride and whal car
you may drive
G o v e r n m e n t c o n t r o l , w h e t h e r it's in the
guise of c o n s u m e r i s m , safety, welfare, or
h u m a n i t a r i a n ism, eventually diminishes
private incentive, freedom of choice
healthy c o m p e t i t i o n on the free market,
individual rcsixinsibility und, in t h e final
analysis, t h e quality a n d e x i c t a m e n t of
living.
The Return of Petain
I S 7 S'J i S ol -I 5 7 5 9 VI a n d
t o B o x 6 7 3 V.V.. SI IN Y
I 2 227.
Not ccjincidenally, Waterman was t h e
one professor with strong s t u d e n t backing
and intensive media a t t e n t i o n . What
would have h a p p e n e d w i t h o u t all this
help is not difficult to picutre All of the
transmittal letters and all of the normally
u n k n o w n decision would have been kepi
quiet and locked away in m e t a l file
cabinets.
ll
all right
T h e government banned cigarette advertising on TV. Il was nice of them to
take such good care of us poor fools w h o
don't know what's good for us. So m o r e
people are smoking now than ever before.
T h e go vein men I is trying m o r e and
more io make our lives happier and
healthier hut with less and less success. In
nearh ever\ instance the ideas have not
worked ,nvd in the process we've lost
much ol out freedom to live our o w n
poison sumac leaves or have a perverted
relationship with m y gerbil,- I'm n o t
hurting anyone else but myself (and may*
be my gerbil) and it should be outside the
realm of the law t o punish m e . Laws
concerning private u s e of drugs, s e x between consenting partners, gambling, prost i t u t i o n - these a r e all laws based o n the
notion that government authorities know
w h a t ' s best for m e . T h i s is p a t e r n a l i s m .
T h e s e laws inhibit o u r freedom of choice,
invade o u r privacy, encourage police corr u p t i o n , a n d c o n t r i b u t e t o lack of respect
for t h e police and g o v e r n m e n t a u t h o r i t y
in general.
T h e r e are o t h e r e x a m p l e s which inhibit
freedom of choice which are less discussed b u t perhaps more insidious.
First off there's t h e safety thing. Close
behind M o t h e r h o o d , t h e Flag, a n d Apple
Pie c o m e s Safety,
an,- i n s t i t u t i o n so
secure t h a t t h e m o s t ridiculous ideas, t h e
m o s t stupid suggestions, can be taken
seriously by otherwise rational beings if
it's in t h e n a m e of safety. F o r w h o can
a t t a c k safety? T o d o so is t a n t a m o u n t t o
treason. T h e cars y o u b u y in t h e future
will cost h u n d r e d s of dollars m o r e be
cause of federally m a n d a t e d " s a f e t y "
e q u i p m e n t . Those a t r o c i o u s look
ligh
i m p a c t b u m p e r s o n t h e 1973
<st
m o n e y , and t h e c a r c o m p n n i .
iren't
going to a b s o r b t h e costs ( n o r should
they). You will. E s t i m a t e s for 1 9 7 5 cars
run as high as twice t h e cost of 1 9 7 2 cars
d u e to g o v e r n m e n t regulations o n safety
a n d emissions. And y o u w o n ' t have any
choice in Lhe m a t t e r . T h e g o v e r n m e n t
figures we're all spastic clods w h o are
b e t t e r off riding a r o u n d in p a d d e d Sherm a n lanks. " S a f e t y " for t h e masses. H o w
a b o u t encouraging, instead, personal responsibility with b e t t e r driver training?
How a b o u t skid schools? Master Driver
Licenses? But no. We're all i m m a t u r e
children w h o d o n ' t know wrong from
right so we must lie p r o t e c t e d from
ourselves. (Jan you imagine federal super
safety cars t h a t are s u p p o s e d t o a b s o r b all
those b u m p s and grinds t h a t m o s t of us
try to avoid now?
The D e p a r t m e n t of T r a n s p o r t a t i o n is
s p e n d i n g $ 2 . 1 5 million t o m a k e further
s t u d i e s of a full size family E x p e r i m e n t a l
Safety Vehicle, a c c o r d i n g to " C a r and
Driver" magazine. All they really have to
do is take apart a N A S C A R racer t o see
h o w t o build a safe car. Why is it t h e
people w h o protest p e n t a g o n spending
d o n ' t attack this o t h e r g o v e r n m e n t waste?
until
a 24 h o u r m a r a t h o n ol singrig. skiis.
d a n c i n g , a n d the a n n u a l pie t h r o w i n g e v e n t .
Telethon
Il is n o w o n d e r t h a t t h e release ol the
:>()() POW's has brought so much emotion
and humility back into t h e hearts ol Ibis
nation. More than a n y t h i n g else, these
men came to symbolize a continuing
Vietnam war. How m a n y limes were we
informed by o u r president that the I'OW
issue was t h e basis of an h o n o r a b l e p e a c e '
How many Americans wore on the arms
bracelets inscribed with t h e names ol men
captured by t h e c o m m u n i s t s ? How m a i n
bumper stickers, editorials, speeches, and
letters were written in their behalf? So
now the happy tears of Americans, the
red-carpet t r e a t m e n t , the new Fords foi
the POW's, t h e personal victory lor
Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, will
give the Vietnam war t h e kind of dignity
it never achieved on t h e battlefield.
Well, n o w some ambitious g o v e r n m e n t
agency in Washington has t h o u g h t of t h e
answer t o t h e "vast w a s t e l a n d " of T V
programs that we poor souls are eternally
forced to watch: have t h e g o v e r n m e n t
operate its o w n network with a h o o k u p
on each and every private T V set. I t t u r n s
on automatically-so we'll have t o watch.
This way we ostensibly get tuned i n t o the
latesl impending natural disater news
threatening us luckless souls living near
flood prone valleys, burning timberlands,
cascading mud slides, invading tsetse fly
orgies, or whatever.
This proposal for a government n e t w o r k
was reported last fall in The New York
Times, hut incredulous reporters caused
White House aides t o deny it was being
given serious thought. This is just o n e
example, however, of how g o v e r n m e n t
bureaucrats, in their zeal to p r o t e c t t h e
citizens, have c o m e up with ideas that
would bring I9H4 chillingly close
In Texas there is a town where an
a u t o m a t i c camera perched above t h e
streets lakes snap shots of " s p e e d e r s . "
These incriminating photos are mailed to
the offender's h o m e along with a s u m
mons Trouble is, the guy's wife may
open his mail first and wonder who that
nice blond was in hubby's P l y m o u t h . Bui
George Washington, Abruhum Lincoln,
a n d Franklin D. Roosevelt had agreed to
s o m e kind of "forgiveness."
We can n o t look at t h e release of our
POW's as an isolated victory or celeb r a t i o n . It is only t h e tip of Lhe iceberg
t h a i covers ten years of great a g o n y and
c r u e l t y . T h e r e are t h o u s a n d s a n d thousands of p e o p l e in this n a t i o n t o d a y who
can never forget all that this fanfare, this
celebration, this e u p h u r i a , is a t t e m p t i n g
t o eruse.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
by Gary Ricciardi
Petaln's body has been found It was
found just lying a r o u n d .
F r e n c h Marshal Petain, World War I
hero of Verdun and World War II Fascist
c o l l a b o r a t o r , was stolen from his exile's
grave last S u n d a y night, and found by the
gendarmery in Paris, Wednesday T h e
theft was a p p a r e n t l y m a s t e r m i n d e d by
Hubert Massol, a righl wing c a n d i d a t e for
next m o n t h ' s national elections. Massol
wishes to see Petain's repuluLion rehabilitated, and his body buried al V e r d u n - t h e
battlefield where 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 died, und Petain wanLed Lo be laid.
Massol and four fellow diggers have
been arrested, but t h e arrest d o e s n ' t solve
Prime Minister P o m p i d o u ' s problem of
what Lo d o with the remains Whether he
returns Petain to his traitor's grave or
inters him al Verdun, he will antagonize
s e g m e n t s of l h e F r e n c h p o p u l a t i o n .
So far, Petain himself has behaved with
m o r e eircumspeelion than he did while
alive; he m a y be the only one t o emerge
from t h e controversy s u r r o u n d i n g him
unscathed. T h e r e are few m o r e difficult
lessons any public figure muni learn than
h o w lo behave with e q u a n i m i t y in critical
situations, and Petain's behavior cun
Leach s o m e t h i n g to us all
When all the world is talking al odds,
when every poor m a n and w o m a n is
striking o u l in anger and being struck
back in return, when, as Melville said, t h e
"universal
t h u m p " is being
passed
a r o u n d , that individual will survive w h o
can quietly recline a n d stare blankly
ahead.
One, if h e is us f o r t u n a t e as Petain,
might even get to go Lo Puns.
PAGE ELEVEN
Letters to the Editor
Art Blasts Gunn
To the editor:
A c o m m e n t in T u e s d a y ' s ASP, " O n e
traditionally n o w s p e a k s of a film as an
art f o r m , which is a ridiculous t e r m , "
intrigues m e
I have no idea w h e t h e r Professor G u n n
was q u o t e d correctly or n o t . I d o a d m i t
that " t h e a r t " of a n y t h i n g may he ridiculous, but I a m convinced there is an art to
film, as t h e r e is to music, painting, and
other creative fields.
In m y h u m b l e o p i n i o n , if cinema is n o t
an art form, then t h e r e are n o art forms.
Arthur Lennig
Associate Professor of A r t / C i n e m a
Bod Marx
To the editor:
I hardly e x p e c t s t u d e n t s to m a k e every
tenure fight close. After all, what good
does it do'.' S o m e s t u d e n t s and reporters
heal their brains o u t t o save Waterman
and before a n y b o d y can even get back to
classes this Curl Smith case comes along
What's t h e use y o u c a n ' t win t h e m all,
can you'.' And the ones you lose. .Well,
there are a lot of good teachers looking
for a j o b .
Many of those teachers u n d o u b t e d l y
b o t h e r e d certain faculty a n d administrators at o t h e r universities t h e way Curt
unsettles s o m e people here. And Curt is
only a Marxist. T h e u n e m p l o y m e n t line is
a haven for subversives; o u t
there
searching for a classroom are anarchists
and Republicans and worse. Smith is
lucky he's had a job as long as he has.
Yet still, if n o b o d y has enough energy
to write letters, or visit s o m e of the
people along the decision-making r o u t e ,
can't we at least force those people t o
make a pretense of logic in this action to
take e n o u g h notice of us t o take a little
care' 1 We a r e as yet u n i n f o r m e d as to
which uf t h e five criteria concerning
tenure Smith failed to meet, and I think
we can assume t h a t his s u p e r b s t u d e n t
evaluations are n o t at t h e r o o t (if t h e
problem (or tl. n again, m a y b e they
are ). So why then m u s t we lose Curt
Smith?
As the largest part of this university, the
students, there are h u n d r e d s of q u e s t i o n s
we put forward that are never q u i t e fully
answered. This is a q u e s t i o n we s h o u l d
persist in until we get a satisfactory
response.
Michael J. Antonucci
What Did You Say?
To the editor:
R e c e n t l y , the Speech Pathology Club
and the Audiology C l u b of S U N Y A sponsored a hearing clinic, t h e proceeds of
which were t o benefit T e l e t h o n I wish
more s t u d e n t s had t a k e n the advantage of
this o p p o r t u n i t y to have their ears tested,
because it seems t h a t m a n y are losing
their hearing This p r o b l e m b e c o m e s particularly a c u t e the later it is in the
evening lor the earlier it is in the
morning, whatever y o u r preference.}
What I am referring t o is t h e m a g n i t u d e
of the noise pollution c o n t r i b u t e d by a
m u l t i t u d e of stereos, radios, and other
means of c o m m u n i c a t i o n . During the day
and t h e early part of th« evening it is n o t
so bad since 1 have learned t o t h i n k and
write in t i m e t o t h e music (the faster the
beat, t h e m u r e mental o u t p u t on my
part). But a t 1 or 2 or .'i in the morning,
the walls, floors, and ceilings b e c o m e
nxlra thin, and do n o t d o an effective job
of blocking the s o u n d s of the Grateful
Dead a n d / o r t h e AJIman Brothers, et al
' D o n ' t get me w r o n g : I'm a great admirer
of the Dead and AJtmun Brothers, but n o t
at 1 in t h e m o r n i n g , when I'm a great
iidmirer of sleep)
But this is n o t h i n g t o get upset a b o u t .
After aJl, if I c a n ' t sleep at night in m y
b e d r o o m , I can sleep during the duy in
PAGE TWELVE
my teachers' classrooms. One way or
other, I still get m y eight hours. But I
rather prefer t h e cover o f darkness and
my soft bed t o the glaring lights and hard
desk.
T h e r e is an old proverb which states,
"Silence is Golden." S o w h y d o n ' t we all
s h u t u p (or at least quiet d o w n ) and get
rich?
Patricia A. Gorman
*
+
,
An Offer Not to Refuse
To the editor:
I am writing c o n c e r n i n g a problem
which affects those of us w h o use t h e
library extensively. T h a n k s to t h e proliferation of a m a t u e r Mafioso who exult in
ripping off b o o k s , jackets, e t c . , from
persons using the library - articles which
they may n o t need o r ever use - those of
us w h o have a great deal of research to d o
are forced to carry a b o u t with us o u r
coats, text h o o k s , n o t e b o o k s , e t c . , when
we are searching for library materials.
While it is b u t a m i n o r inconvenience, it is
an inconvenience. I prefer to c o n c e n t r a t e
up«
my research w t t h o u l the e n c u m b e r arv
apparel designed for 2 0 degree
ten
ures draped a b o u t m e in a 7 5
degree library. I prefer to have t h e freed o m to m a k e n o t e s or to utilize t h e
b o o k s of t h e library w i t h o u t t h e inconvenience of carrying a b o u t n o t e b o o k s and
various o t h e r articles which may or may
not pertain to the research at hand.
As I know of no c o m m i t t e e to which I
might appeal, 1 am writing to t h e ASP to
suggest that s o m e w h e r e in t h e library •perhaps in the d o w n s t a i r s hallways or in
the lobbies - lockers be installed of t h e
variety in use m t h e b o o k s t o r e ( 2 5 cents,
refundable). This would allow t h e users
t o store their temporarily u n n e e d e d paraphernalia and t o c o n c e n t r a t e on t h e
m a t t e r at h a n d : their e d u c a t i o n . T h a n k
you.
Stephen R. Lamb
our hunger tor " n e w s " will probably keep
him from ever leading a normal life.
T h e network news teams have b e c o m e
experts at on-the-spot reporting. Anchor
men learned their mindless banter by
reading and rereading press releases while
our a s t r o n a u t s cruised t h r o u g h space. In
Dallas a n d M e m p h i s and Los Angeles they
learned t o be s o l e m n a n d s o m b e r during
on-the-spot live coverage of a d e a t h .
S t a t e funerals were covered with the
s a m e t h o r o u g h n e s s as t h e Thanksgiving
Day Parade. T h e s a m e c o n c e r n e d team
t h a t b o r e d America o u t of the space
effort did their best t o m a k e A m e r i c a
sleep through its p o l i t i c a l c o n v e n t i o n s
It's a good tiling we w o k e u p in t i m e to
watch peace b e c o m e a fact in Paris. Isn't
it a s h a m e t h a t L B J , w h o s t r o v e so
valiantly for peace, s h o u l d kick off just
before the d o c u m e n t s were signed? Of
c o u r s e all t h e n e t w o r k s had a half h o u r
o b i t u a r y in t h e can a n d ready t o roll.
After s h e d d i n g tears for o u r former
president, we w a t c h e d a " r e c a p " of t h e
war which h a d just e n d e d . Back t o t h e
days of b o d y c o u n t s , we gut t o see again
the man whose m o t h e r watehed h i m die
on t h e tube, His b o d y w e n t i n t o a plastic
hag m u c h like the o n e we t h r o w garbage
in. ( A n d d o n ' t miss t h e fifteen part series
t h a t p r o b e s t h e b r e a k u p of an American
family.)
H u n d r e d s of t h o u s u n d s of m e n were
allowed to return from V i e t n a m
anonymously, to b e c o m e vets on college
c a m p u s e s a n d c o n s t r u c t i o n sites, in u n e m p l o y m e n t lines and offices. Our r e t u r n i n g
prisoners should be allowed t o go h o m e
w i t h o u t t h e crass eye of t h e television on
their front door.
Michael Zeis
T e n u r e is n o t w h a t h e is asking for,
either, b u t merely a renewal of c o n t r a c t
until he c o m e s u p for t e n u r e in 2 years.
He has certainly earned this m u c h .
Bob Quillin
To the editor:
Dave J e n k i n s , " Q u a d C o o r d i n a t o r , " has
issued
another
memorandum
( " u l t i m a t u m " ) . This o n e tells us h o w a
h o t plate might have s t a r t e d a fire in
Waterbury. It adds t h a t h o t plates are
n o w a serious m a t t e r a n d will b e prosec u t e d as a broach of c o n t r a c t . Once again
we have asshole logic by t h e big wheels of
Housing. T h e fire in his o w n Indian Quad
was started by an electric b l a n k e t , so let's
ban t h e m , t o o . Also, No S m o k i n g , Please.
Ri[{ht l Dave! Give the resident s t u d e n t s a
break a n d let t h e m have m o r e t h a n a cell
with a bed and a desk. N o t t o forget a
lamp (or will they go with the candles?).
Gel
off the s t u d e n t s ' ass
They 're
probably s m a r t e r than y o u . P S . Do you
follow your own advice? Del the s t u d e n t s
search your r o o m ! Luckily, I'm »n ex
resident. Shit like this m a d e m e move.
Keep it u p , Quad Pea brains!
Eugene Ostrom
Horse Tenure
To the editor:
T e n u r e und p r o m o t i o n cases have bec o m e part of t h e staple diet of the ASP
lately, und I fear t h a t the righteous
indignation which greeted t h e eurlier
eases may c o m e to hu replaced by a
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
3-bed r o o m
apartment
wanted,
"73-'74» near busline. Call 4 5 7 - 3 0 2 5 .
LOST & FOUND
L o s t : Girts silver antique pinkie ring Red stone - L y n n e , 7 - 5 2 6 1 .
A B C D R I V I N G S C H O O L invites applications for Instructors, part-time
now,
full-time
during
vacations.
438-0853.
FOR SALE
1966 Cnevy Impala, V 8 , g o o d r u n ning c o n d i t i o n . 7 9 7 - 3 0 4 2 .
For Sale: 1962 L o Mans. B o d y nice.
Engine lust r e b u i l t ! B r a n d new tuneup. 43.000 original miles. Runs great.
Asking $ 3 5 0 . Call L e e - 4 5 7 - 4 7 7 4 .
Brand new Goodyear Sure-Grip Snow
Tires - 7 . 7 5 x 1 5 . B o u g h t now car must sell. 4 8 2 - 4 3 6 B . (Pat).
Excellent c o n d i t i o n
- Garcia Ski
Boots and Stand. Size 5'/?. mon or
women 7. $ 1 0 , 4 8 2 - 4 3 6 8
Ski Boots - Ladles size 5, $ 0 0 prcfoam Cabers. Used o n c e ; w r o n g sl*e.
$50. 436-1423.
U.S. Divers regulator, tank, backpack,
boot.
Excellent
condition,
477-5983.
Stereo for Sale. List $ 2 0 0 . Will sell
lor $75. Call M i k e , 7 - 3 0 0 1 .
Panasonic stereo $ 1 7 0 . Call Caltty L.
457-4741.
L o s t : Green parka at CC Ballroom
Feb. 15th - watch in pocket - May
have y o u r s . 4 5 7 - 8 7 5 7 .
Babysitter f o r G-yr. old girl. M o n d a y
mornings, adjacent to campus. Call
4 8 9 - 1 3 5 7 eves.
The Albany Student Press is looking for another regular columnist
for
the editorial
pages.
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
Craftswomen-Craftsmen
Attention:
We are l o o k i n g for folk w h o want t o
share our spacious homo In the c o u n t r y t o practice their art as w e l l as live.
We have an established wholesale
hand crafted leather goods business
and w o u l d like to set u p a crafts
cooperative eventually. Our home Is
t o o big for the lour of us. Potters,
w o o d carvers, jewelers, stained glass,
sculptors, etc. please contact us soon.
E v er g r e o n
Leather
Company,
756-84&6 - Ravena.
Ride w a n t e d t o B r o o k l y n - March 9.
Call M a t t , 7-4032.
Ride needed t o Miami - March break l o r 2. Call 4 7 2 - 8 8 8 3 .
C o m m u t e r s ! Ride w a n t e d f r o m Saratoga t o A l b a n y ( M W T h F ) Will share
expenses. Call Moloney 5 8 7 - 1 4 7 6 .
R o o m m a t e wanted for I A i l ' / 3 t o
aid
handicapped
dorm
student.
Room and board In r e t u r n for services. No experience necessary. Call
Phil al 4 5 / 4 3 2 8 after £> P.M.
Sears Sewing Machine; A t t a c h m e n t s ,
cams, cabinet. 5 mos. o l d ; maintenance, agreement; Cost $ 3 2 0 , sacrifice at $ 2 0 0 . 4 3 6 - 1 3 8 6 .
Riders w a n t e d f r o m Queens-LI t o
A l b a n y , F r L - T c b . 2 3 . Call L i n d a ,
45/5195.
Wednesday evening, F e b . 7, Robert B.
Saltzman of t h e CTIApresented a program
about
the assassination ol President
Kennedy to a capacity bouse in LC 7.
Part of Mr. S a l t z m a n ' s presentation was a
display of b o o k s written a b o u t the assassination a n d related events.
Last night I received a p h o n e call from
Mr. Saltzman (I had m a d e the arrangem e n t s for t h e l e c t u r e ) a n d was informed
by h i m t h a t he found o n e or t w o of the
b o o k s missing from his collection when he
was preparing to speak a t S k i d m o r c this
past M o n d a y night. Since he h a d n ' t unpacked this material since his appearance
in Albany t h e previous Wednesday, it is
obvious t h a t s o m e person or persons (a
conspiracy p e r h a p s ? ) m a d e off with the
books from LC 7 here al SUNYA.
Needless t o say, S a l t z m a n is distressed
by this s t a t e of affairs as these hooks ure
virtually irreplaceable since they are o u t
of print, n o t to m e n t i o n t h e fact t h a t
they provide him with information und
material for his work.
In this regard he asked m e to make a
plea to t h o s e involved in t h e larceny to
please r e t u r n t h e books--no questions
asked. A reasonable p r o c e d u r e would be
to leave t h e m ut t h e Campus Center
i n f o r m a t i o n desk. If that s e e m s t o o intimidating, a p h o n e call t o m e (-1720400)
arranging a pick-up s p o t would be fine
A n o t h e r o p t i o n would be to send them
directly to h i m T h e address is: Robert B
S a l t /. m a n ,
C T I A, P.O. Box 7 0 0 ,
Schenectady, N Y . 12301.
T h e i m p o r t a n t thing is for him to get
his b o o k s back, i repeat that there will be
no e m b a r r a s s m e n t to those involved; and
1 would urge those responsible t o comply
with this r e q u e s t as soon as possible.
Joseph M. Buldanzu
WANTED
WANTED D E A D OR A L I V E : Lionel
trains. Quick cash. Call 4 3 9 - 5 1 0 9 .
Oosporat y needed tor LSI 102:
Btomed C o n i j j j t e r Programs by W.J.
Dixon. Call A n n , 4 5 7 - / 8 9 3 .
Happy l O t h B l r t h d a y W b U A !
With love f r o m the ASP
SERVICES
'lenjius
I <appy l i i r t l i r l t i y !
N l W V O H K l U A M K I I JIM . $159
round t r i p . Weekly flights. Open re
turns. I or I n f o r m a t i o n and schedules
write l o German UVerse.is l o u r Co.,
P.O. Box 535. U r a t l l e t m r o , V e r m o n t
1)5301.
w.inii^il
Babysitter
( i n t . 4 10-0012.
lo
ItltOt
4 14 BB'J.i.
' r lends & Enemies
Nearest spinach.
' l«*«* V«u and
beauillul.
car.
reach In L a t i n A m e r i c a , the Eastern
Caribbean,
Thailand,
Malaysia,
Airtea, trio Pacific Islands, Jamaica in
4 2 other countries. Positions open
also here In the U.S. The choice is
yours. It y o u ' r e a q u a l i f i e d leaUiet or
will be soon, i h e Peace ( orps and
VIS I A need y o u . Contact: 1 Horesa
Martin Division of M i n o r i t y Attatrs,
I
think
you're
M.*
Hnpjnrj l o have a w o n d e r f u l weekend.
I he Magician ( M r . S)
Call
Nappy
Birthday
parenthesis.
you
oddity
Dearest K l u t z .
H a p p y four week anniversary,
I ove. Clyde
'J 0
C n u r c li
(212)264-/124.
s I .
Susan 307.
V o n have such unique problems.
Frorn one w h o k n o w s !
l y p m t j i]
4 5') 1 195
Help Wanted: $100 weekly possltil.
addressing mall lor i n rm
I oil am
part time at Home
Senil shimpe<
^eif.addressed envelope
to M< )M(
WORK OPPOR1 U N I | I-',. Box M i l .
Huldoso
Downs,
New
M e x h i»
BB346,
l'l"n.e Hall Day Care l enter I lirtllet
'ipotilnijs available lor t h | i semester
Nnw accepting dp-plkailops fur thl
sijinrnui and fall semester ' / I . Pleasi
i on tat l Mis, Month in, t IPIM l o t . a
•I h> 0184.
{PASSPORT
I
HOUSING
I
Fast Chrafty Service
i
, I , , • I, M.nlr.oi
.ill '..re. • ! ' , / i
David Shapiro
\
at 457-87141
•MWMWNMMMMwft
WSUA brings you
TELETHON '73
1
with continuous broadcast
coverage beginning Friday
February 23 at 7 am in the
Campus Center Lobby
written and addressed to:
Unless there are extenuating cir-
Dear Muttonhead,
We think you are beautiful and we
love you.
combat hunger and
knowledge of agriculture ire helping
malnutrition in:
M E N - W O M E N . WORK O N A SHIP
N E X T S U M M E R ! N o experience required. Excellent pay. Worldwide
travel. Perfect summer j o b or career.
Send $2 for information. S E A F A X .
Box 2 0 4 9 - D J , Port Angeles, W A ,
98362+
Honduras, India,
Lynne,
Happiest B i r t h d a y
F r o m all y o u r Boogie Friends
Sierra Leone, Korea,
Brazil, Ecuador,
Panama, Nepal, Chad,
Nicaragua, Niger,
Dearest B.
" W h e n y o u r friends are there
Everything's all r i g h t ! "
Swaziland, Dahomey,
Afghanistan, Iran,
Micronesia, Ethiopia,
Upper Volta, Kenya,
Dear K a t i e ,
Happy Birthday.
Philippines, Guyana,
Fen
Y o u ' r e the Greatest!
Botswana, Morocco,
Tony:
Roses are red,
Sunday is c o m i n g ;
I ' m so glad
V o u ' r e still m y h o n e y .
Malaysia, Senegal,
Bolivia, Colombia,
Jamaica, Venezuela,
Tonga
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
PEACE CORPS
HELPED THEM
GET THERE
earrings 2 for $1
buy 4 pair get 1 free
For Information On
What They Are Doing
AndWhatYouCanDo
cigarettes 397pack
CONTACT:
Peace Corps
90 Church St., rm. H 0 3
New York, N. Y. 10007
(2I2) 264-7123
Afro earrings
cor. No. Lake Awe.
Albany
Attn.-members
of the Classes of 74 & 75
PICTURES
Ask for
John Chow at 457-2116
N
fanners, Ay Majors w a n t e d . m u d
positions In 43 countries in Son
America, Asia, A f r i c a and the Soy
I'aclflc,
Cereal
< rops.
vi;i)ttlal>l
poultry, dairy, livestock, alitor
• H I i t l c u l t ure,
veterinarians,
la
mechanics - whatever your held
specialisation, l he Pe*< n < IM p i . I
Inform :il'>
ullieo.
C,
Communication* should be type-
Editorial PiQa Editor
A l b a n y Studont Pratt
Camput Canter 326, S U N Y A
A l b a n y New v o r u , 12222
Volunteers with a
In
Love,
I he Sandwich
> I
I'apers
typed
I x|ieiretreed.
Man I.I, 4 5 9 1 -i'j'.'.
?
MarkNext time you knock, wart for an
answer before you come in - Happy
Birthday, anyway.
Russ & Debt
2 6 4 Central Ave.
HELP WANTED
or worked
on a farm
Lambchop
seeks l o b :
/H?).
witti
CONGRATULATIONS, WSUA!!
Today you start your second sound
decade. I'm proud to have shared the
last four years with you.
Stephen H. Goldstein
EVER
LIVED
Chile, Thailand,
PERSONALS
I xpvrrenced babyslttei
in.-i Home or yours. 4 / /
Happy Birthday Marcus!!
Luv, Sheila, Leslie, Mean a> Lynn
R o u n d t r i p to Haverstraw, leaving
March 1st, r e t u r n i n g March 4 t h . Call
Avlva. 4 7 2 - 9 8 0 7 .
Married Couples • Tarn extra money
babysitting p a r t / l u l l time. $ 1 1 / per
week, l i v e - i n situations available for
this semester. University f amiiy Inc.
Agency. Call 456-0998.
Name brand cosmetics at 30% discount • Write Box 2 2 6 , 750 State S i . ,
Bru, A l b a n y , New Y o r k .
A n youoptn about your unusual
t*xual practices and wHIIng to talk
about It on TV? Call D m i t
356-1700 from 1-5 pm.
Spinach and Lambchop
Lonyhair/wlre guinea piglets. Very
trloudly and u n d e m a n d i n g . Cheap!
434-0542 after 5.
To tiie editor:
Right, Eugene I
Female roommate. Prefer uppcrclassrnan or grad student. O n bus line.
$ 6 4 . Call evenings, 4 3 8 - 1 2 9 4 .
iGLASSFED
Sinner Repent
To the editor:
Why did it take the ex prisoners so
many days to m a k e a j o u r n e y t h a t takes
Kissinger only h o u r s ? Obviously their
return was delayed while t h e military
prepared its c h a r a d e And it was a great
s h o w ! Show the n a t i o n a negro general
doing his job, shaking t h e shaking h a n d s
of the returning m e n . Watch the television where it is best, capturing genuine
h u m a n e m o t i o n as a m a n e m b r a c e s a
w o m a n he has been dreaming a b o u t for
seven years. Listen t o o u r anchor m a n
rattle off statistics a b o u t each m a n w h o
walks off the plane. He's got t h e facts,
he's got t h e insight He corners o n e
released prisoner to ask i m p o r t a n t ques
lions like, "What were your feelings
when " T h e interviewed m a n looks
fatigued. He is tired of captivity He is
tired of traveling And he is tired of the
spotlight.
His family is p r o b a b l y tired of being on
display, t o o . Television n e w s teams r a n
be proud of the prying e x p o s u r e they
have given to o r d i n a r y people whose lives
have been i n t e r r u p t e d by t h e call of the
nation's prime t i m e audience Must we,
ask how they feel? What if they gave us
an honest answer'' If T V . news lives u p
to its r e p u t a t i o n , we'll watch docum e n t a r y film footage of an ex-POW
playing with his kids, m o w i n g his lawn,
and sitting at his kitchen table telling
Sandor Vitnocur h o w h e feels. He will
wish people would leuve him alone But
passive acceptance o f t h e inevitable. The
firing of superior teachers n o w occurs
with the m o n o t o n o u s regularity of coups
in Argentina. This week's head o n the
block belongs t o Alan Wheelock of the
English Dept. His c r i m e is that he is a
graduate s t u d e n t of this s c h o o l {presently
c o m p l e t i n g his dissertation). T h e English
Dept. has a policy against hiring its own
graduates, (which s e e m s to indicate s o m e
s o r t of lack of faith in t h e d e p a r t m e n t ' s
o w n p r o d u c t s ) , b u t Mr. Wheelock deserves t o be an e x c e p t i o n to this policy.
Alan Wheelock is o n e of those rare
teachers w h o is w o r t h getting u p in the
m o r n i n g for. His lectures are consistently
interesting, even when they concern
basically dull material. T h e background
i n f o r m a t i o n t h a t h e gives his classes
makes it clear t h a t he is b o t h extremely
well-read and a painstaking researcher. He
s h o w s a very broad range of knowledge
b e y o n d his particular field of s t u d y , and
he c o n s t a n t l y relates t h e subject m a t t e r
t o larger realms and concerns. He is
c o n s p i c u o u s l y lacking in t h e egomania
which infects s o m e of S U N Y A ' s more
distinguished scholars: t h e benign sages
w h o s t a n d impregnable behind their wall
of e r u d i t i o n ,
occasionally stifling a
c h u c k l e a t t h e ignorance of h u m a n i t y .
Wheelock r e m a i n s easily approachable.
If you are interested in
writing,
submit a sample column to the Editorial Page Editor, Campus Center
326. You may be chosen.
Tube Wins Booby Prize
Vietnam has long been called a conflict
w i t h o u t heroes. Baby killers and village
burners could hardly be accused of upholding American ideals. Now that the
war is over we have selected prisoners of
war t o be o u r heroes. A c o u p l e of years
ago few people even knew that they
existed. Now the r e t u r n i n g prisoners are
the darlings of t h e Special News Broad
cast. Dike it or not, television cameras are
following their every m o v e from t h e
m o m e n t of their release T h e coverage is
c o n t i n u i n g . Right n o w
4 bedroom apartment wanted near
busline for 7 3 - 7 4 . 4 5 7 - 5 1 8 2 .
Come to TELETHON, but if you
Round Trip
Bus Ticket to Miami
Bus leaves Fri. aft. March 9
from the circle
Bus Jeaves Sat. March 17
from Miami
Ticket sales
M
-
Feb> M
Tues. & Wed., Feb. 27 & 28
in CC Lobby from 2-5
74 & 75 Class members
AH other SUNYA students
non-students
43.00
55.00
96.50
can't, tune in to WSUA 640 for fulri
(ID Required)
coverage- phone in those pledges!
For further info, call Allen at 457-5202
Sponsored by Classes of 74 & 75
cumstances, all letters must be signed.
tuuuuuu HAPPINESS IS SHARINGJUOUJ
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THIRTEEN
Danes Whitewash New Paltz
Danes Finally Win On Road
44-0
by Bill Heller
by K e n n e t h A r d u i n o
T h e H a w k s from N e w Paltz
»vere shot d o w n before t h e y
c o u l d ever get off the ground
Wednesday
night,
when
the
Albany State matmen hunted
t h e m d o w n by the score of 44-0.
It was evident early t h a t it was
the night for the Danes. Expecting t o lose the 118 lb. class
via a forfeit, ( d u e t o an injury t o
Walt Katz) the D a n e s received
the good news t h a t N e w Paltz
was also going to forfeit it,
a l o n g with 1 2 6 lbs. and heavyweight. T h e forfeit in the heavyweight division was a disappointment to the crowd who wanted
t o see S U N Y c h a m p R u d y Vido.
T h e m a t c h e s were oyer quickly. E t h a n G r o s s m a n b r o k e a losing streak b e a t i n g his o p p o n e n t
5-0. Larry Mims followed with a
pin in 2 : 1 1 of the second period.
At this point the c r o w d was
aware that a s h u t o u t was a
possiblity.
Senior Jeff A l b r e c h t wrestling
his last m a t c h in the S U N Y A
gym won a s u p e r i o r decision
11-0. Jeff tried vainly t o pin his
o p p o n e n t b u t could not find the
right c o m b i n a t i o n .
T o m Horn had the same problem. He d o m i n a t e d his m a t c h
but could not find the pinning
c o m b i n a t i o n and h a d t o s e t t l e
for a 9-2 decision.
D o u g Bauer s t a r t e d off slow
and was actually b e h i n d u n t i l
the very e n d of the s e c o n d
p e r i o d w h e n he barely b e a t the
b u z z e r w i t h a t a k e d o w n . B u t all
d o u b t was erased o n w h o was
the b e t t e r wrestler in the last
p e r i o d , as Bauer m o p p e d the
ring with his o p p o n e n t . He actually pinned him twice, the first
t i m e o n the fringe of t h e m a t
and the referee ruled t h a t t h e y
w e r e off it, t h e s e c o n d t i m e in
the middle of the m a t in 6 : 1 4 .
T h e m o s t exciting m a t c h was
senior J i m D i c k s o n ' s . Dickson
a l w a y s c o m e s o u t to give his all,
and he gave the c r o w d a thrill.
He picked u p his m a n a n u m b e r
of times, s l a m m i n g h i m t o the
m a t . T h o u g h he fell b e h i n d in
points
early,
his
superior
s t r e n g t h enabled h i m t o pin his
man with just five seconds left in
the m a t c h .
F r a n k H e r m a n c a p p e d off the
s h u t o u t as he d o m i n a t e d the
s e c o n d half of his m a t c h t o win
a s u p e r i o r decision.
T h e Danes, now 7 - 3 , travel t o
R o c h e s t e r this w e e k e n d for t h e
New York S t a t e C h a m p i o n s h i p s ,
T h e y end tlie season n e x t Wednesday at RPI.
Girls Swimmers
Win
by Laurie Wittern
W hen
the
Women's
Swim
T e a m [ravelled U> O n e o n t a fast
Wednesday niglit, Feb. 11, they
d r o p p e d their fifth regular sea
son meet by the dismal score of
3 3 - 8 1 . But it was a good evening
for individual swimming performances. T w o firsts wen? brought
in by Frosh Kathy Moloney and
a n o t h e r t w o by senior co captain
Laurie Wittern. Shelly Heisler
c o n t r i b u t e d a second and Sue
Kellman two third places
Events
looked
somewhat
brighter when the w o m e n placed
second in a triangular meet with
Russell Sage and B i n g h a m t o n ,
Sal Feb 17. Again, s t e a d y performer Kathy Maloney t u r n e d in
t w o first places in the 100 yd.
butterfly and the 50 yd. free
style. Laurie Wittern took a first
i n the 50 y d, brims tst ro It e a nd
t w o seconds in the 100 y d . and
2 0 0 yd. freestyle. Shelly Heisler
had seconds in butli the 50 yd.
and 100 yd. b a c k s t r o k e events.
But the best news was the re
c o r d - b r e a k i n g lime of A l b a n y ' s
"200 yd. freestyle relay t e a m of
Wittern, T r u d y ('ornwell, Heisler
and Maloney. T h e final score
was Russell Sage 9 4 , Albany 0 3 ,
and B i n g h a m t o n 10
Byron Miller d i d
hot
Our on II Ahruzze style \tutie.
)Mi it/H ail! I iiui!) Drenhtgi.
C.rttttU) linttir!
All the uttttd
Oten frt \h hr,,ut
/Q^
LAS AC N A • CLAMS- BLUR
BURGERS • SPIEDIES- ETC,El C.
PIZZfl-PIZM */
"
over
New
Paltz.
Bob
Curtiss, and Dave W e l c h o n s all
were on, as the G r e a t D a n e s s h o t
53% from the field. T h e H a w k s ,
not as bad as e v e r y o n e t h o u g h t ,
stayed
with
minutes and
the
Danes
then
for
entered
15
Mr.
Rossi.
Playing o n e of his b e s t games
of the year, Rossi c a m e off t h e
bench to s h o o t 5 for 6 and blow
open the first half. T h e
guard
senior
was h i t t i n g t h e offensive
boards and m a k i n g crisp passes
to
J. V. Slaughters New Paltz
compliment
With
Welchons
his
hot
shooting
hand.
3-4,
Curtiss 4-6, a n d Kolln 5-8, o n e
can u n d e r s t a n d
why
the Danes
almost hit the 9 0 m a r k .
by N a t h a n Salant
T h e Pups w e n t t o New Paltz
this past Wednesday, and may
never go back again. It is r a r e
t h a t a team devastates a n o t h e r in
the J.V. Leagues, b u t this was
o n e of t h o s e e x c e p t i o n s , as the
Pups now
H-3 simply overw h e l m e d tlie o p p o s i t i o n by a
score of 9 2 - 5 8 .
T h e game o p e n e d with the
Pups, led by Harold Merritt,
seoring the first 9 p o i n t s , T h e
lead
quickly
opened
to
12
p o i n t s , and Merritt sunk
14
p o i n t s in the first 1 m i n u t e s of
play. As New Paltz i m m e d i a t e l y
found o u t , he c o u l d score at
will, and w o u l d leave the game
early in the s e c o n d half after
seoring a record 32 p o i n t s .
With 8 : 2 2 left in the first half
the hapless New Pall/. 5 found
o u t a b o u t a n o t h e r key Pup scorer, Jose Alicea, w h o hit the first
of 10 straight p o i n t s right then
and t h e r e . T h e lead q u i c k l y
Widened t o 23 p o i n t s , and the
game appeared to be as in the
bag as ever, and for o n c e the
P u p s k e p t it that way.
When Alicea w e n t c o l d five
m i n u t e s later, Rich K a p n e r t o o k
u p the slack, hitting r e p e a t e d l y
from the corners, and b a l l o o n i n g
the lead to 28 points. When New
Paltz finally
put 4
straight
baskets together, t h a n k s t o s o m e
sloppy play by the P u p defense
the buzzer went off t o e n d t h e
first half with the score 5 2 - 3 2 .
T h e o p e n i n g of the s e c o n d half
saw the Pups p u t up a veritable
c a n y o n between themselves and
the outclassed New Paltzer's, as
the bulge reached 3 2 p o i n t s .
Finally, it was time for the
rarely used Pup subs, w h o got in
s o m e valuable playing l i m e for
m o s t of the second half. Against
o u r second stringers, New Paltz
could d o nothing, and needless
to say, the Pups won, 9 2 - 5 8 .
Coach Lewis was pleased, b u t
realistic, about. I he win. "We
pulled the fast break off very
well and o p e n e d it up early.
Kapner had a great game in every
c a t e g o r y , and M e r r i t t scored at
will. However, Now Paltz is n o t
o n e of the s t r o n g e r t e a m s we
play, so y o u have to p u t the
game
into
its
proper
per
s p e c t i v e . " Agreed, buL it's nice to
beat a team y o u are s u p p o s e d to
beat by
a 34 [joint margin.
L o o k i n g back just o n e m o n t h
ago, the Pups were d o w n in the
d u m p s with a 1 -4 r e c o r d
no
offense, p o o r defense, and a
pessimistic future. Things changed r a t h e r r a p i d l y , w h e n the
P u p s ' t w o key players joined the
t e a m in J a n u a r y , Harold Merritt
and Rich K a p n e r . S u d d e n l y , the
t e a m was scoring, r e b o u n d i n g ,
and m o s t i m p o r t a n t l y , winning.
Merrill has been simply devastating on offense, averaging IK
poi n ts pe r ga m e , a nd m erel y
lacks the defensive ability that
e x p e r i e n c e will bring. K a p n e r
has simply been the Pups Jerry
Lucas - - he can d o it all, He is
averaging ten p o i n t s per game
c o n s i s t e n t l y r e b o u n d s in d o u b l e
figures, and adds the steady de
fense thai the Pups need t o win
Free Throws Save Girls
defines
complacence
Tuesday
ilighl
Ural Ncv
.i serious
wilh o n e ' s self or l o t . " C o m pi a
ex pet* ling lh< .
llire.il. Alh.im played lack
eertey c a m e very close to
hull hui mummed in pull
being
to
Host S k i d m o r e College j u m p e d
an early 10 7 lead during
21 IS nl I he hall
The
third
quarter
almost
proved to be too much for the
faltering Tigers Unable 10 con
score d e a d l o c k e d al 3 9
I'Vcc
t h r o w s annul saved a near panic
k y . Alhany sipiad.
necl from ' h e flour eight sue
cessful free t h r o w s were all they
ye I her
Somehow,
Ihey Kill ll all In
during
llle
overtime
period and on a d e s p e r a t e , sue
Urodie,
managed
to
salvage
a
T h e game itself was never
really in question. Although the
Danes got off slowly, it was just
a m a t t e r of w h o would tun t h e m
on. T h e answer was Rossi, and
he helped change a 22-20 game
into a 37-24 runaway at the half
A thirteen point lead isn't us
ualiy a Iremendous o n e , hul
tonight it was. The Danes built
up a 54-36 spread and were
never headed. Harry J o h n s o n
and Dennis Terry each chipped
in six in the last ten m i n u t e s to
make it a c o m p l e t e r o u t e .
T h e big question for the D a n e s
is post-season play. With the first
annual ECAC T o u r n a m e n t looming as a definite possiblity for
the 13-7 Danes, o n e thing is
clear. T h e next 3 games, all
h o m e : Geneseo (Friday n i g h t ) ,
Ithaca, and Williams, are definitely i m p o r t a n t and will indeed
reveal if the season for the Danes
is over, or very much alive. T h e
latest NYS sportswriters poll
shows Albany s e v e n t h With six
teams going to the NCAA's, the
chances for an ECAC bid are
good - if we win the rest of o u r
games, they are very good. Are
you going to c o m e and find o u t
what happens, or just sit and
read a b o u t it?
(Editor's note:NCAArevelaed
its
first three bids. Hartwicfi,
C.W.
Post unci Brochpart,
There is at
least one and maybe three bids
^.
Mermen End Streak
by Steve Katz
the prospect ol a n o t h e r loss.
Instead Ihey started swimming
s o m e really strung races. Ken
Weber won the 1000 yd freestyle, T o m Staples the 2 0 0 yd
freestyle and Marc Eson and
Itob CJolian proceeded to place
first and second in t h e 50 yard
freestyle event. Jaik
Shubert
a l t o n e d for his foul in the initial
event wilh a strong win in the
200 yd butterfly. Len Van Kyn
swimming against a fine New
Paltz distance man took second
in the 500 yd freestyle.
Alhany individual wins came in
b u n c h e s this meel. All t h e frustrations and d i s a p p o i n t m e n t s of
the past season disappeared as
each
Albany
swimmer
won
individual honors. In the second
half of the meet Ken Weger look
his second win
of the meet wilh
a victory in the 100 yd, freestyle Man
I'WIII swam his usual strong race in th
Iwin swam his usual strong race in the
If o n last Wednesday night you
were s o m e p l a c e on c a m p u s you
probably noticed a certain added
e x u b e r a n c e in t h e air. Perhaps
you jeard c a r s h o n k i n g their
h o r n s o r t h e s o u n d s of truimphant,
joyous laughter.
The
reason for all t h e i n t e n s e jubilation o n an o t h e r w i s e dreary wet
school n i g h t b e f o r e m i d t e r m s
was the fact t h a t t h e A l b a n y
S t a t e swim t e a m h a d won its
first m e e t of t h e t e r m defeating
New Paltz 55-4 7.
T h e victory was not entirely
u n e x p e c t e d as t h e New Paltz
swimming team hud a r e p u t a t i o n
of m e d e o c r i t y t h a t preceeded
their a p p e a r a n c e at t h e gym. T h e
New Paltz s w i m m e r s l o o k e d ripe
for the killing bringing a 1 and (i
record t o the m e e t .
Albany
hopes for t h a t long s o u g h t after
victory were enlivened by the
fact t h a t New Paltz bad only
eight s w i m m e r s .
Victory did c o m e t o the Ureal
Dane s w i m m e r s b u t n o t w i t h o u t
a struggle. T h e m e e t s t a r t e d
rather
inauspiciously
for
the
Dane s w i m m e r s . T h e o p e n i n g
event of t h e m e e t was Ihe 4 0 0
yd m e d l e y relay, New Paltz did
not field a t e a m so A l h a n y was
assured of an easy seven p o i n t s
straight off, right? Wrong. T h e
Albany relay team was tlisquali
lied for an ilteual t u r n and seven
points w e n t d o w n the drain very
quickly; T h e i m m e d i a t e disap
p o i n l m e n l of this failure was
c o m p o u n d e d by t h e fact (hat we
were already s p o t t i n g New Pall/.
HI points d u e to Ihe not!
existence of the Albany Slalc
diving team.
However, t h e A l b a n y swim
mer.s did n o t slarl crying over
200 yd backstroke and took the
win. Les Puretz set the stage for
the final relay event with a
record setting time of 2.35.8 in
the 2 0 0 yd breaststroke. R o b
Geir tacked on some sorely
needed points by c o m i n g from
behind to finish second in the
event.
In spite of all these individual
victories the 16 p o i n t h a n d i c a p
Albany s p o t t e d New Paltz left
the visitors only o n e p o i n t
behind going into the last event
the 100 yd relay. T h e Dan
swimmers were not a b o u t to let
this victory get away however.
Responding to the first signs of
student s u p p o r t the entire year,
the relay team of Van Kyn,
Staples, Weber and
Schubert
whipped the New Paitz tea:
setting a school record of 3.30 i
Ihe process.
m e process.
JHappy 10th Birthday*
WSUA
1963 - 1973
1
1
This Sat. nite, Sat. Nite of Gold
1
!
ln0n0M0T*0*0*0*OnCr*i<T**^i4^*(Tt}\0~*t0~i*0~u0~»i0'ii0m0l*0\
Win up to 40 times your investment
HEN WAY'S
48 hour
Dance Marathon
March 23 to 25
$5 entrance fee per couple
only 200 tickets will be sold
will be having a birthday party.
Listen for GAMES & PRIZES with
[we are now accepting singles*
iEric Lonschein beginning a t l l p.m.|
for****** t++*+++0+++++4++++*+*++++**++++++++4<
<'***************
If) II victory.
Off-Campus
i News Department
of the A S P
d e c upturns Olhe Simon ami
Donna
Del.iicco
paced
the
Allian\ seoring wilh 13 mill I 1
points respectively This was a
career hesl tin soptiniore S i m o n ,
w h o also pulled in It. r e b o u n d s
needs REPORTERS
|to cover up coming events
at the Capitol
Anyone interested call
Bob or Hurry at 7-2190
A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
h
eessl'ul hooli shot hj guard Burl)
The
I
|
w o m e n lied llu. score 29 all
A
.a,,M.I
1
!
could muiiutii' us Lhi- Spa v i l l i * '
haltle nl survival n e t t e d
learns 1 ii p o i n t s each, us
regulation lime in m i ! w i l h the
r
» ! - . • . . _ Ave.
A..o at
,1 Fuller
C l i n , Rd.
Ul\
Western
PAGE FOURTEEN
romp
Werner Kolln, B o b Rossi,
s y n o n y m o u s with disaster and
defeat for the SUN Y A w o m e n ' s
basket ball team
SPAGHETTI
SPAGHETTI
Danes, led t h e w a y t o an
87-54
Webster
/S...
and
with the aid of a w h o l e g r o u p of
as "...calm or secure satisfaction
CJiefltifii
a complete
t u r n a b o u t in t h e 2 n d half
T h e mainstay h o w e v e r , was
undoubtedly
Byron. After a
h o r r e n d o u s first half of 3-9, 5
turnovers, and poor
defense,
Byron did his thing. In the
second half, Miller banged in
7-12, finishing with 23 p o i n t s
and 8 r e b o u n d s . It's a credit to
Byron to see him b o u n c e back
the way he did. Perhaps it in
dicales a sign of confidence and
m a t u r i t y - i.e. the rounding out
of a superb ballplayer.
While sen,.,. Del.iicco snared
\'i
Sl.nl
l,\
•
was
paced
Nieiuan's I'.! poinls
(luce again,
111. -.h,.\
wa.-. .,,
A l l i u m - pool - h .
ig percenl
age
AIM,,.null Ih.A declMVcl}
oulsllol I lie l.oine leaill, a m eu
i n :>:.{-. renin ihe I'looi ahnusl did
Hi e
I'llen S'.t: from Ihe
I.ml hue depl Ihe Tigers ..In.'
when Hie), nc.'de,I ii ni.1,1
The win puis S U N Y A nl I >
I,a the season, w i l h one innrc
i i i i i l c s t , home versus Kussell
Sage on Tliuisda\
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1973
ONCE A VACATIONING KNIGHT
PIP JAUNTILY APPROACH A
PRAGON,
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 23, 1973
WHO PIP OFFER, FOR THE
PRICE OF TWO 6-PACKS OF
SCHAEFER BEERE,
A MOST WONPERFUL MEANS
OP TRANSPORTATION
ALHANYSTUDENT PRESS
dcJiaeren
PAGE FIFTEEN
8 LO
State University of New York at Albany
Friday. February 23, 1973
FSA's Going Under, So Board's Going Up
What seemed to get Lampert
most incensed was that part of
the proposal which granted
management the "authority" to
hike cash prices in the Campus
Center, but did not mandate the
action. Cash operations in the
cafeteria have continually lost
money while the quadrangles
have consistently turned a
profit-which means not only are
resident students bailing out the
rest of FSA, they are bailing out
the rest of food service as well.
By Al Senia
Basketball
J.V. Basketball
Wrestlers
Swimmers
Wins
Wins
Win
Win
87-54
92-58
44-0
55-47
Page 15
Page 14
Page 15
Page 14
The Board of Directors of the
Faculty Student Association put
off their final vote on a proposed board increase Friday,
after student members argued
that they wanted to see the
proposal in writing before
casting their voles on the
measure.
The postponement was a victory for students, but probably a
short-lived one. The Directors
are expected to approve the 4%
across-the-board food hike when
1 hey meet in special session
within two weeks.
The boost will add up lo $26
lo the cost of a student board
contract per year. Increases in
cash food prices in Ihe Campus
Center can also be expecled
once the authorization is voted.
While Ihe meeting was anti-dimaclic in its final outcome, it
did provide valuable insight into
the student role within Ihe
"non-profit" FSA corporation.
FSA Acting Director li.
Norberl Zahm said the board
increase is necessary because of
rising food prices, exlra feeding
days, an anticipated employee
pay increase, and a "number of
things that could happen."
Included among the latter category are a drop in university
enrollment (which would result
in less Income for the corporation), an increase in Ihe cosl of
bank loans, and an increase in
direct operating expenses. Zahm
labeled these uncertain expenses
"management risks."
"You nevei know when somebody is going lo gel caught in a
conveyer belt-and there goes
voui direct opeiaiing expenses,"
Financial
"I can't buy the proposal unless the prices are across-theboard," he said, noting that it
penalized food service students
from "a food services point of
view."
the Acting Director said in explanation of the importance of
the management risk factor.
"Thirteen dollars a semester is
not a sizeable amount " he
added. "We have to cover ourselves for any possible problem
that might come along."
He admitted that food servrce
would show a profit even if the
proposed hike were rejectedsomething food service has consistently done for the past several y e a r s - but added the profit
would be small and food servicewould be "dangerously close" lo
breaking even.
Food profits—coming mainly
from ihe mandated meal plan—
-have helped bail out the other
FSA program items for ihe pasl
several years. In effect
Ibis
means lhal dormitory students
are underwriting the activities of
the corporal ion.
ll is a fiscal reality that llns
will continue once the hike is
granted. And il is to this reality
to which the undergraduate
students at Friday's meeting
most vehemently objected.
"Students shouldn't be penalized when oilier operalions are
al fault," one non-voting student
told Zahm and the board members.
"The contract student is going
lo get s c r e w e d , " Student
A s s o c i a l i o n President Mike
Lampert observed.
But Zahm, along with several
a d m i n i s t r a t i v e and faculty
members, disputed the argument.
"Our financial situation supercedes all our questions of
equity," John Hartley. Vice
President for Management and
Planning said. "We have a
minimum of choices . . . we aie
trying to change the inequities . •
not Ibis or next year, but
several years down the road."
"We're bringing
ihings
around," echoed Economics
Professor Wallei Balk.
"This
thing
(the board
in-
crease) hasn't been treated
lightly." said Zahm.
"You can't change tilings overnight,"
Hartley
reiterated.
"There have been improvements
... you can't perform miracles
and turn the thing right
around."
liven wilh the proposed hike
of 4V,, said Zahm. ihe food
service net profit will be "only
614%" compared to 814% in
1472. W # in l l >71, and 1514%
in 1970.
But, Zahm added hastily, he
was "willing to lake the risk of
the 4% and hoping things will
work out."
"I have qualms about the fact
we are going to raise a nice,
comfortable
m o n e t a r y buffer
al Ihe expense of resident
sludenls," argued Tom Clingan,
a no n-voting undergraduate
student. "We ought to do H al
the expense of other groups."
But Balk told Clingan thai Ihe
cash buffer lhal would result
from raising food prices was not
a "nice healthy buffei but a
suivival buffer."
The remark set off another
round of debate, with Balk
noting thai "To mandate that
And so the arguments continued for well over an hour, until
Ihe students insisted they receive
Ihe actual proposals in writing
and be given time lo appraise
Iheii worth.
The differences between student and administrative members of the FSA—differences
that have been noliceable for
four years now—were besl illustrated in the remarks of Dean
for Student Affairs, Neil Brown.
In explaining why he felt it
was not unfair to have students
build up a financial buffer for
the corporation even though
they were receiving no direct
benefits in return, he said,
"Sludenls several years ago paid
for Camp Dippikill and things
like thai ...there is a legacy each
of us has here in Ihe
institution."
"But what," one student asked
to general laughter, "has posterity ever done for us'.'"
Aids:
Complications and Cancellations Plague Programs
by Sue Leboff
The fine print on ihe SUNYA
financial aid application says
simply lhal Ihe National Direct
Student Loan and the Basic
and/or Supplemental Fducalional Opportunity (Irani aie
"subject In change ihiough Con
giessional action."
What llns statement means to
Albany's 4,000-odd financial aid
sludenls is thai they will
probably mil know by June
whal
id i»l aid will be available
to them. Whal ll means lo Don
Whitlock, duecloi ol Ihe Office
of Financial Aids, and Ins slall is
lhal they cannot
advise
applicant as thoroughly as
they'd like to, because they
don't know how much money
they will gel lor nexl yeai.
PLEASE RECYCLE THIS PAPER
Two federal piograms lhal
formerly benefited Albany sin
dents - the National Opportunity
(haul
will, in all likelihood, be
discontinued al the discretion of
the Nixon adnnnistialion. A
third source ol financial aid. Ihe
New Yoik llighei Education Act
(NYIIP.AC), is being changed
from a simple "uibbei stamp
i) p e i a I i o n , " lo a HUH e
complicated and selective program. From now on, sludenls
who waul a NYHliAC loan must
gel llien family to file a financial
statement, winch Ihe Office ol
Financial Aids must analyze.
New Program Begun
A new program, the Basic Opportunity Grant (BOG) will help
some of the sludenls who now
icly on the Educational Oppnilunity Grant (FOG), but Mr.
Whitlock doubts lhal "BOG"
will have enough money al Hs
disposal to give poorer sludenls
the amount they need. Undei
BOG, funds are giauled lo
middle-income as well as lowerincome students.
Ms. Kathleen Beeckel, who is
the Wi)ik-Study Coordinator al
the Office nl Financial Aids,
believes lhal. in effect, BOG
takes money away I'tom the
lower-income sludenls who
benefited from F O G
and
spreads ll among middle-income
sludenls. who have a less
pressing need loi financial aid a sorl of reverse Robin Hood
effect. "This appeals lo be something Nixon feels would be a
good political move." Ms.
Beeckel asseils.
BOG Inconsistent
She considers BOG to be
inconsistent with the "neediest
first" philosophy of the financial
aids office. "Our programs are
I'o i those students whose
families |Ust can't afford to foot
Ihe hill. Oui priority is neediesl
first. We'ie rarely able to give
any assistance to higher-income
people."
Mr. Whitlock finds thai while
theoretically n is a good idea to
aid middle-income as well as
lower-income siudnels. BOG
does not have enough funding lo
he effective. Undet BOG. Ms.
Beeckel fears, some sludenls
might nol even gel enough
money to return lo school in
August. She complains lhal what
sludenls leally need is not new
programs such as BOG, hut more
money loi existing piograms.
"The existing piogiams. would J
go a gieal way lowaid meeting 5
student needs if they were fully
funded."
Have to Wail
February I 5 was Ihe deadline
lot sludenls lo file financial aid
applications. Says Ms. Beeckel,
"Because ihey handed in theii
applications in February, you'd
expect that they'd know by
June." However, "the wheels
guild exceedingly sk-W ill
Ms. Kathleen Beeckel
Washington,
apparently. They
will not act on these piograms in
a fashion lhal is imiely or realistic for students...We know the
dil'Miima the student is In*. We
will try, as soon as we can. to get
the sludenls their award letters.
But we have lu wail to see whal
the stains of these piogiams will
be. I'm afraid many sludenls
won'l gel letters until well into
the summer."
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