Legislative Commission Studies SUCF Performance

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FRIDAY
Legislative Commission Studies SUCF Performance
continued from page one
s o m e t i m e s by as much as 55%.
Design changes and differences
in size of construction sites were
blamed for the unexpected cost
increases.
Significantly, the report found
that community colleges have
fared much better in keeping t o
original budget estimates.
The cost of constructing a
student center in the S U N Y
university system w a s about 7 0 %
greater than comparable centers
for community colleges the report noted. A n d the c o s t of
science and physical education
buildings ran higher for S U N Y
than for both private and c o m munity colleges.
In another major area—quality
—the Construction Fund was
again taken to task. Major
structural
deficiencies
were
discovered on a variety of campuses across the S U N Y system,
and these were, in the words of
the report, "neither insignificant
nor isolated."
Pedestrian
handrails were
missing at Fredonia, stage elevators were found faulty at Stony
Brook, Plattsburgh, Oneonta and
Fredonia and fire alarm systems
were inoperable or inaudible at
Fredonia and Buffalo College.
The report noted that s o m e of
these deficiencies violated state
building codes.
Air pollution was found to be
a major problem at the Albany,
Stony
Brook,
Binghamton,
P l a t t s b u r g h , Oneonta, New
Paltz, Oswego and Brockport
campuses. In s o m e cases, local
officials threatened local campuses with court orders t o halt
the practice. S o m e rehabilitative
programs were planned t o lessen
the pollution problem.
R o o f leaks were another major
area o f concern, especially at the
College a t Canton where n e c e s sary repairs t o ten damaged buildings were estimated at $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0
by t h e auditors—contradicting
the Construction F u n d estimate
of $ 4 4 , 0 0 0 .
Major
acoustical
problems
dominated the Albany campus
where $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 was spent improving a total of 9 2 separate
rooms.
Major electrical underground
cable repair at Binghamton will
cost s o m e $ 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 , according
to the report.
At New Paltz, the 'heating
problem was s o a c u t e t h a t o n e
faculty
member r e p o r t e d a
t e m p e r a t u r e of 128 degrees in
his office. It Look a special
faculty c o m m i t t e e and a letter
from the New Paltz Emergency
and Welfare C o m m i t t e e t o get
necessary
repairs
expedited.
$ 2 2 0 , 0 0 0 was allotted for repair
work, t h e p r o b l e m was diagnosed as i n a d e q u a t e design in
the original architectural plans.
T h e original a r c h i t e c t was rehired to m a k e t h e necessary
repairs—and
received
a new
contract
with
additional
c o m p e n s a t i o n . T h e illustration,
according Lo the report, is an
example o f the all-too-frequent
practice "of additional compensation for inadequate initial performance. "
The report also noted that the
m o n e y for much of the repair
work c o m e s from the operating
budgets o f the individual campuses involved—thus straining
already
tight budgets
that
support normal college operations.
The
commission
members
noted that a consequence of
these design-related problems is
more costly maintenance for
local campuses and SUNY.' It
said the problems stemmed from
a "complete lack of proper supervision of the work by architects
and engineers."
The report went on to criticize
individual architects for placing
visual
appeal
above
more
practical considerations. It cited
the example of an architect at
Oswego w h o repeatly placed exit
signs o u t of eyesight—in violation of the building c o d e —
because "the placement of such
signs compromised the architect's concept of quality design.
Amherst Explored
The c o m m i t t e e members alio
conducted
u broad survey
designed to determine h o w satisfied those w h o used c a m p u s
facilities actually were. Over
2,200 students and 150 faculty
members were q u e s t i o n e d on
four SUNY campuses (Albany,
Binghamton, Fredonia and New
Paltz). Five major conclusions
were reached:
—Students
and
faculty
generally felt the actual physical
design of their campus and their
classroom facilities were satisfactory.
—They physical campus Itself
was generally rated more favorable . than individual classrooms.
—Students were generally more
satisfied than faculty.
—Science students and faculty
were more satisfied than were
s o c i a l science students and
faculty.
—Lecture Halls were preferred
over classrooms and laboratories.
From these findings, the legislative study concluded "that
emphasis has a p p a r e n t l y been
placed
on
campus
visual
aesthetics and design a n d less
emphasis...on classroom u s e . "
T h e a u d i t o r s also e x a m i n e d the
SUNY-Buffalo A m h e r s t c a m p u s
and criticized its high sightdevelopment
costs.
They
claimed t h e Bizat Creek on the
c a m p u s was relocated, at a cost
of $ 4 . 5 million, when it could
have been re-routed at a cost of
a b o u t $1 million. But Construction F u n d officials disputed the
a u d i t o r ' s figures a n d said the
cost of relocation have been
closer t o $ 1 7 million.
A u d i t o r s also m e n t i o n e d t h a t a
c a m p u s lake was being constructed at a cost of $ 5 . 5 million.
Construction
Fund
officials
argued t h a t t h e lake was created
l o provide fill dirt and would
the Science Citation Index has
" w a n e d " because of such apparent s h o r t c o m i n g s .
T h e Waterman p o r t f o l i o is n o w
on the desk of Dean Melvin Bers
w h o m u s t write a r e c o m m e n d a tion, o r " l e t t e r of t r a n s m i t t a l "
t o the next h j g h e r s t e p in t h e
tenure proc<_. "'hai, n e x t step is
I. Mover Hunsberger and his
Faculty Personnel C o m m i t t e e . If
what Hunsberger said the o t h e r
day is really his true feelings,
then the case should have s o m e
pretty tough going when it
reaches h i m .
' W h a t decision Bers will make
on the case is still uncertain. He
said t h a t his is " m a k i n g as inl e use
an
in v e s t i gation
as
p o s s i b l e " and that he will utilize
the citation information when
making his r e c o m m e n d a t i o n on
the case. T h e figures will be
considered " a l o n g with all the
o t h e r e v i d e n c e . " Adds Bers: "[
Eson (0).
Hunsberger did n o t c o m m e n t
on t h e alleged inconsistencies,
b u t claimed t h a t the citation
figures are meaningless because
they " d o n ' t go i n t o enough
d e p t h " a n d d o n ' t explain what
the articles were a b o u t . " He
feels t h a t all of the figures
should have been much higher,
particulary
for Professor >J.
Tedeschi, whose o u t p u t is considered v o l u m i n o u s . According
t o t h e Dean, t h e e n t h u s i a s m fur
STUYVESANT JEWELERS
0Mrm(SSSdd(m
Fieurette
IV 9- 0549
PAGE TWELVE
Ostereich, R.E.
Mancuso, ).C.
sign the V i e t n a m peace a g r e e m e n t and his c u t t i n g of funds for
A l b a n y ' s Whitney Yound h e a l t h center as well as h u n d r e d s of similar
projects a r o u n d the c o u n t r y ,
Similar d e m o n s t r a t i o n s are planned in the olhci 40 stale Capitols
a n d in Washington, D C
Local participants will meet al the Spanish-American War Memorial al Central Avenue and Nuiilicin Boulevard al 1 0 : 0 0 , and m a t c h
lo the center on Livingston Street, l i o m there they will march up
I'earl Street
lo Stale Stieel
and eventually t o the Capitol sicps,
wie the tally will lie held.
Ilk- Whitne\ M Young. J t . Health C e n t e r , a joint project of the
Notllistde \ d v i s o i y Council and ihe Albany Medical College, uffcis
pcisoiutl medical c m ' and sell-help n u t i i t i o n e d u c a t i o n lo the pool
health cenlers ate now
"sell
!,, the exclusion ,,f pool p a t i e n t s w h o can't
McCutcheon, N.B.
Simmons, W.
Teevan, B.C.
Tedeschi, J.T.
Wilkinson, H.J.
•Waterman, C.K.
l o u n d i n g . Ilteie was only o n e d o c l o t m the area.
teceiving training in medical and patamedical p t o l e s s i o n s .
Also affected
Albany
is Ihe c o n s l i u c l i o n of a new cenlei in Ihe aiea.
Medical College had been
planning
lo loan
Ihe money
nessaiy loi coiistiiielion, and would Ihen hope loi i c i m b u i s e i n e n l
lin ill federal govethtneiil. If such r e i m b u r s e m e n t
isdoubilul,
AMC might he unwilling lo take the risk and ihe new cenlei might
not he built.
Besides c o m m u n i t y healih c e n t e r s , N i x o n ' s cutreiit policies aftect
*not
consliuclion
tenured
have n o preconceived ideas o n
this."
So what effect the citation
informal ion will have on the
ease still remains to ho seen. Bui
a t least o n e thing is c e r t a i n :
Waterman needs all t h e help she
can get, and t h e latest bit of
evidence certainly s h o u l d n ' t h u r t
her case.
ol low-income
c e n l e i s , c.ise-woikei
*
*
*
*
*
hinds a h e a i h
In these
.ippiopnaletl by C m
gies;
A Ouesion of Priorities
| lie oihei main iMr pose ol (lie d e m o l i s h ,
ns is Ihe w.u Will n go
,,,, |,,| "i,,ui in,ue \ C . H S ' " l h c d c i i i o i i s i i a i o i s w . i n i 1'iesideiil Nixon
10 sign
hie .igieenieih
uegoii.iied
scheduled lo be signed O c l o b c i
*
*
*
*
*
*
Wed. Dec. 13 Sat. Dec. 16
i*
10AM - 5PM
in the ART GALLERY
housing, walei -punl'icalion. das - c u e
seivices. and seivices lo ihe eldeily
cases, Nixon has i m p o u n d e d
J K * * * * * * * * * * *
[ULIUS HEGYI
*
#
|
Sponsored by Art Council
*
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * !
Conducloi
Kruluy, Doc. 8, H::i()
T r o y MUMC Mail
S a t u r d a y , Due. I), 8:31)
Pulan' Thi'ntrt'
fi'Mi'M Artists
Julius Ik'gyi,
,,„iin
Douglas M o o r e ,
LOII.J
Lionel N o w a k .
uindmnn
J.C.F. Bnch
Ooublu Guncurtu
Brahmi
Duiihln Concorlu
Copland
Allpalochian String Suit.
R.tplahl
Pln.i at Roma
tiny prlceii VJ, v i , i- i
Albany, it>, i s . 11, 11
All Sludonlii 1?
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1972
D.C. War Protests Set For Sat.
I he i in i en i funding i tins l l n o u g h J u l y , but alici Ileal. I b e l a t e ol
n u n c than -4 5(10 pal ictus, is a n y b o d y ' s guess P i c u o u s lo ihe c e n l e i ' s
s t a l l . Ibis would p r e d o m i n a n t l y affect c o m m u n i l y people w h o aie
0
1
1
0
1
13
0
8
*i*fc|j» ^L» *MM ^L* ^L^ %1A i ^ ^ t o ^ t ^ ^ J M ^ C iltf ^Iff »1* ^l^^A^ %1* ^Lt * l j e £ s * j ^ • j j r
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
T h o u s a n d s of people are e x p e c t e d lo gather al the Capilol t o d a y at
1 2 : 3 0 p . m . for d e m o n s t r a t i o n s against President N i x o n ' s failure t o
Any c u t b a c k s in the c e n l e i ' s o p e r a t i o n s would mean laying oil
$ painting, sculpture in time for the holidays J
Antoinette
by Mike McGuire
will have lo allracl middle-class p a t i e n t s w h o can pay then o w n way
Analysis not undertaken
since citations were
^R ^n-^p *^ ^P #f* ^*^p ^^ ^r*^P ^**f* ^r* ^r* ^r* ^**i*^r*^^ ^**^ ^r*^r* T*
*
*
DAY, 1973
siilfictenl " liecause these centers serve pool a t e a s . Ibis m e a n s lbe>
0
ceramics, jewelry, graphics, drawing,
Catch a sparkle
Irom the morning sun
Hold the magic
of a sudden breeze.
Keep those moments alive
They're yours tor a lifetime
with a diamond
engagement ring trom
Orange Blossom.
yeta&mmiomveAewouaMcmtrm^K^fieeMfimamtnkni
Protest Nixon, Cutbacks
directive, .ill such centers must now b e c o m e e c o n o m i c a l l y
STUDENT ART SALE
^
INAUGURATION
Action Planned at
Capitol Today
January 19, 1973
Depailiiieiii ol llcallli, h i ilea I ion and Wellaic A c c o r d i n g I O a 11LW
1
0
0
so numerous
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Presents
i c u i i a m M w a i u a i i w a i roM»tm*xoa»K**>tam*
'Ihe hinds I'm this and o i h e i c o m m u n i t y
Citations
Bowen, J.H.
B r o w n , S.C.
Eson, M.E.
Greenfeld, N.
Luchins, A . H .
from page one
edly t o full professorship.
Waterman sees s o m e inconsistency in this, since she received eight c i t a t i o n s a n d can't
even got t e n u r e , much
less
promoted.
T h e profs r e c o m m e n d e d for
pay increases (with the n u m b e r
of c i t a t i o n s after their names)
i n c l u d e : N. Greenfeld ( 0 ) , J.
Mancuso (1), J. T. Tedeschi
(13), J. H. Bowen (1) and M.E.
State University of New York at Albany
being switched from Ihe Oil ice of ICOIIOIIIK O p p o r t u n i t y t o the
future of Waterman Case Uncertain
This
r e p o r t e r saw Deans
Hunsberger and Bers a b o u t the
figures, a n d asked them whether
the n e w information would have
m u c h effect on the final outcome
of
the
case. 'Ill ej r
responses were quite different
Bers was expectodly n o n c o m m ittal, but Moyer Hunsberger,
Dean of t h e College of Arts a n d
Sciences, v e h e m e n t l y d e n o u n c e d
t h e m , saying t h a t they were
" w o r t h l e s s " a n d " d o n ' t prove n
t h i n g . " Interesting c o n t r a s t .
A n o t h e r interesting piece of
information was u n c o v e r e d this
week, namely t h a t there are several faculty m e m b e r s in the
Psychology
Department
who
have been r e c o m m e n d e d by
Hunsberger for "discretionary
salary Increases" a n d p r o m o t i o n .
Professor J, H. Bo wen for
e x a m p l e , had only one citation
b u t has been r e c o m m e n e d for
b o t h a salary h i k e a n d report-
Both
reports
praised
the
c o n s t r u c t i o n fund for accomplishing its objectives os successfully c o m p l e t i n g a m u l t i t u d e of
c o n s t r u c t i o n projects a n d so,
allowing S U N Y e n r o l l m e n t to
increase. B u t m a n y of the same
s h o r t c o m i n g s were found as
well.
Both groups criticized S U C F
for lengthy c o n s t r u c t i o n delays.
B o t h issued an appeal for S U C F
and
SUNY
to work
closer
t o g e t h e r . And b o t h n o t i c e d a
variety
of s t r u c t u r a l
defects
throughout the SUNY system.
Vol. LX, No. I
of Albany
Tenured Faculty
continued
actually have several million
dollars.
F i n a l l y , auditors criticized
S U N Y for its ambiguity o n the
exact amount it was c o m m i t t e d
t o spend o n the entire Amherst
project and its vacillation o n the
actual function of Amherst. The
auditors claimed that such indecision led t o higher planning
costs.
The Trustee decision in 1 9 7 1
to limit enrollment t o 3 0 , 0 0 0
and restrict expenditures on the
project t o $ 6 5 0 million clarified
the magnitude of the Amherst
project and had several long
range
goals—including
the
elimination of m o s t s t u d e n t
housing on the A m h e r s t c a m p u s ,
t h e report said.
Interestingly, t h e findings of
t h e legislative c o m m i t t e e parallel
s o m e of t h e findings of an audit
d o ne by S t a t e
Comptroller
Arthur Levitt's office a b o u t o n e
year ago.
in P a n s
winch w.is o i i g i i u l k
!|
Wli.il c i t e , I will I be i no si leeenl n i m o i s o l .in iniinineul pea, e have
on
hie
demolish.
s'
Ibis
lepoitei
asked
o n e ol
ihe
lulls's
oig.ini /ei'.
"We « inl I" show I ha! we ,/,.»'/ Inisl Nlxou ' he icplied .id, line
11 I.I l Nix
u.is
ipl hi h u d loopbol,
,-u-n il .in agieemenl i
sign,',I
Until ihe ,toi•-.•no
..l\
I'll,
we
lin
aimed and ihe w.i
K in social s e i u . e s
Washington, D C (UPS)-- A NaLionul Day of S t u d e n t Anti-War
ProU'.st has been called by the
S t u d e n t Mobilization C o m m i t t e e
(KM(') lor J a n u a r y 19, o n e day
before Richard M. Nixon lake.',
the o a t h of office (o begin his
second term as President of the
United S t a l e s
"Nixon
has
lied
again,"
charged Chuck Petrin of SMC al
a J a n u a r y 1 1 press conference.
He said the p r o t e s t s are being
scheduled to help build s u p p o r t
lor an in augural ion day march
and rally in Washington D.C
" O n c e again Ihe s t u d e n t a n d war
m o v e m e n t must lake Ihe lend in
forgoing
;i united
reply
lo
Nixon's c h a r a d e , " said Petrin
C a m p u s actions already plan
nt'il
i ncludr
demonstrations,
inarches rallies, leach ins, and
s p e a k OUIM against
the war
Petrin senses "a whole new sense
of o u t r a g e developing ovei l he
President's war policies." Al
though unwilling in estimate ihe
possible s u e of local c a m p u s
deinon.slralions he pointed mil
SMC has received many p h o n e
calls during Ihe h o h d a \ break
fit.in s t u d e n t s asking win.I l h e \
could do when Ihej relui lied lo
ihen college He hopes s t u d e n t s
will also pla\ a mujoi i tile in the
scheduled inauguration da> p r o
ll'sull ,i ipiesll,
lesl
Tile
e
( oiiinuinity Effort
Because lite deniouMialioti is focusing on a coniiiu
y c o n c e r n , il
,s the h o p e ol Ihe o i g a i n / u i g gioups Ihal c o m m u n i t y lesidunls will
pattlctpule m huge nimibeis Theie has been extensive leallelting loi
ihe hilly m o u n d Washington Park and d o w n t o w n Albany
It is also
h o p e d thai huge n u m b e r s ol s t u d e n t s will c o m e , despite Ihe l a d Ihal
most ol Ihe o i g a n i / i n g was d o n e ovei inlet session.
continued
on page
four
n.il m i l 's
f wn
lai g e s l
U111
brella tin11 w.u groups are laying
ihe g r o u n d w o r k for the J a n u a r y
20th inaugural m a r c h a n d rally
In an unusual display of unity
Ihe National Peace Action Coali
lion ( N P A C ) a n d Ihe People's
Coalition for Pence and Justice
(PCPJ)
are co-sponsoring a
march from Arlington C e m e t e r y
lo the Washington M o n u m e n t lo
coincide with N i x o n ' s inaugural
parade.
In
a statement
released
J a n u a r y !> the t w o groups pro-
posed a c o u n t e r " i n a u g u r a t i o n
of c o n s c i e n c e . " Stressing t h e
non-violent nature of t h e a c t i o n ,
Jerry G o r d o n of NPAC said
" t h i s will not be an organized
c o n f r o n t a t i o n . " Sidney Peck pf
PCPJ echoed this and a d d e d ,
" t h i s is a c h a n c e for n o n v i o l e n t
people to express non- violent
o u t r a g e and i n d i g n a t i o n . " T h e r e
has been s o m e c o n c e r n t h a t
inauguration day protests could
turn violent. S t u d e n t s for a Dem o c r a t i c Society and Ihe Progressive Labor Party are planning
a march on Ihe same day that
will end just three blocks from
Ihe Capitol Building.
With two planned d e m o n s ! r a
lions and inevitable
splinter
groups in Washington along with
t h o u s a n d s ol pro Nixon in.augu
ral sight seers on J a n u a r y 20 the
situation will be volatile Seen
n i y measures are lighter than
any previous c e r e m o n y here and
special
credentials are being
rationed out lo newsmen o n l \
after a security check
The
National Lawyers Guild is dis
cussing plans lo m o u n t a major
defense ell'ori m ease "I mass
arrests
Several gioups have orgaill/.ed
bus and car caravans from majoi
cities as far awas as Detroit to
s h u t t le d e m o n s ! . ,,i o r s
lo
Washington for ihe p i o t e s t s
On l-'rulay JanUarj I <l I'CIM
lias urranged a " d e a t h m a r c h " in
Washington
with
pai t u i p a n t s
wearing
placards
sh owing
b o m b e d - o u t villages and t o w n s
O t h e r d e m o n s t r a t i o n s for the
t w o days are planned in m o r e
lhau a score of U.S. cities from
coast to coast and several European cities. T h e list of cities
includes Los Angeles, B o s t o n ,
Chicago, Seattle and H o u s t o n .
Endorsers of Ihe inaugural protests range from Huey P. Newton of the Black P a n t h e r Parly
to Wendell A n d e r s o n , the Governor of M i n n e s o t a . More t h a n a
dozen
congresspeople
have
a d d e d their e n d o r s e m e n t s t o
those of labor u n i o n leaders, t h e
National
Sludent
Association
INSA), a u t h o r s , including Kurl
V o n n e g u t Jr., a n d religious leaders of all faiths.
A s t a t e m e n t issued jointly by
PCPJ a n d N P A C said, " T h e
J a n u a r y 20th march will n o t be
'jusI a n o t h e r peace d e m o n s t r a l i o n any m o r e than a death in
Southeast Asia is just a n o t h e r
death."
Calling
the
Hanoillaiphong air raids " t h e most
massive b o m b i n g the world has
ever w i t n e s s e s , " the s t a t e m e n t
claimed " t h e scale of d e s t r u c t i o n
has passed c o m p r e h e n s i o n . "
Americans " r e m e m b e r
with
bitterness ihe election eve promise thai 'peace is al h a n d , "
said G o r d o n " A n unparalleled
act of political deceit and diplomatic d u p l i c i t y , " is how Sidney
Peck described Nixon's refusal
to h o n o r Ihe O c t o b e r 'JO accord
Peck, a professor of sociology,
said the accords were the first
major s t e p t o w a r d peace in Vietnam since the war began
\lv
iioled that PCPJ is an outgrowth
of ihe New Mobilization C o m
iniltee which in 1 9 6 9 organized
to " e x p o s e the deceit of R i c h a r d
Nixon's pre election p r o n y s e in
1 '.Mis thai he had a 'secret plan
loi peace
Now four years
later in a n o t h e r pre-election promute, Richard Nixon again deceived the American p e o p l e , "
charged Peck.
R e s p o n d i n g lo Nixon's assertion thai w a r critics may p r o l o n g
the n e g o t i a t i o n s , Peck a n s w e r e d
" t h i s is the same language h e ' s
used for y e a r s " C h u c k P e t r i n
felt the groundswell of anti-war
s e n t i m e n t over t h e b o m b i n g of
hanoi
and
Haiphong
forced
Nixon to s t o p b o m b i n g a b o v e
Ihe 2 0 t h parallel
HOT PUSHES
for Weekend
Activities
day night featuring Hector in the even academy award winners.
On Saturday night there will be
fireside lounge. The University
Concert Board is sponsoring a a Pajama Party. Everyone is
encouraged to wear pajamas and
blue grass concert on Friday.
a prize of a "His" and "Hers"
In addition to these groups,
nightshirt will be awarded. Too
others are sponsoring special
Embarasaed?? Come along anyevents. The Class of '75 is having
an ice-skating party at the way— get a present at the door
and dance to the music of Trek.
Mohawk Campus on Saturday
For the athletes a moonlight
afternoon with free beer, hot
bowling party will be happening
dogs, and hot chocolate. The
Saturday
night. Bowling shoes
IFC(Inter Fraternity Council)
are free along with doughnuts.
and the ISC(Inter Sorocity
Council) are sponsoring a beer The lights, except those around
blast Friday afternoon in the the pins, will be dimmed. Then
Colonial flagroom with music on Sunday at the previously
courtesy of WSUA. Indian Quad mentioned coffee house there
has scheduled a dinner on Sun- will be hot buttered rum and
day night and Alumni Quad will t o a s t e d marshmallows. And
remember, the fire will be
be showing Reefer Madness that
blazing.
night also >
Dave Seligmann is very optiThe Wild Wild Weekend
c o m m i t t e is setving hot mistic and enthusiastic about the
chestnuts and pretzels on Friday program and the weekend in
from 11am-3pm. Friday night is general. He commented, "This is
a festival of unique cartoons, a weekend that lets students see
utilizing various audio-visual something for their tax money.
techniques. These cartoons are Money spent for a good time."
something special— some are Enjoy it!
by Robin Sansolo
Welcome back! This weekend
features a celebration sponsored
by the Special Events Board.'
Wild Wild Weekend II began last
night with night skiing. And
there's much more coming, so
read quickly and rush out to join
the festivities.
The weekend, a SUNYA tradition, is under the chairmanship
of Pam Severi and Dave
Seligmann. Their main goal in
coordinating the activities is
diversification. Every aspect of
the program has been carefully
planned to allow maximum
variance. The events include
sports, dancing, a concert, crazy
contests, movies and an immense
amount of eating and drinking.
Due to careful coordination
various groups have contributed
to t h e amount of events
planned. Albany Cinema and
Tower East are showing special
films for this weekend. The
Campus Center Governing Board
is giving a coffee house on Sun-
Professor on Committee
Jack J. Bulloff, science and
technology studies, division of
sciences and mathematics, has
been appointed to serve until
Dec. 31, 1974, as a member of
the American Chemical Society's
council standing committee on
constitution and bylaws. The
appointment was made by Alan
C. Nixon, president of the society.
Dr. Bulloff has served the society as counselor since 1968.
Earlier he was chairman of the
society's division of history of
chemistry. He also is a fellow of
Sigma Xi, of the American Association for the Advancement of
Science, and of the Ohio Academy of Sciences. Professor
Bulloff served as vice president
of the latter group and organized
its mathematics section in 1966.
Computing Head Elected
Financial Aids Deadline Extended
main available until February
15, 1973 in the Office of Financial Aids, Business Administration, Room 109.
Additional National Direct
(Defense} Loan monies are available Tor spring semester 1973.
New applications will be accepted as well as requests to increase
existing N.D.S. Loans. Applica-
Undergraduate Financial Aids
Applications have been mailed
to all students presently receiving aid. The deadline for filing
these applications has been extended from February 1 to February 15, 1973.
Additional applications for any
smdents receiving aid will re-
tions available in BA Room 109.
All students filing New Yorh
Higher Education
Assistance
Loans, for Spring 1973, must
have applications on file in Financial Aids prior to February 1,
1973. Those received after this
date will be subject to new and
more complex processing procedures.
WED JAN 24 7:30
|__J-
cc323
Tech Staff
MEETING FOR PRESENT STAFF
.AND ALL INTERESTED IN THE PRODUCTION
in CC 31 5
r*tv^
R e p o r t e r s ' Inieiesl Meeting
lor iiirreiit and potential reporters
and features writers.
room to be a n n o u n c e d )
We have o p e n i n g s in all d e p a r t m e n t s .
!
Wild Wild Weekend comes to a close -
!
• i
I
- i
A
jy
\
i
with a very special
j
Coffee House -
)
Just prior to intercession
break, John Hartley, Vice President for Management and Planning, announced plans for Colonial Quad Parking lot improvements.
Prompted by complaints concerning sloppy conditions in the
lot, the University Community
Council put in a request that 1)
the Colonial lot be paved as soon
possible,
2) until it is paved,
sufficient gravel be spread in the
lot to prevent further dangerous
rutting, 3) temporary alternative
parking space be found for some
Colonial residents to relieve
some pressure on the lot and, 4)
a public statement be made by
Hartley's office giving the expected time of paving and detailing
reasons it cannot be done any
faster.
Hartley's office replied that
plans for remedying the situation have been underway for
some time. They claim the lot
cannot be paved until Spring
because the weather is too cold
and the asphalt would not adhere.
Meanwhile the directive has
been given to grade the lot and
spread more gravel to temporarily mollify the situation.
Indian Extension Completed
The Indian Quad parking lot
extension was completed prior
to intercession. Reportedly it is
now open for use and students
are requested to park in the
facility. Beginning Monday,
January 29, Security wilt begin
to issue tickets to cars parked on
the lawn.
Kodak Gives Grant
OF A NEWSPAPER!
\y
Wed., J a n u a r y 24 at 7 p m
Library Gets Reports
The SUNYA library has been
designated as one of the depositories for publications of the
Carnegie Commission on Higher
Education. A depository library
is one legally designated to receive without charge copies of
publications by a particular
issuing agency.
Among the first reports, of
those issued by the Carnegie
Commission on various aspects
of higher education, received by
the SUNYA library are "Where
Colleges Are and Who Attends,"
"New Directions in Legal Education," and "The Campus and the
City: Maximizing Assets and Reducing Liabilities." Reports have
been issued by the Commission
on many aspects of the finances
of higher education and on
various types of institutions including private schools, junior
colleges, and graduate schools.
Other research has focused on
cultural or political aspects of
high education on international
programs and on student unrest.
A final report is scheduled for
this year.
The Carnegie Commission on
Higher Education was establish
ed in 1967 by the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching through a fiveyear grant from the Carnegie
Corporation of New York.
Changes in SUNYA traffic regulations as directed by the NYS
Department of Transportation
have been made public by Mr.
Karl Scharl, Assistant Director
for Security.
Perimeter road has been designated a primary road, whereby
all traffic from auxiliary roads
and parking lots is required to
yield right of way. In some
instances STOP signs are or will
be posted at intersections.
One-way roads on campus include the Administration Circle,
the small road in front of the
Physical Education Building and
the two main entrances to the
campus. The Circle and the Gym
roads are one-way in a counterclockwise direction.
The main entrance on Washington Avenue just north of the
Circle is northbound on the eastern access and soutbound on the
west, while the same holds for
the Western Avenue entrance.
All but the Gym road have been
previously designated as oneway.
The speed limit for Perimeter
Road is 30 m.p.h. All other
areas, including parking lots, access roads and service roads, are
1 5 m.p.h.
Parking is prohibited on all
campus raods with the exception
of areas on the Administration
Circle posted with signs.
Caution is advised during the
next few weeks while adjustments are being made. Several
intersect ions offer potentially
dangerous situations and motorists are urged to be particularly
alert.
Colonial to be Paved
Collection Donated Here
Masthead Meeting
T u e s d a y , J a n u a r y 2 3 at 7 : 3 0
Robert J. Robinson, director
of the Computing Center here,
has been elected to the membership committee of EDUCOM,
the lnteruniversity Communications Council with headquarters
at Princeton, N.J. SUNYA is an
elected member of the council.
Mr. Robinson returned recently from Ann Arbor, Mich.,
where he attended the council's
eighth annual meeting. The nonprofit consortium of 111 universities and college works cooperatively to advance the use of
computers and communications
technology in higher education.
It also conducts and coordinates
joint research and development
projects involving computer
technology, operates a consulting service, and puhlishes a quarterly bulletin.
an important part of Kodak's
program of higher education for
many years. Introduced in 1956
to assist privately supported
schools, the plan was expanded
in 1969 to include publicly
supported institutions. It was
enlarged further in 1972 to provide for grants to two-year public and private colleges.
New Traffic Regulations in Effect Here
State University of New York
at Albany has received an unrestricted grant in the amount of
$3,250 under Eastman Kodak
Company's 1972 Educational
Aid Program.
The grant, made on the basis
of $250 for each year attended,
indicates education received at
SUNYA by employees of the
company They include Reinhold Bachmann, Kodak Park Division, Rochester; Royee E.
Coon, Kodak Apparatus Division, Rochester; and Francis J.
McCarthy, Kodak Office, California. They joined the company
within five years following graduation and now art- completing
their fifth year of company employment, provisions of the
awards.
Mr. Bach man received a
Bachelor of Arts from SUNYA
($750), Mr. Coon, a Bachelor of
Science and Master of Science
($1,250), and Mr. McCarthy, a
Bachelor of .Science und Master
of Science ($1,250).
Direct grants have represented
Giose Rimanelli, of the depart
ment of Hispanic and Italian
studies, has given his personal
collection of material on the
recently deceased poet, Ezra
Pound, to the SUNYA library.
The donation includes nine
photographs; two articles in Italian by Dr. Rimanelli which appeared in "Le Carte Parlanti"
and "RoLosei"; and a letter
typed to the editor of "Rotosei"
about Dr. Rimanelli's article and
signed by Pound.
Shown' in the photographs are
Pound in Rapallo, Italy, 1935, in
his house in Rapallo, 1935; in
Merano, Italy, 1952; Pound's
musical scores based on poems
by Villon and Cavalcanti, Count
Boris Rachewilt/.'s Caslel Fun
tana in lirunnenhurg, Tirolo,
Italy, where the poet lived after
his return to Italy in 19!YK;
Professor Rimanelli with Mrs.
Shakespier, Pound's first wife,
Sigri do Walter, grandson of
Pound, and group photos of
Pound, Rimanelli, and Pound's
editor, and others.
\
STATUTE UNCONSTITUTIONAI
In response to the unrest that
swept the campuses of the country in 19(iK, Congress passed a
federal statute which made it
possible to refuse financial aid
from the government to "disruptive college students." This
statute, however, has been declared unconstitutional by a
federal panel in Chicago
The statute was examined as a
result of the denial of such a
federal loan to Jeanne Rasche
Del.iff of the University of Illinois Because of her participation in an an I i-war demonstration in 1970, she was convicted
of a misdemeanor, and became
ineligible for the loan As of
now, it had not been decided
whether or not the ruling would
M a r c h 2 4 - 3 0 , 1 9 7 3 $271.50per
llMilit t u r n , l.l > ' . U\ HiMuiud.i. 6 nights
Hnhday
I n n . UrMiiMiiW
person
BERMUDA COLLEGE
parson
(triple
.iccum.l
Be.miuda. (i r m j h u
and 'tinner d a i l y , H o u n d i n p liaustars b u t w u m i
.in l a x .
WEEK TOUR
A p r i l 2 0 - 2 6 , 1 9 7 3 $298.80 par
tin hicj«s H o u n d I n p Ihylit h u m Albany Ui
1.J i...r•. .,i B u n n u d i a n d H o t e l . B n i a k f . t i i and
EARLY FINALS POPULAR
II won't be surprising that
more students will be able to
enjoy their Christmas vacations,
without January finals, that is.
The Chronicle reports that a
recent survey shows an increase
in the number of schools that
are scheduling final exams before the Christmas vacations,
and that 80% of the colleges in
this country have this arrangement. The study was done for
the American Association of
Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, and a total of
2,-150 institutions was used.
A number of adjustments have
been employed in order to adapt
to the new arrangement This
includes the "early semester"
calendar, which is followed here
at SUNYA for a total o\' 97(1
schools, as was reported by The
Chronicle
AUTOMATIC "A"
A r e y o u interested ill a d e f i n i t e
"A" in a course? Well, the Spartan Daily reports that such a
course is planned for the fall
semester at California Stale University at San Jose. The course is
"Principles of Sociology," the
professor will be Dr. Azmy
Ibrahim, and the system used
will be the Personalized System
of Instruction (PSI).
There are five or six booklets,
each covering the material of
two units. Reading the material
and doing the exercises should
prepare the student for each unit
exam. Passing a test with an A
allows the sludent to continue
with the next unit. Anything
lower than this requires the student to review the work and
repeat the lest.
Everyone will, therefore, have
As going into the final, which
covers the same material as the
unit tests Should a student get
he-low an A on the final, however, he must study over again
and then repeal the final. As Dr
Ibrahim explains, this is an attempt to do away with the idea
of an inferior education throughout the country
Fried Chicken Dinner
Includes H.iund t u p
On,if) a c c o i n u d d l i o n s d l Hit* N*;w
ait]Mii I and I m l e l , ( H a t u i i rn.s, dirt-are and i n t t j i h d t i u n a l
be appealed to the U.S. Supreme
Court.
Sun. Jan. 21 6-8 PM
photos by dishaw
l
with salads, soda,
dinriui daily. H o u n d t r i p nanstHfb IJHIWHH-II Air p u n ,md l l o i e l . Motel U*
and HMluiPe-, also IIM t u d e d .
ARGUS TRAVEL
STUYVtSANT PLAZA
funded by i l u d e n t u *
489-4739
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19,1973
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
& rolls in the
Indian Quad Lower Tower Lounge
Rem trribar... Never a Charge For Our Service
(Convenient Parking Facilitiet}
gggggggggggggggggggggggga^
i
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
I
O P E N D A I L Y : M o n d a y t h r u Friduy
Wml. a n d F r t . ' t i l 8 |>m, Sat 1 0 ' i l l 3 p m
"Hot Toti" Buttered Rum Drink
Hot Chocolate
Marshmallow Roast in CC Fireside Lounge
PAGE TWO
by Marc Litcofsky
According to The Chronicle of
Higher Education, the voting of
the panel was '2 to 1 in favor of
this decision, and it bad been
staled that "the first essential of
due process of law" had been
violated.
BERMUDA
V
Denial of Aid Unconstitutional
w
$1.25 with Indian Quad Assoc, card, $1.75 w/o IQA
Advance ticket sale on Indian Quad dinner lines
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
-—
1
Youth Fare Discount Suspended by Board
The Easter and summer plans
of many SUNYA students will.
be severly affected by the elimination of discount youth announced Dec. 7 by the Civil
Aeronautics Board (CAB). Hie
National Student Lobby (NSL)
and senior citizen groups are
seeking to reverse the CAB decision through Congressional
action. C AB voted 3-2 that
domestic youth fares are unjustly discriminatory and should
no longer be permitted. The
decision implied the same fate
for international youth fares.
"The wolf is at the door/' said
NSL Executive Director Layton
Olson. "Although CAB has set
no specific date for terminating
youth fares pending a hearing
early in 1973, on the effect of
such a move, the discounts could
very well end as early as March."
"Since Congress can prevent
CAB from eliminating youth
fares, students should ask Congressmen Harley Staggers (D-W.
Va.), John Jarmen (D*Okla.) and
Sam Devine (R-Ohio) to insure
that the House Interstate and
Foreign Commerce Committee
sends the youth fare question to
the House floor during the first
half of 1973," said Olson.
"Students can also ask their own
congressmen and senators to
vote for youth fares when the
question comes up."
Senators Frank Moss (D-Utah)
and Charles Percy (R-Ill.) and
Cong. James Harvey (R-Mich.)
introduced bills in the last Congress authorizing discount fares
for both youth (under age 22)
and/or senior citizens (over age
65). The youth and aging groups
made a powerful coalition. The
Moss-Percy bill passed the Senate but died in a House-Senate
conference due to a stalemate on
another issue. NSL will inform
its 200 member schools and
other students when such bills
are reintroduced.
"CAB will continue to defer
final cancellation of youth fares
if students and Congress start to
take action," said Russell
Lehrman, head of Continental
Marketing Corp., a Houstonbased youth fare sales concern.
In 1968 CAB reversed its own
examiner when college students
protested the examiner's decision
that youth fares were unjustly
discriminatory. CAB was soured
on youth fares since then after
receiving mail from older travelers and legal pressure from Continental Trailways Bus System,
which has lost riders due to low
air fares.
On the current decision CAB
Chairman Secor Browne, Vice
Chairman Whitney Gilliliand and
member Robert Timm voted to
end youth fares. CAB members
Roberty Murphy and G. Joseph
Minetti voted to keep them. The
majority admitted that the discount fares undoubtedly generate more traffic for airlines. But
the board argued that the fares
are closed to people who would
otherwise travel discount fare
and are open to people who
would otherwise travel full fare
to an extent that this age discrimination is unjust. The minority
argued that the discounts raise
so much added revenue that,
rather than burden full fare passengers, they benefit these travelers by contributing to common fixed costs. Moreover, if
any airline feels it's losing on
youth fares, they can cut or
abolish the discounts, the dissenters added.
As NSL points out, airlines
make healLhy profits on youth
fares except when guaranteeing
reservations. Some airlines have
scheduled extra planes for youth
fare passengers while others have
officially offered reserved scats
at youth fare prices. Both de
facto and official guaranteedseat youth fares are very unfair
and uneconomical in comparison
to standby fares. However, the
board lumped both kinds of
fares together in its argument
that the Tares are not sufficiently
successful in generating passengers and revenue t o warrant discriminating against middle-aged
passengers.
Y ou th fares we re made t o
attract passengers who did n o t
have settled travel habits. T h e
Capitol Action
We have been informed by t h e
NYS Office of General Services
(OGS) thai the new e x p a n d e d
tie line s y s t e m which was effective O c t o b e r 2, 1972 incurs toll
charges from the major comm u n i c a t i o n centers in t h e net-
work t o locations in the surr o u n d i n g areas. T h i s capability
was designed into t h e system by
OGS. Undi r t h e old tie line
system
th -re were n o toll
charges. You may recall that we
were given access t h e the N Y S
tie line network by O G S in
1969.
Because of the high cost a n d
heavy v o l u m e of these local toll
calls o n t h e tie line system,
especially after normal office
LOSE
20 POUNDS
IN
TWO WEEKS!
hours, OGS proposed to remove
S U N Y A from t h e tie line netw o r k effective December 1,
1972. After hurried conferences,
b o t h on this c a m p u s and with
O G S , we were granted a temporary reprieve by OGS with the
understanding that we would imp l e m e n t controls to restrict tie
line usage and t o curtail nonofficial calls.
Currently, O G S is conducting
an extensive examination of calls
m a d e on the tie line network t o
d e t e r m i n e whether
frequently
called n u m b e r s are of an official
business nature. If calls can be
identified as n o t official, the
calling party will be charged
personally for the calls, in accordance with our regular procedures,
Smokey's friends
don't play
with matches.
Only you can
prevent forest fires.
"jmw
t
f
flzlren
f
X.
fli
fflSiBa!
p
EXPRESS
YOURSELF
III
THIS
SEMESTER-
WW
f
Mi/Mm
m
TO
STLYVESANT
PLAZA
Y o u r cooperation in limiting
calls in the tie line system t o
official university busiflt'.s* will
be appreciated.
%,
- f-
con't from front page
Community groups participating in the demonstrations unhid
Albany Welfare Rights Organi/.artion, United Tenants, t'cnu-i in
United Labor Action, Norlhs.de Advisory Council. Prison hu|e..i
Friends ol' the Farmworkers, and the New Democratic ('nalin. n
Peace groups participating include People's Coalition loi IV.K>- and
Justice, Women's International League lor Peace, the IndoJiiii.i
Peace Campaign, Clergy and Lay Concerned. Vietnam Veicun
Against flie War, Youth Against War and Fascism. The Sann Rust
Coalition lo Sign the Tieaty Now, and the Albany High Ubetalun
Front.
Tie Line Calls Under Examination
Editors
Note
The
following
memorandum
has been
distributed
to deans,
department
heads and administrative
officers
regarding tie line usage.
restricted
standby
discounts
were justified o n t h e grounds
t h a t y o u n g p e o p l e have more
time than m o n e y while m a n y
middle-aged travelers are businessmen with travel expense
a c c o u n t s a n d fixed schedules.
Involved with N S L o n t h e disc o u n t fare fight are t h e National
Association of Retired Person*
National Association of Retired
Federal
Employees,
National
Council of Senior Citizens and
several airlines.
Famous I' S Women
Ski Team Diet
During ihc nun-snow off season
the U S Women's Alpine Ski Team
members go on the "Ski learn" diei
to lose 20 pounds in two weeks
I hat's right
20 pounds in 14 days1
The basis of the diel is chemical food
action and was devised by a famous
Colorado physician especially for the
U S Ski Team Normal energy is
maintained (very important') while
reducing You keep "lull"
no
starvation
because ihc diet is designed ihat way' It's a diet that is
easy to follow whelher sou work,
travel or stay at home
I ,m is, honestly, a fantastically
suctcsslul dirt If ii weren't, the V S
Women's Ski I cam wouldn't be permitted lo use it' Right'' So. give
yourself the same break ihc U S Ski
feam gels 1 osc weight the scicnlifit.
proven way F.ven U you've tried .ill
the lit her diets, you owe n to yourself to try the I S Women's Ski
Team Diet t hat is, if you really do
warn to lose 20 pounds in two weeks
Order today Tear this out as a
reminder
Send only S2 00 ($2 2) for Hush
Service)
cash is (> K
to Information Sources C o , P Q Box 982,
Dept ST, Carpintena. Calif 93013
Don't order unless you expect to lot*
20 pounds in two weeks1 Because
thai'i what the Ski I c a m Diet will do!
M i i m n m m i m i i i B !
n
1 n i T
\\v
M M M H
B
ITU u xru U U U U |f u U D
the international
film group
slate university of n e w
u v ir u to u u
'IJ
TT-A
u, v u-
york ai albany
funded by studimt ta
THE CINEMA OF JAPAN
IKIRU
Friday, January 1 ^
' ¥$.%( <x£'&ii)i$Ji'.* v
7:15 and 10:00
LC 25 '
UGETSU
Friday, January 26
7:1 5 and 9:45
LC 25
WOMAN OF THE DUNES
Friday, February 2
•——•—————«
PAGE FOUR
,,
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
7:1 5 and 10:00
LC 1 8
CUP AND SAVE
•••••^•••mBIBIBIB!,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19. 197''
STUYVESANT
PLAZA
Western Ave. corner Fuller Road, Albany!
FREE BUSSES WILL RUN:
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY
every half hour from 5:30 to 9:30 pm
SATURDAY
every half hour from 11:30 to 6:30 pm
BUSSES W I L L STOP:
At S U N Y A : Administration Circle, S t o p i no. 2, 3, and 4 , and tha S a m o a BldOA l S T U Y V E S A N T : H a l l ' i Dtuy», Flail'», D a n n y ' i and Howard Johnton'i.
ROOM
SERVICES
!
&
s M
C R E A T I V E
tinctly
will
by J o h n Jekabson
interested ,in-pushfrig for more
bombing raids. This is their
chance to get those admiral
stripes." For 30 to 40 days, the
carrier is "on the line" without a
letup from the grueling workload. There is little* to look
forward to when the ship goes
on liberty. Rest and relaxation
for the crew is a five-day stop at
Subic Bay in the Philippines, and
then a return for another Vietnam tour.
Subic, which is the largest U.S.
supply base in the Pacific, and
the storage point for all the
ammunition going to Vietnam, is
no glamour spot. Around the
base is a typical military town
Alternative Features News Service
Is t h e U.S. N a v y in f o r t h e
same fate that d e s t r o y e d
the
A m e r i c a n A r m y as a n e f f e c t i v e
fighting force in Vietnam? F o r
t h e past e i g h t m o n t h s , t h e N a v y
has b e e n d o i n g t h e b u l k o f t h e
f i g h t i n g a n d t h e f a m i l i a r signs o f
d i s i n t e g r a t i o n h a v e all a p p e a r e d •increased
anti-war
dissension,
racial tensions, and riots, acts o f
s a b o t a g e , a n d g r o w i n g use o f
hard drugs. Even if the f i g h t i n g
s t o p s s o o n , it w i l l t a k e y e a r f o r
the Navy to recover f r o m the
" V i e t n a m curse" that had emoralized the American m i l i t a r y .
21-year
old
ship's
fireman,
P a t r i c k C h e n o w e t h , as t h e c u l p rit
and
charged
him
with
"wartime sabotage"
a crime
carrying
a
30-year
sentence.
C h e n o w e t h is a q u i e t , unassuming
sailor
from
Puyallyp,
W a s h i n g t o n w h o grew up in a
f o s t e r h o m e . H e has n e v e r been
active in any k i n d o f political
g r o u p . P r e s e n t l y h e is i n t h e b r i g
a t T r e a s u r e I s l a n d , w h e r e h e has
been h e l d w i t h o u t bail f o r f o u r
m o n t h s while t h e case is g o i n g
t h r o u g h its p r e l i m i n a r y hearings.
" T h e N a v y has an i n c r e d i b l y
s h a k y c a s e , " says E r i c S e i l z ,
attorney for t h e
y o u n g sailor.
" T h e r e are n o e y e w i t n e s s e s , f i n -
S e r i o u s r a c i a l clashes o n airc r a f t carriers have received w i d e
publicity recently, but the Navy
v i e w s as m o r e u n i m o u s t h e rush
of sabotage incidents
keeping
U.S. w a s h i p s i m m o b i l i z e d a n d
away f r o m the ( i u l f of T o n k i n .
S i n c e t h e air w a r has i n t e n s i f i e d ,
mysterious explosions have ripp e d t h r o u g h several h u g e a i r c r a f t
earners s t a t i o n e d just o f f N o r t h
Vietnam.
Millions
of
dollars
w o r t h of
r e p a i f s h a v e IUM-H c l o n e
o n these .-.hips, a n d o t h e r s d e l i b e rately sabotaged in o t h e r parts
o f the Pacific.
much
sabotage o n the s h i p the
Navy
is f r u s t r a t e d a n d
for
looking
a n y o n e t o serve as a scape-
g o a t , " the attorney
says.
charge
sabotage
of
wartime
"The
is
b e i n g used t o b o o s t the p u n i s h m e n t a n d t o m a k e m y c l i e n t an
'example'
to
the
rest
of
the
trial
was
in
Nor-
crew.'
A
similar
sabotage
completed
folk,
last
month
Virginia.
military
In
that
judge
case, a
found
Jeff
A l l i s o n , t h e son o f an O a k l a n d ,
California
guilty
fire
highway
patrolman,
of setting a $7.2
aboard
USS
the
Forrestal.
maximum
million
aircraft
carrier
Although
penalty
the
could
have
over
y e a r s a g o , he publicly
two
Zumwali
took
s t a t e d h e w a n t e d Lo change "Th,,
lily-white
Navy."
racist
He
image
of
u, e
i n s t i t u t e d a number
o f c h a n g e s , r a n g i n g f r o m relaxed
rules
on
hair
active
and
o|
m,Jr(.
less i h , m
First $ 2 0 0 . 869-5781.
one
percent
of
[he
o f f i c e r s are black. A t
theofficer
training
Annapolis
college
at
are
black.
Most
of
conservative
towns
and
have
little
in
dealini>
ex perience
minority
'62
63
<n , „ ,
with
of
g e r p r m l s , or any
evidence
other
linking
physical
dence l i n k i n g h i m
The
prosecution
tirely
on
witnesses
ted
physical
with
case
statements
the act.
lenced
of
three
admit-
the sabotage, hut t w o
to
five
years
of
hard
by
men
the
on
of
sabotage
persist.
Constellation,
USS
of
the
scene
joking.
r e p o r t s t h a i some o f its sensitive
We
of
have
ihe
like
evidence
m en
that
o n the ship
Ibis- b r a g g i n g
they
hy
The
mutiny
talked
121)
equipment
with"
sabotage
ship away f r o m V i e t n a m . "
American
black
has heen
Oilier
w e r e r e s p o n s i b l e l o r k e e p i n g the
DEAD
trains.
the
creativity,
resume
ality.
Start
every
noticeable,
and
you
your
desk
you
with
OR
Quick
ALIVE:
cash.
AM-FM
fits
your
preparing
that
personnow
apartment
dr.
New
includes:
for
PRICE
(l)prlnter's
proof,
(2)a
"think"
session
with
creative
you
Apt.
Publications
Inc.
'73
Kong, W.C.
presents
Fields,
a Winter
Thursdays
and
thru
9:00.
Film
toga Spa " S u m m e r "
go
press, h n i
in
rumors
and
about
sabot.ige
top
sabolage
ganued
an
answer
officials
on
Yel
or
group
railed
iSOSl.'
is
blame
;i " l o o s e l y
little-known
hippie types
Slop-,
i-mharnis-siiig
When
demanded,
the
this
Slop
m
Ills
have
having
and
I
completely
any
S 1,11
I.,.!.-,{
i n f l u e n t ,• o n
m
Naval
personnel "
Lite
I h e ship-, in t i n H u l l <
is h a i d
" W e work
.llil'ls - . . m i d l i n e s Inn
sailoi
hum
Ihe
has
the s h i p . "
o n t h e s h i p s , v.
Consh
for
Ihe d o p e
runs o u t
on
highest
led
to
to
escape
the
Drug
Rehabilitation
at S u b i c ,
best
which
dope
dealing
Pacific.
spot
(Place:
"Sabotage
on
numern
most
ol
with
living
says
conditions,"
"There
The
political
the
war,
the
have l i r i i u t f h l
lo
SilboLlltte,
its
llartx.r.
.mil
i,ur|i
Ihi
such
the
Kitty
CSS
'"'d
I he nil carrier
'"»'
'hi- mnliriy
'he
I'SS
newlo
a.s
line
the
A
Ihe N a v y Simply
"xeludinn
h a w li
riieusmi:
"
ttXOBB PHP tmtmmtBsaxmmama
i
>i
will
and
17 TRIPLE DECKER SANDWICHES
applications for conference assbtaate now available!
CALL 459 1405 or 459 7090
ll"'
lor
Office
Interested
position
June
Ciinlcicnte
Pl;iiiiiiii)>
()|
2S
Student
in
involve
/\ii|>usl
invilrcl
Sara-
mini
\<)7.\.
All
room
and
'"
I'
Shakes
Opposite Macy's
ileitis
BBHIfi
Jiuaa
tmnminnnmn
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
m a r t led
Call
ol
JK50.00
pins
linn- l o i n n
hoard
loi
loi
l''7.V
All
pcliocl. A p p l i c a t i o n
applicants
arc
deadline
n-cpiirccl
lo
is
couples
78b-7 758
(18
oi
i n r n '
'
]
oi
wilte,
il»
meetings. Plan
Sunday, January
21, I ' m
at
" " '
M u n . n v
<>M
j
"'
'
cause
pain
wouldn't
Hall.
Center
I'm
additional
11, I')7
1 at
7:00
l i a l l i o o i n . < >l<
information
in t h e A s s e i n l ' U
stop
liv
( jm|"
1 111.
Learn
to
Qualified
sing,
teacher.
%b.Vj
UGL Y
Sl.nl
(or
plan.
the
Enclose
Weight
Control.
Avenue,
Albany,
Mail hy January
receive
bonus.
FOR
Send
Contiol
to
Ymk.
FAT.
life.
l; a i r v i e w
p.m.
a
Weight
Huny!
You'll
27,
19? J
Contiol
he
whirl),
I M
M/IC/I
ii
uiittwtiit'
millirt'
rrcoiiHUt'd.
prrsniHil
Kitidr
In
HOUSING
|
iti'iliimin
l s
m
si n u .
disturbing
cu'ii
il
ilic-j
| ic 11111 c d o
emotion
could
IVi-lings
Nor
between w o n d e i l u l ami terrible.
[
occurs
only
wnli
wrong
as c o r r e c t i o n
do
linolion
I
Disturbance
situations
is m a d e .
|
conditions
when
l'eelin|!s
as
change
Munitions
the cause
with
iillc'iini',
instantly
change
unci p i e c i s c
and
Same
p a i n , n c a n n o t lie e l i m i n a t e d w i t h o u t
gradiiallv
they
change"
i
I
nul
I [icy
In
change
or
sliorl.
of
pain
19,
I'JV
•'R1DAY
for
semester.
$4b/month.
Near busline. 4 8 9 - 5 6 5 1 .
W a n t e d : 2 bed. apt., heated, maxir
anytime
thru
December.
after
4:00
P.M.
but
or
from
sides
is
1
Female
apartment
mate
STUIMsN'l J O B
OPPORTUNITY BOOKLET
Kit.
1, Box
II C, Orleamt,
Mass., 0 2 0 5 3
most
mil
an
disturbances
that
Ihey
accident
suller
wrong.
force
of
the
all
This
do.
from
Bobby,
255
State
The new Classified deadlines
are as follows:
Monday 1 2. noon
Thursday 10:30 a.m.
r o o m .
On
busline.
Call
2
bed
apt.,
maiximum
$135,
Park
area,
occupancy
thru
December.
heated,
Washington
anytime
436-9595
after
1,250 - W i n t h r o p e A v e n u e . 3 o r 4
Nice
laige
apartment
17/-7384,
bus
439-9241,
- Room
lot
one
male
Heat
included.
436 1398 aflei
change
$50.
10:30
Call
P.M.
Ask
Room
lo
needed: Neai
vn/iiionlh.
busline, up
Call
Kalhy,
•I 16 4 5 4 1 .
'.'
I iiendly
People
shaie
large
ished,
carpeted.
needed
apartment.
Call
to
Furn-
489-2033.
Bodioom
apartment
Heated.
loi
lent.
$210.
Call
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
same
where
wrong.
disturbance
allness
Nature
a
of
pain
and
Albany
Student
Press
(.mil,nul
l a n l y o f t e n t h i s semes-
lei
would
.nul
t HUP,
<V1'J
h k i ! i ider
plGflse
( all
ever y
I I'.belh,
M'M.
" L O S T a-FOUND"
I ost
Blue
Ski
Jacket
(girl's
436-4541.
Lust
M a o
o e i o n o in u
n o l u b o o k . Last t o i m . H o w a r d .
Lost:
f me
l l i u i s d a y , LC
loi,
State
g o Id
IJI a c e l o l ,
IU, computet
Quad
t-xhomo sen'imantal value!!
ward.
con-
CM H u m a n i t i e s .
Please c a l l A n n o ,
welcomes
you back
to school
and hopes
you had a
very good
vacation.
Re-
/-404\).
However,
are e x a m p l e s
over
lh.it
all
stem
So
makes
the
perfect,
self-
emotion
GOING TO MONTREAL?
results
evident guide. Therefore, anyone can discover
the
See
Street, evenings.
489-4814.
medium) - rewaid - no questions
proof
disturbing
apt.
w a n t e d for s p r i n g s e m e s t e i . O w n
A n y o n e w h o plans o n d n v i n g l o
mil Islands.
Kor Cupc (.'ml
C o m p l e t e lisl ol 1 ni.sint's.M-K re
iMiipltiyi'i's
nuii'inM
suitimi'i
S e n d $2.01) l o :
admit
wrong
basement
busline.
to
be
Room ,ind lio:ircl(2 meals per clay)
from i^ per day
Ladies oi couples preferred. Groups ol male and female
students with references will be accepted,
incapable of error.
lest the persistent diverse force of
alleetiug
all
life
with
the
hook.
Nature
"I'orce
O p p o s i l e s " by Kenneth Charles. A v a i l a b l e
Of
in
hard covei al $6.00 ami paperback $2.50
Send to: International University Trust, 9842
Aliunde Itlvd , South Ciale. California 90280
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
F R I D A Y , J A N U A R Y
spring
apartment,
IU7U S T U D E N T J O B
Ol'I'OltTIINITY BOOKLET
•asl
conllicl
both
uili
wanted
489-2033.
in in.in w i l l c u d .
We
large
785-4613.
roommate
3
,
i
I..,I
i ,i„. ,.,„,
m i l e m o t i o n are a c k n o w l e d g e d , die w a r spirit
•• ol
from
Female
Co.
1.11)
share
games.
wanted.
minutes
campus. $B0.'m"nth.
Furnished.
ex-
91 si SI., Suite I F , N ew Y i n k ,
N Y . i i H U H i . ' i ^ i s i i 9(157
nit r n
7
glad
you did,
I-AKN TOI' MONEY! I'ail lllll'
p r o m o t i n g student H ivel. Call
o i W i i l e : T h e A m e i i c a n Sin-
v
room;
relegiaph Ave.,
Ceiilei.
Looking for a female companion
$70.
11 1
New
profes-
IWI-t
of
please
loi Charlie.
Itirmshecl, M a l e S I , neai
Inn
ttonclciliil
cauishcs
Wednesday, January
music.
Weight
oi
time,
Law,
home
C a l l 4 4 ' ) - ' j , i 14 e v e n i n g s
'
l o lie piese
7:0(1 in < <
HOME.
my
STUDENT TO DISTRIBUTE
VERY UNUSUAL COMPUTER
DATING l-ORMS.
S400-S(iOO/MO.
WKITI. UOX 50K, IHHU.DI K,
COLO
Tiavcl
apartmentmate
Own
Available
training-.:
LOSE
I: m o p e ,
full
in
I j,go
cli'nl
Male
line.
U e i k e l o y ( A . 94 7 0 4 ,
n / ii f i i m r / ' / i t /
n
create
interest
donn
enjoying
oldei).
JOBS
STUIH NTS-Austiaha,
sunimoi
goodies.
to
students.
Typing
and
O V E R S E A S
rates.
IN M Y
/-7896.
road
time
3-5
of
Vermont,
489-0661.
Business
born
I lept. I d, 2550
trvt'iih
.itlciicl
Sei
single
School
4:00p.m. Deborah Goodrich
JG D O N E
Voice
Call
spaio
week).
unused
i n a p a r t m e n t of l o u r . F u r n i s h e d .
this
Family
in y o u i
pei
loinialiim,
h k a -clililc as ii ii in \
conference
German
Reasonable
7/ping:
M u n - F i i t o r an a p p o i n t m e n t .
/ hi- ItmutiH
|!
.ippK
will
flights.
information
write
482-8432.
Live-in
lor
Agency.
o p p o i t u n 11 y
^
!
< eim i
( A . s
week.
there
salary
Ivvo m a n d a t o r y
OPEN DAILY
9 urn 11um
SUNDAYS to 10:30 pni
DELI to 10
his.
other
436-9595
%itciie Oileid Guide, t* JleuU*t<} Peace
liiivon
44 IVo/f Rood
money
Albiiny
.n.iil.iM'
lo
Inc.
(3-10
N u Liiko Avu
posnnm
now
Campus
arc
a in
S,
i arc
I ilc
n u c l e i H I . i i l n . n i-s
will
Assistant
( u n i t - ] f i n i- 7
pet
a current,
to the University
869-8248.
exlia
pail/full
available
Lain
21>4 ClHltlnl Avil
catering to all your affairs
Summer
$11/
1 dog.
465-6959.
8C.9-24 7 4 .
a
cigarettes 397pack
When
Summer Planning Conference 1 9 B
I'ailui
/-//04.
Afro earrings
Applications
Earn
have
contact J i m , 7-5070.
2 people and
w i t h garages a n d p a i k i n g o n
-
H.A.
'A b l o c k f r o m b u s l i n e . F i r e p l a c e s
Wanted;
length.
T'Pl
to
day
you
stone w i t h
for
The
Brattleboro,
Any
456-0998.
lens.
' "
i n >"•
'•• i mjangg B EBgHH3 mmtl Bfflj
I k
Fktar
earrings 2 for $1
\buy 4 pair get 1 free
'
W i l l i n.,
Always a Special Treat on Sundays
Dehaous
3.5
..n
War, il w i l l In- .i I ' m . ' I'll '
Navy
student
Love,
(Busline)
Virginia
459-7."'.?.
one
Like W o w !
room,
story, 5 bedroom, 2 bath brown-
T e r m Papers T y p e d • A n y k i n d -
7-8987
babysitting
vices
camera
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
'"
are
l)n-
Couples
situations
w h i i In H I
is
schedules
penses p a i d , s i g h t s e e i n g , t - i e e i n
'' "
pi-i i|ili'
Navy's malaise
because
bh.cks
it
s i v e n r s s " us i h e I'oul
HaHsayanvpa,
l , v I L'O black o n
' h e N " v y h , i s had a l o n g l r a d i l i o n
111
ill
lllitlee
Hawk
Comlellalmn,
time,
new,
another
Own
If
O v e r s e a s T o u r C o . , 56'/? W e s t e r n
/83-5231.
money
sions
'• '••'•
IKHlles
problems
I
toi
Mairied
'
C h a i r m a n K c l w a n l Il.-l..-.
on
50mm
Gary
semester. U n i v e r s i t y
la 3 5 m m
On
S. A m e r i c a , A f n c a . M o s l
w a u l l o go hack l o Ihe bases, so
Hactal
$194,
I''
h l e i n s is o n l y i l e . a m r
"
I,II
eiminii1!- •
is i n v i ' M i t l i i t i n i l
just
iti'i.
t h e y f i g u r e out the easiest w a y
""''•
for
SKIIslth !-• 1 >k like an Olyml>i • Ch nip I- la'arii |lo se and
In h i m v Hi • easy wii y ! - a t
In m e ! with i SkiSkil! -Before
ll try the 1 ills! Wj-iti' l o u s i e r
i> •silt 11, lie S ittinnw, M •IH()02
'
1
IKJIIII
Yel,
and
/-5260.
baby-sitting
week. Call
/32-/660.
Retina
Call
looking
Ih'' N.,\\
hiwcsl
connrChhMinal
that
men
im'(|N.,l,i\
sion,
consciousness
the
racial
the
the
isn't
Retail
speakers. L i k e
$ 2 5 . C a l l M a r k at
to
ships comes f r o m d i s s a t i s f a c t i o n
sailor
made
lor
unclear,
application
Theatre).
Returns. For
Ave.,
Sex
things l o o k
b u t alas s u c h is l i f e .
2 R o o m m a t e s needed t o share 3
7:00
round-tiip. Weekly
Open
Pub-
nude
Dear E v i e ,
YORK-FRANKFURT.
$159
Grad s t u d e n t w i t h 8 - m o . o l d son
,,
the
in
plastic
share
skis, c u s t o m
$ / 5 . Call
pose
or M i t c h
Nordica
1 0 0 % Glass.
to
expose on
Campus.
qualil
Center
is a c t u a l l y
New
Pan A R - 4 X
I hi
shipboard
d r u d g e r y and get t u r n e d over
needed
newspaper
price $ 1 4 4 . Call J o n , 4 5 / - 7 / I 2 .
themselves i n its d r u g ad-
much
i the \ . i \ \
you!
nvitli
illuMll
atili lllilltaiy
ly
competing
Girls
boots.
,i
has
recent
by s a y i n g , " a c l i v i s l s , a n h .neiul,
In
is safer t o have o n
speech, A d m i r a l Charles D u n c a n
dismissed dlsseiisi
,,
of
(liu
"Great"
G r a s s , <>\
the
slo b u c k l e
S a m u e l . / - 8 / 4 1.
in the i
heroin
NEW
area
paid.
selaer, N . Y . or c a l l 4 8 2 - 0 8 2 4 .
b u c k l e b o o t s . S i / e 8'/?. $ 3 9 . H o n
Kodak
turn
I
Sacrifice!
dealing o n the con!
(I ic ts
T h e Naval brass says l i t t l e publicly
Hml
c o n l ' i c i s . He also says some m e n
lo
Was
sailor.
of
access
that
black
reported.
in t h e P a n lie.
t
offic
beatings,
for
from
the Navy
space
lications - 2 Green Street • Rens-
even-
Call Paul - 4 5 7 4 6 9 3 .
petty
thing
ad
Commissions
refrigerator,
Deborah Goodrich.
part
flexible. Write: Apt.
broil
while
mention.
Munari
and
the s h i p , f i g h l s break o u t , "
4(/j-8()20,
sell
•Sue
462-7048.
05301.
thai
"Every
crejLsingly
is
now
al
for
to
Ilouis
Size 8. E xcellent c o n d i t i o n . $ 2 5 .
the
thai
room
Navy
$25.
then
arming
the
shown
the
"The
over
oiler
time
newspapeis.
are
sailor says, s p e a k i n g a b o u t r a c i a l
u n s c h e d u l e d repairs ,il US bases
had
there-
good
Men's
with
from
old,
lilac!
" T h e easiest
gel
liesl
Bonin
• M e n ' s size 8 ,
seasons
ings.
dogs t o .-.mell o u t grass, so s m a c k
"When
"tampered
unreported
to
Hanger
.mall scale acts of
says his i n v e s t i g a t i o n has
s o m e .151) m e n
but
?
for
table,
Washington-Quail
Festival
584-9330
information.
Help Wanted: Students
bestest
'Tis true? M a y b e soon
James
Sundays,
Call
Call
tail
pong
Men/Women:
Saratoga P e r f o r m i n g A r t s Center
tires,
my
furnished,
per m o n t h . 3 7 4 - 5 9 5 4 .
B o n d at S . P . A . C . C a l l 5 8 4 - 9 3 3 0 .
-
to
O w n r o o m if w a n t . N o f r o n t s o r
Goodyear,
$40.
Scotia,
Birthday
roomie.
paneled w i t h brick fireplace, bar,
to
462-0824.
HELP WANTED
radial,
o n e - r o o m
h u n t i n g t o c o m e . Satis-
master
call
Call
Radio for
R E N T :
work
t o insure
faction guaranteed. O N E
King
Wanted:
Vietnam
big f a c t o r
peddlers,
s m a . k , ' says a sailor
sailors,
t h e m spread as ships p u l l in
Seii/
Spills
••""••""
make
closely
well.
said t h a t b o t h
and
drug
Call
Coral
w h i l e c r e w m e n s.,:
Stuff
o n t h e " s h o w " trials, t h e r e p o r t s
rac
most •
p o p u l a t e d by p i m p s , p r o s t i t u t e s ,
K o n g or Singapore
B u t w h i l e the N a v y is p u t t i n g
o f t h e m say t h e y t h o u g h t he was
many
Sundaes
PAGE SIX
- $200.
Lange Ski Boots
the
more
expected
n o n e o f the e x c i t e m e n t of H o n g
labor,
rests en-
w h o c l a i m Pat
doing
evi-
been llfYO years, A l l i s o n was sen
PLATT'S
PLACE
f*
Runs
2
13,
situation,
harassment
Diik.itcsscn
limn-
Lionel
Fairlane.
lues,
SR
condition,
knives
Hot Dogs. I l a i i i t u n g s .
( ountci
WANTED
condition.
call 785-0 7'J1.
w a y t h e N a v y is de;
high.
Soups. Sandwiches.
W
Ford
Dependable
" H i e N.i
& k c ( tciiin
- Good
Galaxie.
5-buckle;
sailed for
fflBBBgEBBH
Salads. B i ' v c u g c s
from
V o l k s w a g o n Beetle.
srFlilj|
groups.
Because
For i n f o r m a t i o n :
u i r e c t o r , S>)iJY Summer Program in Israel
State u n i v e r s i t y of New York
Jneonta, ;Iew York
13820
lahulous
apart
manager's
We
Linny:
Happy
F O R
dM-3045.
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
in cooperation wi th
uept. of Education, Jewish Agency
SEVENTH SUMMER PROGRAM
in I s r a e l
at Hebrew, H a i f a , and Bar-11 an
Uni vers i ties
J u l y - A u g u s t , 1973;
6-9 undergraduate and graduate c r e d i t s
I calming
Ford
I'jb
s a b o t a g e d . " ' I b e l i e v e t h e r e is so
Visit our
Bus
$ 6 0 . Call E l a i n e • 4 6 5 - 6 0 0 7 .
Snow
T h e carrier USS Ranger, whiUs t a t i o n e d at A l a m e d a N a v a l S t a tion, suffered more
than t w o
d o z e n d o c u m e n t e d acts o f s a b o tage i n t w o m o n t h s . T h e s e i n c l u d e d c u t t i n g o f f i r e hoses, telep h o n e d b o m b threats, plugging
o f a fire m a i n , p o l l u t i o n o f the
ship's fresh water w i t h a v i a t i o n
f u e l , fire in the a u x i l i a r y r o o m ,
flooding
of
the
ship's
fresh
l a t i o n f u e l , fire in the a u x i l i a r y
r o o m , f l o o d i n g o f a gun comp a r t m e n t , a n d assorted d a m a g e
to the generators and oil p u m p s .
B u t h e m o s t s p e c t a c u l a r sabotage was d o n e
t o the ship's
reduction
gear. S o m e o n e
had
t h r o w n a paint scraper a n d t w o
holts
into
the
year
causing
$H(J(),(J()0 w o r t h o f d a m a g e a n d
k e e p i n g t h e 7H.UO0 t o n
IfiOO
m a n ship idle for lour m o n t h s .
T h e N a v y has s i n g l e d o u t a
WBHPggfl HtergEBggg
VW
(he white*,
from
resumes
439-5109.
1 3 1 o f t h e 4<100 i n t h e new class
come
dis-
insure a f i t t i n g resume. F o r Info,
61
than
Our
show
itnv
o t h e r b r a n c h o f t h e m i l i t a r y and
Carol
N.Y.C.
b a t h r o o m , attached garage. $ 1 2 0
$20,
less
St.,
ping
p e r c e n t a g e o f b l a c k s o n the sln|>s
5.8, m u c h
E.73
personnel
b l a c k s i n t o t h e s e r v i c e . S t i l l , ih,.
is o n l y
you
the j o b
WANTED
FOR SALE
dress u, [he
recruitment
235
h u n d r e d s of resumes t h a t cross a
day.
iftsm
composed,
different.
set
PERSONALS
Delmar
R E S U M E S :
Professionally
Elmo
in
n a m e , address & p h o n e t o
Richards,
Admiral
BATH
available free. K i t c h e n priv. Send
Reservations; Manoir cles Lilas
4842 Blv. Levesque
St. Vincent de Paul, Laval
Montreal, Canada
Plionei
661-9844
«
PAGE SEVEN
A Vet's Life
After
Discharge
ALBANY^
STUDENT
PRESS
"Too Delicate" Matter
Deserves More Light
Alton Claude Foss Jr. joined
t h e Navy after graduating from
high school in 1964. In high
s c h o o l h e was selected for National H o n o r Society and won
letters in football, basketball and
track. T h e all American boy
enlisted at age seventeen and
g r a d u a t e d from Field Medical
Service School at C a m p Le
J e u n e , N..C. He volunteered for
" s e a d u t y " and was assigned as a
h o s p i l a l m a n 3rd class to the 2nd
B a t t a l i o n . 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division in Vietnam.
Even
page
There
he
began
pre
of
"rON/eHTOUR
PANEL
TO 6-ET
WIU
DEBATE
OUT OF VtETNAM
devices,
police
attorney
"attack
that
with
cherry
they
ha 11 h e a r i n g s
and
Foss
joined
ordinator,
truck
and
Foss
vehicle
wii h
hucenv
Al
intent
his
a
to
was
motor
commit
t r i a l , he p l e a d e d
• ' n o c o n t e s t " Was put o n p r o b a
the
VVAW
and
became
r e h a b i l i t a t i o n p r o g r a m al t h e
Later,
beat
drug
the
milled
result
this
of
the
an
to
time,
drug
the
n-rnui
program
partly
left
with
the
as
problem,
w a s s e p a r a t e d f r o m his w i l e
she
two
to
a
he
PAGE EIGHT
called
ACLU
case. T h e r e
h.i
I
prolessoi
.
Red b u n t i n g a d o r n e d bridges
and
bu i l d i n g s
throughout
Moscow, Kiev and Leningrad.
E n o r m o u s c l o t h paintings of
Lenin, Marx and EngeJs, and
smaller p o r t r a i t s of various heroes of the Revolution, hung from
all g o v e r n m e n t buildings in the
cities
American
nationalism,
especially a r o u n d patriotic holidays, is rarely less than blatant,
but evidences of Soviet patriotism are heavy enough to stun the
foreign visitor
include, understandably.
lo
"forget
went
testify
it."
to
before
address
was e x c u s e d u n t i l t h e next
live
to
fifty
t h e s p r i n g o f ' 7 l ! he
w o r k e d t o plan a protest lor
Democratic
and
COP
The
the
on
July
11
f o l l o w i n g day
e x c u s e d and
conven
un
lions
the
negotiating
team
ihe
al
Miami
Reach,
seeking
t o i n q u i r e m a r c h p e r m i t s and
is n o t
statements,
month
but
O n the
alleviate
members, Scott
spirae.\ charges
(mostly
c o n s p i r a c y i n d i c t m e n t , Fus.s w;is
appear
before
III
lime,
the
Federal
lo
conventions
John
Ifushen,
Director
Department
Thv
I he
lo
Crand
and
charge
Miami
to
Al
Ibis
Public
for
In
the
Jus
was q u o t e d
Hrmltl
as
by
saying,
is a b s o l u t e l y n o
in
between
the
participation
runner
lions "
nature ol
in
However,
month
late.'
on
Herald
slated.
the
attempt
mle
little
over
Angus!
VVAW
leaders
Ihe
.ml
ul
l he
Miami
Democratic
conven
the
un
Jul.v
-,
two
hill
The
m
llullvwuod
lh.ee
times
and
On
A.lgusl
|S
interviewed
|,,,MI
t
I'm
|
m
i uiivi'i
'
I "II"''
I,.HIM
'.ill.
F o s s , t h e t w o a g e n t s o f I he D a d e
II.'
II"-
t,1
U1
I).mil
i
Ihe
they
could
was
"talk."
toltl
Fo..s
"Kithei
went,
you
o p e r a t e w i t h us or we gel y o u
a
drug
bust "
agreed to
meet
co
on
Confused,
Alton
with FBI
agents
c u r b lis c o v e r a g e ol t h e c o n t r o v e r s y . A d d e d
i
II• •
"'I he p r o i e e d i n g s are l o o d e l i c a t e . "
I.atei in t h e c o n v e i sal i o n , H u n s b e r g e r s u g g e s t ' d
'
play 'i " m a j o r r o l e " in i he d e c i s i o n m a k i n g pi o t e We cjucstion h o w t h i s is t o b e d o n e il s t u c h i i i , r
lelt o n l y hall i n f o r m e d
on the particulars ol
Dean
ISMI.
c a s e is a n
Hunsbcii"
issue
In Moscow, there was the girl
w h o insisted Russian novelist
Sol/.heiutsyn "s la I est works are
unpublished not Tor political
reasons, but simply because his
b o o k s are not any good. " A n d
besides,
he
is rather
too
a n d Stalinist "
But also in Moscow, there was
the studenl w h o a d m i t t e d he fell
neiy
of political and social
o p i n i o n s is p e r m i t t e d
"You
c o m e ,iw.i\ wiih a vei\ distorted
impression il you only see the
cities "
wl
dircc t l \ alfei I s t u d e i i l s .
All
the
inlonnatloll
printed
in
coiniecilon
A
Wat el m a n r a s e in t h e A S P is f a c t u a l a n d d o c
Ian
lo
"ill
"pie|lidne"
1
11
understand
how
publication
del Is
id
such
m a k e r s . We d o
'
m l ' •'
llol
„
"iild In- l u i i s i t u e d .is " s e n s a t i o n a l i s m . " < )n i In
secans ili.ii
"»n
aid
i In
the puhlii atii
f sin h i n l o i m a t :
dec i,
in
makers
efiilable coiulus
''
, ihe case.
arriving
I'he
al
.
ASP's
ptn j
to open
i h.u
In Moscow also, then- were ihe
villagers ton ring Ihe Lenin Mu-s
mim, a middle brow exhibition
featuring his printing pres.s and
false b o t t o m e d
suitcase,
who
wore rapt, tl slightly uncomfurt
able, expressions of al lenlioil b n
their stern guide, ami also show
ed ;i quiel, confident respect for
their c o u n t r y ' s revolutionary Ins
lory
" brine m o o evidence t o l i g h t ,
™e have, l i i i t h i - n u o r e , a t t e m p t e d
"•minium.
between
the
student
coininni
" " uiheis
hampered
o|
il,e
In
Il ,u 1
' ' " 'Hid , „
'**'"tK
adi
,.,ine
istration.
who
would
( )iu
rather
efforts
keep
hi
.
l a n d l i m s a n d all o l I he .lei al I •. • .1 :
1,1,,.
w d o ,„,, | >r |, rVl . , i n v „ r w , , | M 1 „ , ,
1
u punts
facts w h i c h d e s e i v e
But in Kiev, there was the
Russian who as afraid to enter
the hotel t o accept the gift ol an
American shirt, and instead in
sisled on receiving it in a desert
ed park at night
| . , li.
,1-1 I ' , '
'
on
llave
A " « , K | I,Ml
Hepleinlier
Market
Ihrmighoul
Russia
is
free
Children's clothing is also uiex
pensive, hul adult clothing is the
( ) l l l . necc*,sil\ that is often high
priced Tin- prices ol luxuries
,uv .ilnmsl ,ilw,i\ s pruhilillive
foii.se<|iientl\ . ihe black rn.uk
el flourishes in id'- ciiies ami
luurisls are a p p a r e n l k among Us
main sources of suppU As soon
,,s one is r c e o g n u e d as .. tourist
HI the s h e e t s , lie is sure to be
upproitehed id least by children
asking lor chewing gum and
American cigarettes, but just as
often by Russians offering icons
and military paraphanalia for
sab-
.l.n.n ,. .
K l , K".
Mail lleeli ... I i e i h i l l - l l I "
"I'
I he Black
Kond and rent in tin- cities is
Mulilti
„|>
'.Uleilie
t h e m b e h i n d t h e O r a n g e H o w l so
irunu
t h e c o v e r a g e of W a t e r m a n ' s
be d r o p p e d , lie d i d s u g g e s t t h a t t h i s n e w s p a p e i voi
- J. • I • r, • I ... i
and
meet
did not ask t h a t
I S
a c c o m p a n i e d b y his h a l f b r o t h e r ,
to
Al"
I'..
j i n v i n t f .il Ihe h " ' , | n l , , l . he . . . i n .
.. n . ' l e m i Ins < I I . I I l t j i j h l p i i n u m
Hie
.i|i'.|,ili,iii until
,11.-1 On
( i O I 1 euilveillMMI
I'i
lit tempted
him
What leaves a far m o r e lasting
impression, however, is n o t the
gaudy
ornaments,
but
the
sincere patriotism of m u c h of
the Russian people. Many, especially those to whom
the tourist
is i n t r o d u c e d t h r o u g h official
channels,
merely
repeat
the
party line in answer to any
political q u e s t i o n , but, finally,
l he impression is inescapable
thai most Russians feel t o w a r d s
their c o u n t r y a.s most Americans
once, perhaps fifteen years ago,
fell t o w a r d s their own
i
w a n t s t o avoid an " o v e r p l a y i n g " of t h e c a s e .
V"l".'l'|'.'.."'l
IU.II.II
.lull,:.'
On Si'iili'inlii'i
County Public Safely Dcapil
meal (PSD) called him on the
told
iii.ik. i
and
,„.„!,.,
i , 1 " , uinl.-rw,,v
,il u . o
and
administrators),
d e a l A g a i n , Kuss w o u l d n u , , „ , , ,
Ihe s l a t c m e n l i h , ,
'I I "
' .IBM .1111, '
...I ..v ,
nilA week
lull-,
.,-,
1,1 I I '
I
phone
and
m a k i n g in l o , k e d
•
.,k-
Ihe. I ' l l " '
agents at a rail) in Flamingo
I'ark
Thai night, according to
was
aparlnienl
Ihe ,,1'IM •
I s ,||,1[|in
DlMnel
s p r i n t ; Were e x p t t s e d as tint c o l i c s
then
Kuss „ n , | | i r l n i .
hn.'.ks
111.,I
druu
illul
d b i l l n u dr.,| u . i s m
puln.'
earliei
the
d a y , he
['he\
haled
VVAW
llltll
next
undereovei agenls who ha.I m i l l
Ihe
the
t a k e n l o ,,n e f f i c i e n c >
Ill-
Also
members
da> I n n m H i a l e i i h . T i n - KBI naul
Miami iu m
l o net
m
queslioiied
and
Washington
sale
turned him ovei in ihe Kill TinFBI agent look Fuss lu a lloli
timing
mves
with
b u s t , a n d o f f e r e d lo m a k e ,, deal
Tlie\
has
detei
during
officers
II, mill
the grand |ur\
eon
7, Koss called
KiigMU
We.
U o b e r l v\ | { , , , i
were deliberately
in
charged
Augusl
arresting
.,
local.un ul
mined
the
on
KJ, 11vi• d a y s a f t e r (he
and
the
thai
Knilfen
indicted
I-
" lh.
W
possession of U S D , a I V U m \
On
demoiisira
confirmed
ligation
O n Jul.\
arrested
testify
alleged conspiracv
formation
lice
a
Tallahassee
an
of
were
decision
Camile
On July 7, the Friday before
I he
Democratic
Convention,
Fuss and Tl other members
Austin
W\>
,
publun.
tenure
the Waterman
four
ul
subpoenas
the Waterman
10 w a n t , a n d
John
AM
nut
told
the
other
f o s s and
and
to
prejudice"
Hi,,l
day.
given
m.'.il
cit
reportedly
them. This iswhat
Paso
coordinators)
of
he
d i r e c t l y affect
lice and d e m o n s t r a t o r s .
received
much
a man
Later
,d C a m e s v i l l e . D o n a l d Perdue ol
po
ih.it
College
|)ermanently
Kl
about
between
to
committee
Ihir
further
N V (' , William Patterson of
Jury
the strain
was
"only
List
the
e x c u s e d f r o m the i n q u i r y
VVAW
to
he
t o l d t o r u n i c hack
and
of
Sciences. Hunsberger
day
he was again
thirteenth.
questions
that
w o r k e d w i t h R o c k y Pouicrance's
police
the
Then
t e i - n l h he was asked no
Foss s e r v e d t h e V V A W as p a r t
ol
On
Talla
m e m b e r s h i p id' the Dade C o u n t y
from
Dean
,..n
Dep.noi
Kogow
chapter
and
Koss met Scott Camile ol
Gainesville, Florida in I 97 I. (.'a
mile is the regional c o o r d i n a t o r
for the VVAW and along with
Foss is u n d e r Federal indictment
for conspiracy to "organize in
dividual fire (earns and attack
wiih a u t o m a t i c w e a p o n s lire and
meeting,
Kogow
Koss
to
the
j u r y and was iisked his name and
children
l o r N e w Jersey.
CITY
He a p p e a r e d before the r>nmd
m a n a g i n g t o raise t h e
Throughout
VA
rflor!
h a b i t , lie
himself
About
in
HARPBR
grand jury
in
n,
l i o n a n d d i r e c t e d t o e n t e r ., d r u g
hospital.
Id.
hassee
t h e r e is , m \
v\ il h e n t e r i n n
July
sling shots and crossbows "
M a r c h ol" 1 9 7 2
Bruce
advised h i m
b o m b s b y m e a n s ol' w r i s t
thai
charged
After
would
alleges
to influence then i V V A W M
delivcrv
night.
further
claim
a
that
Foss i m m e d i a t e l y
In 1970 Foss worked lor the
l l t i i i u n Drug Co ol Miami, hul
ul'tei a short period was fn-ed,
ie|jortedl> because ol .. had icm
per T w o mouths later the c m
ol
YORK
charge
lllg drugs increased
theft
1T&
and police stations." The
i n v e s t i g a t i o n a n d I he
the
OF NEW
cars
jury
reported
WHElHlR
Hunsberger,
interviewer
incendiary
lion
pany
her
And thev include several a d m i n i s t r a t o r s , m o s t
grand
kill
with
figures, a n d lists ol p s y c h o l o g y
Mover
p e r i o d his
pain
p a g e s t o r i e s .nu 1
of front
Dr. W a t e r m a n ' s c o l l e a g u e s in t h e P s y c h o l o g y
operations on his leg During this
reliance on
IV.I
T h e r e are a n u m b e r o f p e o p l e o n t h i s c a m p u s w l i . , I
"There
series
concerned
like t h i s p u b l i c i t y . T h e y
Miami,
a
MI.IK
Psychology
by G a r y Ricciardi
Lenin is More Alive than the
Living.
This slogan, p o s t e d p r o m i n e n t ly in a Leningrad airport, is
typical of the veneration the
Soviet
government
urges its
citizens to pay t o their c o u n t r y
a n d its r e v o l u t i o n a r y beginnings.
I was f o r t u n a t e to s p e n d t w o
weeks recently in Soviet Russia,
and even m o r e f o r t u n a t e t h a t
t h e l i m e I s p e n t there coincided
with the patriotic celebration of
the unification of the various
Soviet stales in 1922.
m e n d e d lor pay h i k e s .
disrupt
began
spreads
citation
medical studies But al school
his p r o b l e m with d i n g s proved
to he loo muc\ ul an obstacle
and he returned to Florida with
out eomplet nig his si utiles In
Foss
lias p r o b a b l y
of
p u b l i c a t i o n of t r . i n s m i l t . i l l e t t e r s , p e r s o n a l n i c u m , . •
VVAW
College
casual r e a d e r
publiciv.ation
have seen n s t e a d y s t r e a m
lo
Oklahoma to
Oklahoma Ar
most
intensive
C a r o l i n e W a t e r m a n ' s f i g h t for t e n u r e . T h e p a s t lew n,
Foss remained al the Key West
Medical Center for some I 1
m o n t h s . During this period lie
received a steady diet of nar
c o l i c s winch, nol surprisingly,
led him to an habituation Fin
ally released with a brace on his
leg, he went to work with men
tally retarded children .it the
Sunlantl Training Center near
Miami
He worked there lor
IHMI-K ,i year. He t h e n moved
wit li his wife and two children
moved out to
attend Northern
the
ASP's
D o c t o r s did not put his le^ in a
cast, because the w o u n d was still
draining. Instead, they pui him
in traction al Key West Medical
Center, Florida, and the strap
that held his leg up eventually
severed his achilles t e n d o n and
severely damaged his post tibial
nerve As .i result of I his, his
fool is p e r m a n e n t l y damaged.
N e w J e r s e y a n d f r o m t h e r e lie
State University of Haw York at Albany
m
January 19, 1973
Notes On Soviet Youth, Black Market, Jewry
Having defended the U.S. govern merit's policies in Vietnam,
m e m b e r s of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW)
n o w have to defend themselves
against the same g o v e r n m e n t at
h o m e , and Alton Foss seems to
have achieved t h e d u b i o u s dist i n c t i o n of being t h e focus of
t h e g o v e r n m e n t effort against its
o w n veterans.
In May of 1966 Foss was
a c c o m p a n y i n g a group of Marine
engineers as part of a security
force. T h e y ran into an ambush.
He was w o u n d e d twice in the
left leg, his bones shattered by
an AK 17 m a c h i n e gun. He was
" m e d e v a c ' d " to Charlie Maddon
Hospital in Danang. He under
wenl the first of ten o p e r a t i o n s
o n his leg on the way back to
t h e slates.
/A
arts and leisure
211
lie
bluhiid Mis lell vvriH. mid ilrank
Iwii l.iillhi. ,,l cvuiiil alruhii, Al
the time he wun ,1 VVAW Irml
u.nl„„,a,i „„ „„,,„ „ m
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, JANUARY l'»
^
^
_
Foreign c u r r e n c y , especially
American dollars, can b u y anything on t h e black m a r k e t , a n d
they are naturally m u c h in
demand. It U c o m m o n t o be
theaters w h e r e p r o d u c t i o n s especially w r i t t e n for children are
p e r f o r m e d . T h e M o s c o w Childr e n ' s T h e a t e r t r o u p r e c e n t l y performed in S a r a t o v , and thoae
View o f t h e Kremlin in Moscow.
a p p r o a c h e d on the s t r e e t and
iisked to e x c h a n g e dollars for
roubles, alwavs al e x o r b i t a n t
rates. A r u b l e is w o r t h p e r h a p s
$ 1 . 2 0 , but it is possible to illicitly e x c h a n g e
$20
for
forty
rubles.
American and Western European clothing is p o p u l a r , a n d there
are a few Russian shopsr which
exclusively deal in it. Nevertheless, il is hard to o b t a i n , and
black m a r k e t c l o t h i e r s flourish.
O n e American in M o s c o w was
offered thirty ru b l e s for his
pair of jeans, and it's c o m m o n to
be offered belts with military
buckles for various articles of
clothing.
T h e Kiev flat of o n e pair of
black m a r k e t e e r s , w h o
were
a p p a r e n t l y n o m o r e than middlee c h e l o n dealers, was full of an
impressive array of radios, televe;i u l i sets, icons, jewelry, and
various t y p e s of clothing. Il is
difficult for the average foreign
tourist t o deal successfully o n
the
black
market,
however,
unless he deals in very small
;i m o u n t s . A visitor m u s t exchange all his r u b l e s for dollars
upon leaving, and c a n n o t leave
wiih m o r e m o n e y than he c a m e
with, nor m u r e goods til ail be
could have b o u g h t .
Illegal drugs are a p p a r e n t l y n o t
wide-spread, a l t h o u g h they are
used.
One
pair
of
Russian
s t u d e n t s in Kiev bad a p p a r e n t l y
never heard the word before, h u t
one American in Kiev was offered four grams of hash for $-1
Assuming the hash was of fair
ijiiably, it's i m p o r t a n t t o r e m e n i
her thai a dollar is w o r t h m o r e
in huying p o w e r on the black
m a r k e t , than it is at the inter
national rale of e x c h a n g e
Urban Youth
In the cities, at least, children
are granted all the advantages
public institutional facilities can
offer For the youngest, there
are free day care c e n t e r s (food,
however, must be paid lor), and
lor Ihe older children, there are
Pioneer 1'alaees T h e Pioneers are
the
Soviet
t'ljinv a l e n !
of
America's Buy and (iirl S c o u t s ,
and
the Palaces al least, in
Moscow, Kiev and Leningrad
are
s p r a wl ing,
expensively
e q u i p p e d p l a y g r o u n d s for t h e m
T h e Pioneer Palaces c o n t a i n lib
raries, gymnastic etpi ipemenl,
paints and brushes, and records
The children are supervised, and
likely iis much e d u c a t i o n lakes
place in the Palaces as does in
the schools.
In the cities, there are also
puppet theaters and children's
w h o saw it have a g o o d idea of
the lavish sets a n d imaginative
costumes
lo
which
Russian
theater-goers, b o t h children and
adult, are a c c u s t o m e d .
Western p o p music is very
popular with Russian teenagers,
and at a d a n c e at a military
a c a d e m y in M o s c o w , t h e rock
group t h a t p e r f o r m e d
played
exclusively w e s t e r n music, including Rolling S t o n e s ' songs,
" J e s u s Christ S u p e r s t a r , " and
" L i g h t m y Fire"--aM in English.
T h e r e has long been a tradit
ional t e n d e n c y a m o n g Russian
intellectuals lo feel inferior in
training t«) their peers in the
West. This t e n d e n c y even carried
over t o o n e s c h o o l of c o m p o s e r s
w h o s o u g h t t o e s c h e w Russian
She w e n t on t o say t h a t m o s t
J e w s w h o e m i g r a t e d o n o t do so
o u t o f religious o r political
m o t i v e s , b u t o n l y because they
e x p e c t t h e s t a n d a r d of living t o
b e higher in Israel. " O n c e they
get t h e r e , t h e y usually w a n t t o
come back."
Kiev was o n c e a c e n t e r of
Jewish c u l t u r e in t h e U k r a i n e ;
n o w , h o w e v e r , t h e r e is only o n e
s y n a g o g u e t h e r e which is still
used
for
worship.
Despite
Russia's long t r a d i t i o n of anti-semitism, this decline is also
a t t r i b u t a b l e t o t h e Nazis w h o
o c c u p i e d Kiev for t h r e e years in
the S e c o n d World War, and w h o
either s h o t or t r a n s p o r t e d to
c a m p s t h o u s a n d s of Kiev's J e w s .
T h e s y n a g o g u e in Kiev is a very
old, o r n a t e s t r u c t u r e in the
P o d o l , the oldest section of
Kiev. T h e s y n a g o g u e ' s J e w s are
all old m e n , a n d t h e old men
a p p e a r to be t h e last of Russia's
practicing J e w s .
Y o u n g Jews, however, have a
strong sense of i d e n t i t y , despite
their n o n - o b s e r v a n c e of religious
practice. T h e y see themselves as
a g r o u p singled o u t for political
and social p e r s e c u t i o n . One J e w
in Kiev related t h a t a m o n t h
before a friend of his had applied for permission t o emigrate,
a n d a week later h e d i s a p p e a r e d
w i t h o u t a trace. A n o t h e r Jew
posed a r i d d l e :
" W h y is Red S q u a r e the highest point in all R u s s i a ? "
" B e c a u s e from there, you can
see S i b e r i a . "
Two American Jews who made
several c o n t a c t s with J e w s in
Kiev claimed to have been foll o w e d , a l t h o u g h t h e y were n o t
S t r e e t scene in L e n i n g r a d .
musical t r a d i t i o n s and tried as
much ;is possible to imitate
Western E u r o p e a n styles. T h i s
tendency is still, ill least lo s o m e
small
e x t e n t,
apparent
in
Russian universily s t u d e n t s today. O n e Russian s t u d e n t in
Moscow s e e m e d visibly flattered
when told the Russian reading
public a p p e a r e d m o r e sophisticated than tin- A m e r i c a n . And
a y o u n g university i n s t r u c t o r in
Leningrad c o m p l a i n e d Russian
intellectuals c o u l d certainly accomplish iis m u c h scholarly and
scientific research as those in ihe
Wesi, 11 only t h e g o v e r n m e n t
were
more
broad-minded
in
appropriating e d u c a t i o n a l funds
Soviet Jewry
According lo id least o n e girl
in Moscow, t h e r e is no antisernilium in Russia. J e w s are
respected as individuals and are
accorded the equal t r e a t m e n t
granted t h e rest of the population " I t ib," she said, " o n l y those
J e w s w h o w a n t t o emigrate t o
Israel w h o we considur traitors "
p r e v e n t e d from going a n y w h e r e
they chose. O n e of t h e m had a
lb-brew d i c t i o n a r y confiscated
iis a religious tract u p o n first
e n t e r i n g Russian c u s t o m s .
Nevertheless, t h e r e is at least
o n e g o v e r n m e n t p u b l i s h e d Yiddish magazine. An old J e w in Kiev
w h o was s h o w n a c o p y just
l o o k e d , waved his h a n d , clicked
his t o n g u e a n d w a l k e d a w a y .
T h e L o o k of t h e C i t i e s
M o s c o w , Kiev, and L e n i n g r a d
are all very clean cities b y western s t a n d a r d s , and M o s c o w is
especially so. T h e s t r e e t s are
spotless, and t h e s u b w a y s , called
the M e t r o , are fast, s m o o t h , a n d
of c o u r s e , clean. T h e M e t r o stations are lavishly d e c o r a t e d affairs, r e p l e t e with s t a t u a r y , c h a n deliers, white tile floors, a n d
marble walls a n d ceilings. Public
transit, including buses a n d trolleys, is t h e m o s t p o p u l a r m e a n s
of t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . Public transp o r t a t i o n is c h e a p (slightly m o r e
than 5 c e n t s ) , a n d b u s e s a n d
trolleys are o p e r a t e d on the
honor system.
Traveling from
Moscow
to
Kiev is, p e r h a p s , like traveling
from New York t o Nashville. In
Kiev, the people are m o r e o p e n ;
the pace is slower, a n d t h e cit^y is
far less exciting. Kiev lacks the
Kremlin and the great m u s e u m s ,
b u t it is a m u c h greener c i t y :
sixty p e r c e n t of Kiev is parks,
and in Lhe s u m m e r m o n t h s , it is
a p o p u l a r resort.
Leningrad, however,
is the
m o s t beautiful of the t h r e e . Pre•planned and built by Peter t h e
Great, it is a city of palaces,
cathedrals,
and
long,
wide,
straight streets. T h e c i l y is m o r e
Western than the o t h e r t w o , and
this influence can be seen in the
a r c h i t e c t u r e ( m u c h of it Italian),
tasted in the food, and seen even
in the streets, which are slightly
dirtier than Moscow's.
Although Western n e w s p a p e r s
have r e p o r t e d u r b a n c r i m e is
increasing in the Soviet U n i o n ,
nevertheless, the cities are far
safer Lhan most American cities.
Diirk e n t r y w a y s a n d alleys can
be entered w i t h o u t fear of punishment, and the p o o r e r s e c t i o n s
of the cities that I saw a r e , if r u n
d o w n , far cleaner than A m e r i c a n
slums. No slum is an enviable
place to be, and m i d n i g h t in
Moscow,
tramping
th rou gh
streets lit by the glare of
Cossock eyes, miles from the
security of B e d f o r d - S t u y , is n o
m o r e agreeable t h a n t h e darkness of Central Park. Nevertheless, every traveler w h o m a k e s
the best of every place his plane
lands him, c a n n o t h e l p b u t find
s o m e t h i n g familiar. T h e b r o k e n
w i n d o w s look the s a m e .
A c h u r c h ( n o w a m u s e u m ) b y the Dneiper River in Kiev.
I
view/leisure/preview/lelsum/preview
»I^W#M^>W4H^»
Calendar
I.F.G. and the Japanese Cinema
by Joseph Dougherty
The ASP Crossword Puzzle contest will
not be held this week. A new contest with
Wild Wild Weekend II
new prizes will begin with the January 26
issue. The puzzle is included for your
Friday, Jan. 19
Saturday, Jan. 20
Skating at Mohawk sponsored by the
class of "75 in conjunction with Wild Wild
Weekend II, there will be skating on the
lake, free beer, free franks, free hot
chocolate and free buses. First bus leaves
circle at 1:00 and will run hourly. Last
bus back to campus is at 7:00.
Beer Blast: at Colonial Quad Flagroom
from 3:30-6:30 sponsored by IFC-ISC in
conjunction with Wild Wild Weekend I I .
Music provided live by WSUA.
Roasted Chestnuts and Hot Pretzel Social: in front of Campus Center 11AM3PM, free.
Pajama Party Mixer:dance to the music of
Trek from 9PM-1AM in CC Ballroom. If
you want to win Pajama Contest and the
prizes, dress appropriately. Otherwise,
just come and dance, drink and eat, and
its all free.
Concert: Concert Board presents Country Granola and Bottle Hill at 9PM in the
Ballroom. Tickets are $1.00 w/tax, $2.00
w/out.
Cartoon Festival:unique cartoons never
shown on this campus. 10PM-1AM, free
with a cash beer bar in the C.C. cafeteria.
(Late buses running downtown until 1:20
AM).
Moonlight Bowling: lights turned low,
free shoes, free coffee and free Dunkin'
Donuts in the CC Bowling Alley until
1AM. (Late buses running downtown
until 1:20 AM).
State Quad Party: 9:00 in the Flagroom,
$.25 w/State Quad card, $.75 w/out.
Continuous music, beer, sponsored by
State Quad Association.
Buses to Washington: for the inauguration activity, leaving the Circle at 4:00
am. Cost is $13.00.
Sunday, Jan. 21
Indian Quadxomplete fried chicken dinner with fixings. Mohawk Tower lower
lounge from 6PM-8PM. Tickets in CC
lobby, $1.25 w/lndian Card, $1.75
w/out.
"Up
IFG
Fri:
"Ikiru"
Fri:
the
(J:30,
Circle Twin (785 3388:
Sandbox"
9:30;
Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 1 0 : 0 0
" P e t e & Tillie"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 1 5 . 9 : 1 5
7 : 1 5 . 10:00 ill l.C 25
Sneak Preview
Tower East
"The Getaway"
Fri: 8 : 1 0
Fri&Sat: 7 : 1 5 . 9 : 3 0
" M o n k e y Business"
Towne (783 5539;
"Cocoanuts"
Sat: 7 : 0 0 , 10:00 in L C I
"Poseidon Adventure"
MadiSOn (489-5431)
"Across 110tli S t r e e t "
"Tlie N i g l u c o m e r s "
Fri; 7 : 1 5 . 9 : 4 5 ; Sat: 8 : 1 5 ,
Fri: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0 ill l.C 1
10:30
Fri: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 1 5
Sat: 6 : 5 5 , 9 : 1 5
Cinema / (785-1625)
Cine 1234 (459-8301 >
SUNYA Cinema
"Willard"
Fri: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 0 0 .
l.C 1 8
1 1:00 in
"Young Winston"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 4 5
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The erotic tension of Woman of the Dunes
;
r
1*
Speakers: "Divorce is a Cop-out"
L_
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55 | | 5 6 .
F » ^ I ;.,--; © I I -' E S § 58
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1 1
59
g
CCGB Coffee House: featuring Hector in
the Fireside Lounge at 9:00 with a fire in
the fireplace for roasting marshmallows,
hot chocolate, hot buttered run with
cinnamon sticks, and it's all free.
Hellman (459-5300;
ASP Crossword Puzzle
¥
Movie Timetable
On Campus
enjoyment.
"The G e t a w a y "
I'n&Sat: 7 : 0 0 . 9: ill
" D i v o r c e is a c o p - o u t , " say
Albany Attorneys Robert and
L a w r e n c e K a h n , a u t h o r s of " T h e
Divorce
Lawyer's
Casebook,"
a n d guest s p e a k e r s at Albany
Public L i b r a r y ' s n e x t Evening
with t h e A u t h o r s ar H a r m a n u s
Bleecker
Library,
19
Dove
Street, on Wednesday, January
17, at H p m . T h e p r o g r a m is
s p o n s o r e d by the Friends of the
Library
try making a n u m b e r ofpersonal
a p p e a r a n c e s since the b o o k was
published early this fall by St.
Martin's Press.
. .
At the Library p r o g r a m , the
Kahns will appear as a u t h o r s ,
not lawyers. T h e y will answer
q u e s t i o n s from the a u d i e n c e as
well
as
written,
anonymous
q u e s t i o n s that may be t u r n e d in
during t h e evening. T h e y e m p h a size, however, that they can give
no advice on legal m a t t e r s .
When (he figures are in for
IS)72 a c c o r d i n g to the Kali its,
there
will
have
been
over
1,000,000 divorces this year.
Thai m e a n s an involvement of
2 , 0 0 0, 0 0 0
spouses
and
1,000,000 c h i l d r e n , and by t h e
t i m e the affected in laws are
meluded,
reaches
the
astro
nomical figure of
12,000,000
p e o p l e involved in divorce m a
o n e year period. " D i v o r c e is an
e p i d e m i c , " they say
Auditions - Most Happy hlk
•••
by EDWARD J U L I U S
ACROSS
1 Secular
5 Di s c a r d
10
Roman P o e t
111 1 t a l i a n I s l a n d
Israeli jeaport
is
16
Traveled
17
i e n d Out
lh
Baylor
IV
Poisonous Lizard
20. i-.isrhievous Child
*2. Bent
2 It. C o l o n y o f o e e s
Deserve
i l . K a r s h - s o u n d i np
) 1 . T y p e of C a n d y ( p i . J
15, U o x i n p P l a c e
)6, A m e r i c a n N o v e l i s t
•)b, b u l l f i g h t C r y
)V. Loud N o i s e
uo. C h u r c h H e a d s
UI. S c o t t i s h P h i l o s o p h e r
1 2 . L y r i c 1oem
»3. L o b b y
1 1 . Longed f o r
1 5 . move B a c k a n d F o r t h
IV. Use of C o a r s e L a n p u a ^ e
iy. Pledge
5 1 . Rinfi C h u r c h B e l l
5 2 . S l o t o.achl ne 1 terns
5b. S h i p
60. A s s i s t
t i l . PyKmy A n t e l o p e
61. midwest S t a t e
Therei Sp.
65. A c t o r L l o y d
66. i i x p l r e s
67, Snow V e h i c l e
S l e e p i n g Noise
69. h a k e s k i s t a k e
DOHN
1 S l y Look
2
hater
Wading o i r d
1
ll
Contagious
Defer
5
6
Heat measure (abbr.J
7. L a t v i a n Capi t a l
8. F l a m i n g
9 . I'.akes a b r u p t L a n d i n g
10. body P a r t s
1 1 . S p o r t i n g . j o o d s Company
12. I n a c t i v e
1 1 . ijftf u n c t
21. Verdi Upera
21. Contemporary Author
25. D e l i g h t in
2 7 . Wooden S h o e
26, b a r t e r
2 9 . F r e n c h Name
10. D e c r e a s e G r a d u a l l y
12. V a l i d
Gantry
33.
11. Shabby
IV. D e s e r v e
10. Shares
1 1 . S l o p i n g Land
Terror
1 1 . Wan
16. Lacking Vigor
IB. Cowlike
5 0 . R e l a t i v e o f 3-Down
5 2 . 1'lan' 8 Name ( a b b r . )
51. S t a t e o f l i l i B e r y
51. French Pronoun
55. S t o r a g e Tower
5V. T i m e o f Day ( r r . i
5H. P i t c h e r
59. C t r l
62. Tavern
n.
•k *
*
T h e i r b o o k , now in its second
printing, was w r i t t e n in the hope
of saving s o m e of these in.H
riages ll includes a n u m b e r ol
d e t a i l e d rases, plus c h a p t e r s on
marriage
counseling,
family
c o u r t , a l i m o n y , and custody
I'ighl
T h e two b r o t h e r s have
been traveling a r o u n d the conn
I he Stale Utiiveisit)
Like
all
library
activities,
Evenings with A u t h o r s are free
and o p e n to the public. Coffee
will be provided by the F r i e n d s
of the Library.
Fourteen
new
framed
art
r e p r o d u c t i o n s go on view in t h e
lobby of H a r m a n u s
Bleecker
Library
Monday,
.January
9
along with a display highlighting
the L i b r a r y ' s collection of b o o k s
on art.
I h c a l i c and the Mtisu D c p a i l i n c u l wish in
aniitumcc the a u d i t i o n d a t e s lot then hist joitH musical p r o d u c t i o n
n| 1-Kiiik l u c s s c i ' s Must
Happy
l-'clla. In be p e i l n i n i c d May 2 - 0.
AudmoiiN will he held Stuidav I c b i u a n
Mnndas
lebiiuin
|-chiu.ii\
I I limn
IJ.
7
II l u n n 2 p . m . l o n p . m . .
I;cbnutij
I ucsday
l.v
and
Wednesday
Mi p m m 1 1 0U p m A u d i t i o n s will b e bold in
the Mam I liealie in the I V t b u r n i n g ^ i l s t ' e t i l c i
Mi
foseph
audillnncis
liall MM
i" picpaie
dltcuoi
n|
llus
iiiiisk.il.
a soup VVIIKII suits ihen
has
asked
AndilmikMN will be i c i p i n e d to pinvtde then nwti slicel m u s k
ilk-se a u d i t i o n s
all
VOKCS and sl\ Ic
loi
In addilion a u d i t i o n c i s shuuld be p i c p a i e d In dunce
and JLI
I be S u n d a \ and M n n d . u a u d i l t o n s VMII ^etilei aiuiind singing and
da\ .iiuhiiniis \ M I | be mainly
dalicuig, while the I uesda> -^^ We
diamatn
\ u d i l i o n c i s slnmld pi.ni •
lending at Icasi nne evening
nt each kind id a u d i t i o n s
| In- aikliiiuiiN aie open M all S l a t e I ' n i v e i a u
siudeill' and ihei
aie ii:au\ m l o t.. he Idled
A l b a n y State Cinema
presents
|
7 : 3 0 , 1 0 : 0 0 in l.C 18
Off Campus
Colonie Center (459-2170;
"Wilderness J o u r n e y "
Fri&Sat: 6 : 3 0 , 8 : 3 0
Deleware (462 4714.
"Killing Class"
Fn&Sat: 7:00, 9:30
Fox Colonie
(459 1020)
"Deliverance"
Fri&Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0
Don't Miss
Wild Wild Weekend lis
Unusual
(Solution to last week's puzzle)
v.
"Klute"
Sat:
We see a distorted picture of the cinema of o t h e r countries.
Because of the nature and
politics.of
film
'distribution w e
see only a small part of the world's o u t p u t of feature films ana, for
the m o s t p a r t , we s e e the best. This cinematic tunnel-vision o f t e n
works t o the best interests of the country in question. We assume all
Swedish films are marked with the maturity of Ingmar Bergman, all
Italian films must be of the same quality as those of Fellini and
V i s c o n t i , a n d all F r e n c h film is as sophisticated as the work o f
R o h m e r and Truffaut. It is a minor self-deception as these things go.
There is a great deal of film in this world that we d o n ' t get t o see.
It's a little like inspecting Hanoi after the bombings; as sincere as we
may be, we are still being s h o w n only what " t h e y " want us t o see.
A s I s t a t e d , this selectivity o f t e n w o r k s t o t h e advantage o f the
nation in question. T h e major e x c e p t i o n has been Japan. F o r the
past twenty years o n e could assume from the Japanese films released
in this country that the only things made there were films the hilt o f
Son of Godzilla a n d The Attack of the Mushroom People. E i t h e r by
accident o r design the body o f Japanese cinema has been inaccessible
t o us until recently.
Over t h e n e x t three weeks, the International Film Group, funded
b y s t u d e n t t a x , will p r e s e n t e x a m p l e s of J a p a n e s e c i n e m a at its
finest:
T o n i g h t ( F r i d a y , t h e 1 9 t h ) Akira K u r o s a w a ' s Ikiru (Living) will be
s h o w n in L e c t u r e C e n t e r 2 5 a t 7 : 1 5 a n d 1 0 : 0 0 . T h e film is t h e s t o r y
of an aging b u r e a u c r a t w h o has w o r k e d at the s a m e job for t h i r t y
years and learns he is a b o u t to die of gastric cancer. K u r o s a w a ,
p e r h a p s best k n o w n for his Ra&homon, e x p l o r e s the old m a n ' s m i n d
as he slowly c o n c l u d e s t h a t he has d o n e nothing i m p o r t a n t or lasting
with his life a n d his frenzy t o c o m p l e t e s o m e c o n t r i b u t i o n t o the
w o r l d b e f o r e his d e a t h . T a k a s h i S h i m u r a ' s p e r f o r m a n c e as t h e
d o o m e d civil servant w h o tries t o justify his existence by building a
c h i l d r e n ' s p l a y g r o u n d is legitimately t o u c h i n g .
K u r o s a w a has a l w a y s been a d i r e c t o r fascinated by t h e m a n i p u l a t i o n of t i m e as he d e m o n s t r a t e s in this film by his b o l d use of a
c o m p l e x series of flashbacks.
On F r i d a y , J a n u a r y 2 6 t h , Kenji Mizoguchi's Vgetsu
Monogatan
Wi. be p r e s e n t e d in L e c t u r e C e n t e r 25 at 7 : 1 5 and 9 : 4 5 . Vgetsu is
an e x a m p l e of t h e " J i d a i - G c k i " p e r i o d / c o s t u m e film set in a small
rural village at t h e e n d of t h e s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r y , it is a t i m e of war,
which m e a n s d a n g e r and violence, but also prospering business for
G e n j u r o , t h e p o t t e r . G e n j u r o w a n t s t o stay in business and m a k e as
m u c h o u t of the war as h e can with the help of his s o n . His son,
h o w e v e r , is d e t e r m i n e d to b e c o m e a warrior.
T h e film is an o d e t o p e a c e and t r a n q u i l i t y in the form of a p a r a b l e
a b o u t the s h o r t - s i g h t e d n e s s of G e n j u r o and his son, in their greed for
m o n e y a n d fame t h e y will find n o t h i n g of real value. T h e J a p a n e s e
have a history of b e a u t y a n d serenity played ag d n s t d e c a d e s of
horrible civil war. T h e " J c d a i - G e k i " Tilm is a while flower growing in
a b l o o d y battlefield. T h e y are a m o n g the m o s t b e a u t i f u l a n d
e m o t i o n a l l y rich films in t h e world and Vgvlm is o n e of the best of
t h e genre
T h e final film in t h e series will be p r e s e n t e d on F r i d a y , F e b r u a r y
2 n d , at 7 : 1 5 and 1 0 : 0 0 in L e c t u r e Center IJS. Sana No
Onna
(Woman
of the Dunes) has b e c o m e s o m e t h i n g of an u n d e r g r o u n d
classic since its w i n n i n g of t h e G r a n d Prize at t h e 1 9 6 5 C a n n e s
Festival Director Hiroshi T e s h i g a h a r a has m a d e an u n c o m p r o m i s i n g
film exploring h u m a n i n t e r a c t i o n antl the n a t u r e of f r e e d o m .
An e n t o m o l o g i s t is searching for s p e c i m e n s on a lonely s t r e t c h of
beach. Missing his bus back lo t o w n , he is promised a c c o m m o d a t i o n s
by a passing s t r a n g e r T h e stranger leads the y o u n g m a n t o a vast
s a n d p i t with walls as sheer as those of a mine shaf T h e base of t h e
pit is almost filled by a w o o d e n shack in which a w o m a n lives alone.
T h e y o u n g man c l i m b s i n t o the pit by a rope ladder, is w e l c o m e d by
the w o m a n and m a d e c o m f o r t a b l e for the night. In the m o r n i n g the
ladder has been r e m o v e d T h e y o u n g man is a prisoner.
It develops that t h e w o m a n is kept in the pit by the n e a r b y village
which feeds her a n d c l o t h e s her so long as she keeps shoveling sand
out of ihe pit If she s l o p s the e n t i r e c o m m u n i t y is in danger. Since
the job is l o o m u c h for o n e w o m a n , the villagers have c a u g h t h e r a
m a t e The y o u n g m a n w h o had t u n e studied i n s e c t s t r a p p e d in a jar
i.s now himself t r a p p e d and observed by Ihe taunting villagers. T h e
y o u n g man is d e n i e d his freedom, his dignity and finally his i d e n t i t y .
T h r o u g h it all a strongly loving, deeply sensual relation grows
b e t w e e n ihe y o u n g man a n d the w o m a n of the d u n e s
When the film was first s h o w n in New York, A r t h u r Knight had
Ibis to say, " ( T e s h i g a h a r a ) creates a c o s m o s thai is c o n t i n u a l l y
absorbing., a w o r l d in which the camera explores not o n l y the
tensions b e t w e e n his two principals, but the very t e x t u r e of skin,
sand, and sun bleached plank of which that world is m a d e up. And
hovering over every scene are Ihe challenging, larger q u e s t i o n s that
m o t i v a t e d the film ui ihe first place. T h e relation of a m a n t o his
work, hi his c o m m u n i t y , to (a) w o m a n and to himself
"The G e t a w a y "
1 ri&Sat: 7 : 3 0 , 9:45
i"
Fri&Sal: 7 : 0 0 , 9:30
"M'A'S'H"
J*
$1.25 w / o
/ lib
!
11.
Friday Jan. 19
C.C. Caf. 10-12?
Fri&Sat: 7 : 1 5 , 9:15
75' w/tax
! I')' :V; 1 i
!
7 30 end 10 PM
Sot. Jan. 20
LCI 8
"1776"
|
'Unique Films Never Seen on Campus Before!!
PAGE 2A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19,
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 3A
^
P
E
S
S
T
S
USE YQOR MASTER CHARGE FOR
ALL PURCHASES OVER $5.00
IRTS
I'm here to welcome you, too. In paperback.
$1.50.
We
n e e d writers,
reporters,
people
to go o u t a n d get ads, etc. for a n e w
newspaper
Jewish
people
II k
Panel
i l WL
discussion
questions
on
and
.swers
to
with
causes
abortions
that will be funded by the
Students
Tuesday,
M o n d a y , January 2 2 , 8 P.M., L C 18.
special
Hike
Interest
January
Also,
interests a n d
ecology,
welcomed.
follow.
Coalition.
etc.l
will be
meeting
will be
2 3 at 7:00
Don't forgetl Monday, Feb. 5,
1973 is the deadline date for applications for conference assistant positions for Summer Planning Conference 1973. Applications are still
available in CC130.
P.M.
inCC 370.
Into
Jazz
guitar?
jamming with
The
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Society
will
hold
of
a
Physics
meeting
Das o f Physics w i l l
superconductivity.
Students
the
calling
Infirmary
other
should
students in
use
speak
International
gram:
about
Refreshments
Applicants:
Franco.
be served.
a
degree
Friday,
application
February
9,
1973.
The
file
n o later
Office
grams
ihan
of
announces
competition
Applico
at
International
for fellowships
t h e University
the
ol
clearance,
pleted
Adm.
bldq.
applications
degree
B 3
Corn
should
school',
N o t i c e t o all faculty
organizations
sity
rented
for
post
sprinq
already
you
payment
box,
semester.
paid,
have
office
have
univer-
boxes
Rent
1973,
is d u e
if n o t
Ihe S U N Y
Posl
French
university
two
Placement
sample
Tuesday.
P.M.
job
Service
interview
January
23,
view
end graduate
must
signify
o l applying
their i n
.
nmuiiir.
t h evisoal
School
Meelinq
Christian
wer
a n d get t o g e t h e r
10 t h e
Everyone
friends
C o m e m e o l t h e g i r l s o f Kappa
Come
24.
t o o u r Open
House
Delta
January
7-9 P . M . , K D l o u n g e , T e n B r o e c k
Oetllldo
appti
Happened
to Baby
I alls.
''I Hit
will be
b e a short
at 7 3 0 F o r m o r n
Interesl
interested
Albany
Streel.
i s a v a i l a b l e 10
weight
Discover
Watch
All
N (
g i v e .1
watchers
how
I
and
'"'
Freudian
meeting
Gamma
somfi
Kap, M o n d a y
new
card
i h e sisters o f
night.
January
22, i nHerkimer Hall, 7 9,
an-
" C o m e o u t a n d m e e t K.D. a n d y o u
conscience
open
Sal . J a n
mike
20
read a p o e m ,
opinion. Troy, 5th Ave
P r e s b y t e r i a n , 11 0 0 P M
also
Coming
Feb
Soon1
23-24.
Telethon
'73 o n
Happiness
is
Sharing
A l l proceeds will g ot o t h e W i l d w o o d
School
for
damaged
children.
autistic
and
B ehappy
brain
Share
hjrthur
Students'
'.'HU.
be
ol
Telethon
a i e hereby
Telethon
will
Baptist C h u r c h , 2 7 5 State
express ynur
Coalition
nul.llurl
. . I ,1
" . e m b i ' r s h i p meetint) Suiufay.
January
learn
Comfi and meet
tnay find a friend
I I 3 0 12 3 0 .
Format
uf
.1 m e r e I n n
this '.nan.' Itii
Jewish
memlxes
to
games?
infor
soon
Emmanuel
Fid. .1
II.."'I
will
Towers
Club
Interested in w o r k i n g for
2 2 , in H U 354 al 7 3 0
document,uy.
general
lU'
Judo
Jan. 2 3 There will
periud
tions
1.1 R e d
Department
State
welcome
serial upHr.ilion can rid y o u o l m a n y
Charles W
Deadline loi
.11 W a p p i n q e i
Imagery"
new
needs y u u i
will
a l l i I ' M ... l i t e
h e held
l . / P M
Jan 24th
Hall
Fill
Pally
Happiness
CC
Center
Remember
each
nite
cards
ex-
it
in the CC
i n f o ..all C h u c k
4H0
Audi-
Ballroom
1 0P M
theCampus
..•til
talent'
Jan 22 25 a n d
7334
u p VOUJ
f o r tins semester. Y o u will
forWild W i l d Weekend.
semester's for
Assembly
l o pick
lurch
tax
need
Keep
as q u i t e beautiful, their qualities
e n d u r i n g i n d e p e n d e n t of t h e
Llhuroscian c o n t e x t . Many a r e
ingeniously c o n s t r u c t e d o u t of
found objects, carefully patina t e d t o suggest an a n c i e n t origin.
T h e degree of disguise varies,
offering c o n s t a n t challenge t o
the visitor's i n n o c e n t assumptions of t h e reality of t h e
a n c i e n t c u l t u r e and of the reliability of his own senses. T h e
ambiguity is heightened through
the use of real stone and m a r b l e
pieces appearing a m o n g those of
heavily
encrusted
styrofoam,
plastic and similar materials.
tir<;l
Besides c r e a t i n g " a r t i f a c t s , "
Daly h a s w r i t t e n
Llhuroscian
p o e t r y a n d m u s i c and has established a c o n s i d e r a b l e b o d y of
L l h u r o s c i a n s c h o l a r s h i p . T h e exh i b i t i o n will p r e s e n t L l h u r o s as a
" r e a l " a n c i e n t civilization Tor
archaeological,
anthropological
and a e s t h e t i c s t u d y . It will n o t
e x p o s e t h e w o r k as t h a t of an
individual artist.
Likewise, the chants ot h u m a n
voices are interspersed with electronically
generated
sounds
T h u s , t h e unsuspecting visitor
first e n t e r s t o receive straightforward
in formal ion, t o see
works of logically varied scale
and purpose, t o sense a consistency of style and a n c i e n t surfaces ~ all factors which permit
him t o make an initial leap of
faith, t o willingly suspend disbelief and accept the civilization
as a u t h e n t i c Presented also with
i n n u m b e r a hie
contradictory
clues, fragmentary evidence, and
planned interferences, he is provoked into actively participating
in rediscovering and synthesizing
the idea of the culture for him
self
T h e e x h i b i t i o n t o be on view
at t h e University A r t Gallery
from
Monday,
.January 15,
t h r o u g h March 1 1 will consist of
m o r e t h a n 100 o b j e c t s including
sculpture
paintings
a n d facsimiles from
temples, photom o n t a g e s , a n d t h e like. Larger
d r a m a t i c pieces include t e m p l e
doors, h u g e fragments of frescoes, a n d a full-scale, spectacular
temple wall, d e c o r a t e d in basrelief. T a p e d s o u n d will provide
music,
translations
of ritual
c h a n t s , a n d a n interview with
noted
Llhuroscian
anthropologists.
T h e magazine Ni'tosuu'ell h a s
called the show "an o u t r a g e o u s
spool' of archaeological exhibits,
a tour de force of craftsmanship
and a provocative esthetic experience " T h e ambiguities of
Ihe show are deliberate Daly has
said that he wants die viewer t o
be actively aware of Ihe synthetic nature ol' t h e Llhuros
civilization a n d to b e c o m e involved with the artist in its
73.
T h e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f the exhibition a n d Daly's c o n c e p t go
well b e y o n d i m i t a t i o n and parody. T h e " a r t i f a c t s " are described
7 7986 or
Remember
is Sharing
T h e University A r t Gallery of
State University of New York at
A l b a n y s o o n will offer a remarkable e x h i b i t i o n e x p e r i e n c e , t h e
" d i s c o v e r y " o f a previously unk n o w n civilization, " L l h u r o s . "
All o f t h e f r a g m e n t a r y r e m n a n t s
of t h e " L l h u r o s c i a n c u l t u r e " —
its u t i l i t a r i a n a n d ritual objects,
its scientific
instruments, its
architectural
r u i n s — are in
fact t h e c o n c e p t i o n of a single
contemporary
artist,
Norman
Daly, p r o f e s s o r o f painting and
s c u l p t u r e a t Cornell University.
is o n e w a y .
Hall
makiog!
o n Tues.
:'<) f e l l
.11
10 I h e
some
Sorority
MISCELLANEOUS
in
"Ivory
is a n event
n e w members
/ nauguration
Whatever
dovnlopmmiu
MM'
f o r artists
nounced
Pmgrams
11 >l...
This
t o make
spring?
Alliance
a n d a n y o n e is w i . ' l i 01111' l " - i t l n i K l
MAJORS & MINORS
arls
will
magazine
ol Ihe
Student
i.ationsis Febiary ». 1973.
Psychology
selections
Want
this
m o t i o n c a l l J a c k ,11 4 5 9 6 9 6 8
pounds
College
exhi-
d e m o n s t r a t i o n a n d r | i i e s h o n a n d ans-
'73?
short
sub
Applications
In Ui
S SI III
night
Spon
Successful
admission
lie made
Lounge
foradmission to
program.
lormal
Steven
Observation
Want
19, a l 7 P.M. i n
InlerVarsilv
C o l m a n ,11 t h e O l l i c e o l I n t e r n a t i o n a l
M.
will be
in Observation, the
accepting
P.M.
applicants wilt he awarder! Ihe
Graduate
'0
by
M o n d a y . Jan
h e accepted
seniors
should
year
arts.
media
of t h ejuried
T h e Albany
on
Fellowship.
stu-
will
Dec
Building
Refreshments
10
many
Tableman
IS a Christian?
night,
from
led
for
a
original
students
l e v e l c o u r s e s as a
fellowship or "riusle d'assislant"
o n
F a c t i inlnr
'/*>
s o that
M r Charles
Physics
sored
a
a
Communi
l e c t u r e ClinKirs)
or "colleges"
in
1 9 7 3 a t 3 Oil
lasts a p f j r u x i i n a l i . ' i y
the
Graduaie School and o f unrolling
cations Cemor. R i i o m S H 33 I
beneath
are
of
hear
o n What
Friday
secondary
tention
films
in theEducational
Come
our
show
once
held i n the Gallery in M a y , and
especially
Applications
degree
various
considered
appear
spoak
"postes
office
will
Programs, SS
Italian-American
senior
The
10 I n t e r n a t i o n a l
occurs
from
bition
of
Ollice
staff o rcall 4 5 7 4 3 7 8 .
information,
part o l theii M . A . o r P h . D . programs
Seniors
For ap-
a n d more
111
University
distance
lake graduate
dents.
regarding
or wish torem a post
contacl
lor "lyeees"
commuting
graduating
b y 1/30/73. II
a n y questions
Works
It or 2)
t w o
lor French
within
may
Observation
Prepare n o w t o s u b m i t
of a
The "postes d'assislant"
awarded
staff, students
who
at the
a n d
d'assislant"
b e n>
lurned t o the same office
and
Reims,
Pro-
of Strasbourg, a
"poste d e lecteur"
ollice,
Pro-
t h eopening
tions and forms m a y be o b t a i n e d at
Registrar's
Spain and Sweden?
plications
Students ex
Counselor
i n serving as c o u n -
selor a l s u m m e r c a m p s f o r c h i l d r e n i n
will
459-9725
pecting t ograduate i n M a y must
Camp
Interested
come
Degree
WHAT TO DO
Tuesday,
January 2 3 a t 7 : 3 0 P.M. i nP H Y 129.
Dr.
in
Call
2 7 0 - 7 2 6 8 a n d ask l o r Leigh.
Students
on
Interested
another guitarist?
The "Ambiguous" Culture of Llhuros
Yon won't be
Calm
I
marllyn
rediscovery. B e y o n d t h a t , he
hopes " t h e foibles, follies, superslit ions, cruelties,
fears a n d
anxieties o f this m y t h i c a l c u l t u r e
are recognized as having disquieting r e s e m b l a n c e to o u r own
civilization."
T h e entire e x h i b i t i o n was organized by t h e A n d r e w Dickson
White M u s e u m of A r t at Cornell.
On T h u r s d a y night, F e b r u a r y 1
at 7 : 3 0 , there will be a recep-
niiHjung
loi
Lacrosse
tion and a lecture b y Mr. D a l y
t o which t h e p u b l i c is invited a t
no charge.
Gallery h o u r s are 9 t o 5 Monday t h r o u g h Friday a n d 1 t o 5
S a t u r d a y and S u n d a y .
Sweet Jenny Grit-Henways
Sweel J e n n y ( i n l is a hand uf
stage. That they are playing, and
a line
w o m e n w h o will he playing lien-
being asked back again and again
delight is c o n t a g i o u s . T h e y gel
way's tins S a t u r d a y night, liased
is politics e n o u g h . I h e smiles of
people
in S y r a c u s e , Ihe g r o u p has heen
pride
magic. T h e sheer energy o f this
thawing over-capacity c r o w d s al
e v e r y w h e r e Ihey play is evidence
group
clubs
ihey
of t h a t . T h e y d o . h o w e v e r , d o a
for
hegan playing publicly this past
little tongue-in-cheek m e d l e y o f
and see for yourself how these
summer.
"cock n i c k " occasionally.
and colleges
since
T h e musical
baek-
o n t h e laces o f w o m e n
aie
Sweel
Jenny
range
from
lime
playing, a n d their
u p and dancing
more
like
than
compensates
a n y technical
flaws. C o m e
w o m e n " c o o k " t o g e t h e r . It'll d o
your
g i o u n d s o f ihe live w o m e n w h o
Interesl
kawln
N o r m a n Daly, " d i s c o v e r e r " o f the lost civilization of L l h u r o s
On the w h o l e , S w e e t J e n n y has
hearts
good,
sisters a n d
brothers.
1
I h i . . . , w i l l I.-' .. "
DFLTA-SICMA-PI
William
C. Stewart,
S U N Y PI
will
J'
menlCenliiT
speak
preseni
will
on " A n
•
|..li market"
Ijiia.I.nn, r o o m
'.fi'.i.
sponsor
from the
M i Stewart
lysis
in
"''h'
i"i'l " ' . i '..lav
rh,,,il,.i
I...
minors,
y..i.
.ill
Theater
and interested
plan
.
Ih
l u e s d a y ,11 / (111 I M i n I h e g y m
Appli.
W i l l . .11 1 (111. ,11 I I . . ' S l i l l l i n
students.
11
m v1
.... p . "
,,,
m m
I veiyui
vices
loll
"'
..1 ' , ! J N Y A l b a n y
v
I
.11 K
II
cv.uy
uivui'il
I Huns.'
.-. •
1,. Shabhat
ser-
Council
limy
m. .n CC356
I r M1,1 V n i g h l ,.t / : i ( l H M
S.ilniil.iy,
..II I n i l i v
P M
lis . i n - tie..I.J , i , < a l l i e d f o i
AMIA
majors,
1
m . 'H A
' . " Ian M
January
I ll in / 6 9 1 B n. I
Business
Students:
gonil
Wai.t.'.l
..l.nli'iif.
,,'i.,
Inn. I
A l l i n ,,,,. i n t e r e s t e d ... AM A
hand-
I S H gles a n d d o u U l o s I .» 1
AMIA
ball
.'.1 S a i u n l a v ,
similnsl
squash
knowledge an'l g">w in ,1 pmlnssi
869 0()m0ei.v".'n ' . a n d / I' M
11.
January
Ml!
Pa.
wi'i'l
.'
.illyl,
•1!,/ /,•', III .„ I...
. .a.
Any
a .IS/ K/'H,
I.I
Itilmgual
S
I
lhlituiu.il Ed ml In
1.'/
1 .1
I a n . ' 1 11 m
'.IINYA
Spun'
I.'... ItirHI
Hi I ,in,|...|.„,
i"'
.1 I "
I n g l . ' . l ' •.'.
....I I
I-
new
othcers
i... l ' l / i
lihr.
..•..„• a n
..If
age I ' I ' . ' '.I
•, I
..
dune 1 '
loud
last
Linda
piano a n d
D ' A I I I I C O o n lead
III.,
Any,,,
All ol Sweel
sings. Willi
on
Jenny
J a n i c e . Susie, a n d
Cindy sharing lead vocals.
"1
Ihe S l u d e n l A s
I i y !> I ' M
A h a n d ol w o m e n ? Many w h o
F relay,
come
„ „
Talottw i
,
Milnr.il
cm n
"i
. I I
( I I
III..
...
l.nl|
•!'./ H/HI.
poi
,, M i n i
1 •'!, .
loi Ihe uovelly a i e con-
verted by the end of the first set.
„, „„,
'73 o n stage
.(.'iii'ial
U.'l.ll
ill
1' 1 / ',
"Mimnix" slur Mike Connors sets
into many fights in his TV thriller.
"Hut there's one fi^ht wc can nil
net into," says tile actor. "The
fight against cancer needs everyone's help. (Jive generously to
your A i n m n m Cancer Society-"
These w o m e n d o n ' t c o m e d o w n
F r a g m e n t of a m u r a l , " E a r l y Archaic*
with
a n y heavy
polities
Iron]
S w e e t J e n n y Grit will play H e n w o y ' s this w e e k e n d
>»»t*4*****»**»*»»f*****»*»**»***************************
I
I
IMIIII |
±1111IJ l-LIJ-l-LIJ-LULtl 1111111 l l l l l . L I A I J 1111111
lUJIHIHIIIIHIII
urmrsify concert board presents
Wild, Wild Weekend II Concert!
Pajama Party Mixer
Telethon '73
Miscellaneous workers
needed for 24-hour period
Saturday Night in the Ballroom 9-1
\
Beer & Munchies
Prizes, Dancing, Cartoons, or Whatever
BOTTLE HILL and
COUNTRY GRAN0LA
If interested, come to LC 4
Wed. January 24 at 7:00
or call Beth or Debbie
7-8786
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19
9 pm
CC Ballroom
.I1'«°.!.!I. , ..''.'.'M.°I||'|'|||
jj,jllnlj$jti»t*aa»i»"r'f""**',t'r'trrrrrrf",,rf"*r"""""M"*""********'t*"""*A
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
PAGE 6A
rhythm
h i e ., s o l n i i , i
:C34(i.
limners
Wild Wild Weekend II
"TREK"
plain
,'n
ran'
Music by
organ,
on electric
flute. Janice
organization
ui
ollice,
.mil
II in llu- Kin linil.litiil II .1.111
.'A» .... Iiiasrlay 1.11. .'I .11 H I' M A
iv win I
w ullii 1.a tin'
,s 1,,
well mil
w "II -. I .11 ullv i.ul
H e l l . ...
jfr
comes
o n base
a n d slide g u i t a r ;
Wilcox
1<l/'l
must
[ilieaho
,n
ll.d.VI
d a l e .-,
356 D u
on electric
ennui
cussion
I.,11 , , i
fit.' Spanish Club .-. Itavng .is
N Mnili.
„ .
. a n pick
ers
l,..,,. services and onegs f>" I'll .'.ii I
serneste
I a
sound
Kohbins
gun.u . and Susie ( i a y n e s on per-
Patagoni .mil Will West, w.i
1,, ,111 his win i •, ". Monday >-\
I,
„ v ,"l a H I' M . '
1 (lini,
1
,|., llllJ l'i II
I),,,, ,.,•
Then
Jackie
and electric cello; C i n d y Saund-
I..II..W
, ,iii(l Kosltni
a.
I " h e l o '111
from
.11 I I ] a 111 . . i l l a t
( l n « | Stk1llll.1l
rock b a n d s t o s y m p h o n y
oicheslia
i ishman, 7 3010
dual i n lers i n CC
law
other
can lie picked
A n y q u e s t i o n s call U
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
Iff
Pfes
frm^oasjjijjl
Hj|l£"estn$f
IrrBcbnt oft
Cam
«••" "'" " J ^ •
l u n d o d b y i t u d e n t t,y
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
;J
PAGE 7A
Letters to the Editor
Now Get This
w**** JANUARY
-*>* CLEARANCE
SALE
To the editor:
J u s t a brief c o m m e n t o n the
article by J u d y D a m o n t in the
ASP of D e c e m b e r 8, 1 9 7 2 .
Ms. D a m o n t r e p o r t e d t h a t President Bonezet h o p e s t h a t the
School
of
Criminal
Justice
would b e c o m e m o r e closely r e
lated t o penal i n s t i t u t i o n s . While
this a t t r i b u t i o n is s u b j e c t to a
variety of i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s , for
the r e c o r d let m e s t a t e t h a t we
have n o ties to penal i n s t i t u t i o n s
and I k n o w of n o plans to
establish a n y .
on P I O N E E R
I am n o t alone here in m y
belief t h a t o u r prisons are inh u m a n , corrupt,
destructive,
and wholly ineffective institutions t h a t c a n n o t be p e r m i t t e d
to exist m u c h longer. F o r myself, t h e only r e l a t i o n s h i p that I
want with the Oswalds a n d Atticas of t h e w o r l d is o n e that
operates to p u t t h e m o u t of
business.
and thousands of other
Sincerely,
Fred C o h e n
Professor of Law
and Criminal J u s t i c e
STEREO
Next, Please...
COMPONENTS
To the e d i t o r :
Many
students,
particularly
during this s e m e s t e r , have spent
a great deal of l i m e s u p p o r t i n g
teachers w h o , for o n e reason or
another,
have
been
denied
t e n u r e or o t h e r w i s e told not to
return t o the University. I applaud this t e n d e n c y a m o n g the
s t u d e n t b o d y : it indicates an
awareness of responsibility and a
sense of pride in o n e of t h e most
crucial c o m p o n e n t s of an educational i n s t i t u t i o n : o u t s t a n d i n g
and d e d i c a t e d teachers.
SOME OF THE SPECIALS
SAVE $ 2 0 00 0
I s h o u l d like here t o inform
your r e a d e r s of o n e m o r e such
teacher, w h o has been told t h a t
his c o n t r a c t has n o t been re-
STEREO HEADPHONES
Pioneer-SE-30 reg.$34.95
NOW $24. 9 5
Pioneer- SE-50 reg.$49.95
NOW $34. 9 5
On J a n u a r y 3, 1973 Nelson
Rockefeller
gathered
together
the S t a t e Legislature inside the
State Capitol on S t a t e S t r e e t to
tell of the S t a t e of t h e S t a t e
And a sorry state it is.
TX-600, SA-600
SA1000,TX-1000
170 watt AMPLIFIER-TUNER
combination
PIONEER'S
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reg. - $659."° NOW - $459. 9 °
100 watt AMPLIFIER - TUNER
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reg.-$379.90
SAVE-$40
OW
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on a P I O N E E R '
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reg.»149.,5N©W-$l©9.<
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00LONIE
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PAGE 8A
ALBANY
TIC^tnfAn.
4t2tB01
SCHENECTADY
141 trim BM.
MM111
QLEN8 FALL*
J t l ( * £ • M m Worn,
HUM*
PITJ8FIELD
d l t a w K w
4W-14M
AMHERST
M A « .
r W m n
M.
T h e big p r o b l e m facing t h e
people of New York S t a t e , said
Rocky in t h e S t a t e of t h e S t a l e ,
is D R U G S . T h e y are tearing
apart our s o c i e t y , he said; any
one w h o sells those awful c h e m
Seals kills as surely as the Man
with a long knife lurking m a
dark alley late al night A c c o r d
ingly, he said, we must h a w liftprison t e r m s with n o h o p e ol
parole or suspension to these
" e n e m i e s of t h e p e o p l e " "We've
tried e v e r y t h i n g else, a n d every
thing else has failed "
1 s u p p o s e each age needs its
paranoid fantasies. During the
latter years of the last c e n i u r \ , M
was tin- Irish i m m i g r a n t s (relerr
ed to as " P a p i s t s , " read agent.s ol
the alleged i n t e r n a t i o n a l C a l h o
lie c o n s p i r a c y )
A lew years
later, it was " a n a r c h i s t s " (read
Ia bo r
orgaiii/.ers )
Come
N o v e m b e r M)18, it was Bolshe
vicks. T h e good old
Papists
imbued with successful labor
unions became "comnmnislh
When Al Smith ran for President
in l!J2K against Hoover s o m e
b a c k w o o d s c o m m u n i t i e s wen*
s h o w n pictures of the New York
G o v e r n o r c u l l i n g the ribbon lor
the Lincoln Tunnel which had
just o p e n e d in New York City
In reality, the displayers said,
this was a tunnel to H o m e for
the Pope to use to rule America
after S m i t h ' s election
During F D R ' s tune it was fust
^cj^jmuiusls^iyja^
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
n e w e d : Mr. Joseph Balfior, a
teacher of acting and directing in
the D e p a r t m e n t of T h e a t r e for
the past four years.
When we T h e a t r e s t u d e n t s
were informed of his dismissal
last spring, a series of heated
m e e t i n g followed, which began a
string of letter-writing c a m p a i g n s
and
meetings
with
assorted
Deans and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s . (We
all k n o w how thi'St> usually work
o u t . ) Finally the m a t t e r was
b r o u g h t up again—for t h e second time, the T h e a t r e faculty
voted overwhelmingly t o approve his renewal. But now the
final word has c o m e to us, and
-Joseph Balfior will not return in
September.
We've been told that the reason is his position as a "lect u r e r , " which, some say, implies
a rotating job of one year. In my
perhaps limited view, this rationale is both asinine--there are
many " l e c t u r e s h i p s " which have
gone on for years and years with
no change in personnel - a n d ,
most i m p o r t a n t l y ,
unfair, in
view of the literally gigantic impact Mr. Balfior has had on the
s t u d e n t s of the T h e a t r e Depart
m e n ! and the c a m p u s at large
Not only has he directed a number of well-received and widely
seen p r o d u c t i o n s , such as "Pornographic
P l a y ,"
"Camino
Heal," " Y o u r Own T h i n g , " and
" T h e Bald S o p r a n o , " as well as
the sixth Major P r o d u c t i o n up
coming in May, the musical
" T h e Most Happy Fella;" but
almost every single s t u d e n t w h o
has ever appeared on a S U N Y A
stage has c o m e into c o n t a c t with
I) i m i n classes He was inst ru
menial in the establishment of a
working
Black T h e a t r e
Ensemble, an organizer of the St.
John's
Project
of
bringing
t h e a t r e to the Albany c o m m u nity which has since developed
into part of the credit-hearing
C o m m u n i t y Service Courses.
His dedication to theatre, to
his s t u d e n t s , to the University
" f a s c i s t s . " The latter actually
did exist, and this t r i u m p h will
fuel paranoia lor al least the
next fii'U years Alter the war, it
b e c a m e the " c o m m i e s " again In
the
early
'(ill's
it
was
" b e a t n i e k s , " then a lew years
Liter it became " h i p p i e s , " then
" r u m p u s radicals " As paranoia
subsided for each t y p e , a new
fantasy always arose or was ere
.iled. Well, folks, today the ol,
led of paranoia is the " I n t e r
national Drug Trafficke. "
He's a h u h ' man, who usually
looks Puerto Kican or Italian. He
lurks a r o u n d dark alleys, wears a
irenchcoal with a hat pulled
down low over his "W'S He
never talks lo anybody except
r|ementar\
always
winch
school
offers
looks
students.
Ihem
He
"candy"
suspiciously
,,/mes in his hack pocket ol
.is the hltle Kills rides in his
Ih'.ugh,
es"
(jmic
,,,!,,,
,,,
,-
|\
he
-a\s
Little People
are Big People
"»"
lo
k
»'
the
some
i h m i s a l o n g Hie l i n e * o f " G e e ,
h o w spiffs k e e n 1 ' and eagerly
!,,|ics a p u l l on .i sir,nine l o o k i n g
,.,H,irelie Withm lf» *'< »«<|a he
ih transformed i n ! " a mangy,
iinli social DRUG FIKND. As
l h t , vignette ends, he is either
dead, dying, »" '*h»' " ' l"' 1
Nothing is
Sacred
T o the e d i t o r :
Why does t h e A l b a n y S t u d e n t
Press suppress t h e n a m e s of individuals arrested for various
charges o n c a m p u s ? I a s s u m e
t h a t t h e y are over t h e age w h e r e
they can be c o n s i d e r e d children
and legally e n t i t l e d t o such prot e c t i o n . T h e r e is s e l d o m a n y
hesitation t o n a m e p e o p l e rightfully or wrongfully in c o n n e c tion with o t h e r m a t t e r s , a n d I
fail t o see why s t u d e n t s s h o u l d
be so c o d d l e d especially at a
l i m e when we are t o l d s t u d e n t s
Would it be t o o m u c h to ask if
in general totally reject t h e conwe little p e o p l e , the ones on the
c e p t of "in loco p a r e n t i s . "
b o t t o m of t h e t o t e m p o l e , could
Sincerely,
" s e e our n^m^s ( t e a m s ) in the
J. H o o d , M.D.
paper, t o o ? " S i n c e r e l y ,
Director
Doug Lewanda
Member of League IV-B H o o p t e a m S t u d e n t Health Service
Tell us all about it.
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s should be t y p e w r i t t e n
and addressed to:
E d i t o r i a l Page E d i t o r , A l b a n y S t u d e n t
Press, C C 3 2 6 , S U N Y A , A l b a n y , N . Y .
T o the e d i t o r :
In the ASP issue d a t e d O c t o b e r
27, y o u r C O M M U N I C A T I O N S
section printed a letter from
Lloyd F i s h m a n , President of t h e
AMIA Council. He was requesting that just "a little m o r e space
in t h e A l b a n y S t u d e n t Press be
devoted to the coverage of m e n ' s
intramural a t h l e t i c s . " (After all,
a n y t h i n g is greater t h a n nothing)
Unless there are e x t e n u a t i n g circumstances, all letters
must be signed.
Well, you had r e s p o n d e d nicely
(although it was still less than
a d e q u a t e ) during these past few
weeks, publishing t h e finals in
both flag football and soccer. In
your last issue d a t e d D e c e m b e r
1, you were so kind as t o show
your readers the c u r r e n t s t a n d
ings of the t e a m s in the Basketball League, However, you failed
lo include L E A G U E IV which is
c o m p o s e d of 4 divisions A, B, C,
D. Now we all k n o w t h a t League
IV, no m a t t e r what sport it is,
" c o n t a i n s the least a m o u n t of
U n f o r t u n a t e l y , I fear the G o o d
Governor might actually believe
this fantasy
He said his d u t y
was to wipe out " h a r d " drugs
such as " H e r o i n , u h h , L S D u h h ,
and, and, h a s h i s h ! " Heroin is
c o n c e d e d by most as being a
" h a r d " drug in thai it builds up
a rather real d e p e n d e n c y
There was a f o o t n o t e to the
lab r e p o r t s on acid, t h o u g h , that
the newspapers chose to ignore coffee and lea caused much
more c h r o m o s o m a l d a m a g e than
LSD But t h e n , legislators drink
both, so of course they c a n ' t be
nearly as d a n g e r o u s as s o m e t h i n g
that's only ingested by dirty
hippies
In A Sorry State
like
Dad's
vitamins
<>i
Mom's
speed whoops, I mean diet pills
The kids a l w a \ s elaborate on
I,,,.,, •,!,," with s p i l l \ answers
UK,, " w h s do UMI think they .-all
,i dope*'" The man always dis
...ns oil into shadows as the
.'PI
,,•,- siri'iis scream
nearb>
pol
ni'tinies lie has naughty mag
Sometimes,
and the c o m m u n i t y arc u n q u e s tionable. I m e n t i o n all this with
sadness, n o t anger; w h a t ' s d o n e
is done, the decision has been
made, a n d frankly, any professor
w h o has h a d t o p u t u p with as
m u c h adminstrative pigheadedness as Mr. Balfior ( a n d so m a n y
o t h e r s ) has, is p r o b a b l y b e t t e r
off s o m e w h e r e else, away from
all the a n i m o s i t i e s a n d bureaucratic silliness. I just w o u l d like
t o let t h e s t u d e n t s k n o w t h a t
there's o n e m o r e good man
gone. Who's n e x t ?
Sincerely,
R o b e r t Verini
President, T h e a t r e Council
p u r e t a l e n t a n d skill in t h e art of
p l a y i n g t h a t s p o r t ; " B u t did y o u
p e o p l e ever s t o p t o realize t h a t
this is as i m p o r t a n t t o u s "lesser
p l a y e r s " as it is t o t h e guys in
League I w h o failed t o m a k e t h e
s c h o o l t e a m . T h e r e are 3 2 t e a m s
in League IV - e a c h t e a m with at
least 7-10 players- w h o just w a n t
t o get t o g e t h e r a n d play basketball just for t h e helluv it. We can
m o r e or less predict e l i m i n a t i o n
by o u r league's t e a m representative during play-off t i m e because
of t h e q u a l i t y of t h e play of
Leagues I, II, a n d III. Yet, I
d o n ' t see w h y we s h o u l d not be
p u t in t h e Press. ( T h e excuse of
n o t e n o u g h r o o m w o u l d be a
poor one!)
bv Mtkf
Mcduire
Governor
Rockefeller wants to give the
sellers ol liasl
fie severe sen
letices than are given lo perpel
raiois ol any crime in New York
Stale Murders and rapists are at
1,-asl eligible for parole Uoi'ke
feller hmisell in effect ordered
forty deaths al Allien and never
e v e n h a d t o a p p e a r in c o u r t
"We've tried everything else,
and everything else has failed "
What is e v e r y t h i n g else, Govern
or'.' T h e
Narcotic
Addiction
Control C o m m i s s i o n , which you
formed to carry out a campaign
pledge? Under this p r o g r a m ,
s o m e o n e c a u g h t s h o o t i n g up
horse is given their choice of jail
or " t h e p r o g r a m . ' In an urban
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
^ HAND/
v
jail y o u ' r e lucky if y o u ' r e not
raped or s t a b b e d within the first
week. Most take " t h e p r o g r a m , "
as the least o b n o x i o u s of two
disgusting choices. O n c e in " t h e
p r o g r a m " the aim is to treat as
many addicts as possible as
quickly as possible. It's rough
• n o u g h t o " c u r e " s o m e o n e who
d o e s n ' t want t o he " c u r e d '
w i t h o u t s o m e o n e trying lo kick
him out tin* door before lht
" c u r e " has had a chance t<
succeed.
I s u p p o s e Ihe N A C C pacifies
s o m e of the m o r e right wing
citizens of the stall'. T h e s t a t e is
" g e t t i n g l o u g h " - w h e t h e r or
not that " t o u g h n e s s " is accomplishing a d a m n e d thing doesn't
really mailer. Force is being
used, and of course that must he
an i m p r o v e m e n t over giving the
dirty a d d i c t s " w h a t Ihej w a n t "
even if its the m e t h a d o n e that
will
l-'i
them
live
without
robbing society hluid and Willi
out dying in the st reels
One solution you haven't tried
yet, Governor Forget about the
" s o f t " stuff, even i! only out of
praeticulit> If you don't think
people should s m o k e pot or hash
and you want to impose your
morality on everybody
else,
d o n ' t d o It, b e c a u s e it will
waste
lime, m o n e y , and energy thai
could be spent in much m o r e
socially helpful pursuits If you
wanl lo, have the slate take out
newspaper and television advertisements telling all of us what a
hazard soft drugs are. L o o k h o w
effective ads were with LSD use,
even t h o u g h most of Ihe ads
were either misinformed or else
deliberate lies.
And as far as the " h a r d stuff"
goes, for G o d ' s sake let people
do it as long as they d o n ' t h u r t
a n y o n e else in the process.
But you may say they are h u r t i n g
people in ihe process. At t h e
m o m e n t y o u ' r e right But it is
the current laws that are doing
this People have lo buy heroin
from Ihe u n d e r w o r l d al inflated
prices, and then they have to rob
to get enough m o n e y If the
government were to take over
heroin distribution ( y o u are not
going to s t o p it - there is far t o o
m u c h of a d e m a n d to let you
s t o p the s u p p l y ) prices w o u l d
rocket d o w n w a r d . People could
hold p r o d u c t i v e jobs w h e r e t h e y
could earn enough m o n e y t o
su p p o r t
themselves,
without
resorting t o a life of crime. O u r
cil ies would
become
safer
People w o u l d n ' t d r o p dead in
the streets, because quality control would save t h e m from being
poisoned by a d u l t e r a n t s or else
suffering an accidental o v e r d o s e
{ l o v e rn m e n t
p rograms
for
detoxification would be available for those wishing t h e m , a n d
the} would be run by c o m p e t e n t
medical personell and not b \
politicians looking tor a lew
cheap voles We'd all he a lot
happier
If s o m e o n e wants to shoot u p .
Ihe government has no right to
s t o p him unless he h u r t s s o m e
o n e else.
A lot m o r e m o run will be
spent, a lot m o r e c h e a p voles
will be garnered, and a lot m o r e
people will die until Rock> and
the Legislature gel this simple
jnessjuje^^aisse^iaire^^
PAGE NINE
Waterworks: ftffoiy Never Before Told
by Elizabeth Jones
Last semester, the ASP printed
a series of articles about professors currently u p for tenure.
Y o u all remember the Waterworks Case--the professor, pedagogue, and champion of the students who" was blackballed by
her department" for what appeared to be an advanced case of
cooties. Y o u recall the administration's fair and just subjective
opinion of student support for
this professor. It seemed to me
that there was something more,
something different lurking between the lines of this tale.
Here's the story as it really
happened:
Once upon a time lust semester, Dr. Carillon W a t e r w o r k s o f
tht
Psychology
Department
went through
the mill for
tenure. After being swatted and
paddled around the d e p a r t m e n t ,
it became evident to her m a n y
student s u p p o r t e r s t h a t
the
administration was also preparing a good spank. S t u d e n t s
manned tables at dinner lines
recruiting signatures from other
s t u d e n t s in favor of helping
Waterworks, a n d the ASP began
full coverage of the case, b u t the
real clincher was a "letter to the
e d i t o r " published in the ASP.
T h e mighty pillars of S.U.N.Y.A.
began to tremble even while the
presses rolled.
T h a t day, in Social Sciences,
one of Waterworks' colleagues
overreacted t o the letter. It
claimed that Dr. Waterworkds
was the " b e s t t e a c h e r " in the
entire Psych D e p a r t m e n t . " H o w
can you d o this to m e ? " wailed
the colleague, tearfully shaking a
copy of the ASP at Waterworks.
" Y o u are not the best teacher, /
am, 'Cause / s a i d , " he cried. He
then pouted and stuck out his
tongue. Just then, S c o o p non
Troppo, w h o was covering the
story for the ASP came o n the
scene. The wimpering professor
spied non Troppo, tweeked the
y o u n g reporter's nose for news
and grabbed his lapel. "You'll
pay for this, you little drip!" he
cried (as he shouted) and would
have wrung the reporter out had
something in his libido not
halted him. The professor then
sulked away from Waterworks'
office. "I'm telling," he said.
The case eventually led its way
to the ivory and plush offices of
a member of the administration.
Student supporters were there
granted t h e pleasure of an interview with Oy More Hamburger,
Dean of A r t s and Seances. As
the students seated themselves,
the Dean shifted his eyes and
m a d e a nervous twirling m o t i o n
with his fingers at the corner of
his waxy m o u s t a c h e . T h e group
of s t u d e n t s presented him with a
petition, signed by 2,360 students.
" W h a t ' s this? What's t h i s ? " dem a n d e d Hamburger with a cordial sneer.
" A petition signed b y . . . . " began a quaking s t u d e n t .
"If it has a n y t h i n g t o do with
Dr.
W a t e r w o r k s ' case
for
t e n u r e , " i n t e r r u p t e d the dean,
" y o u can be sure we will make
the fairest decision."
The students continued, "This
is a petition signed by 2,360
s t u d e n t s in favor of granting Dr.
Waterworks t e n u r e . "
" T o i l e t p a p e r ! " shouted the
dean as he tossed the petition in
the Taco of the closest students.
" N u m b e r s are a h u m b u g ! I want
f a c t s ! " He reached into his desk
and w h i p p e d o u t the paper with
the psychology faculty's vote
not to reinstate Dr. Waterworks.
"There! 8 - 1 ! And that's a fact!"
he leered.
"But what about the student
evaluations? What about the vast
majority of enthusiastic students
appraising Waterworks?" protested the students.
"Of
n o use, whatsoever.
S.U.N.Y.A. students don't k n o w
anything," he said with a dismissing wave of his claw. " N o w
this!" he continued, shaking
sheets of parchment
before
them, "is an evaluation!" He was
referring to Psych Department
chairman Teethin's report o n i
Dr.
Waterworks.
Hamburger
cleared his throat and read:
Dr. Waterworks
may be loved
and revered by her students,
but
I think she's pretty
mediocre
myself. She may be
extremely
active in student
affairs, but I
think it's alot of nonsense.
Her
research is minimal; she's been
published only eight times in the
last four years, not enough
to
make the Psych Department
impressive.
And
besides-1
think
she's
neurotic.
" H a - H a ! " laighed the dean as
he held u p the p a r c h m e n t .
" F a c t s , ladies a n d g e n t l e m e n !
Pure f a c t s ! " He leaned back in
his black leather chair. " O n l y
eight times, h u h ? That's...let m e
s e e . . . " and he reached for his
adding machine. " T h a t ' s . . . a h . . .
oh yes. Here it is. T h a t ' s t w o
times a year! Published o n l y
twice a year! And e v e r y b o d y
k n o w s we w a n t q u a n t i t y , n o t
quality a r o u n d h e r e . "
O n e Waterworks s u p p o r t e r asked if s t u d e n t s might be able t o
a t t e n d the final deciding meeting
of t h e Faculty Personality Comm i t t e e . Dean Hamburger leaped
up and shouted, " N O ! " Then he
slithered down am> muttered,
"Who d o y o u think runs this
joint?"
In t h e last phase o f the case,
S c o o p non Troppo got his hands
on s o m e hot evidence -• the
Science Citation index report. It
appeared that Waterworks had
been cited 8 times for her research last year - 8 more times
than six tenured.members of her
department and more times
altogether than ten members of
the department.
When
University
President
Benzedrine was asked about the
significance of these statistics, he
said, "I wash my hands of it."
When Dr. Teethin' was approached he meerly said, "I'm
not telling."
So o n c e again, t h e mighty
pillars of S.U.N.Y.A. shook.
Once again, the s t u d e n t s ' supp o r t of Carillon Waterworks was
justified. And once again, the
Psf/ch D e p a r t m e n t had temper.
A n d back in the chandoliered
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n building, S c o o p
non T r o p p o interviewed Oy
More Hamburger. T h e reporter
asked the dean w h a t he t h o u g h t
of Dr. Waterworks being cited
by m o r e sources t h a t t h e majority of her colleagues.
" C r a p ! " broiled Hamburger.
But t h e dean quietly regained his
usual cool and slimy c o m p o s u r e
and shrugged his shoulders.
" T h e s e n u m b e r s mean n o t h i n g
to m e . "
And
the
p i l l a r s of
salt
trembled.
T h a t , fearless reader, is t h e tale
as it truly h a p p e n e d . T h e last
and m o s t p r e p o s t e r o u s part, the
final decision of t h e administrative h a t c h e t , has yet t o be told.
About this time an "unlucky
driver" period began for FOBS
He states that a Hialeah cop
stopped him for going t o o slow
( 3 0 in a 4 0 z o n e ) and then
threatened to s h o o t him if h<
didn't take the VVAW sign off
his van. In a period of about £
month, Foss suddenly received
some half dozen traffic tickets
On October 10, at a pretrial
hearing on the drug charge,
Criminal Judge Murray Goodman denied Foss the right to
have William Kuntsler as an
attorney. Goodman s t a t e d tha
Kuntsler could function as consulting a t t o r n e y , but could not
address the court or the jury. In
his motion t o deny Kuntsler t h e
right t o r e p r e s e n t F o s s at t h e
drug trial Assistant S t a t e ' s Attorney R o b e r t K a y e r e p e a t e d l y
m a d e reference t o the "circusl
style a t m o s p h e r e " t h a t Kuntsler)
might bring t o a c o u r t r o o m
Apparently, Judge
Goodman!
accepted
this
argument:
w o u l d n o t allow disruptive pro-!
ceedings in this c o u r t , " he said
in gagging Kuntsler. Carol Scott,
a Gainesville a t t o r n e y w h o was]
supposed to assist Kuntsler at'
t h e drug trial said t h a t she wa:
to do t h e research a n d the pre
trial while Kuntsler was to be
t h e primary a t t o r n e y . " T h a t
w h a t he was r e t a i n e d f o r , " she
said. So, having b e e n denied
Kuntsler's assistance, A l t o n elected to defend himself. G o o d m a n
a p p o i n t e d Public D e f e n d e r Phil
H u b b e r t to be at F o s s ' s side;
t h r o u g h o u t t h e trial in case h
changed his m i n d .
Foss was n o t very successful as
an a t t o r n e y a n d was convicted
on N o v e m b e r 2 0 of t h e felony
charge. He. is s c h e d u l e d to be
sentenced on D e c e m b e r 14 th
and could get up to five years in
prise
• • —
byWiliiam L. Ryan
AP Special Correspondent
'As" the' United States gets closer and closer to pulling out of
the Indochina quicksand, the relief felt by leaders around the
world is going t o be m i x e d with
apprehension in s o m e areas.
T h e w h o l e o u t l o o k for S o u t h east Asian leaders is a b o u t to
change radically. T h e y will be
looking at a new and unfamiliar
sort of ball game.
The N i x o n Doctrine
The Nixon D o c t r i n e assumes
t h a t the U n i t e d S t a t e s will avoid
future military i n v o l v e m e n t on
Asian soil. S o u t h e a s t Asian nations are on n o t i c e t h a t their
defense is primarily their o w n
problem, and t h a t t h e y enjoy
only t h e s o r t of p r o t e c t i o n t h a t
is implicit in U.S. p o w e r and
influence.
Their fingers crossed, these
leaders are h o p i n g t h a t C h i n a ' s
quarrel with t h e Soviet Union
and t h e need of each of t h e t w o
C o m m u n i s t giants t o develop
new relations with t h e Americans will provide a m e a s u r e of
insurance while they prepare for
a painfully u n c e r t a i n
future.
Guerrilla m o v e m e n t s , revolutionary pressure and o u t s i d e en-
•r.i.n
C
by Ron Wolf
•
I
\S
RUSH
HAS
STARTED
panyEven President N i x o n is reported to have told F r e n c h President P o m p i d o u at Lheir meeting
in the Azores last year, " W e will
have an S S T . . . "
OUT OF BUSINESS|
BZ
Chi Sig
Gamma Kap
- KD
- Psi Gam
436
Savings Up To 50%
EVERYTHING IN THE
7982
STORE MUST GO!
the Soviet Union, China and the
European C o m m o n Market will,
by their built-in conflicts of
interests, create a situation canceling out pressures o n Southeast Asia. But meantime, he
says, t h e area " s h o u l d use t h e
time given t o us by the American presence t o c o n s o l i d a t e o u r
domestic systems and c o o p e r a t e
with each o t h e r . "
The Middle East:
Probably t h e No. 1 foreign
policy priority for Washington
after V i e t n a m is the Middle East,
where a lot of d y n a m i t e waits
for a d e t o n a t o r . T h a t situation is
even m o r e sticky for A m e r i c a n s
because t h e U.S. energy crisis
puts greater emphasis all the
time on Middle East oil.
T h e Soviet leadership at the
m o m e n t appears both to wi.nl
and to fear c o n t i n u e d turmoil in
the area, and puts on an oddlooking s h o w . It denies Egypt
the wherewithal
that
might
tempt Cairo to bow to domestic
pressures a n d forget about possible s e t t l e m e n t but at the same
lime seems t o encourage Syria in
calculated p r o v o c a t i o n s of Israel.
Oil is T h i c k e r T h a n Blood
Egypt's
President
Anwar
Sadat, b r o o d i n g a b o u t the Soviet
bloc in the relaxation it could
bring, in the contamination it
could mean through less restriction on contacts, in possible
erosion of Communist authority
in the bloc and perhaps even in
the Soviet Union Itself, A peace
within bounds would be b e l t e r one that could bring s o m e of the
economic benefits without danger of political cost.
attitude, seems even more hurt
by his rich Arab brethren in the
oil nations w h o go o n reaping
golden dollar harvests when they
could just as well be threatening
to create an oil crisis. What kind
o f Arab unity is it when Arab
rulers fail to take advantage of
such an obviously promising
handle?
There's no real insurance that
some day the crisis mightn't
come anyway, touched off by
new hostilities provoked, for
example, by Syrian belligerence.
Damascus has been openly challenging l.hi Egyptians to engage
in a new bout with Israel.
Russia's Hopes
Moscow
hammers on
the
theme of needed results from
the preliminary meeting in Helsinki. T h e Russians want it to
p r o d u c e , this year, a full-dress
all-Europe s e c u r i t y conference,
on their terms. That is, they
refuse t o m a k e a n y concessions
that would involve free exchanges of p e o p l e , i n f o r m a t i o n
and
ideas across
ideological
boundaries. T h e y m a k e it seem
that what Ihey really want is a
neutralized E u r o p e resigned t o a
dominating continental
influence implied by the military
might of its Soviet neighbor.
T h e y are in a h u r r y , t o o , because they d o nol relish possible
d e v e l o p m e n t s in Western E u r o p e
centering a b o u t an e x p a n d e d
C o m m o n Market whose economic muscle, already considerable, might be c o m p l e m e n t e d
s o m e day by s o m e m e a s u r e of
political integration.
In Europe:
President Nixon w a n t e d t o get
back into the E u r o p e a n picture
as s o o n as possible, to m a k e
1973 a " y e a r of E u r o p e " for U.
S. policy. With A m e r i c a n s o u t of
Indochina, he will have a b e t t e r
chance of getting that project on
the road.
In spiLe of i
.ievelopments
in Soviet-,A<
m relations, a
contest is still going on - so far as
Moscow is c o n c e r n e d , a n y w a y .
T h e d e t e n t e is not so t h o r o u g h going as to mean thai the Kremlb- might want more peace than
il can h a n d l e . T h e r e are dangers
in t o o m u c h peace for the Soviet
build-in g an SST designed t o
move p a s s e n g e r s at a speed of
1 MOD miles per hour.
The fight over the SST was o n e
of the biggest battles of the last
Congress and the largest victory
ever won by environmentalists.
T h e " C o a l i t i o n " of a b o u t 30
e n v i r o n m e n Lai
nvironmenlal,
conservation,
and
consumergroups o p p o s e d the plane on
numerous grounds.
They cited the effects of some
booms | n > m
such
high-speed
flights, greal ly increased engine
noise, anil possible alteration of
the upper a t m o s p h e r e as possible
dangers. T h e v -i ••.„..rl SSTs
would be more wiisu-lul than slower
phines because they would use
more fuel per passenger-mile to
opernt:' al high speeds. They said
thai il they SST were eeonomicalk I. asihle il could he built
wii li p i n ale m o n e y instead of
goveriimenl funds, l-'mally, they
qtiesl tuned the nat ion's priori
ties. Was it really necessary to
spend an eventual $ 5 . 5 billion
'.'to move people from New York
lo Los Angeles in t w o h o u r s
instead of six hours?
T h e Senate, led by William
i'roxrnire of Wisconsin, v o t e d
4 9 - 4 8 to e n d Lhd the expensive
program. Now, 21 m o n t h s later,
the p r o m a m ' s p r o p o n e n t s are
back again
preparing
to m a k e a n o t h e r pilch
for
govern m e n I m o n e y from the
new Congress. And the opposition is gearing up for a n o t h e r
fight.
Senator
Proxmtre
(D-Wis.)
.sounded the alarm N o v e m b e r
12, by saying thai if the administration (ries lo bring back the
SST "it will have a major fight
on its h a n d s . "
I'roxrnire said, " I ' m absolutely
convinced that Congress m a d e
the light decision in ending the
project
last year. I've s ,.,. n
nothing lo change my mind
about that decision. In fact,
nothing has changed except the
p u c e lag, which would he about
luiii times as high as b e f o r e . "
David 13 rower, president of
Friends of the Earth ( F O E ) , has
promised " a n all-out e f f o - t " a
gainst the resurrection of the
SST.
F O E is the national environmental g r o u p with a m e m b e r ship of ,10,000 which put loge- ' h e r the successful coalition
againsl the plane during the last
session of Congress.
Brower says, "I think
the
Nixon a d m i n i s t r a t i o n '.'is serious
a b o u t building the SST. But
again they seem lo have ignored
the fact that the people of this
c o u n t r y do not wanl lo spend
billions of dollars of tax m o n e y
on a technological while elephant."
Brower and F O E have had the
c o o r d i n a t o r of the last fight,
(leorge Alderson, working fulltime for the past few m o n t h s on
new SST developments,
"We are reorganizing the coalition agiaiisl the SST we had I wo
years a g o , " said Alderson.
T h e Sierra Club, a participant
in the old coalition, has already
begun mobilizing its m e m b e r s .
I.. TOWER .EAST
BEER BLAST
I"
to start the Wild Wild Weekend off --
3:30-6:30 Fri. Afternoon Jan. 19
WSUA's Eric Lonschein
I
I
i
i
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
Admission
broadcasting live from
Colonial Quad Flagroom
I.F.C.
FREE
i.s.c.
CVj^LA}.^tti
A MARX BROTHERS DOUBLE FEATURE
| MONKEY BUSINESS
and THE COCOA\I%UTS \
This Thursday
j Saturday
LC 1
IX 18
7:00 and 10:001
\ $ .25 w/state quad card
THE
$.75 w/out;
N1GHTCOMEKS
WITH MARLON BRANDO
This Friday
\
LC 1 7:00 and 9:30
|$.50 w/state quad card
$1.00 w/out jj
funded by student 1.1
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
It aj ara t n a m
considers
il
possible thai the United States,
IS GOING
Keep your eyes & ears open for events times & places to come
& see what these girls like so much about sorority life.
PAGE TEN
O n c e a Vietnam cease-fire
seemed near, Thailand, Malaysia,
Indonesia and Singapore began
c o m p a r i n g notes. All h a d been
a c c u s t o m e d t o the c o m f o r t of
the U.S. presence on the continent. Now s o m e of these leaders sound like boys whistling
their way past the graveyard.
Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew
of Singapore visited Thailand recently and n o t e d that the period
immediately alter U. S. disengagement in Vietnam " m a y
not necessarily be characterized
by peace and stability." T h a t
could turn o u t to be the under
statement of the year.
Despite all that has happened,
however. Southeast Asian leaders prefer to trust the United
States rather than the Russians
or
Chinese.
S i n na t h a m b y
Kajaiatnam, Lee's foreign minister, told the Thais. " I am suspicious of all bin [lowers, just as
sheep must be suspicious of
timers, but the United States has
been acceptable to u s , "
BARE SHIN FURS
Sororities are dive & well in:
<im(*m>mc!»ix*
H o n e y m o o n Over?
'Inn likelihood of s o m e a t t e m p t
to resurrect the SST (supersonic
t r a n s p o r t ) in the next session of
Congress has p r o m p t e d the old
"Coalition Againsl the S S T " to
reassemble
('ongress
killed a measure
March 2 1 , 197 1 which would
have authorized the actual construction
dt' (wo p r o t o t y p e s
of (he highly controversial palne.
Al thai time the government had
already poured S I . - billion and
eight years of research
into
" T h e SST isn't d e a d . "
claimed presidential aide J o h n
Ehrlichman in a recent speech in
Seattle.
" T h e SST will c o m e b a c k "
says T.A. Wilson, c h a i r m a n of
the board of the Boeing C o m
98 Control Ave, A l b a n y
Ryckman Hall Ten Eyck Hall Herkimer Hall Ten Broeck Hall
Rensselaer Hall
c o u r a g e m e n t of violence still
plague the area as it uneasily
prepares to make its peace with
Peking.
Return Of The SST: The White Elephant Rides Again
<mmt ttKowe vmc **K >MC>«K >Mf. xm*. XSSK xsex. >as< *w< xm
KVfl^**-***^**)^^
Dutch
After U.S. Involvement: What Then?
V 6 t cont'd from p.-8
defense headquarters and other
vets rushed him to the hospital.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE
ELEVEN
Red Heroin Or Propaganda?
GRAPHIC EDITORIAL:
by Arthur Everett
Associated P w s t Writer
RESTORE SOCIAL SERVICES
SIGN THE AGREEMENT
STOP THE WAR
mlornatiitruil traffic in dinjperowdGfagfe O ^ i w r w s t i MMton LIIT prcrioa* ch*/0re of 3eoa(*V Ri^ablf* o f
China thvoKTonwnt has no* pfodao?<J twt«**no? t o
suUitanttMb the LiH^ntiom.''
A d a i m by miniwtics Uwesfcigut«ra Itwiti Hint hunUit
was buing smuggiud into thin country hy .1 "Chiman
cann«ctitia" un 'i»« China inmuluml mm with
ikepaihsm Thursday in both Wuaumgttiit mil liimg
Kung.
A Htmg Kong sourcv dfecfeHwrf: "TH*re« u«t tfea*t
thill many Communist Chinese- nAtidnaft* rgTefinasi«>
thi» UnttM) Stutwt and w^* find I pfiretty iArd"rr*r*> t o
bfllevo there 13 a n * w h o HAS b v « i nulrirnr iranwroa*
nip.* to t h e United iftates."
tncernuKtinui uurcotaus igmus in Hony Hona. simt
celluphant? bugs touring .1 red star .mil thu imprint in
English.
*T*tw P e o p l e s
K.imihiii: .11 China."
prohuhly witr^ ''part >( cha I'mvmi [miiiagnuila
oamptugn iganist Communist Chum,
AtteroatiT** Sfeatt^BB SPTVICB*- A* .fjair'^^rK*- g $ o v $ o»»?r ttw recent
mtnHrtq of *.h* ftwi* Ma» Ffttaprtftl n Jflwtfi VHrtrtafi*, 31 giftwp trf*
Vnwrifflrai riw b*§Brr * -ATr.r^.f^ -,o "fdsp mon-»T r'dr its rfetferfl^afl.
.Ht :i pvess •ronfererav- nefd ]ff Wa«hrm§ti?»*j D 0 art -MmMey J. M*d?tfirf
Ai<d fb^' iraforf^ffi* sofo#fir-MTi * rmfciocaf cW*»e to cwffart i m'tYtmrt
•ioVhun bo -ew)ra*tnKt 9^ch .\fe* HorfprCaf vVif^fv wig desferorerf by
r
J. 5. 5V>2s sttHt nwforp- C&rtHawa
AnKMif Ji*-sex?n»o*rs r'o/ t-,h*-rAmni*gp ir*?-fts»n3P*rAtt0rt«5? 0<rt»«Mrf
3jtr?w<»y Ctcffft^ p^*s~*wri^fe t AFthav M>T?*»r' Vo»Mn> i*.a«*» eiiwlato**
ii^wn 3ort>- iqjiws VrmHtrofl^ FVesfd(m4 o? :h«'ChnrciV and! 3o*rf*fy
>/ f.hw fJr»5w* Mfetfood&ftl Orarcf*- r?cv«rpn'd i^rfeaef AiMn1. Chapfcim
>/ : h * 3^rlt»H«y 3feftw«^ 7? D»*onr?y rjf Vaft? VTr»»r^Hy- Dr CIr.ir(*»s
MieOrew 3»wfcort THyririaeHjfc inr? <rt>^f*awper«iofl ?t* Met3Seal Aid fhf
I r.iiivhwn, m d Vfrg&wj flRiiroer isvjt:h^r r>? -Mfflws Wawwr Am»»vican
;»»rvHTi»m'.in "wM<? ft t b * EJRV d*wv ". !9*9'
"^n*«n »»»- ;P*»TW ' ^ T«?mf> ft h*- n«fw^ >f \m»*rii*9. ' rUnwey
*liirk ;nid i€ -h'* arewi -o«vf*rwi«»>
;o«w vm^^'trHPM ir? f«*fpfy
rj-i^uort in«ir i«**t«v&r* -!/a hzt T*5mft*nif srt? -*rv*i»ifl«i* -8 m •if'>n' c/j th*»
ipivit y> h*M -»-)*ri*rv in-.-J jl«tTt!« r '.-^ tfVttie h^v -an ,n m&y -.h*»
litfrt.tgH if, .*nflfc »» h;H "tJ»» r?*--n*»i ••» *)Mi-*v
h»* iS^fi' \>fei
Vgents in Hong Kim* Jn tpttntc at r ' l W ' h m w
I ' n m w c t U m . " However, tliey ^fp r r«o« o ^ u n U n d
CJdnwe, but t o ethnic CJ»hw«# orta mwlr .ir rJi*
'tpiuin produnni? areos of U O H . Burma irtd rwrttsera
rtmiland or pr(x^?f« heroin m Hon-f HITVHQ
In Washington, 5tatw D e p a r t m e n t sources said
rJinv [rave nothing :tt whsttuittiitu ihu v p m i hv Itn-aJ
autfton&tm 'haf ruinous *i it.'llurs .vtinh >i heroin
ire ouming ruu h« L'mufd Status rum lU*h China
iiy vny it' Kong •i.jng. 5itn.ilur - u p u m 11 tin* past
«rere said u tuve (on« unsu'ismimuietl despite
investigation.
HonR Kung wmt descrlb** a« m wreaaingfey
itnpoftunt wnv station .m ih#- heroin -nlt.r,fr : n -ir*
United Smtcs. But »n*» VTp.;ti»rn agent -wild .h*rp van
no .'ndcnce if t'.immunjst i*hin*;^ rrrolwm^nt n
the J(t ur so bprDtn-prodoctng' fsetortds -Hitin^it^rr o
• if 'pprnting in Hong Kong.
'WH 'iint 1 iii ! fi:uii
j mimvc mv .•inmtrv
(hipping .trigs inr*mtj vouiu uhel in* imgs .0
*u»ry«nn would ( n o w vnu b nvoivnd, ' uirli*it t
2r,ir« Depurtmtmt Tpotimitnun. ?miuiw ;1 iiitnm,
Huiwwnr, 7-ruii; JagHiT*. .p«i:»ui ritvwuie lurroiu-s
3rcjnetiur.ur. rfuuii J« tin :-;um 1.' mute 'Vcdfii'sttiiv
"ii.ii i n a i m m i i i 'Chines** :*;nn«*: 1:011
*x:Med fur
tmuggling m i l i u m 11 IM--:HI m j tin, m m t r v
Please follow Smohev'5 4BC5
•'' lento mulu Mm ' ; 11. v v-i.'--" [ :unf n u n . '
Elogern ,uui "Vimon."
nun
u l u w ht- drugs
BE sure to
drown ail fires
id-'jffl he. 'lentil: 111 ti mi.; ."b.muowi. " ' i , . *\'M|t'liciihowa inn MH trigs ::iim: 'Jin 'hitin.
CAREFUL to
Sogers uiu 3rnoHt">n Intl. > ••
-.lueni- ItiiM
::uli*M 1 IH'V.'. :uninrmu:v V tiii'vim • j-.u lUnnimvtMl
•siny imi inuuv«cM(i [ iiu--';i .,-• -jig .uimiii'd >v
G n n n s e .oiunan vnu u t m ^ ' i .n..; vi.'i in- turn- n
S«**v '. ii-; uiu >'<-'v iKrn«j"
m.in
TOBOGGAN PARTY
(if weather permits)
HOT COCOA
vt:i
i
-U.UJUIH:
uimi 1
v:..
h.iu '*:muuma*«iv
11.
•'
<".,
HOT DOGS
r.tr r
nil ,•>•»' • im»iiM's
undr^ftM • ••' utj.«nt.t
•Vr nor** nlV»*mat(*wi «*Tft#- \4ariicMl
«£re«t Umhrrdge vf««« • i- M 4 2
lltCIl
vj«1 '•»• .rt«*oi*h«nu
a*H<t-h
CbtiZi&lk
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.iSAGNA • 3UBGERS
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rnoi
•jMPfi
^U * -N l"»l WN
•'MF
? ' i " N f i »PW 1 lPAfl
iifirn
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 • AT MOHAWK CAMPUS
,iyaa_,5a^fat,
from 1 to 7 pm
buses leave circle every hour on the hour
W1LLARD
11 M >-:
open to all students
,n
.... .,
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
.; .. u
. u *^J I .HOI • ' IMMf B • ' ' '
; 7,9,1 1 PAA
I
sponsored by class of 7 5 in conjunction with wild wild weekend li
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
.'MrnCM
I
Also Ice Skating On The
Mohawk River
PAGE TWELVE
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(ini»!S
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II
n '••' . imi «^s ••">widv»r»fi hw ".he
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TtinnlM Tit,m(**»T^ ••• n-* 'uNni'.tl
•ni.'d su.i.'s
nw«i .g;ti-*'t
v h»* ?Vwidi
^ct'» trying r> '•Imt^M '»*ii*tn:imV vfin.sr.-i
1' Jvhl«** lt»nirh • H<J
if-tmi*ul *i>mpf«*y ^^« • •iro»«t:-'T*,*»TiHt*r! 1 •< w > ! it«m v** -Mi itjk
il^icv . •<! J*»rpmlr*»'- " in«t U»*-wnihk"- *
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BwaE tun in [if»«:i :t',mmi»'i
t.*r»!iia ir hi* m-v/i -::rn,HT»MI' *
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;uviMt
'Iz-'i-t^i 'A^trr'sim^^P '.O '*• '.h»»"*
~.:i:li'tnmi 11 .11* am*
BUSES LEAVE FROM CAMPUS- TICKETS $13 ROUNDTRIP
BEER
'.iwoical r u
smokes
rHt*v uutl I'.l . ' r e u i u i
mil iff!! •hinged
v.r^l Uiigai " i n - ' in-; ;mi :•:<!.: .-'
•"*: uni inn l u c f
3it»i] v»T. uT'atmi i\w*r a,-* v*«*'i *>n
'••..:• v-: '/iiiMititis
::--.i/rfU't v n u vmiuunuing -!•* iini^g!.
111 Mill ,
MARCH ON WASHINGTON D.C. SATURDAY JANUARY 2 0 ,
Tickets Must Be Paid In full Friday. Two P.M. - Four P.M. CC Lobby
FREE:
(.•.•»i n ) M l
rh«» ;r,Mf >J i n>iiu*K» joif;ir^ v^a pi* '*»**mH-p 'J-JU'.t*n Vnu "In Viep
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imf*r*»n*!*» i .jmrt^r .>^ miil^Trt ^-J'ii*= ^VJ ilvoai^M -itHent^if 7h«»
«rn "iifiii; 4 TT;**rVi»ft /•» pWttdw ••*••••**• '.•»-*»*'•••»• FO-T ,r,*eof,-niT^r
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rh*» lijf'f'i Vfin HoHpicH wtw li'tniM" 1 •.•j-Tf.»i tn-t nt»d1tfaj .rho«-ji
rmHr^it •ri1' ti«*»nnt nwr» jurnij r*m**d 1 n-*dit'ifi*» vh«*r h»»
J
•••vci'^1 vm Wstroywt
• •'nno»Hin*i
•"" •»!> .li-nus :•• ,*»v»ral
ALWAYS 10k!
^matchestiilcoM
LC 18
25:
Fri. Jan. 19
KM -.r ! I N • "'•••••' •< luLU« «n«*
FRIDAY . ; A H U A K V
0 .'/?••.
.vLuZ-uMY '.TUDENT PRESS
>AGE
THIRTEEN
Ellsberg-Russo Trial Opens
by Linda Deutsch
Associated Press Writer
L08 ANGELES AP - The
g o v e r n m e n t p r o s e c u t o r in t h e
P e n t a g o n p a p e r s trial told the
jury t h a t h e will avoid any men*
t i o n of the V i e t n a m war during
t h e trial, calling it "irrelevant t o
t h e charges. 1 '
As h e s p o k e , s o m e 20 V i e t n a m
Veterans
Against t h e
War
w a t c h e d from front rows of the
spectator section. They had been
accompanied t o c o u r t by members of the defense t e a m .
Defendants Daniel EUsberg and
A n t h o n y Russo have said they
released top-secret d o c u m e n t s
o n the war in an effort t o end
t h e conflict. T h e y call the war
t h e key issue in the trial.
But Asst. U.S. A t t y . David
Nissen, in his o p e n i n g a r g u m e n t ,
said, " T h e g o v e r n m e n t case will
n o t present m a t t e r s irrelevant to
t h e charges. We will present no
evidence — no witnesses — no
d o c u m e n t s t o litigate t h e war.
T h e r e will b e n o witness called
to say whether the war should
have b e g u n . . . "
Promising jurors a " c a l m , une m o t i o n a l p r e s e n t a t i o n of t h e
f a c t s , " h e said: " T h e r e will be
n o appeals t o the passions and
prejudices of anyone.'*
He t h e n listed t h e subjects the
government would n o t mention.
Nissen said he w o u l d n o t discuss w h e t h e r t h e g o v e r n m e n t has
w i t h h e l d i n f o r m a t i o n o n the
war. " S u c h m a t t e r s are irrelev a n t , " h e said. " T h e charges in
this case d o n o t deal with
m a k i n g information available to
the public."
EUsberg, 4 1 , and Russo, 35,
are charged with espionage conspiracy and theft in c o n n e c t i o n
with t h e leak to news media in
1971 of top-secret p a p e r s detailing origins of U.S. involvement
in the V i e t n a m war.
Nissen said the g o v e r n m e n t
Watergate Continues
bv Don McLeod
case w o u l d m a k e n o m e n t i o n of
t h e n e w s p a p e r p u b l i c a t i o n of t h e
d o c u m e n t s , n o evidence
on
whether other
p e r s o n s have
violated secrecy laws just as
E U s b e r g and R u s s o did a n d n o
evidence on w h e t h e r t h e defenda n t s " f e l t justified or n o t . "
W A S H I N G T O N A P - An ex-FBI a g e n t testified in t h e Watergate trial
t h a t h e was paid $ 2 2 5 a week b y P r e s i d e n t N i x o n ' s c a m p a i g n staff
for eavesdropping o n D e m o c r a t i c p a r t y t e l e p h o n e c o n v e r s a t i o n s .
Alfred C. Baldwin I I I said h e listened from m o r n i n g u n t i l after
dark a n d logged t h e c o n t e n t s of s o m e 200 p h o n e calls t h a t a security
agent for t h e C o m m i t t e e for t h e Re-election of t h e P r e s i d e n t h a d
wire-tapped.
Baldwin's t e s t i m o n y was i n t e r r u p t e d Wednesday a f t e r n o o n by a
d i s p u t e over w h e t h e r h e s h o u l d n a m e t h o s e w h o s e conversations h e
overheard. Lawyers for s o m e of t h e bugged D e m o c r a t s s o u g h t t o
keep their private affairs from being aired in c o u r t .
Lawyers in t h e case said U.S. District C o u r t Judge J o h n J. Sirica
ruled against t h e D e m o c r a t s in a closed-door hearing. T h e a t t o r n e y s
said an appeal w o u l d be carried t o t h e C o u r t of A p p e a l s t o d a y
before t h e trial w o u l d c o n t i n u e .
On trial in the burglary-wire-tap case are J a m e s W. McCord Jr.,
former security chief of the N i x o n c a m p a i g n , and G. G o r d o n L i d d y ,
w h o was counsel t o N i x o n ' s campaign finance c o m m i t t e e at the t i m e
of t h e break-in at D e m o c r a t i c h e a d q u a r t e r s last J u n e .
Five o t h e r s earlier pleaded guilty a n d are awaiting s e n t e n c i n g in
c o n n e c t i o n with the alleged political-espionage c o n s p i r a c y against
D e m o c r a t s . T h e alleged plot c o m e t o light after five of t h e seven
were c a p t u r e d at g u n p o i n t inside t h e D e m o c r a t i c National C o m m i t tee offices in Washington's Watergate c o m p l e x .
Baldwin said h e first was hired at a salary of $ 7 0 a day as a
b o d y g u a r d for Martha Mitchell, wife of former A t t y . General, J o h n
N. Mitchell wha at t h e t i m e was N i x o n ' s campaign manager,
But after a week of that, Baldwin said, he was given o t h e r duties
a n d a pay c u t , a n d told " b y Mr. McCord that, if Mr. Nixon was
re-elected, this was t h e way to join the team and go u p t h e
l a d d e r . " After o n e week as Mrs. Mitchell's b o d y g u a r d , Baldwin said,
he was asked to a t t e n d p r o t e s t d e m o n s t a r t i o n s t o learn of a n y
possible t h r e a t s to t h e Nixon C o m m i t t e e , the Mitchells of t o t h e
President himself.
Later, Baldwin said, h e e n t e r e d the motel r o o m which McCord h a d
r e n t e d for him actoss t h e street from D e m o c r a t i c h e a d q u a r t e r s a n d
found it filled with a variety of electronic e q u i p m e n t .
Baldwin said h e was i n t r u d e d t o m o n i t o r transmissions on t w o
frequencies carrying e a v e s d r o p p e d conversations from D e m o c r a t i c
offices. But, because only o n e c h a n n e l could be picked u p , h e
testified, he m o v e d from a r o o m on the fourth floor of the H o w a r d
J o h n s o n Motel t o o n e on t h e seventh.
But t h e s e c o n d frequency still did not c o m e in. T h e g o v e r n m e n t
said in its o p e n i n g s t a t e m e n t t h a t his was o n e of the reasons for the
break-in in which t h e five were c a p t u r e d .
" T h e d e f e n d a n t s ' motives will
n o t be discussed in o u r evid e n c e , " said Nissen. "Motives do
n o t excuse b e h a v i o r . "
T h e defense has c o n t e n d e d
in pretrial a r g u m e n t s t h a t a key
p o i n t of the e x p i o n a g e law is the
r e q u i r e m e n t of i n t e n t t o h a r m
the g o v e r n m e n t of the United
S t a t e s . Nissen has claimed the
g o v e r n m e n t need n o t prove such
intent.
However, U.S. District C o u r t
J u d g e Matt Byrne, in a speech
from the bench to a t t o r n e y s
T u e s d a y , said the "congressional
p u r p o s e " of espionagt laws was
to p r o t e c t certain information
"in prevention of injury to the
nation."
State Judo Club
&
CHEFBUKL
is inviting anyone interested to a meeting on
SPIED, k
Tues Jan 23 at 7PM
in 3rd fl wrestling room, j
in the gym
.,„<*.*
OR
%
,
SPAGHETTI
ONLY IO.VWHE.tJ S E R V E D W I T H I
Salad Buffet I
L
Daily l*30AM
JPM
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — i
Jewish Students' Coalition Spring Schedule
January
22-26
28
Information Table in the Campus Center
Kosher Deli-Dinner- General Meeting
February
3
*4
All-University Party
Symposium: Educational Opportunitie's in
Israel - speakers from Hebrew Univ., Tel Aviv
Univ. and Technion
Tuesday Educational Series (TES): Prof.
Malcolm Sherman on "The Return of
Quotas"
11
13
discussion:
"The
Future
of
Judaic
Studies"
17
19-23
25
*27
20
24
*27
American Zionism"
Hebrew Club Purim Program
Post-Purim Party
TES:
Prof. Donald Cohen on "Passover
5733-A Call for an International Freedom
Seder"
30
31
April
*3
Israeli Coffeehouse
TES
March
4
Kosher Deli-Dinner
7(Wed.) TES: Prof. Melvin Urofsky on "The Roots of
Prof. Zvi Abbo and others
Feature Film : "Bye Bye Braverman"
Information Table in the Campus Center
General Meetinq
TES: "Let My People Go" award winning
film documenting the o o s t - H o l o c a u s t
struggle for a Jewish homeland.
7
11
„ 28-May 5
Dippikill Weekend Retreat
Feature Film
TES: "A Wall in Jerusalem"
Israeli Coffeehouse
Model Seder
SHALOM WEEK A special week of speakers,
films, concerts, an Israeli Night Club and
more...
* IN HONOR OF ISRAEL'S 25th ANNIVERSARV
May
6
Doc Sauers Works
Christmas Magic
J
by BUI Heller
Everyone knows w h a t happened at t h e C a p i t o l D i s t r i c t T o u r n a m e n t , right? High flying, bigtime Siena c a m e rolling i n t o t h e
annual t o u r n e y at a p e r f e c t 5-0,
steamrolled o v e r A l b a n y , w o n
the c h a m p i o n s h i p , a n d left 7-0.
Meanwhile, t h e G r e a t D a n e s , demoralized after losing t o
Hartwick, B i n g h a m t o n , a n d Siena,
were never t h e s a m e . It s o u n d s
good o n p a p e r , b u t s o m e o n e
forgot t o tell D o c S a u e r s a n d his
boys h o w t h e s t o r y was supposed t o go.
All the e l e m e n t s w e r e t h e r e .
The Danes had suffered back t o
back losses t o t w o t e a m s they
beat last year. A n d L o r d k n o w s
how powerful Siena was. T h e y
had k n o c k e d off S e t o n Hall, did
have an u n b l e m i s h e d r e c o r d , a n d
boy did the m e d i a b l o w t h e m
up! Outlandish p r e d i c t i o n s of
the Albany
encounter
were
mixed with p e r s o n a l r e m a r k s as
the T o u r n e y a p p r o a c h e d . E m o tions were p e a k i n g ' qji b o t h
sides.
Call it Christmas magic or anything else, but when the Capitol
District T o u r n a m e n t c o m e s by
at t h e end of December, the
A l b a n y Danes play their kind of
ball. T h e game started poorly.
T h e Danes fell behind early
20-10, as Siena b o m b e d Alb a n y ' s zone press. Sauers switched t o man-to-man and the lead
was cut to three at the half. T h e
big reason was Q u a t t r o c c h i , w h o
won the T o u r n e y MVP, and Bob
Rossi, w h o canned 12 in the first
half.
How did S a u e r s feel? " W e had
a long talk o n t h e ' b u s after the
Binghamton loss, the t e a m worked hard in Dractice; T h e y h a d
basically the s a m e a t t i t u d e t o wards Siena as in the p a s t . I knew
if we played a good game we
could win. A n d we d i d . "
T h e second stanza was great if viewed from the Albany perspective. Reggie Smith got super
h o t , hitting five in a row in o n e
streak, and finishing with 2 3 .
T r o c h played o u t s t a n d i n g ball at
both ends, clicking for 25. At
o n e point, the Danes led 75-56,
but cooled off to take a 81-71
victory. The big factors were
A l b a n y ' s good r e b o u n d i n g and
t o p conditioning, as Siena looked ragged towards the end. T h e
victory was for Coach Sauers,
" o n e of the most satisfying wins
of my career since I've been at
Albany."
T h e next night was Union with
t h a t big C h a m p i o n s h i p t r o p h y
on the line. T h e Danes raced to a
thirteen point lead in the first
half and then got hit hard with
fouls.
Eleven player
control
fouls helped p u t T r o c h , Reggie,
and B y r o n Miller in t r o u b l e , a n d
forced D o c to go t o his b e n c h .
Harry J o h n s o n r e s p o n d e d w i t h 8
p o i n t s and 6 r e b o u n d s t o h e l p
maintain a 31-22 edge at t h e
half.
T h e n t h e fouls t o o k their toll:
Smith fouled o u t , and T r o c h a n d
Byron each picked up four. With
t h r e e Danes on t h e b e n c h , U n i o n
b o u n c e d back in the second half
and seemed destined t o win
when they got possession w i t h
19 s e c o n d s left and the game
tied. But a hurried Union s h o t
was wide and t h e game w e n t
into
overtime. Albany
went
wild, especially Mr. Miller on t h e
boards, and the G r e a t Danes
won by five. Bob Curtiss a n d
Dave Welchons each did a j o b o n
defense. However, it was a typical Albany win - e v e r y b o d y
pitched ir>.
So the Danes repeated as Capitol District C h a m p s , went o n t o
whip H a m i l t o n 9 5 - 5 8 , and nip
the New York Athletic C l u b
82-79. More i m p o r t a n t l y , they
regained their m o m e n t u m and
their ill center, Werner Koltn
( a n o t h e r reason the Danes reh o u n d e d well). All will be needed as the Danes prepare for their
tough league play c o m i n g up a n d
that
u n m e n t i o n a b l e goal, an
NCAA bid.
Wrestlers to Face Amherst
lead. Doug Bauer last year's
freshman sensation has not been
able to reach last year's form.
Rudy Vido injured last year has
n o t been able to regain the form
he had early last year.
Cliff Wess who was expected
to help o u t in the upper weight
classes was injured a n d his avail-
by Ken A r d u i n o
The Albany wrestlers r e t u r n to
action this S a t u r d a y w h e n the
matmen lake o n A m h e r s t o n t h e
road. The wrestlers will be trying
to move above the . 5 0 0 mark
after splitting their first t w o
matches.
After finishing t h i r d in t h e
quadrangle m e e t , t h e A l b a n y
team took on Williams. Pins by
Wall Katz and Larry Mims, along
with fine p e r f o r m a n c e s by Jeff
Albrecht and R u d y V i d o , and
also helped along by t w o forfeits, enabled t h e Danes to easily
defeat the visitors.
ability this year is in question.
II is the lower classes which
have d o n e the j o b for Albany.
Returning
Icllermen,
Larry
Mims and Jeff Albrecht are b o t h
undefeated, and Walt Katz, a
freshman, is the surprise of the
season. He is also u n d e f e a t e d
and has c o n t r i b u t e d a few pins.
Lights turned low...
A M , all at Chapel House
Jewish Students' Coalition-Hillel
Box 369 BB-SUNYA
PAGE FOURTEEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Coffee
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
Hopefully, the learn will bloss o m in the u p c o m i n g games, and,
with a little luck and y o u r increased s u p p o r t , the P u p s may
even m a t c h the varsity's winning
Special Compact Courses during
Weekends - Intercessions
S u m m e r Sessions
Dunkin' Donurs"
STANLEY H . K A P L A N
EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD.
11)1 («•( l i t " t f W araatlyti N V
(212133BV-&30Q
jWolf Road Texaco Rentals
J1372 Central Ave. Albany
NY
goo....._^a.o.»o.»o».«..IUUUJUUja^
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1972
In the near future, the team
will be taking on several
traditional
rivals,
including
Siena, Union, and R.P.I. Siena
and Union are doing well, and
R.P.I, beat us by 10 last time, so
this should he interesting. Hopefully, the addition of H a r o l d
Merritt ( 6 ' 4 " c e n t e r ) , Rich Kapner ( 6 ' 2 " forward), and R o n
Edwards ( 5 ' 9 " guard) will provide the needed d e p t h t h a t a
good team must have.
' Lesson schedule can be tailored to
meet individual needs Lessons
can be spread over a period of
several months to a year, or for
out of t o w n students, a period
of one week
' O p p o r t u n i t y for review of past
lessons via tape at the center
00
Tools Rented/
Parts Discounted
Coach Lewis is " n a t u r a l l y aiming for a 14-4 s e a s o n " ( t h e team
is now 1-4), and believes " t h a t a
.500+ season is certainly possible. We should get a p r e t t y good
idea of how things will turn oul
after o u r next t w o games, versus
Sch. C.C. and t h e n O n e o n t a
Slate."
* Preparation for tests required t o r
admission t o graduate and professional schools
* Six and twelve session courses
* Small groups
" V o l u m i n o u s material f o r home study
prepared b v experts in each field
Shoe Rental
2 Each Additional Hour
H
'
MCAT-DATGRE
LSAT-ATGSB
OCAT
NAT'L. BDS.
MOONLIGHT BOWLING
3* First Hour
Any questions will be answered and new memberships accepted at our Campus Center table January 22-26, New Rate:
$3.00/semester-Reg. $5.00/year Don't forget Shabbat Services every Friday evening at 7:30 and Saturday morning at 10
Cautious
optimism
is h o w
Coach Lewis described his outlook for t h e r e m a i n d e r of Ihe
Danes JV basketball season, and
with good reason. Definite imp r o v e m e n t in its last t w o games,
high m o r a l , great a t t i t u d e , and
the addition of t h r e e new players s h o u l d all h e l p the team gel
and p u t on a better
postvacation p e r f o r m a n c e .
« T 1 8 » » » B » ' i 8 8'iTH 8 U T a i T i l 8 8 »•»•» 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 » 0 « « I 8 0 S S 0 S D 0 O O 0 0 0 9 6 e 0 0 0 O 0 0 9 8 - 8 B B S j {
Rent Service
Bay and Lift
*
by N a t h a n Salant
Do it Yourself
IJAuto Mechanic^
General Meeting-Elections
•
Pups Hope for
.500 Year
Naturally injuries could be a
negative factor,
should
they
appear, a.s will the quality of the
o p p o n e n t s ' play. According to
Coach Lewis, " N o team should
blow us off the c o u r t . I've scouted all of o u r o p p o n e n t s . All are
good clubs, but n o n e arc super
teams. We'll just have to play
t h e m o n e game at a t i m e . "
The KIT m a t c h b r o u g h t oul a
major problem; t h e u p p e r weight
classi
The hist five wrestlers
failed i<. -•am a single p o i n t for
the team and blew a 1 (> p nl
•
Danes in action last Wednesday against Marist.
T h e c a u t i o n over o p t i m i s m is
in t h e r e for a few reasons, the
most i m p o r t a n t of which is the
27 day layoff the players have
had since their last game. T h e
q u e s t i o n is w h e t h e r the team
will be able to resume where
they left off before the vacation,
and have the players remained in
shape? F o r t u n a t e l y , the team
will play S c h e n e c t a d y
Comm u n i t y College this S a t u r d a y before
playing
SUNY
rival
O n e o n t a next week.
One week later the Danes m e t
RIT and a t t e m p t e d to d o something which they have failed to
do the last t w o y e a r s ; win. T w o
years ago RIT was o n e of only
two teams t o b e a t t h e grapplcrs.
Last year with revenge in t u e i r
eyes the m a t m e n c o u l d • ily
A
manage a tie.
'
This year was n o t t o be
fferent. The m a t m e n o p e n e d
p
an early lead,leading 19-3 and il
looked like Albany w o u l d reverse the trend but R o c h e s t e r
won the last five m a t c h e s , three
of them by pins and Hie Dane
matmen had their first luss ul'
the season
• J?
'
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
.££•_
*"*
(•16) 538-4665
I M V i tVININGS M O U N D S
ndud
by
stucjun
B r a n c h e s in Mafor C i t i e s in U . S . A .
tt* T'tluruyf SikinJ with tkt Ntlioumtd*
R*p%HI»m
V
PAGE FIFTEEN
Wresilers Return
Doc Works
TUESDAY
to the Mat
X-Mcrs iAaglc
Vol. LX No. 2
IDC Seeks to Avert
Death of Campus Pond
Danes Rally To Extend Streak
ASP F e a t u r e - Part I
The following
game
with
its a t t r o c i o u s
foul
Danes d i d n ' t let u p . T h e y t o o k a
52-51 deficit a n d t u r n e d it i n t o a
s h o o t i n g . T h e R e d F o x e s only
Clutch.
That's
the
word
to
describe t h e A l b a n y S t a t e G r e a t
m a d e 7 for
Both teams came o u t shooting
it l o o k e d like t h e Danes m i g h t
q u i t e welt in t h e o p e n i n g half as
lose
t h e t e a m s stayed
N C A A a t its m e e t i n g last week
of t h e season.
Bryon
Miller
and
Johnson
h a d a b o l i s h e d t h e 1.6 p r o j e c t e d
Albany s c o r i n g h o n o r s ,
grade p o i n t a n d replaced it with
Sauers finally e m p t i e d t h e bench
each p u m p i n g in 16 p o i n t s . Hart
a C average in high school for all
with a m i n u t e r e m a i n i n g . In t h a t
of Marist was t h e leading scorer
college b o u n d a t h e l e t e s .
16-4 s p u r t , Marist failed t o score
in t h e game n e t t i n g 20 p o i n t s .
71-55
2 2 a t the c h a r i t y
stripe.
Dane basketball t e a m . J u s t w h e n
advantage
when
Doc
shared
close. Marist
a field goal. Marist did hit for a
Also o u t s t a n d i n g for Albany was
s h o t a h o t 5 5 % from t h e field.
Coach Doc Sauers. Sauers was in
two years, t h e Cagers got their
b a s k e t in t h e closing s e c o n d s b u t
second wind a n d p o u r e d it o n to
T h e lead changed h a n d s 11 times
it hardly m a t t e r e d t o t h e Danes
top
b u t t h e Danes were able to inch
as they h a d t h e i r s e v e n t h v i c t o r y
"Move, Move."
d o w n Marist College 71-57 Wednesday
away.
their first h o m e g a m e
night,
thus
in
extending
their streak t o 22.
There were t w o old
and
one
budding
faithfuls
star
that
Sparked
by
form
screaming
his
T h e Danes n o w e m b a r k on a
usual
key
road
trip
tomorrow
SUNYAC
Johnson's
tonight
night
rivals
Fredonia.
and
visiting
Buffalo
Buffalo
State
t h r e e straight baskets j u s t b e f o r e
and
is in a
half time, Albany was able t o
rebuilding year b u t they are 2-0
take a nine p o i n t lead into the
in S U N Y A C play.
Playing F r e d o n i a the following
again that he is the m o s t impor-
feet with an exciting b a c k h a n d
the
tant link to the team. Without
layup.
excellent
Troch
in
the
proved
lineup,
once
Albany
s q u a n d e r e d a ten point lead and
suddenly
found
itself
losing.
lockerroom.
Johnson
at
the
second
half as the
with
s h o w e d no signs of letting u p . At
the ever improving Harry
J o h n s o n and J o h n
Quattrocchi
this
point,
Quattrocchi
Hart, Marist hit for nine straight
severely
points. Troch was quickly inser-
chances
important
since
Towards
were b o t h hurting. S m i t h did see
parttime duty
b u t h e was n o t
the s a m e spark plug o n
offense
and defense.
Marist
put
itself o u t of
the
Miks
Then
the
Danes
(he road.
this
past.
pond
which
dinner
T u e s d a y nights.
The
Jon
is located
in
Nine days of intensive
and
Union
short.
t r o u b l e o n c e m o r e b u t again the
subsequent
work-
team
the
o u t s in Florida during interces-
College last W e d n e s -
T h e loss was especially painful
day. The Great Dane Swimmers were
for
the Albany s w i m m e r s
who
responded
strong individual
w i th
several
may
be
Quad
Monday
the c a m p u s . As b o t h s t u d e n t s a n d faculty c o m e and g o . p e r t i n e n t
facts c o n c e r n i n g
the lake are
and
diving events.
relay
victory
had
A
in
little
effect on t h e final score.
performances.
had won their season's opener.
Pete G e r s t e n h a b e r t o o k first in
The
the 200 yd. butterfly and Mark
often serve to ignite a previously
Eson won
overconfident
team. T h e swim-
mers
undoubtedly
team
had
throughout
worked
hard
intercession
to
the
performances.
stroke.
Bob
Almost i m m e d i a t e l y a l t e r finals,
second
in
the
Ken
sharpen
their
team
Coaches
left
for
the
Swimming
College
Forum
Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.
the
Great
worked
with
Here
Cantor
the
Weber
breasltook
required
the n
Albany's c o m e b a c k
a
dives
result
proper
has
purpose
appropriate
swimmers
Albany's
h o wev er
t o p p ed
defeat
can
swim
stantial
make
disappointing
team
at
partisan
home.
A
crowd
their revenge taste
subwould
even
sweeter so plan to be there
best collegiate s w i m m e r s in the
nation. C o n t i n u i n g their rigorous
training program on their return
to Albany, the s w i m m e r s
loose, confident
Union.
Perhaps
problem. T h e
were
of a win over
was
the
team lacked
that
the
SUNYA Judo Club
emotional killer instinct needed
to k n o c k off an equally charged
up opponent.
To
their
credit,
the
Albany
s w i m m e r s did not lose their cool
alter
initially
lulling
behind
After being u n e x p e c t e d l y beaten
in the
first event,
the
medley
relays, Albany c a m e back to win
the
g Van
1,000
yard
freestyle.
Ryn
won
the
event
Urn
T h e S l a t e J u d o C l u b will be
accepting new m e m b e r s for the
second s e m e s t e r starting Tuesday, J a n u a r y 23rd. A n y o n e interested in J u d o should come to
the S U N Y A Wrestling R o o m on
the third floor of the gym at
7 : 0 0 P.M.
T h e club works out with head
instructor R o b e r t F o u n t a i n from
6 0 0 until 9 0 0 on T u e s d a y
nights. People who wish to k n o w
m o r e about J u d o are invited to
c o m e d o w n and watch. Last
semester the S t a t e J u d o Club
grew in n u m b e r s and maintained
its position as the lurgest c l u b at
Albany S t a t e . E x p e c t a t i o n s are
very high t h a t even m o r e people
will be joining this semester.
in
=i strong fashion posting a time of
3|S
PAGE SIXTEEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
often
that
been
widespread
speculation
pertaining
to
it.
as
Thus
it
to
its
and
policies
seems
from
time to t i m e l i t t l e - k n o w n facts should he
If d e f a c e m e n t of the p o n d c o n t i n u e s , EDC warns it m a y die.
days of increasing concern lot our e n v i r o n m e n t .
net was that of a reservoii
We
obtained
cluding
the
the c a m p u s
pond
from
pond
the
gathering t h e m u p . T h e q u e s t i o n
lo oui athletic fields at limes ol
Partially
pond
the
pond
this
purpose
was
of
spillway
the
pond
loi
con-
near
This c o n c r e t e
the
pad
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
small
niigation that could be p u m p e d
arose as lo w h e t h e r oi not
used
dueled
children with g u n n y sacks were
A l b a n y C o u n t r y C l u b . Originally
had
lor
in-
they
should
Because
money
be
the
reconstructed.
it
would
have
saved
and
would
have
been
is
surplus
till from
the
Aca-
particularly
which
now light
tills sandy
soil
made
the
weie
in
the
the
process
campus,
and
of
be-
siderable erosion, m u c h of which
soil,
we
have
had
banks
project
d a m which had b e c o m e
sheeting, clay. e t c . t o reform the
planted,
d a m , rebuild
western
d o w n across Western.
about
the
neighborhood,
and
the
end ol the p o n d . T h e
lake a b o u t ft inches.
v o l u m e ol the pond was dimin-
This was c o m p l e t e d in J u n e of
ished accordingly. T o c o p e with
1%4.
this silling of the p o n d b o t t o m
One
the
of
the
purposes
that
helped to justify the p o n d priij-
and l o c o n t i n u e to o p e r a t e
the
irrigational s y s t e m , we have con-
At the D.C. Inaugural,
a March, a Parade, a Holiday
'Something to do with
childhood...1
by AI Sen hi
Over o n C o n s t i t u t i o n Avenue,
the pence people were selling the
s a m e tired c h a n t s , the militants
carrying familiar banners, and
the holy freaks peddling Jesus
Kveryone was laying d o w n Ihe
rap to his ' b r o t h e r ' as the b o d y
of p r o t e s t o r s snaked their way
from the steps of the Lincoln
Memorial, past the C o m m e r c e
and Interior D e p a r t m e n t s and
on I o
I hi'
grounds
of
the
Washington M o n u m e n t .
Up t w o blocks was where the
fun was Pennsylvania Avenue
was a steady stream of dancing
p o m pom
girls, loud
brassy
bands, colorful balloons and eel
luloid floats. A Thanksgiving
Day parade and N.K.L. chum
pioiihli ip
half time
show
c o m b i n e d into o n e gala performa n c e , all vividly described by a
muitak-voiced a n n o u n c e r
who
s o u n d e d as if he had t a k e n a
wrong turn from Disneyland.
It was everyone's c h i l d h o o d
d r e a m c o m e t r u e , the purade
y o u ' d always wanted to see an a
kid. And il wus all packaged,
p r o d u c e d and directed by Nixon
the resident b o m b e r , Nixon the
peace promiscr
'Kveryone loves a p a r a d e ' , a
s p e c t a t o r said.
Even t h e freaks, T h o u g h y o u
could hardly blame t h e m . T h e
presidential
production
that
w o u n d its way past the p a c k e d
reviewing s t a n d s bruising eager
majoreites and p u l a m i n o ponies
and even real live American first
o n l b e m o o n a s t r o n a u t s was a
light year removed from the
parallel procession of disorganized
and
confused
idealists
w h ose
o p e n i ng
chants
of
'Move!', 'Move 1 ', ' M o v e ! ' e c h o e d
t u t i l d y oil the s t o n e steps of
Lincoln
T h e d e m o n s t r a t o r s bad c o m e .
T h e y proved their point. It was a
personal message. T h e y w e r e
tired of N i x o n , whose day il
was. T h o u s a n d s of t h e m , from
places like Massachusetts, New
York,
t h e Carolinus,
Texas.
T h e i r signs and voices s h o w e d
their personal disgust w i t h this
m a n N i x o n , this bugger of
D e m o c r a t s and b o m b e r of dikes.
B u t their energy was soon disputed.
T h e i r leaders had sold
the
Biology d e p a r t m e n t so i ha I ihe
with
raise
T h e r e have been and no d o u b t
m a y c o n t i n u e to be s o m e inci-
them
out.
Thei r
m ood
a l t e r n a t e d . Th«'y were unsure.
L o u d chants o f ' 1-2-3-4, Sign the
T r e a t y , S t o p the War!' c o m p e t e d
with the s o m b e r singing of ' d i v e
Peace A Chance', T h e result was
not a militant o u t c r y of personal
and collective anguish. Il was a
c a c o p h o n y of harmless holiday
noise.
And it was outclassed by the
h y p e up the road. T h e media
had forsaken t h e m for the bigger
show, the belter drawing card.
T h e y looked ludicrous, ignored,
as t h e unseen leaders led t h e m in
;i circle a r o u n d the M o n u m e n t
and pabt a hastily e r e c t e d loll
booth
w h e r e plastic, smiling
marshals ordered t h e m t o 'dig
into your p o c k e t s and give! give!
give!'. It left a bitter aftertaste.
Was it a peace march or a revival
m e e t i n g ? A c o m m u n i o n of peace
or a R e d Cross Blood Drive?
When
the
d e m o n s t rators
reached 14th Street, the first
c o n n e c t i n g avenue n o t c o r d o n e d
off by police and buses, t h e lines
b r o k e slightly. C o n t i n g e n t s of
blue jeaned y o u t h a n d older
continued on page three
dents
of
the
p o n d . These have included
the
sis
will
be
accomplished
llie greatest possible e m p h a on
environmental
siderations,
con-
l-inal plans will he
a p p i o v e d by the l ; | X \
Soon
the
after
E D C on
the
formation
tins c a m p u s ,
of
defacement
defacement
with
Before trees and glass could be
dis-
preclude
wiih active paiUeipation of the
t e n d e d to move lowaid the lake
lake
lo
con-
required s u p p o r t to r e c o n s t r u c t
the
as
lo ireal the lake and en-
e n o s i o n . This pioject is
ol C a m p u s Planning and
t h e p o n d with i n t e r l o c k i n g steel
minutes
so
icslahih/c
now being p l a n n e d through
Office
While c o n s t r u c t i o n of the new
ilus erosion silted
end and
luither
c a m p u s was ill Us infancy, the
5
Ihe natural s t a l e . This p o l k ) stilt
Holds, and every a t t e m p t is being
virons in that m a n n e r .
and
and
because the lime is
to
Ovei the y e a i s , e s p e c i a l l y while
sur-
lo restore the p o n d ,
to dredge the
for s w i m m i n g .
the spillway
area
r o u n d i n g it should be retained in
there is a project
the
rotted
and
llial the p o n d itself
wooded
the
western
cause of the sandy c o n d i t i o n of
the
this
established
and
t e n d s lo b e c o m e veiy d r y .
the lake would be of gieat value
gaining
ol
the
inlet
d i a m s so quicklyallei rainfall and
d e m i c P o d i u m . However, we fell
in
of
irrigation
because
impor-
on
dredging
Ihe
need. Tins is e x t i e m e l y
long since ceased to use the lake
succeeded
at
tant
still t h e r e , even though we have
be
when they face the S t o n y Brook
bid with a
late surge fell short
with
unexpected
will
never k n o w n ot
published to bring c a m p u s personnel up to d a t e , particularly in these
looking for revenge on S a t u r d a y
victory in the fi00 yd. freestyle
s o m e of the
Dane
out
at
'200 yd.
An
sometimes
forgotten.
over the years tailed, and in less
Albany
freestyle
natural
and of special value because it
building
at t h e D u t c h
optional
area in the
we
losses ,n the crucial b r e a s t s t r o k e
1 1 : 3 4 . Successive losses in the
the w o o d e d
Amy
of our c a m p u s is o n e of o u r greatest
A v e n u e i n t o the Krumkill C r e e k .
n e x t three e v e n t s p u t A l b a n y in
Tisdale.
c o n s t i t u t e s a w e l c o m e contrast to the formality of the majority of
appeared
of the m e e t a n d a late rally fell
Walter
Selwyn.
assets. It is particularly beautiful
than
behind right from t h e very start
Scott,
for
lines
t o push
were n o t e n o u g h
Don
use the basin loi a d u m p i n g site
are o n e dollar,
the Albany S t a t e s w i m m e r s past
Kelly,
and Gary
Fish of all sorts were scattered
sion
Richard
portion
Albany's
championship.
Hopeful Done Swimmers Drop First
by Steven J. Katz
F.d
Gary Jones,
pressure to forget the p o n d and
d a y ' s g a m e at O n e o n t a . Tickets,
tough
Chesin,
very simple, we were undei gieai
started
t o roll. Albany was particularly
Sorrell
the n o r t h b a n k out to the d e e p e r
would
s p o n s o r i n g a bus trip to Wednes-
purchased
Albany.
Buckhoff,
s t r u c t e d gradually sloping from
the
defense a n d t h e offense s t a r t e d
Decisions
York at
A loss t o either
point
boards.
Rienow,
George Keleshian
of New
weekend
hamper
for
which
the
the
lost a close game tu
playing their kind of ball- tough
under
given
T h e D u t c h Q u a d Association is
ted into the game but Marist was
able t o gain a slim o n e
lead.
in
and
has
Lou Ismay,
s w i m m i n g and a concrete pad to
victory.
Reggie Smith a n d Werner Kolln
Robert
Borgman,
the Environmental
University
John
serve
team
quite
McNaught,
Hartley,
are:
the
on
was
John
EDC
win
taken o u t for a rest a n d Marist
by J o n s o n
of
If t h e Danes are t o gain
started
game
Cowley,
from
of the State
S U N Y A C title, they m u s t
p u t a close game i n t o an easy
A big
an
B r o c k p o r t last Tuesday.
was
Led by
has
team
defense
trouble
hit for ten u n a n s w e r e d p o i n t s to
t o click.
defensive
Fredonia
Danes
Fredonia
zone
Albany
get s o m e early playing t i m e in
stretched their lead to 4 8 - 3 8 a n d
Danes.
their
It l o o k e d like the subs would
T h a t ' s when Bryon Miller along
members
The
night might pose a p r o b l e m for
the Danes t o victory.
Quattrocchi
The
(EDC)
T h e small
one
John
Commission
is a statement
southeast q u a d r a n t
p o i n t b r o u g h t the c r o w d to its
powered
January 23, 1973
Page 15
Page 15
b y Bruce Maggin
State University of New York at Albany
of
graffiti
the
by
pond
known, unauthorized
ihe pond
local
pond
un-
fishing in
by p e i s o n s from
community,
campus
shed
persons
etc,
population
in
such
continue
such
the
holds
the
disregard
as
practices,
of
p o n d could he spoiled. It would
the
seem that it b e h o o v e s everyone
q u e s t i o n of the pond arose and
mi
beautiful a n d "forever w i l d . "
Mine
the
policy
to
the
at
that
the
II
was
campus
to keep
the
pond
S A N A N T O N I A , Tex. ( A P )
L y n d o n Baines J o h n s o n , the e b u l l i e n t T e x a n w h o as 3 6 t h
p r e s i d e n t of t h e United States led the n a t i o n at the height of t h e
t u r b u l e n t 1 9 6 0 ' s , died M o n d a y ,
T h e 64-year-old former president, w h o had a long history of h e a r t
t r o u b l e , was stricken at bis ranch in J o h n s o n City and was dead on
arrival at B r o o k e A r m y Medical C e n t e r in San A n t o n i o , his press aidi
.said.
T h e S t o n e w a l l , Tex., native who c o m b i n e d a folksy m a n n e r with a
will of iron t h a t he used in the Congress and in t h e White House t o
bend legislators his way, presided over the b u i l d u p of the V i e t n a m
LBJ Dead At 64
A n d rl was the wur that many said led to his a n n o u n c e m e n t in
March of 19-68 t h a t he would not run for a n o t h e r full term. At the
s a m e lime, J o h n s o n a n n o u n c e d a hall in the U.S. b o m b i n g of N o r t h
V i e t n a m above the I 9 t h parallel a n d set in m o t i o n the m a c h i n e r y
t h a i led to the F a n s peace talks
J o h n s o n e n t e r e d the White H o u s e in N o v e m b e r , 1 9 6 3 , after the
assassination in Dallas of J o h n F K e n n e d y J o h n s o n had fought
K e n n e d y for the n o m i n a t i o n in I 9 6 0 , lost and had been selected as
his vice p r e s i d e n t .
He was the first S o u t h e r n e r to win the presidency since 1956.
A protege of fellow T e x a n Sam R a y b u r n , J o h n s o n was first elected
t o t h e H o u s e of R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in 1937. He tried and lost for t h e
U.S. S e n a t e in 1 9 4 1 . He was finally elected to the Senate in 1 9 4 8
a n d b e c a m e majority leader in 1954.
J o h n s o n wus t h e n a t i o n ' s only living ex-president. Harry S. T r u m a n
died D e c e m b e r 26 at the age of HH after a lengthy illness.
T o m J o h n s o n , a long-time LBJ aide a n d press s p o k e s m a n , issued
Ibis s t a t e m e n t from the hospital: " T h e former president was stricken
at the LBJ R a n c h and was flown t o B r o o k e General Hospital in Sat;
A n t o n i o w h e r e he was p r o n o u n c e d dead on arrival by Col. George
M e G r a u a h a n . Mrs. J o h n s o n was notified a n d flew t o San A n t o n i o
w h e r e she is n o w . Funeral arrangement* are i n c o m p l e t e ,
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