Who Can B e a t Nixon? Muskie Grabs Lead

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PAGE 12
FRIDAY, JANUARY 21,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Who Can Beat Nixon?
Lou Harris and CBS:
Muskie Grabs Lead
Muskie Needs Primary Wins
by Walter R. Mears AP Political Writer
Sen. Edmund S. Muskie appears well on his way
toward wrapping up the Democratic presidential
nomination long before the national convention
convenes on July 10.
There are perils to be faced in the 23 presidential
primaries, where Muskie will be challenged by some
or all of his eight rivals for the nomination. "I'm a
target," he said. "I know that, so it is going Lo take
some very good campaigning and a Rood response."
But privately, a Muskie strategist contends that
the senator is the only candidate now in a position
to show up for the Miami Beach convention with a
majority of the 3,016 delegates already committed
to his nomination.
What concerns Muskie men is that somehow
they'll fail to get that majority, thus setting up the
possibility of a deadlock that would open the way
for someone else.
It
would
take
a
series
of
setbacks
in
Muskie lias once again caught up with Nixon in
foreign and domestic policies.
per cent
vith
Nixon-Humphrey-Wallace
remains considerably
per cent, with
reject
qualification."
but
Humphrey
is
far
behind
among
the
"Our
from
for
selecting
CDS Survey
CHS
that
said
a survey
by
admit
its news department
in
in-
Democratic
against
filed
in
flow so much
the government so obviously
told
newsmen in
has been
unable to
its mistakes in a lingering war, Kennedy said
National Convention. The tally
people
their
have
president
demand
a sense of national purpose and
164; Rep.
struggle to recapture. There could be not better year
Wilbur
to begin than now."
Donald
In Vietnam, Kennedy said, 20,000 Americans have
I).
died since Nixon took office.
candidates, the traditional method of holding blocs
Mills
of votes uncommitted to any major contender, (JOV.
of
Arkansas,
38;
Alabama, 29; Lindsay,
John J. Gtlligan of Ohio and Sens. John V. Tunney
Gov.
George
Wallace
28; McCarthy,
of
"And
13; others,
A
all had considered favorite-son candidacies; all are
not for Muskie.
candidate
needs
1,509
of
the
know
that
Indochina
in
1972,
President
Nixon
Tor
of
soldiers
of
will
the
not
simple
reason
allow
the
Orville
F. Poland, Chairman of the GSPA
at S U N Y A , feels that
Axelrod is worth the 528,000 he is receiving from SUNYA and that
and one from the Division of the Budget, from
the fact that Axelrod is already receiving a large pension from the
slate should make no difference in his being hired here.
...abare
Saigon
Prof. Charged Wilh "Conflict of Interest"
new approach to China," hut added, "Lei us pray
states, and more to come.
Graduate School of Public
lie photographed.
Kennedy said Nixon "deserves great credit for his
7 0 , outposts in the early primary
the
that
another term of office," he said.
a year ago, is in good shape now with a headquarters
at
where he recently retired. Due to illness. Axelrod was unavailable to
government to falter until he is secure at home for
500 sources in 50 stales during the survey. (AP).
Axelrod, a professor
Affairs here, receives two regular checks from the State of New York one from S U N Y A
thousands
innocent men and women and children, will die in
convention's
3,016 votes for nomination. CBS said it questioned
-Muskie's organization, short on political expertise
we
North and South Vietnam, and tens of thousands of
68; and 9 6 9 votes still unaccounted for.
of California and Adlai E. Stevenson I I I of Illinois
area.
for
inspiration they can identify with, participate in, be
followed
ton,
votes; McGovem,
American
to
leadership.
would
by,
198
"the
turned
proud of...That sense of purpose is what we must
The national survey showed Humphrey
favorite-son
limes
traditionally
be only 3 1 0 votes short of victory.
with 311 votes. Sen. Henry M. Jackson of Washing-
staff of nearly
that
the people," Kennedy
such
"They
Democratic
things, discouraging
difficulties do not
tact
Charging the administration
delegates works to the benefit of the front-runner
among other
"without
declaration
the capital.
President Nixon.
process
similar
manage the economy, curb violence in the cities or
-The polls still rate Muskie the most formidable of
new
A
present
the
mistrusts
same
the presidential nomination on the first ballot f t the
-The
Florida's
forthcoming presidential election."
in the red, and
matchups
"The State
cannot
" I am not and do not intend to be a candidate for
affluent voters by 29-56 per cent.
the campaign is in the black.
in
who
Massachusetts Thursday and released Monday said:
per cent with the S I 5 . 0 0 0 and over group,
dicated Muskie would have 1,199 delegate votes for
candidates
a leader
his intention not to be a candidate was
situation as evidence that Muskie would falter. Now,
Democratic
as
M a r c h M Democratic presidential primary ballot saying
•Money, once a severe problem, is proving more
the
Nixon
I he office of president of the United States at the
better
to
President
an a f f i d a v i t r e m o v i n g his n a m e f r o m
12 per cent for Wallace and S per
accessible, Muskie advisors say. Six months ago, t hewas some $ 100,000
his broadside in a
The speech came only hours after Kennedy filed
behind, trailing Nixon 46-37
cent, Humphrey loses them 2S-49 per cent. Muskie
42-45
rivals were pointing privately
delivered
untrusting of the untrustful.
Humphrey
While Muskie wins the independents by 42-40 per
The ingredieni •. of that momentum:
Democratic
against the Nixon administration's
D-Mass.,
inspire and his administration as government by the
race,
cent unsure.
organized, we have some momentum," Muskie said.
organization
a
Washington. He called on the American people lo
with incomes of SI 5,000 a year t>r over.
a
officially
Tuesday, January 25, 1972
State University of New York at Albany
speech Monday night to the National Press Club in
from young voters under 30 years of age and voters
In
attack
Kennedy,
11 per cent as an indepen-
per cent edge. Muskie trails the President by a slim
wtt'n-
Kennedy,
a broad
Nixon, with Wallace at
not only is in front, he's gaining.
start,
M.
now stands even, 42-42
he
dent. Muskie's increasing strength has come mainly
the
Edward
where
cast seven weeks hence in New Hampshire, Muskie
fumbling
Sen.
has risen steadily in the last months to
wins the 21-29 year old vote by a decisive 54-30 per
ii
Vol. LIX, No. 2
noncandidate "without qualification," has launched
to Nixon
cent, but Humphrey only squeaks by with a 42-39
of
by Robert L. Campbell
the latest Harris poll. Muskie's popularity compared
presidential primaries to stall Muskie; and product'
sort
Kennedy Leads Democratic Attack
Associated Press Writer
such a stalemate. And with the first ballots to be
"After
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
that history does not tell us that the price we paid
was wrong, because we lost sight of other nations
Primary
Battles
Ahead
and deeper values."
by Glenn von Nostit/.
being hired
here.
But under later questioning,
Poland admitted that Axelrod receives fewer fringe
freezes, but at least one S U N Y A professor doesn't
benefits than most S U N Y A
Democratic
candiates in stressing
'(• u u ii in i e issues.gene r a l l y reP e n n s y l v a n i a ' s primary , April
25,
Florida's March
consul's April
grounds
if
II
riled us the are
and Wis
vllere Presidenl
xon is inosl vu
move
ment is to succeed.
primaries,
Mr-Govern
llundn
more are expected
recently
outlined
;i
by
Campaign manager Joseph Grandsaid
Mctloveni
has a volunteer-staffed
office
pshire
town,
ones
The2H
increasing
federal
plus
many
liuiisiui also counts heavily on the
the
delegates will he
iitiiccil
cumiiatc's visits to luncheon and
loo,
Ami-
selected
Here,
pears
be
In
Muskie
ap
income
for every
coffee
in good .shape, mil
because he is assured of a sweep,
As
usii.il.
Ins
some.
reason
"I
think
it 's going
lu
hi-
I In-
why
.idVISITS
klewlIV.
In
Mrs
advising
ihc
sella lor
from
Mini
Met lovein
on
.lit
how
h
receptions
that
combine
d e l i v e r y , part i cu I nr iy mil el e
Kntfliiml
vision, is enough lo takeUu^edge
A s
first
Editors' Note: 77ns watte is the beeinninn of ASP roceratfc of the
'72 election. Subsequent t#»wt*« ivtll offer candidate profih s ontt
information on valine, procedures. If you have tiny qm nitons
hit or
concerning your voting rightx or the flection, plvatu* cull >h
Boh at 7-2090.
M(
7
than
,UllVlM.n
campaign
Muskie,
ri(
, w „„,.„,
Irip
in
who
r
is
anything he says, no matter
,
how hard the words
„r ,
could
sweep
the
first
eight, alt of which he is entering.
If Muskie managed that, the nice
would be over by early May.
McGovern Rutin inn
While
the
war
still
comes
tions,
he
has
loined
the
uthor
Fifty student volunteers started
"Are
you sure you want
determining
this
institution's
final
untiru
matter
has resulted
in serious accu-
favor
on
"I'm
the
p a r t of
strictly a pro-
fessional."
Although
tho
state
several
other
unknowns,
Klcanoi Mctiovern replied, "was
,
.
. .
when 1 was in labor
are
on
Ihc outside
looking ill,"
N
Department
the
of Disabled Veterans
r.t
i i
I
, I l
,- . Oil II I V C d l l V S W 11) g I 111'OU g l N l ' W
in lhis
Meanwhile, presidential hopelul l ( ,
,
,bid
„ , , , .for ,the
,
,Deni
,
vi
Sen
Vance liartke, I) bid , said
received lite
the Nixon administration hassho
,f
W n ",i cold indifference lo people
and particularly voUmins"
Millord , N i l
town Democralic
have an uneasy
the government
has
Committee
Ynrly told the lonnii
Mice
Hampshire's
New
Mcl'loskey
will
l.os Angeles Mayor Sain Yorty,
today
bus declared
111 L A C O N I A ,
liartke told a meeting of 1 he state
More
thai
man
himself a
Price l a g : S-I7.20()
in Nashua, N i l
"People,
this
March
7
N II , Hep. Paul
of
California said
Two
yoais ago Axelrod worked for the stain as
people's faith in govcriinienl
he
resolred
when
President
Deputy
Duector
of the Budget Division
He took
Nixon orders an end to a "deliber-
advantage of a plan enabling him lo retire at 55 and
ate policy of deception in govern-
now receives a pension o(
ment "
Atter
Mcl'loskey. a candid
Republican
lion, said
presidential
for the
uonillla
"I don't think there I
anything worse
lluni what's hap-
pening in governiucul today with
primary is "the most important Ul
" > i s deliberate
the nation "
tion
policy
of deeep-
retiring from
some $19,000
the slate,
is near
there
bankruptcy,
reliable
are additional
SUNY
state checks. Many receive large pensions while also
serving as consultants to the state, while many state
Axelrod will receive tenure when ho comes up for
officials also lecture at the State Universities. GSPA
review this year. He has only recently received his
Chariman Poland comments that, "I think that the
doctorate-working
stato retirement
toward
it part time while still
teaching experience
and his actual
is limited
to high
system is a disaster. This is poor
public policy." Profossor Axelrod feols difforontly
about tho rotiromont systom, saying that, "Govern-
school. Poland says that it was because of this lack
ment has to be competitive
with
of teaching experience thai Axelrod was hired "with
time
law
tile
understanding
tenure."
Poland
that
adds
he
that
there
was
a
state
industry," A t
which
would
one
have
would
not
receive
forbidden Axolrod from being hired by S U N Y A if
Axelrod
did
rocoive
ho alroady
teaching experience in his last job, "because he was
rocoivod money from tho stato. It was
repealed several years ago for unknown reasons.
required to explain things to othoi people."
a year.
he was once again
"bund tiy the slate" when, in April of 1971 be toots
a position as piofessor
that
While his reputation in the field of management
classroom
Like
indicate
may be "national", there is somo question whether
employed with the Budget Division
Democratic contender. Well, would you believe...
slipped away from them and they
in January
The
lo go
through with t i n s ' "
hern
week
in
Donald Axelrod.
feeling
firsl
national loputation in management."
he played a
sations of conflict of interest being lodged against
work at Mctiovern's headquarters
the
role
the Budget
m
up
every time MeUovern hikes ques-
major
Division of
with 27 appearances scheduled in
Canvassing by volunteers, an important McCarthy campaign tool
l e e . ,
,
II-...-M,.
I n I 9 (1 H , I sessc n t I al I o i M eGovern, especially since a poll
showed three mil of lour Demo
eratic county and town officials in
New Hampshire favor Muskie.
the State
two days, hi- turned to his wife;
lie said he did not believe any
candidate
political
But when asked to explain the reasons for his hiring
budget allocations.
this stale,
"The last lime you asked that,"
ul
a
Ho adds that,
profossors and state officials drawing two separate
M''skie, who has chosen the risky
one of them.
we have a chance to hire someone, we hire him."
high
not
of
that is going to be decisive , " said
st every
teaching experience was
And second, his previous job position was one that
w and
virtually
virtually -i "favorite son" in New
contesting
was hired, because, in Poland's words: "Whenever
was
Rockefeller."
II II in p.sli i re licl weci
March
of
experienced and best equipped of our faculty," and
to
in
sources
speaking The senator's low keyed
route
What causes Axelrod's case to be one of particular
solely
influence
in his appointment as a S U N Y professor, and t h a t
significance is twofold: First, his previous classroom
limited
considerable
that "there was no political hanky-panky" involved
"it
school.
had
affocted Albany State directly; as Deputy Director
sound more forceful in his publu
a series of
than that of most S U N Y A
having
McCioVeru is scheduled In spend
ftl) per cenl more tunc ill New
primaries,
in
charges of conflict of interest, however, and claims
higher
admits
Axelrod responded that, " I n all modesty, I have a
rather than the result in any one,
results
is considerably
the Budget, from where he
proposals slirri'i
little public ri'*|><iiiM\ winch is tun
he
determining SUNY allocation. He is quick to deny
According to Poland, Axelrod is "one of the most
Unconilllllled voters wilh support-
but because he can afford to lose
that pension. These fewer fringe benefits are more
recently retired.
y e n r - o l d ( 1 rand-
school .ml. .mil providing a guar
annual
from the Division of
While with the Division of the Budget, Axelrod
was in part responsible for the S U N Y budget, and
than compensated for, however, in his salary, which
Graduate School of
smaller
in which more than (10 per cenl of
Democratic
the
professors.
in
of
proposed
at
the State of New Y o r k - o n e from S U N Y A and one
already
just about every major New Ham-
also
a professor
Public Affairs here receives two regular checks from
broad program lo tighieii taxation
tin- rich and corporations. He
Axelrod,
March.
maison
1 will be key balle
a stop-Muskie
This leaves the other
professors because of
have to worry about his financial security. Donald
AP Compilation
Responsible for Budget
pension from the state should make no difference in
his
It may be a year of austerity budgets and hiring
in the GSPA
Despite
the
ban
on Axelrod's receiving tenure,
at a yearly
informed sources indicate that, nevertheless, there is
salary of $28,000. Orville F. Poland, Chairman ol
a movement afoot in the GSPA lo grant him tenure.
the GSPA tools thai Axelrod is worth the $28,000,
And Axelrod himself says that he's nol sure, "it I'll
and that the fact thai he is already receiving a huge
receive tenure or not."
Axelrod began leaching tune in January of 1 9 7 1 ,
but was hired a year in advance, enabling the GSPA
to obtain him before tho hiring frou/e took offocl.
He had boon with tho Division ot the Budget since
1948.
PAGE 2
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Many Fare Well
ftspiteTight Budget
Trial Begins For The Harrisburg 7
by E d w a r d Z u c k e r i r a n
A L B A N Y , N.Y.
South
Mall
HARRISBURG.
( A P I - After they all move into
Legislative
I t is o p p o s i t i o n t o t h a t " m i l i t a r y
Pathology"
by Edmund Pinto
Associated Press Writer
the
building,
New
-
residents u l ' t h i s conservative
slop
ii
iin<!
stare
when
Tony
drives
by
in his
196 1
eight
cartoonist
has
with
brightly
biblical
Scoblick,
group
of
bargain
prices, according
to
the
knew
Seohliek
that
boards
T h e y w o u l d stare harder if Ihey
at
has b e e n
present
the
predica-
a m a r r i e d p r i e s t a n d it
publicly
sponsibility
a n i m a l s at rest i n a g a r d e n
that's
has b r o u g h t
ihfir
member of the "Boston Eight," a
illus
scenes
that
to
m e n ! T h e y tire-
surplus Dodge truck, which
trtilfd
furniture.
ILNS)
city
Navy
offices outfitted with about $1 million worth of
PA.
Thf
Seohliek
York
Assemblymen and 57 State Senators will be using
And
PAGES
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
tor
calimed
raiding
in and around
redraft
Boston
in
1969.
charged
state. Without a 45 to 5 0 per cent discount included
by
on state contracts purchasing the furniture, the cost
using
former
nun
would have come in at about $2 million for a suite
k i d n a p H e n r y Kissinger. President
w h o is m a r r i e d
to Scoblick
and
of two offices—one for the legislator and one for his
Nixon's
also
of
staff.
T h e t r i a l i s n o w t e n t a t i v e l y set f o r
the
U.S.
that
government
truck
in
foreign
a
with
plot
policy
to
Mary
adviser,
Scoblick,
a
a member
the
"Boston
Eight."
Jan. 2 4 .
Legislative
leadership
and
committee
chairman
" T h e reason it was a N a v y t r u c k
have larger suites to accommodate larger staffs.
is b e c a u s e K i s s i n g e r w a s a f o r m e r
The cost figures on the furnishings are based on
standard state contracts arrived at after competitive
?%$<«*"
bidding, won by two New York State companies.
Navy
m a n , " Scoblick
seven
others
w h o comprise
the
blood
Eight"
the
records in M a r y l a n d ,
"Harrisburg
find
The
the decor and we said no. We put two stipulations in
office
and
we
prevailed
- that
it all be done on state
average cost for the staff
furnishings
is
based
on
rather
than
a Cadillac
or
Ply-
n th
Emergy
on
in charge of the competitive bid-
which
approved
and
ding for OGS.
cluded
in
Assemblyman James L. Emery, R-Geneseo, a mem-
chairs and two end tables.
ber of a joint
legislative committee
two
club
"In each instance," Young said,
"But there are some changes in
final word on what furniture would go into the
this," according to E. Davis Gail-
none, the prices equal
what
Mitchell,
offices.
lard, assistant
anyone can buy and better than
Senators
Mall construction.
The
Legislative
Building
at
the
Mall
is
only
"If
partially completed, but legislators already occupy
the
4th,
5th
and
6th
floors.
The
7th
floor
is
the month.
In
legislator
most."
had only
"This furniture is built to last,"
Emergy said. " I n the long run it's
to someone else who might need
more economical...dollar for dol-
made
it"
lar
Rochester;
in
the
new
building, and 28
been described as "an oldsmobile.
should
be
more
advan-
tageous to us over the long haul."
The other legislators who served
and
William
and
matter
,
T
It
in-
and
T.
State
Conklin,
tables
B.
furnished.
Today
Hardwood
the
House
chairs
by Gunlock
and
Chair
because
Cam-
bodians
Kennedy, Eisenhower, or T r u m a n .
invaders."
he
is
to
be
congratulated
for
t h e houses
were
Although
star.
"
vaguer
prove.
Toui
Leariaft
means
all l e f t . '
m e a n s m a s s i v e use o f a i r
Times
lined
courts. I t
!',
f r o m |>;igi'(l
"Refugee
a story
that
Daniel
he m a y
recently
had successfully
a
friends
tiering
up
flat!
at
Theodore
have
point
lor
and
being Iralleil
by a lei.'vision cam-
mode
the
FBI look
and former
'-""
a
draft
Berrigan's
raiding
description
Mary
thing
Scoblick,
in
federal
people
of
religious
that
principles
federal
church
very
after
offices
followed
of
a
in
Ibetn
much
in a c o u n t r y
to
need the
lo
support
Ibid claims t o
be a c h u r c h - g o i n g c o u n t r y . "
The
p r o s e c u t i o n has a n n o u n c e d
p l a n s l o c a l l (if) w i t n e s s e s .
to
Lull
Among
endanger
The d c l ' e n d c u l s
trials,
rather
waul
lb,in
Hie
healing
his
April
he
was
boards a n d oilier federal offices in
McAhsler
d r o p p e d f r o m l b . - rase e n t i r e l y in
n i n e s t a l e s a n d , al t h e same I u i l e
second
,i
l o w e i ed
the
legal
spiracy
to kidnap,"
Philip
Berrigan, llteir
and
and
Ihelll,
indict
a maximum
spiracy
to
from "con
which
commit
Is " a p i e i
I' legal p a t h o l -
auaiusl
ogy
s u p p o r t nig
our
bears a m a x i m u m
p a t h o l o g y in S o u t h e r n ! A s i a . "
I,,
ill.ill
hears
l i f e sent e n c e , t o " e o n
II ti- It I
military
conspiracy
a series o f r a i d s o l
charge
B e r r i g a n goes o n
char-
Fa. o n federal
III
a
study-release
"What
burg
of plotting
boards
dential
and
advisor
lo
vandalize
kidnap
Henry
presi
Kissinger
Iwo
Hie
which
penalty o f five
years.
were
Berrigan and
appended
indictment
move
IntlerK
defense
for
lo the
m an u n u s u a l
attacked
muling
by
pie|-
The
letters,
reprinted,
ol
a plan
Icilllinology
I
TOWER
EAST
January 28 & 29
CINEMA
LC-7
the statement
people
of
this
u\'
Amer-
said. " T i n -
country
will
be
ring l o b l o w up tunnels thai carry
s i t i o n t o w a r w i l l be c o n s i d e r e d a
heal
c r i m e , w h e n t h e g r e a t e s t c r i m e is
into
federal
Washington,
utterly
have
DC.
impossible
a lair
trial,"
buildings
"I
think
for
Kunstler
in
il's
them
to
i n an
war
itself."
Signatures
statements
Richard
were
those
Falk, Princeton
on
the
of
Dr.
law pro-
i n t e r v i e w . H e r e i t e r a t e d his allega-
fessor, A n t h o n y J . R u s s o , r e c e n t l y
i in n
indicted
thai
Roman
have
the
Catholic
an u p h i l l
predominantly
defendants
battle
in
will
Harris
with
leaking
the
Daniel
Ellsberg for
the pentagon
Vietnam
papers
war; Dr.
/inn,
a
ly P r o t e s t a n t . H e a l s o r e s t a t e d h i s
fessor
w h o went
b e l i e f lh;M t h e p u r p o s e i d ' t h e t r i a l
Daniel
Berrigan,
is l o d e m o r a l i z e t h e a n t i w a r m o v e -
in
I 9 6 H ; C a r l o s F e l i c i a n o , a Puer-
men i.
to
Rican
nut simply
to punish
t he
Boston
on
Howard
h u r t ; , an area t h a i is p r e d o m i n a n t -
and
University
pro-
to Hanoi
with
Philip's
charged
-If) p u b l i c
seven d e l e n d e i l l s .
will)
buildings
Puerto
brother,
bombing
in N e w York
Rico,
and
Michael
Kerher, a Harvard leaching
A i;itiii|i o f - l o p t i n w a r advocates
'Ws c o n f e r e n c e
which
discuss
were
tin
kidnap
make
a
arrest
a block
of
widely
possibility
-
in i n n
- someone
like
fellow
w h o stood trial w i t h Dr. Benjamin
Spock
Henry
Kissinger"
and demand
release
cessation o l b o m b i n g
tlie
for
his
r.iiil.s o v e r S o u t h e a s t
Asia a n d Hie
release
prisoners
of
political
al
home
that
such
sources
a plan
acknowledge
457-8583
m a y have been
'"pics,"
H I i he a n t i w a r
movement,
Admission: i l . 0 0 . i n t l $.50 with Sl.ile Quad Card
i n t h e t r i a l is t h a t
learn
to
bet w e e n
free d i s c u s s i o n
i n ( .,vm
make the
discussion
matter
in a free
what
Tony
the
Scoblick
society,
range
of
said re-
cently
$ I Donation lutys ,t J
yearly membership
COFFEE HOUSE
must
and planning a n d t h e necessity f o r
no
elll/.cn'.s
14 WILLETT ST.
WE ARE NOW OPEN MONDAYS!
for you to rap, drink
" A Key p o i n t
people
hsciis-si'd i n a I l i n e o l d e s p a i r o v e r
llmtutl A i ' l i s f
7:30 & 10:00pm
hut t h e y c l a i m it w a s n e v e r c a r r i e d
past t h e t a l k i n g stage
d ist i-iict i o n
"poqr
COLOR by U nit
ica."
w a t c h i n g t o see i f e n e r g e t i c o p p o -
in
3
is o n I r i a l h e r e i n K a r r i s is t h e c o n s c i e n c e
also are accused o f c o n s p i -
They
Defense
udlcial pre-trial piibhcilv
offences
Hie U n i t e d S t a l e s , "
letters between
ALAN ARKIN
|
signed b y five p r o m i -
nent figures in t h e m o v e m e n t .
eliarge.s.Bemgan a n d six o t h e r s are
HERBERT 0. LEONARD presents
|
f r o m t h e federal b u i l d i n g a n d read
a statement
accused
Berrigan
w e r e a l i e n e d I n be t e x t s o l
include
added
' b e alleged
What
larged
III o n e o f
Philip
a l s o ell
not
the words
mi antiwar conspiracy
held
new llldielinenl
was
I delelldi'llls.
Rev
Iriiil
h i s f r i e n d s o u t s i d e w h i l e par-
bill
which
in
s n u g g l e d let I ers b e t w e e n
and
w a s n a m e d as a
new indii'tmeul
prison
confidence
ill)
The
Last
a n d assault, met
Berrigan
ticipating
nels,
Berrigan
w h o , w h i l e serving a
for fraud
gained
"would
Kissinger a m i
goveruin.
term
Philip
be o i l i e r . "
lor con
nn i n f o r m e r
iimself
icpiu-ale
the dcl'cndents
from
R. D i x o n H e r
n a n w h o claims that by d e f e n d i n g
Click
The
ges i n Ilarri.sr>Lii(i,
"The
Hie w o r l d
political. They
Rochester, N Y
lasi January by the indictment of
Rev
children"
become
It) m o n t h s o f a sentence
sis
Ill
of
Scout
Eagle
from
be case b y J u d g e
Ted
miliiL
bomb
instead
Addeil
least
C l i c k was r e c e n t l y servered
like
lelhiw-defellllenl
H o o v e r ' s charges were
s|ililie\
paper
hove
"burning
t h e m w i l l b e B o y d V D o u g l a s s Ji-
tools."
of
of
left,
the
ii r a i l
era c r e w .
Click
the Catholic
supported
'
prison o n appeal in O c t o b e r
serving
appearenccs
"lie
t o dis-
draft h o a r d raids
downio-
Click,
w h o w a s released
publii
one
of
steadily
Daniel
railro(
and
lie n u n a n i l ' p r o f e s s o r ,
reslsler
while
two
and more difficult
Y a t , his f a m i l y , <
ber o f
John
eluded
months
making
is
Kunstler: Fair
Trial Impossible
broader,
r e p r e s s i v e g o v e r n m e n t w a n t s is f o r
uu
un
nd
d ii n
nu n d e rr gg rr o
numerous
bomfj"''
the
are
T h e defeildenls, al! active m e m bers
th\
by the lac!
Berrigan,
EB1 f o r f o u r
bead-
P r o b l e m in C a m -
w a s suggested
been m o t i v a t e d
Meas
lor
they
j
on
Leap
except
1(171, t h e N e w Y o r k
have
lerviews,
"Toui
n i l a t e d areas.
On J>c
giving
t h e village,
came and started
First.
the
inside
in Harrisburh. The Seven, defended by William Kunstler, are charged
t h e new charges seem
serious,
Meas Y a t , a f a r m e r w ) , o d
see w h a t t h e N i x o n d o c t r i n e r e a l l y
power j
less
village
of
McLaughlin, and former priest Anthony Scoblin are among the seven
1
' " B u t a f t e r t h e y spetv
iwo addllli
NEWCOMERS WELCOME!
North
miles west o f P h n o m
L e t us l o o k t h e n a t C a m b o d i a t o
charged
| Mandatory For Present Members
and
byj
t e r t w o w e e k s ago
Wayland in Steuben County.
Wednesday, January 26
7:00 pm
c c 334
fought
Rev. Joseph Wenderotli, Rev. Neil
Roman Catholics who are on trial
witli conspiracy.
' " W h e n the c o m m u n i i
WHAT IT MEANS
Co. of
^ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING*
,
are b e i n g
in
j
e
Vietnamesi !j
communist
bodia c a n n o t be laid t o J o h n s o n ,
Daniel
|
|
and South
full-scale
involvement
of
| ASP TECH DEPT.
a mem-
American
I'II c o n s p i r a t o r
everywhere, the February issue of the National
Lampoon. Go "on the pad" with Dick Tracy;
thrill to a whodunit by Edward Gorey; take on
GM with Ralph Nader, public eye; recoil in
terror from Chairman Fu-Manchu; relive the
golden age of the Mafia in the Cosa Nostra
Comic; and let Angela Davis take you on a
tour of the Big House. All in the Crime issue
of the National Lampoon, on sale today.
it knows
a Bal
•„,• „nrj
a r t i l l e r y f i r e — m o s t ... i
took
end
This cost is based on a formula that provides the
following: For the legislator-a desk 84x42, $543; a
legislator's chair, upholstered in top grain leather,
$310; a credenza, 70x181/2x29, $396; three-seai
sofa, 84 inches long, about $590; three armchairs
one upholstered in top grain leather, about $95
each; a club chair, $265; and two end tables, about
$50 each.
Wenderoth,
present o r because pitc>
fugitive,
CRIME
IN THE STREETS!
Or, just off the streets, at local newsstands
was at
Nixon
taking full responsibility for it.
The cost for each two-room legislative suite
averages $2,490, after the discount. The average
cost for the adjoining staff office is $2,100, after
the discount.
scheduled to move onto the 7th floor when it is
Richard
desks and credenzas were
by
draft
war. U n l i k e V i e t n a m , unlike Laos,
xx
several other States Senators are
Joseph
I t is t r u l y M r . N i x o n ' s a f f a i r , a n d
Bloom, D-Brooklyn
The
when
priest
for pouring
and napalming
becau.s..
office.
J.
Jeremiah
Rev,
is i n d e e d . C a m b o d i a
peace
Biondo,
Donald
on
form."
were As-
imprisoned
no laughing
••••
other
Assemblymen—for a total of 5 4 Democrats and 5 4
Republicans-jnd
it
items
R.
R-Herkimer;
R-Brooklyn,
one
The quality of the furniture has
all, 8 0 Assemblymen and 31 State Senators
to
the
offices
Peter
R-Ossining
we gave the extra desk
secretary
expected to be ready for occupancy by the end of
have offices
a
"The level of quality is second to
the
semblymen
that had the
director of South
that
vetoed the imported furniture but
desks and chairs for a receptionist
sofa,
JLC
mouth," by Paul Young, who was
contract and all be New York State made," said
secretary,
the
currently
a Catholic
the
charges against t h e m
"The architect wanted imported things to go with
Rev. Berrigan,
and
No entortainnwnt...
coffoo, etc.
ALBANY
Just a pl&ca
editor*
nnlc
our
(tpoli>f>U'H
Id
the staff of SWEET EIRE Jack
Schwartz {1/21/72 ASP) was not
meant to be identified an a spokes
man for that newspaper.
Our apologies: the photo of the
three University Council members\
was improperly credited. The
photo was provided by SUNYA
Newsfoto..
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 4
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 197:
NIXON
DOCTRINE"
NEWS BRIEFS
AP Compilation
INTERNATIONAL
ISTANBUL, Turkey ( A P > - Istanbul became a ghost
t o w n S u n d a y as t h e city's three million inhabitants
were immobilized by an all-day curfew. Squads o f
soldiers in camouflage dress with guns at the ready,
carried o u t a house-to-house search for urban
guerrillas.
More than 8 0 , 0 0 0 troops and police took p a r t in
the massive operation, code named "Tornado One"
by Istanbul's martial law command,
T h e command announced s o m e arrests had been
made and some weapons seized, b u t gave n o details.
SALISBURY, Rhodesia ( A P ) - A spokesman for the
British commission testing Rhodesian opinion o n
the proposed settlement between Britain and the
breakaway c o l o n y said Sunday t h e group will
continue its mission despite black rioting that has
resulted in 1 5 deaths.
The violence in several Rhodesian cities a n d t h e
almost u n a n i m o u s o p p o s i t i o n from blacks h a s
prompted talks o f failure. S o m e have speculated
that L o n d o n m a y recall t h e c o m m i s s i o n . T h e
official death toll remained at 15 s h o t by police and
4 9 suffering g u n s h o t w o u n d s . T h e g o v e r n m e n t
refused c o m m e n t o n allegations t h a t seven of t h e
dead were b a y o n e t t e d in t h e Umtali riots T h u r s d a y .
C A I R O (AP)— New austerity measures t o p u t the
Egyptian e c o n o m y o n a w a r footing w e n t into
effect today.H T h e y include a b a n o n imported
luxury items, higher taxes, and a promise t o crack
d o w n o n t h e thriving black market,
" E a c h o n e of us shall c o n t r i b u t e t o t h e battle
preparations according t o his i n c o m e , " Prime minister Aziz Sidky told parliament S u n d a y in his first
policy s t a t e m e n t since his .'11 m e m b e r " w a r cabinet "
took office five days ago.
Meanwhile several thousand s t u d e n t s c o n t i n u e d a
sit-in al an a u d i t o r i u m of Cairo Unfversily for a
sixth day t o d a y .
But a march from t h e university In parliament was
thwarted by h u n d r e d s of rioi police who used tear
gas, s m o k e bombs a n d b a m b o o .slicks In disperse
about 5 0 0 s t u d e n t s w h o withered o u t s i d e i h e
campus, T h e s t u d e n t s pelted t h e poller with rocks
but scattered quick h, when the pohcr charged them.
San Francisco, Calif. (CPS) Disney Productions has filed suit in
federal court here against Air Pirates Funnies for allegedly trying
to destroy their business. T h e
complaint asks $ 5 4 0 , 0 0 0 in damages.
In a c o m i c book called A i r
Pirate F u n n i e s , claims Disney Prod u c t i o n s , such familiar old chums
as Mickey Mouse and Minnie
Mouse are turned into sex exhibitionists and Donald Duck into a
Peeping T o m .
T h i s assault, says t h e suit, is
designed t o " i n t e r f e r e with and, if
possible, t o d e s t r o y t h e business
of t h e plaintiff and t h e assets of
said business."
T h e suit asks $ 1 4 0 , 0 0 0 in damages for c o p y r i g h t infringement
a n d $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 in punitive damages
from each o f four artists named,
T h e c o m p l a i n t also lists 5 0 John
D o e s as defiling Disney characters,
Disney a t t o r n e y J o h n Hagler
said t h e d e f e n d e n t s have agreed
not t o publish further issues of
the publication a n d n o t t o sell any
of t h e remaining issues in stock
p e n d i n g Disney's hearing o n a
p e r m a n e n t injunction.
J o s e p h R h i n e , counsel for Hell
Comics, publisher of Air Pirates
F u n n i e s , claims " o u r people had a
right t o u s e t h e characters for
p a r o d y p u r p o s e s . " He feels that
" M i c k e y Mouse belongs t o everyone.,.and certainly w e a r e not
going t o destroy Disney Productions."
Tin- publisher and artists named
in t h e suit were unavailable for
•Kill 1 licit
Sign Up as an ASP Reporter
hrWI
...,s, wno was
vetoed the imported furniture but
•jT7r the competitive bid-
which
£GS.
cluded in the offices were As-
.iih instance," Young said,
,1/1 of quality is second to
approved
semblymen
the items in-
Peter
R-Ossining
R. Biondo,
a n d Donald J.
fie prices equal to what Mitchell, R-Herkimer; and State
can buy and better than Senators William T. Conklin,
R-Brooklyn,
rniture is built to last,"
and Jeremiah B.
Bloom, D-Brooklyn
The desks and credenzas were
id. "In the long run it's
inomical...dollar for dol- made by Hardwood House of
Rochester; the chairs and end
fliould be more advan-
p us over the long haul,"
tables by Gunlock Chair Co. of
aer legislators who served
Wayland in Steuben County.
two-room
——>
legislative
suite
the discount. The average
by Kim Sk'U'ii Juhuse
I'oniii
111! IMlblll',,1 l „ | l l
Sievel Fire i i ,1 M l l l | I T | l l f l-ll
Irovri'sy bi'l'i
I hi' (Vntral ('mi
n l Thursilu
Tlti' malti'r w;
briiiilihl h r l i i i r ill,. Coniinl in ,i
serifs nl' llnvr lulls iiilr,„liii-,.,| | , j
.luck S c h w a r t z , m e m b e r ,,r Sieeel
Fire trior mill a member nl' Ciiiincll.
S c h w a r t z mi ruiliiceil his first bill
In overturn ,i inline, by U m p e r l
wbo froze Siueel Fire's budget fur
a violation of t „ x policy. T h e
offense occurred j n | | „ . j S S U ( . |„,.
fore last, That issue failed to
include a statement siiviny that It
was funded by student tax. Dur
U1K t h e d e b a t e o n t h e bill a contradiction occured, Lamport said
that when h e was Vice-President,
State! Fur had been continuously
1
ART LANGUAGE HISTORY
sent written notices infiii'nniie
litem of violations of s.A rules
wlule S'cliwarlz said thai In- had
"ever received Ihose notices. The
bill Was passed, I L'-li :l
The second lull mtrmlitced In
Kchwart/. would have (ju,. n „ | | j .
' " ' " ' ' ''•sPonsil
v In freeze S A
",,;'""/';
" hudsw.s I,, i l , , . |.',
l
'"""-*" ' " " ' " > ' l l c
' the Couneil
' " " " I ' " 1 "'"' l <>
< Hits bill was
Passed be „, IM |„ he forced | „ ,,,,„
a voucher even llliuiiih the use o f
Mich lunds mitihl he unconstittt.
""'•'I. Lampert, r e a h / i „ M h a t t h e
J'" was mainly „ „ „uf«r„wth o f
he .Sinec( hre controversy, stated
o
hat . It
well
the erne
case that
, , may
'"',v w
" 'he
" ' "-he
I might
might have
have acted
acted hastily"
h „ « m „ " in
;
w
I
BLACK STUDIES MUSIC
January Book Sale
For the benefit of
Bryn Mawr Collego Scholarship
?
TJ
m
31
CD
>
BRYN MAWR BOOKSHOP
<>»e urcadiu at Western
(justbeyuiiUbunkinDonutsl
E
482,1549
°
wl
h a n isslu
fu r
CD
pC
"
:
Wed., J un , 2e...l0:30-.|:;to
Tllurs
••''"" 2 7 •.lOtSo-O-oo
I'Vi I
„
Prl..<tan.28...10:30-4:30
Hal, Jan. 2!).,. 10:,'I()-.1 : ;it)
I
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w
o
x
Z
o
LITERATURE SCIENCE WOMEN'S RIGHTS PHILOSOPHY I
by Fred Itaint'm.iii
a n d Sieve Colin
T h e r e h a s been .some q u e s t i o n ;is
to just w h a t t h e Nixon D o r i r i m '
mentis in praclit'iv Its advocate-*
claim t h a t it is designed t o lessen
American
involvement
abroad,
with t h e U . S . providing only
material support for friendly third
world c o u n t r i e s righting communism.
Critics charge that it is a rationale for greater U.S. involvement,
allowing American leaders greater
freedom t o intervene in t h e third
world by massive use of air power
instead of d o m e s t i c a l l y u n p o p u l a r
U.S. foot soldiers.
N o less an a u t h o r i t y
than
Richard Nixon himself has r e cently provided a perfect e x a m p l e
to e n d t h e c o n t r o v e r s y .
On Nov, 1 3 , 1 9 7 1 , he stated in a
press conference that " C a m b o d i a
is t h e Nixon d o c t r i n e in its purest
form."
Il is indeed, Cambodia was a t
peace when Richard Nixon took
office. T o d a y it knows full-scale
war. Unlike Vietnam, unlike Laos,
American involvement in Cambodia c a n n o t be laid t o J o h n s o n ,
K e n n e d y , Eisenhower, o r T r u m a n .
It is truly Mr. N i x o n ' s affair, and
lie is t o b e congratulated for
taking full responsibility for it.
y ^teeei
ny
,„».•
' • ' ' a" " lpalsy
"'. S y " ''
""""''/'I'" rut. .'.""!
t h a t a n y t h i n g that b a d to do Willi
the paper was " r a m m e d through
the Council, T h e motion failed
when the Council tied ill Hs vntiiig
7-7-2.
thi; mind rotjUirtis quiotttess
you want a quwtmm (hat is pi-rprtuji
and Dvifrtustmy
thv right way is tf't) ntjrtiHiJ ttf'if n,tlui<i
way
and th.it iiwolvos Kiiow/(?dtj»
qunitnuss a. in you
if you tdikt! thv Knuwltidijn you <•>
' *»
find it.
Divine Light Mission
come listen to Satsang
lues. Jan 25 8 pm LC^
SUr ALONG f p M /
IOTTED LINC I J i J A r
are a few of t h e t o w n s r e p o r t e d as
destroyed in a recent Cornell Air
War S t u d y . Recent n e w s p a p e r rep o r t s have lengthened t h e list:
Taing Kauk, Baray, K a m p h o n g
T h m a r , Kleah S a n d a y , Tuoi L e a p .
But such incidents mark t h e
relatively few limes that U.S. reporters have h a p p e n e d t o observe
first-hand b o m b e d - o u t t o w n s o r
villages. Vast areas of n o r t h e a s t e r n
and n o r t h e r n C a m b o d i a have been
inaccessible t o t h e western press,
and t h e actual n u m b e r of t o w n s
and villages leveled c a n o n l y b e
guessed a t .
©CK?«
oj[0
K
THE BOMBS F A L L
Most observers have e c h o e d such
reports as a N e w York T i m e s
dispatch d a t e d D e c . 2 , 1971 :
" T h e r e is growing evidence that
the peasants fleeing I he c o u n t r y side n o t far from h e r e d o s o
because of allied b o m b i n g a n d
artillery fire—most of if American
and S o u t h Vietnamese—and n o t
because c o m m u n i s t t r o o p s a r e
present o r because pitched b a t t l e s
are being fought b y t h e Cambodians a n d N o r t h V i e t n a m e s e
invaders."
' " W h e n t h e c o m m u n i s t s c a m e all
the houses were s t a n d i n g , ' said
Meas Yat, a farmer w h o fled t h e
village of Toui Leap a b o u t 1 2
miles west of P h n o m Penh's cenWHAT IT MEANS
ter t w o weeks a g o
' " B u t after they s p e n t t h e night
Let us look then a t C a m b o d i a t o inside t h e village, t h e airplanes
c a m e Hnd started b o m b i n g , s o w e
see what t h e Nixon d o c t r i n e really
all left.'
means
" T o u i Leap is flattened n o w
Firsl.
means massive use of air
except for t h e railroad station.
[lower i
MI luted areas
Meas
Yat. his family, a n d a numOn Dec f. !M71 . t h e N e w York
ber of friends have been wanTimes fr>*iil-pn^t*d a story head
dering up a n d d o w n
Highway
lined " R e f u g e e IV'bli'tri in CamKoiir since I hen, c a m p i n g in field-:
bodia Laid l o Allied Bombs
and in I he enclosed yards o f p.i
(ieneral A i v m n l i n g Office Says in
godas."
Study Two Million Have Kled
Secondly, t h e Nixon Doe
Thru- Hollies."
T h e l P I million refugees are o n e means heavy reliance on 1<M
conscripts and m e r c e n a r i c
third of C a m b o d i a ' s total p o p u T h e Nixon A d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a s
lation, displaced in just a year and
built u p t h e C a m b o d i a n Army
a half. In c o n t r a s t , it has taken a
from .'10,000 at t h e time of Sihadecade of ground fighting in
n o u k ' s o v e r t h r o w t o over 2 0 0 , 0 0 0
South Vietnam t o displace o n e
at last c o u n t . It is still growing.
Ihird of l b " p o p u l a t i o n ,
This Army is raised, trained, and
This tul 'I wave of h u m a n misery
is d u e alnu«v1 entirely t o massive " a d v i s e d " b y American military
personnel.
A n d , in a d d i t i o n , t h e
and indiscriminate b o m b i n g of
from
towns a n d villages, which has be- U.S. has b a d a n y w h e r e
2 0 , 0 0 0 t o fit),000 S o u t h Vietc o m e t h e Nixon A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s
namese soldiers fighting in CamIrademnrk,
I he very
"wanton
bodia p e r m a n e n t l y since April .'10,
destruction of eiti«*s, towns, and
1970.
villages" described as a Crime of
U.S. Asian allies a r c suffering
War in Niiremhui'g Principle VI,
e n o r m o u s casualties. N o figures
clause b
are released on C a m b o d i a n miliSnoiil, Miinol, Sic K h l u m , Kom
tary easualities, but all r e p o r t s
none Chain. Skoitii, IVey Tolling
'mm^m
e>
OTtJfiTBBQfflJ
indicate they a r e s k y r o c k e t i n g ;
and In t h e week o f Nov. l>.ri-Dec.2,
<\ H V.N. ( A r m y of t h e Republic
V i e t n a m ) dead alone o u t inhered U.S. killed 4 3 9 t o 9 .
Most of I these casualties occurred
m Cambodia.
"A STERILE GAME'
T h i r d l y , t h e Nixon
Doctrine
means total disregard of political,
social o r even relief reforms.
T h e r e c e n t abolition of t h e Cambodian Parliament and Lon Nol's
reference t o t h e "sterile game of
d e m o c r a c y " received wide att e n t i o n in t h e world press
What is less widely u n d e r s t o o d ,
however, is that t h e U.S. is giving
no a t t e n t i o n whatsoever lo economic, social or even refugee relief
APPLICATIONS FOR
WAIVERS
i
Sof the Student Activities Assessment
i
Student Association Office by February 14t*>
atffkaHoits for conference attkhtrit now a*thM
for J
:
Ithe Student Association Office, CC 346. §
Applications must be returned to the
e m e r g e n c y health c a r e . "
T h e situation persists t o d a y .
T h e N e w York Times r e p o r t e d
on Dec. ft t h a t A r t h u r R o s e n , t h e
public affairs officer of t h e East
Asian Bureau, "said t h a t it was
the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s position t h a t
'since only a limited a m o u n t o f
m o n e y is available, we can m o s t
effectively focus it o n military
and e c o n o m i c a s s i s t a n c e . ' "
T h e article went o n t o n o t e
K e n n e d y ' s charges, based o n t h e
G o v e r n m e n t Accounting
Office
( C . A . O . ) report t h a t " t h e Cambodian G o v e r n m e n t ' s efforts t o
c o p e with t h e refugee p r o b l e m
have s o far been ineffective..."
T h e G.A.O. report slated t h a t
N O T INVOLVED
" t h e policy of t h e United States is
not t o b e c o m e involved with t h e
S e n a t o r Ld w a r d
Kennedy
p r o b l e m s of civilian war victims in
(D-Mass), chairman of I he S e n a t e C a m b o d i a . "
S u b c o m m i t t e e on Refugees later
This, t h e n , is t h e Nixon Docnoted that " t h e U.S. assistance t o
trine: massive a u t o m a t e d w a r
C a m b o d i a , l b s military assistance
from t h e air, t lous use of Asian
p r o g r a m , for li>lH.r> million and t h e soldiers on in ground, a n d n o t
A.I.D. p r o g r a m for $ 7 0 million,
the slightest regard for d e m o c r a t i c
have n o t h i n g in t h e m r e m o t e l y
form o r relief t o t h e victims o f t h e
c o n n e c t e d t o refugee relief o r
b o m b i n g . - LNS
aid under t h e Nixon Doctrine.
What is called " e c o n o m i c " aid is
entirely such war-related acts as
supplying rice t o t h e C a m b o d i a n
Army.
During t h e April 1971 Refugee
Subcommittee
Hearings,
U.S.A.I.D. (Agency for International
Development)
administrator Meinecke was asked w h a t
aid t h e United States was giving t o
C a m b o d i a n refugees.
As far as U.S.A.I.D. is c o n c e r n e d
they have n o t asked for aid for
refugees, a n d we haven't b e e n
involved," h e replied. ( " T h e y " is
the Lon N o 1 " G o v e r n m e n t . " )
Summer Planning Conference 1972 j
|the Spring Semester ore now available inf
•
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:
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I BRYN MAWR BOOKSHOP
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we have 100,000 used books
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voter v
l b , - Insl lull by S e b u . u l
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•bed l.amperl
inc. h i m
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nasi w i l l
bill. .,n m l . , ipe a'
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m k l . ,,,,. i,
Iron, the records ,,l 111, l ,-ai
Council was |
•il
lb , | . I .
T h l , ,,„!„',
Swivl
Fire Kick l.iese Cli.i
of t h e Coiineil, „,st helo,
journmciil, m a d e ., m u l e
rcfreeze Siveel Fife's bu.tuel
March I, 11)7^ Liese was a . «
Sleeel Fire bad come
com.mil
„,
because Sweel
..
. | ,....,...
,
, „ ,-.
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|,,el was
n e z m e its budget, hut a n y mis- frozen, a l t h o u g h .Schwartz, sattl hV lh
',"'' m"t,
" w e e u l i " e s can d i d n ' t use s l u d e n l funds but his
. way be corrected by the Cotin
" b a r m i t z v a h " money. 1. l t d
<•". I he bill was defeated by „ t h a , t h e Council was being played
a.
NKW YORK (AP)" H o w a r d C, Samuels, son of the
Off-Track
Betting Corp. president, Howard J.
Samuels, pleaded i n n o c e n t t o d a y t o t w o counts of
criminal possession of d a n g e r o u s drugs.
He was arraigned before Queens S u p r e m e Court
Justice Moses Weinslein, w h o adjourned t h e ease
until F e b . 2, when it will be tieard in t h e new
Q u e e n s Narcotic C o u r t ,
S a m u e l s , w h o is free on $1 M) hail, was accompanied by his father, w h o said be had no c o m m e n t . T h e
charges carry a m a x i m u m sentence of seven years
upon conviction.
ASP Today!
CENTRAL COUNCIL
Z
STATE
BECOME A "USEFUL CITIZEN
M tin-
Thi'
W A S H I N G T O N ( A P ) - President Nixon urged Con
gress t o d a y t o " s t o p raids on t h e T r e a s u r y " b y
imposing a rigid ceiling t o keep the federal spending
within t h e $ 2 4 6 . 3 billion requested m his new
red-ink b u d g e t .
In • MMMft to n.wipop.r cantos, i. Edgar
H M W , Director of foierol Bureau of Inv.triJ.lioni, Myt,—
"AH Amtrkani should bo truly grateful to
our n.wjooporboyi for thafr contribution to
our society.
"Good cih'Mnihlo in a democracy requiroi
•olnttokini (reparation on trio part of our
youth. Our youn, people, if they ara to fulfill their future obligations to our society, must
be willing to be of service to the community.
They mutt learn to always respect the rights
and the property of others. Honesty, o sense
of fair pfey and indMtrioutness are necessary
traits for those who would become useful
crrliens."
mi' of llli- works llni
ruulil lii court.
NATIONAL
ALABAMA ( A P ) Alabama Gov. George ('. Wallace
said Sunday he does mil plan In accept a challenge
from N e w York City Mayor .John V. Lindsay t o
debate in Florida's Democratic presidential primary.
Wallace said his campaign schedule would no I
allow lime for a d e b a t e .
lie added, " I don't know whether I ought t o draw
any c r o w d s for Mayor Lindsay or n o t , but t h a t ' s
probably what In- wants t o d o , and I think lie's
running very low in F l o r i d a . "
iippi'il
FBI Chief Cites Value of
Newspaper Carrier,
Training
PAGES
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
J
Interested undergraduate students are invited to apply f o r i
.positions as conference assistants for the 1972 Summer!
{Planning Conference. Applications for these positions are J
now available in the Office of Student Life, Campusl
Center Room 130. The positions will involve a maximum j
time commitment of June 18 through August 18, 1972. j
Assistants will receive a salary of $500, plus room and}
board for the entire conference period. Applications must J
be submitted by Monday, February 14, 1972 in aider t o j
be considered. For further information about Summer (
Planning Conference, plan to attend a general interest J
meeting at 8 P. M. on January 3 0 , in Lecture Center 7.
*
It
PAGE 6
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,197;
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"THERE BUT
»
FOR FORTUNE
GUESS WHO'S COMING TO ETON
by Marcus Eliason
Associated Press Writer
' b " * ™ ' , W O r W ' S * " ° f "• " ' l l >""
•hem
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Brim,,,."
'" m i l k l n «
Eton is called •, ,,,,11
« * „ „ ! U,aiI ',
* ' ' ""'
«M
London, where life was and is rough. Two years ago
he retired from his job as a London docker, That
also spelled the end of 25 years of haranguing,
wheedling and agitating fellow-dockers into strikes
that sometimes threatened to topple the national
economy,
Pubtis feeling toward Dash veered between fondness and outrage. He proudly claims to have been in
on every dock strike since 19-15,
Al 65 he's taking a course to become an official
tourist guide in London, to supplement his state
'"""
!l
"«v society ,„
U
" c l u l l l l >' « hiKh
by Sandy Grntly (l.NS) On a
summer day in 1912, George
Elder stood up in a Philadelphia
courtroom and said he wouldn't
fight in World War I I . lie told the
federal judge if was "Roosevelt ,
w a r " He saitl he was ;i pacifist
who haled "all w.i,
u , . rial,
I In
and violence . " He
Negro, pari Chi
uid ih
I'S. owed him
Imli.ii
rights.
pension.
" D o I like London? I'm a bloody London chauvin
ist, that's what I am," he exclaims. He is outraged
by the thin,e!i I of joining the Common Market
"The more I read this country's history, the more
I'm "gains
nine the Common Market." he says.
"The very fact thai the United States, with billions
ol dollars in the market, wants us to join, makes me
suspicious If we go m prices will rise again, and
we'll heal the beck anil call of America."
lb' sounds the Communist hue on the United
Stales, Inn lists two Americans among his heroes,
•lack London and Franklin 1). Roosevelt,
"pi»-'ei.-.«iUc ,„,„
,'
' " " • " ' ' • | > . " - e m s . " h ( . said,
' K h ">>' e d u c a l i u n w a s , l i r r , r e „ M , . „ n , , . ' „ „ ,
no, nervous a l , o U l speak,,,„ U H , , I ' , , ' : ' ;
:
' h ' " K l l l ' d ' " « < * tougher audiences »
A l l l l , l
Dash was educated in the Cockney Kas, End of
Kid,.,-,
P a u l s e n is r u n n i n g as a R e p u b lican, rather Hum a Democrat,
b e c a u s e he d o e s n o t w a n , t o t a k e
any voles away I r o n , i h e D e m o cratic candidates, l i e doesn't m i n d
taking v
s away f r o m President
Nixon, however.
" S o m e o f I h e R e p u b l i c a n s have
t o l d m i ' t h a t I o u g h t t o gel o u t o f
I h e race b e c a u s e I ' l l |iist s p l i t t h e
voles for Ihe o t h e r s , " Ihe come-
" I ' m a comedian and I can always
gel w o r k . "
He says t h a i hi-, c a m p a i g n is I h e
o n l y o n e I h i l l " m a k e s sense, " " I ' m
just w a l k i n g around lalking w i l h
p e o p l e , " he said. " | ' | | a n s w e r a n y
q u e s t i o n . " A n d he p o i n t e d o u t
t h a i h i ' is t h e o n l y c a n d i d a t e t h a t
"doesn't owe anybody anything,"
He is financiin' his own campaign
which he hopes will break even.
He plans a series of 50 cent
concerts at colleges in New Hampshire,
He does speak on any issue, any
issue thai is, except pollution, He
.says everybody is against pollution so why talk about i l . " i t ' s
like some of the candidates saying
once again that they are against
the war," Paulsen said. " I wondered what the French were doing
I here in 19 1.1."
Paulsen concluded the interview
by saying that he felt a little bit
weird. He said that he had just
gotten a haircut, an extremely
short one, so he will "really look
like
;i
good
R e p u blican."::KAHTH NEWS
\ .
'V-.
. *S*
GR6VHOUMD
- ^
he
hail
H i r ^ n l i m e delViul - ,
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questionnaire; iailing lo notify his
.
. ,., .
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d r a l board ol change ol address.
her „',s, III 12, by | wo n.M'lii,!!,,,,
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''"'I'hia J.-.tI.I,I . who .„•,
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hlaekl. h ,., ,, ,,.,|,',,,,.|,
, „,-,, , , „ .
Elder
eiilereii
„„„,„,
I'«v,„led ,„ ,„„,„.,, i m l j | u
With
Elder's
,„,
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w
m
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nmi- i n j ;
^;::is:-;i
srUDENT ASSOCIAriON
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..Ik
' I Me,
P.i'ili.iiull,
U.,,
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'•• «•-•«
ke e v e r y '
the , ' , „ „ , '
t.ii.,
^
•
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^
has nrvr\b e e n used t o b r e a k t h e p e a c e , o n l y t o
k e e p i t , n e v e r b e e n used l o desl r o y f r e e d o m , o n l y t o
defend i t . " Did we "defend the f r e e d o m " of the
enslaved Bangladesh? Are we defending the freedom
of Brazilian cili/.ens living under a newly established
dictatorship? Is U S, military and economic aid t o
the Greek dictatorship helping to defend freedom?
One does not have to be a Congressman to realize
that the President has once again 'ried to pull shades
over the eyes of the American people.
Turning to issues at home, again the President's
remarks are hollow This leader tells his nation that
" w e are making a new prosperity w i t h o u t w a r , "
How can Mr
Nixon expect American citizens,
young and o l d , to support and believe in his
proposals while they stand in front of welfare and
unemployment offices with empty promises i n
hand
The (i per cent unemployed do not feel prosperous; instead they wonder what happened to the
President's promise made in HHiH that then- will be
a major decline in unemployment,
In IH6H, N i x o n called for an increase in law and
order; in IH72, he said that crime in the District of
Columbia was reduced IH per cent from the year
before. However, those plagued by a rising crime
rate of 2 1 per cent in all other pails of the nation
l o f e e l o p t i m i s l ic o v e r
the
aides have opposed a Serial e-passed watei pollution
control hill.
••
P r e s i d e n t ' s message is eonsislei.it W i l l i h i s past
policies as be totally neglicts any proposals to aid
tile blacks, Indians, and women. These groups are
(lot among Ins "urgent priorities."
Throughout the address President Nixon attempted lo portray himself as a I'residenl above politics.
This pose nu^hl have succeeded if Ihe President bad
addressed a lay audience, Iml to Ihe fillf) experienced politicians who make up the ('ongress,
including many of the eomoin democratic hopefuls,
the performance was a f a i l u r e .
The message which lacked substance, fire, and
conviction might hi1 a clue In the four coming years
should hichard M, Nixon win the 1972 election
m
!
s
,
Unfolds life to a natural state of freedom
I'
Ihe
|. up.,
.•III
;
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'""l<han,i„ck
'
i|)e
" S k w l ' » see"'h, " ' " J "
Uley M U ( | .
CI
They s
. . . "'""Ilficuli „
.
Asia; in
ate Registration Ends Today ,4:00
^
*
--in
•
nil
I
II,,
had l„
passiv,
i i,
I 1.1
Two Introductory Lectures by Jack Forem,
So King H ichard will continue
to lie t o the
American people. He is a master at the art, a true
political being, and if enough people can deceive
themselves, King Richard will continue lo reign.
A n d we can once again expect Hubert Humphrey t o
fill the television set w i l h bis jolly smile. He will try
to shed the skin of Ins old boss, and claim that he
did voice disapproval when Johnson initiated his
genocidal policies Hubert will come o f f as the
friend of all Americans and hide the former
Humphrey whose hands suggest that they are
soaked in the blood of .10,1)00 American boys and
countless oilier victims o f that satanie war.
A n d John Lindsay will talk aboul the problems of
the American city as if there really was a euro. He
will claim that as President he could save all the
cities and that tin only reason he could not save
New York was be •ausc of Washington's hostility,
Not lung is going It save the New Yorks and L.A.'s
from the heroin, ci me, slums, and destruction that
is their dest my,
A n d we could go n from candidate to candidate
and try to discover nme answer, someone who can
get us out of this nightmarish web in which our
country has entrapped herself. In 1968 the answer
may have been available, but he is dead now,
Perhaps we would be a little wiser if we realized that
one man may not solve our problems. General
Motors and Chase Manhattan have destroyed too
much
i answer to one man. The generals and their
cohort have caused too much death and suffering
to millions, and thev •an not answer to one man.
fDo you have questions about
LAW SCHOOLS?
Y O U R RIGHTS?
- Provides deep rest for increased energy
•'"!> ii
:,ki"«
t o t h e w a r til S o u t h e a s t
11172, Ihe I'residenl remain* adamant agamsi setting
an\ dale lor tola! withdrawnl of American forces,
holds firm HI his atinmiuceil intention of maintain
ing a residual force in South Vietnam, and asks for
increased military spending We wonder, are these
live President's "secret plans" lo >-\M\ live war"
Mr, Nixon told the Congressmen I hat " o u r power
-Spontaneously develops full creative intelligence
•'III
'"
A n d then there is the man who must see
children rot in America's ghettos, surrounded
junkies, whores, rat infested tenements, and sol
cops who supplement their salaries by doing a l i t
heroin selling on the side. These children
growing up in an aura of death that permeates e v e r ^
inch of ihe slum ll makes little difference lo t h e m |
whether the band plays " H a i l lo the Chief" to K i n s Richard or lo some other white man. A n d how doj*'
you explain to a little child thai cad paint does n o | | .
eliminate hunger or thai Senator Muskie doesn't
think he can win an election w i l h a black running
male? That child will grow up to understand a
different type of politics.
There are the countless other victims of our death
culture. Old people who must survive on their
meager social security checks that can't even
provide them w i t h Ihe necessities of daily living.
They were good enough to send sons off to wars
and good enough to build the nation with their
b l o o d , sweat and tears. They believed in the
American Dream Machine, yet now they were old
and they discovered that the machine d i d n ' t care
about them anymore and ail they could look
forward to was death, For these Americans,
campaign speeches are empty and void o f any real
significance. For many young people who once
believed that their enthusiasm and idealism c o u l d
change things, the 19712 elections w i l l only further
their disillusionment. Many scorn the so-called
democratic process and see it as little more than a
hoax. Many feel thai men can't change tilings, and
that the single most oppressive obstacle to change is
a system thai not only allows, but aides in the
destruction of human life and human values,
In I1M1S. the Ui-puhlieaii candidate Richard N i x o n
p r o m i s e d an i^ul
Maharisiii Mahesh Yogi:
I
,.,.,
etil
0,1
In Southeast Asia, the war goes on At Ihe Capitol,
the President avoided any significant mention of the
war, and of his Viet nanii/.al inn program He said "as
our involvement in the war in Vietnam comes to an
end, we must now go tin to build a generation of
peace," yet those wailing outside tor their President
to set a dale of total withdrawal were disappointed,
Transcendental Meditation as taught by
'•
.,,
d I,
l ,
peace.
TODAY:
1
^Ie"|. , n h
CRFVHnnun „ n ,
^
" '
, „ . . K ° ' R E y H ° U N D SERVICE'
A,. NEW YORK ' / 00 „ „
j f j ^ ^
s|iiiu.il \.nvic:ti ni
."
' p''"'«"n
I
For the peasant farmer in Vietnam who has seen
the American bombers destroy his c o u n t r y , lt :
mutters
very
little
who
will
occupy
1600
Pennsylvania Avenue. The cheers of the delegates i l l
the convention halls are sounds he will never hear,
He oidy can recognize (he screams of children
whose limbs have been burned and shatlered.^WB
recognizes t h e s o u n d s o f f i g h t e r jets s t r e a k i l i ' j j
across the sky anxiously waiting to drop the load Oil
a small peasant society Whether one democratic
hopeful promises an immediate withdrawal or not
means little to him. The war is not over now, a n d j t
is not over when every American troop has left aim
every gun is silenced. He must live w i t h JJffl
memories and I be suffering that war lias hit)light for
the rest of his life, The democratic hopeful w i l l OHM
live w i l h ii as long as it is ;i political issue.
On the Cnpito] steps policemen bltickrd rclaiives
nl' prist J lie rs ul' war. Hie nuiLlu'r i»f ;i (1.1. killetl in
Vietnam,
unci
several
hundred
antiwar
(U'monsirntnrs 1'nnii t'onduelin^ an end-tin** war vigil
Inside Ihe r a p i t o l , Pfi'sidenl N i x o n loltl a joint
session of
C o i m n ' s s that
ineicnsed
military
spending w; s ;in "nrgeiil p r i d i ' i f y " for tmr nation
lie said thai "strong military delVnses are not Hie
r i i r n i y of |)i'jiec, they are the guardians <>!' peace,"
I'he {'resident ironically believes thai the United
Stales, a eounlry so weakerietl by internal stress is
strong enough to he an international guardian of
,
l S
l i M i e n j ' '|"L I,',' ' , ' ; " "
• ' " , - it",.' ' t i l ,
t«TUSB€VOUeUJH€€lSi
W
tf ; ctmm,aMA c
"
-,„
lllnslruh•,/,
,. S,>„rU
,,
, I ,, ,.,
I nhk
„
„ ' , , , , , , j l l l l l / , ' , s.
hnght
„ l l del.',.',I, 1. ,
iilv
l^';'
nji
II,. | „ | | „ «
and curre,,, events c l „ s , h
-
by Robert Mayer
Opinion
by Maida Oringher
Opinion
The
, „„„,,,,
I I " ''
' hack ,,, l h
'.
August, and a ,,
me
I'n-m Ins uppe, leg \ „ « h. .,,•
' - ( i , or reading
Fooled Again
T h i s year N i x o n promises aid f o r I h e e l d e r l y ; y e t
refuses l o i n i t i a t e measures t o help this m i n o r i t y He
p r o m i s e s h e l p f o r the e n v i r o n m e n t , yt'i his o w n
r
|us (|iivs M | | i | | i j
We Won't Get
Priorities
c;m m i l he ex p e e l e d
President's statistics.
medio,-on
dissideul
°"»
I
|„
p r e s s e d , |,.,,,,.,| | „ ,
. ,,„
|s A
l-.ul.
h.i
''''ilailelpl,,:,
• edu " " s
i-'gnalures
- "
" S ww,.r
"r"
I'll
. «er s„„| h e s , | „ . , „ | , , | ,•„„„,,!
'"" S t h
' Mlil.ldWp| lta H„
'm^fM'^i'": m
gg
,
|o|.
when
wi,"! , * , ; ' " / •
"""
d
"
"Weill
here,
''"''"rs wll»'
'I lo his M i l "
' ' " " , " 1 " 1 " . " ' " 1 " ' C h e r r y . In l b , , ;
•'•»•
wastebiiske, syndrome"
<caa»fc>..
"'
Klllc
|
,,
"\P
"i*
«,,
I„V1.
I,,,,,.
I" I .
h
in ii l i u i r y
n „ a
Hure
I'M.
wtirM
2 ; ' " " , w u f « ' " W be dumped
DI luwii
i„,„„
anil
,„,,.
I'WV
in I
employ,,.
c.,-.'
' h o p p i n g cent,.,-, o f l h e n o r t h e i l s l
; . " " ' " " friends, „ „
HERE'S THE M A N W H O ' L L H F I P YOU
PLAN YOUR ESCAPF!
'
Cr.vl.ound «tud»Ml . " l " " ! , . • ' , , „ „ y u „
The first l i n n
on (ii-orge tilde
August
L'll.
i
,|, ., |,.,, , „ , |
W(>rk',.,|
( ener.,1 | | , „ r „ ,
'
'">|i
Iheir observations: " I I . . is , a, ,.
'"''""'
'lodger ..very talkative , -mil :|„
government owes I
ni,„„.y |],
is
Part Cherokee Indian., rail, •
Roosevelt's war...says I'.S. sbouhl
n o t bt
' 1'ghting Japanese, win, m
a brilliant people."
Their diagnosis: paranoid sehiie.
phrenia.
A m o n t h later lOclohcr l!M2..,
Byberry psychiatrist m l c r v r a l
George
Elder.
His remark..
"Patient
is intelhg, ni...kni,«.
what is going on around linn,,.
converses freely, ,s spunlanrmi,
i,ncl
voluble...conversa,,,a, is «,
herent and relevant, .patient a
frec
" r delusions anil halhicini,
li ns
lll!
is
" a conscieniiim.
objector.
Exhibits
perserutiin
trend. Is part Indian. Says gum*
rm nl (,wl s
'
' h i m money."
'''he diagnosis: dementia pr,ii'<-m
(inability to distinguish rciliti
from illusion),
Elder says a " w h i t e prearniT.,
tried to have linn r . i ' i . i l i.
lives." The
1917, hut couhhl'l find •: n .
an i l l t e m p i .
W W I I lleld.s, w h e n . K|,|,,
,i
SI
Phllade phla
Hlougl
()„|,
Hvl'i-rn
Kltler h a s , , , , k n o w n relatives
&
" ' • 'I"'"
" ' -""'>
bouse w i l l ,
heavy
" ' " ''"" •"•""nil Ihe porch I),,,,,,
l 1 1 1
•"" " ' "'' - h<'.V»ud aie llyherrv's
'!"' ' ' • " "-" »">'
""VS
.,
,, ,
al
v i
^ZM
LIS I
,.?i
"inch longer." THE PAS r
;
hug C II, w|,,',,, |-.|,|.., i,,,
t
\'m,-i,ll>
hopped ,1, „,
.
improper draft card
On August 20, 1912. Elder «•;
indicted in ihe C.S District Court
in Philadelphia for "failing i "
execute and return a (draft I
!
s
„,l.l
given me was five years in prison "
And the future?
" I don't want ,,,,, „ m V i |-|| , | „ .
" i ! 1 " here. |
,', | h , „ ; ,.„„ Kui
n
"tSv
Police
,,
(for real)
dian
id. " T h e y say, for e x a m p l e ,
that
' " he h u r l i n g M c C l o s k e y
( C o n g r e s s m a n Paul N . I b y r u n n i n g
as a R e p u b l i c a n , " " T h e y ' r e a l w a y s
t a l k i n g a b o u t w h o I'll he h u r l i n g , "
he said. " W h y a r e n ' t t h e y w o r r i e d
about hurling m e ? "
" A c t u a l l y , I d o n ' l need t o w i n , "
he s a i d . " I ' v e a l r e a d y g o ! a j o b , "
'ID
A month later, Elder wasccrti... i
i
ii i.i
i
fled IIS legally insane - although
psychiatrists said he was coherent,
showed no signs of hallucinations
or bizarre behavior. He was sent
to Philadelphia Stale Hospital at
Byberry. STILL A PACIFIST
Byberry, which now has 2,-l7h
patients, was jammed with 6,000
then. Newspapers called it " a
medieval
cesspool" and. the
"shame of the stale," A Life
Magazine expose in May 1946
rated Byberry as one of the worst
institutions in America.
Twenty-nine years and three
wars later, Elder is still at
Byberry, His hair is gray, his back
is bent and teeth are missing. He is
65 His mind is sharp and his
dignity is real. He says he is still a
pacifist,
When I talked with Elder at
Byberry last week, I was the first
outside visitor he had seen in 29
years, according to hospital records.
" I wanteil
was
diffident
voice.out" I when
was aI conyounger," objector
Elder said against
in a soft,
scientious
the
,lirn,,
war. The mosi they should have
Paulsen for Prez
Last week Pal Paulsen q u a l i f i e d
t o r u n as a R e p u b l i c a n i n t h e
Presidential p r i m a r y M a r c h 7 t h in
N e w H a m p s h i r e - a n d he says h e ' s
s e r i o u s . " I ' v e g o t as m u c h r i g h t as
anyone to run f „ r President."
Paulsen
told
Earth
News
this
week.
• •• Act
if,, h i d hei -i a r r e s t e d i
PAGE 7
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Misplaced
d r a f t , " said Elder. " \ m „ . . .
was a pacifist. They I,„,L '.,.,',''
hearing- w n h l | ,,,
'"
' h i ' ferleral builitin
. ,,,
Chestnut .. My ,,.,,
'"
over..."
I'Vd.'i ,il re,-,,,.
'••
.,'irliii, ,i
.„
', " '
., l o n e l y u p s t a t e ro.nl w h i l e h i " '
hiking
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
i
INSURANCE?
L A N D L O R D T E N A N T PROBLEMS?
T h e n ask
Sanford Rosenblum,
SA Lawyer!
Stuclonts' lnliiriuilioii.il Moclitiitiun Sucnity Ruylomil Diructor
I h e best d i n ' , "
II
;;',:::::'
illllllued. " A l l ,
place will do
Tues. January 25
C C Assembly Hall
12:45 AND 8 pm (choose one!)
jHe'll be here tonite, and every
Tuesday nite, at 7 pm in CC 3 4 6 . !
W»»»***»**#—»'*»**—*
Maybe we are learning that we can
not expect a messiah l o come in
Ihe form of a presidenl. It is time
lo look into the very nature of
our system. A system that regards
materialism way above humanism.
When JFK was buried, Castro said
that only fools could rejoicn ul
such a tragedy; for systems, not
men, an' the enemy
PAGE 8
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
PAGE 9
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Environmental Studies Lost in Smog
In May of 1 9 7 1 , Vice-President for
Affairs Phillip Sirotkin a n n o u n c e d t h e
Academic
of
formation
related"
the
courses
characterized
at all. Why such courses as " R o m a n
with the responsibility
Criticism",
and
"Economics
of
Decisions"
are
particularly
"environment
for
the
t o " d e v e l o p policies a n d
Environmental
Studies
Pro-
for
courses in
Environmental
the
Studies.
hiring
freeze:
have
progress
report
to
bureaucratic
which
Benezet it was said t h a t , " T h i s S p r i n g
has
( 1 9 7 2 ) we can e x p e c t t o sec the i n t r o d u c t i o n of
threatens
courses
which
deal
directly
those
ment,"
and
was
announced
it
with
the
that
environtwo
who
Forum,
new
discussion
Human
was
Aspects
of
"Scientific
Enviornmental
Aspects
of
Problems,"
Environmental
have yet t o be seen.
Indeed, t h e
mess,
inception
has been
onment-related"
Even
this
already
accomplishment
value, as the c o m p l e t e d
being
has
been
ol
present
was
T h e h u m a n cost of this w a r - o b served on t h e s c e n e - i s
overwhelming. T h e b o m b i n g continues, t h e war drags o n , creating yet
more
victims.
Yesterday
in
Danang I saw a girl w h o had been
paralyzed t h e night before, by a
shell fragment.
taken
liuie,
h.u.nd
Another
factor
contributing
Official sources agree there ure
1 0 0 0 known paraplegics still needing care. They are d y i n g at h o m e ,
because of lack of t r e a t m e n t , or
by their o w n h a n d s , o u t of despair.
T h e r e is o n e thing we can d o ,
which can only be d o n e with your
help. C.O.R. is e x p a n d i n g its
Saigon House t o provide paraplegic and severely
handicapped
children with u c o n t r o l l e d , rehabilitative e n v i r o n m e n t , supervised
care and therapy and Vocational
training to help t h e m b e c o m e
self-sufficient. Vietnamese medical
personnel
will
receive
special
of
Respon-
Inc. can be reached by
writing
to
N.W„
20009,
or
1621
Connecticut
Washington, D.Q
by
calling
(202)
367-H989t~ed.
Re: The Appointment
Editor:
I, also, hope the a p p o i n t m e n t of
the young, black a l u m n u s , Vic
Looper, t o the University Cou.icil
will he a step t o w a r d " g r a d u a l "
reform, rather than an end in
itself. T o o often we expect that
one new change or a p p o i n t m e n t
will he the immediate miswer t o
all o u r woes. In fuel, we d e m a n d
Friends:
It is lute at night ami silent in
Hie C o m m i t t e e til' KeKponsihilily
House in Saigon us I write, the
only sound s p o r a d i c , outgoing .tr
tdlery lire in t h e d i s t a n c e
m.iid.i
Advertising
ghei
gtt'HM VOM l l n s l l l /
Features
John laiili.il!
(luhhic naiansolm
Sports
ulan abbey
report
would
would
have
confused
action
implementation
inent
little
ol
little
between
the
of
the
environmental
e n d s here—it
or
"this
Spring", or
"next
F a l l " . It is
a
have
been
clear a n d
been
definite
ready,
answered
EBBIE THE EEP
consists
Administration
were truly
behind
progress
and
questions
forwardly
the
excuse
that
was
austerity
formed,
the
"there
and
is n o t
University
was
b u d g e t , and the s u b s e q u e n t
incuts that
enough
At t h e t i m e the c o m -
new c o u r s e s w o u l d
soon
were made a l t e r the hiring freeze
on
an
announce
be
offered
and with
the
k n o w l e d g e that no n e w r e s o u r c e s were available.
II was clear t h a t t h e r e had b e e n
communication
behind"
m o n e y " lacks c r e d i b i l i t y .
mittee
as to the progress t h a t had been m a d e by
part
candidly.
Even
is
miii'v-v None ol the a d m i n i s t r a t o r s
his c o m m i t t e e .
to
then
a
present seemed In know w h a t was going o n . and
ol
"firmly
of little more than w o r d s . If t h e
that
Environ-
the
and t h e c o m m i t t e e . T h e y tell us
are
effort,
C o m m i t t e e ' s Coordinator m a d e no d e f i n i t e state
Ir may
coordinator
be true t h a t
s o m e t h i n g really is b e i n g
a c c o m p l i s h e d by the C o m m i t t e e . P e r h a p s we are
B u t t h a t is a b i t t o o h a s t y a n d
presumptious.
On the o t h e r h a n d , I w o u l d
rather be o p t i m i s t i c (not d e m a n d
ing, just o p t i m i s t i c ) o n things like
the University Council. S o , I suggest t h a t we begin considering the
a p p o i n t m e n t of a few s t u d e n t s t o
the Council, especially in light of
the r e p o r t t h a t this b o d y will be
m a k i n g regulations " g o v e r n i n g the
c o n d u c t of s t u d e n t s , " e t c e t e r a , in
the article e n t i t l e d , " U n i v . Council Will Have S t r o n g V o i c e . " Fine
T h e m o r e p e o p l e t h e " p o w e r " in
this university is d i s t r i b u t e d amongst, the better. But remember, t h e s c h o o l , a n d all of education exists primarily for t h e good
of t h e s t u d e n t s . If a voice is going
t o be given t o a g r o u p c o m p r i s e d
of businessmen w h o are n o t directly c o n n e c t e d with S U N Y A ,
b u t m a k e major decisions binding
its o c c u p a n t s , t h e n it seems advisable t o allow t h e s t u d e n t s t o at
least look over their s h o u l d e r s
while t h e y ' r e making these deeis
ions.
D o n ' t tell me this is t o o rush and
t o o d e m a n d i n g a p r o p o s a l . That is
exactly what I don't, want t o he so
s o o n after u reform in University
Council, I only " s u g g e s t " that we
" b e g i n " t o " c o n s i d e r " further lie
cessary changes
Sincerely,
Patrick 11 C u m i n
|cll mdj-eis
Off ( n n i p u s News
huhin.iwi
Inula mule
loin ihmlcs
IWiy sussinaii
Aris
sieve aiiiinoll
Business
I'lul ni.uk
Joan of Sweet Fire
T h e r e were several o b j e c t i o n s
during t h e last Central Council
meeting
to
the
Student
Associ at ion's
funding
of
S w e e t Fire. N o w a l t h o u g h m o s t of
these o b j e c t i o n s c o n c e r n e d allegedly technical q u e s t i o n s , such
as " S h o u l d S t u d e n t T a x s u p p o r t
the
S w e e t Fires delivered
offc a m p u s , " a n d " I s it necessary for
S w e e t F i r e t o use tape r e c o r d e r s , "
I c o u l d n o t help feeling t h a t underlying the d e b a t e was a very
basic p h i l o s o p h i c a l
issue which
only o n c e in a while rose t o t h e
surface of discussion. T h a t t h e
d e b a t e lasted a l m o s t t w o h o u r s
c o n f i r m e d my feelings, as did a
few heated o u t b u r s t s d u r i n g t h a t
t i m e ; " I f it were u p t o m e , Sweet
fire w o u l d n ' t be s u p p o r t e d at all it's an o u t r i g h t
revolutionary,
c o m m i e p a p e r , " being t h e m o s t
memorable.
"Blatantly Political"
Despite t h e p r e o c c u p a n c e with
tape r e c o r d e r s , I think the real
q u e s t i o n in d e b a t e was first of all
" S h o u l d the S t u d e n t Association
support
a student
newspaper
which has a political b i a s ' ' " This
q u e s t i o n was actually slated hy
o n e Council m e m b e r , w h o con
I'MKIIK l i o n Manager
W.I I Ii ' i i w isll.lll
Ediior-ln-Chiel
.il stvni.i
News
any, definite
they
the
the
s a y i n g t h a t c o u r s e s will be offered " i n t h e Fall o f
Commit-
1971",
on
President's
to
the
time to s t o p pretending.
committment
the Steering C o m m i t t e e
All
to
half-hearted
and
devoted
t h a t if t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n has given u p
t e e ' s lack of progress s e e m s t o be a feeble a n d
to
Studies.
is t h a t
and
revealed
is p r e s e n t l y a
the
confusing
Support Your Local Radical Newspaper!
Committee
Avenue
ostensibly
if
in
mion: 1/22/72
T h e need is urgent and real. A
life of misery and gradual deterioration faces those w h o otherwise-with y o u r h e l p - c o u l d be saved.
Please give what y o u cun.
D o n n a Shor
Executive Director
The C o m m i t t e e of Responsibility,
The
effort
was
be
"envir-
list was d i s t r i b u t e d
training at t h e C.O.R. Children's
Shelter, families will learn h o w t o
care for their paraplegic children.
sibility,
entire
not
confusion
at t h e last
at the F o r u m
thai
and
This
Environmental
Communications
Responsibility.
Carbine fire s t r u c k M m h , costing
him a k i d n e y a n d paralyzing h i m .
the
offered.
s t u d e n t s t o o late in o r d e r to be of use, and m a n y
Bach A n h , was caught in m o r t a r
fire, walks with c r u t c h e s . As for
Lau, L I F E magazine vividly docum e n t e d t h e obstacles he faces.
Like the o t h e r s , he is resolutely
overcoming t h e m , b u t he needs
help...and he is only one case,
During this brief visit I have seen a
score of hospitals, seen h u n d r e d s
of a m p u t e e s hobbling t h e streets,
seen paraplegics languishing with
minimal or n o care available.
the
it.
Studies program
ami
environment
since u s
to c o m p i l e a list ol
courses
being
Coin
were
learned
mental
Pro-
strangle
which
courses w o u l d be offered, " S o c i a l , Political, a n d
should
sluggishness
entangled
to
this
hampered
has m a d e n o effort t o i n f o r m
its e f f o r t , t h e y tell us s o . T h e y are d e l u d i n g us b y
s t u d i e s , b u t their s u p p o r t
first
m i t t e c ' s only concrete a c c o m p l i s h m e n t
In o u r . . p i ' " " " . U u ' I m p o s e ul
t e a c h e r e d u c a t i o n is tfi help p r e
pare future t e a c h e r s in an a p p r o
priate, well i n f o r m e d , life like set
ting. Included would be an orient a t i o n , a M^nes of w o r k s h o p s
( w h e r e m o t i v a t i o n , discipline, and
t e c h n i q u e s are d i s c u s s e d ) , ohserva
tions of actual touchers und supervisors a n d o u r o w n t e a c h e r partici
merely succeeded
the
courses
Downstairs, t h e h o y s pictured
her*' sleep s o u n d l y , liach Anh,
Lau and Mini) have he.ml I he
s o u n d s i>t w.ir all then short lives
V i e t n a m e s e , all have r e t u r n e d In
their h o m e l a n d after being evueu
uled t o the United Stales fur
medical care hy t h e C o m m i t t e e of
forum
that
Committee's
the
o n l y ask
the
administration
the
making
sity,
little progress has been m a d e . Most i m p o r t a n t is
in
of
the u n i v e r s i t y a b o u t t h e s e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s . We
a l l o w e d t o obscure the a d d i t i o n a l r e a s o n s w h y so
be offered
b l e m s . " T h e new semester has arrived, and these
Please!
Instead
Fall,
and
What m a k e s Mil-ie and t h e s e
s t u d e n t s so special? Where else d o
s c h o o l s y s t e m s offer
workshops
and allow t i m e for meaningful
o b s e r v a t i o n s ' ' What oilier m e a n s
w o u l d h«' beneficial t<i m e t h o d s
s t u d e n t s than p a r t i c i p a t i o n of this
nature
before
c o n d u c t i n g tin" r e a l ' " Ihiiiii''
field.
seemed
progress of the c o m m i t t e e clearer t o t h e univer-
b u t these never came i n t o e x i s t e n c e . T h e n ,
President
Dolores Heschus
the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
studies
as t h e y
environment
in
Milne, we love you thanks for
making us better future teachers.
Sincerely,
Sue Pierce
mental
Benezet,
those present.
severely
Yet
o v e r l o o k i n g several solid a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s . T h i s ,
h o w e v e r , is highly d o u b t f u l , a n d if it is t h e case,
President
Committee's
courses w o u l d
efforts.
totally
u n a w a r e o f each o t h e r ' s a c t i v i t i e s in t h e e n v i r o n -
and
Last Spring the C o m m i t t e e a n n o u n c e d t h a t n e w
1971,
Isn't this a good part of what
e d u c a t i o n is? Learning and being
able t o apply yourself ut the expert
level? We t h e n are able t o m a k e
o u r best p r e s e n t a t i o n of course
work. S t u d e n t s are s t i m u l a t e d and
from this, k n o w l e d g e und education c o n t i n u e s t o grow.
"Art
Business
We must readily a d m i t t h a t a lack of funds a n d
has m a d e little policy and has yet t o d e v e l o p a n y
content
Life",
r e l a t e d " r e m a i n s unclear t o us.
g r a m . " Since t h a t t i m e the Steering C o m m i t t e e
T h e p e o p l e w h o c o m e in cont a c t with Milne s t u d e n t s are e x posed to and become acquainted
with
high, m e d i u m
and low
achievers. A l t h o u g h t h e y are of a
select group, chosen to be a part
of t h e c a m p u s s c h o o l , t h e y are
still s t u d e n t s w h o e n c o u n t e r social, family a n d personal p r o b l e m s
of various d i m e n s i o n s . Issues on
d r u g s , a b o r t i o n , h o m e life u t m o s p h e r e und t h e war c o n t i n u e t o
play a n o t s o - h a p p y role here in
the life of these kids as t h e y d o
e v e r y w h e r e else. T h e r e also are
t h o s e t h a t are q u i t e c o n t e t.
"environment-
of an E n v i r o n m e n t a l Studies Steering C o m m i t t e e
content
p a t i o n . We are m a d e aware of
Milne is Needed!
w h a t to e x p e c t when we have o u r
own classes. We b e c o m e confident
in lesson planning, being at ease
Dear Sirs:
before s t u d e n t s and are alert t o
In spite of t h e negative c o m - the p r o b l e m s existing with stum e n t s we hear c o n c e r n i n g t h e d e n t s t o d a y .
Milne S c h o o l , we w o u l d like t o
Milne offers us an o p p o r t u n i t y
e x p r e s s o u r appraisal of t h a i
t o d o all this und m o r e before o u r
school system.
actual
leaching
positions. We
As Business E d u c a t i o n majors, m a k e o u r mistakes here and then
we found Milne t o be an asset in go forward with all o u r learnings
o u r p r e p a r a t i o n in t h e t e a c h e r and apply t h e m w h e r e it really
education
p r o g r a m . F r o m o u r c o u n t s . T h e s t u d e n t s at Milne
own
personal e x p e r i e n c e s a n d benefit from securing ideas from
from s p e a k i n g with s t u d e n t s w h o several t e a c h e r s and supervisors
T h e teachers acquire an advanh o l d similar views, Milne offers an
tage, t o o . T h e y look t o w a r d Milne
ideal e n v i r o n m e n t for acquiring
as u practical e x p e r i e n c e a n d a
the teacher " k n o w - h o w " .
very valuable asset.
as
have little t o d o w i t h t h e e n v i r o n m e n t
nuclide kantoi
Photography
sieve pollack
Ldiiorial Pi
dcbhi
sue julla
k .III-II
Circulation
IUII w o o
Graffiti
Inula ks.i.oml
However, I think it fairly o b vious t h a t the nonpolitical newsp a p e r is a nonexistent c r e a t u r e .
Every paper has political s t a n c e ,
however subtle, which is determined if n o t be a declared political position then by the kind of
news the paper chooses t o p r i n t ,
the kind of news it chooses t o
ignore, a n d the orientation o f t h e
n e w s w r i t e r s and hence of the editorials a n d news stories. This
m e a n s t h a t even ASP is a political
paper. T h e fact t h a t ASP c h o o s e s
n o t t o discuss m a t t e r s s u p p o s e d l y
unrelated t o the university, or
m o r e t o the point, the fact t h a t it
chooses n o t to discuss issues inside the university from a leftwing p o i n t of view, does not m e a n
t h a t ASP is n o t political-it o n l y
m e a n s it is not left-wing. If a
p a p e r is n o t critical of the s t a t u s
quo,
then it is favorable t o w a r d
the s t a t u s q u o . If, on the o t h e r
h a n d , the paper is critical of t h e
s t a t u s q u o hut not radically critical, then it is on the side of
reform
But never is there n o
stand taken
S u p p o r t E x t r e m e Left?
T h u s the real q u e s t i o n underlying t h e Council d e b a t e was n o t
" S h o u l d t h e S t u d e n t Association
s u p p o r t political n e w s p a p e r s , " b u t
instead,
"Should
the Student
Association s u p p o r t certain kinds
of political n e w s p a p e r s , t h a t is,
papers of e x t r e m e left (or right)
wing p e r s u a s i o n ? "
N o w t h e response t o this question by t h e liberal m u s t on principle,
be " y e s . " F r e e d o m of
t h o u g h t , o p i n i o n , s p e e c h , the
press - t h e s e negative f r e e d o m s (
i.e ., freedoms from t h e restraints
of o t h e r s ) are t h e crux of liberalism. T h e liberal w h o says " F r e e d o m for all o p i n i o n s which are
not t h r e a t e n i n g t o my o w n , " is
not a liberal in t h e philosophical
sense of t h e word.
N e w s p a p e r s for Wealthy
However, in actual fact, liberals
historically have r e s p o n d e d " n o "
to q u e s t i o n s of t h e universality of
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
lechiiic;
ph>lr
d e m n e d s u p p o r t of Sweetfire on
the grounds t h a t the latter was
" b l a t a n t l y political,"
Exchange
i n a i k h i t olsky
Tiui Editor Ml titfico ol itw Albany Student ft ess is loaned in
Campus Center 326 ol the State University of New York at Albany,
1400 Washington AvOinie. Althiny, New York 12222. Tho ASP may
hti reached by telephone at {blH) 457 2190, The Albany Student
Press subscribes to thu Associated Prttss, Co I lego Prass Service, and
UbetatKiti Mows Survive, and is fMrtnilly funded by mandatary
studont tax. Price tot a subscription is sown dollars pur your oi four
dollars poi sonwstur.
Communications tiro pi muni as space permits aid are subject to
editing. Editorial policy ol the Albany Student Press is determined
by tho Editorial Board.
tween t h e liberal a n d t h e radical.
negative f r e e d o m s . I n d e e d , histoT h e liberal c o n s i d e r s individual
rically o n l y a p o r t i o n of liberal
freedom t o be freedom regardless
society has e n j o y e d these freeof h o w m a n y p e o p l e actually posd o m s , a n d this p o r t i o n has always
sess it. T o t h e radical, individaul
had a specific e c o n o m i c / c u l t u r a l
liberties are liberties o n l y if t h e y
c h a r a c t e r . I t has been m i d d l e and
exist equally for all m e m b e r s of
u p p e r - m i d d l e class, w h i t e , and
s o c i e t y , n o t m e r e l y in t h e o r y b u t
male a n d h e t e r o s e x u a l t o b o o t .
in fact. It is indeed n o t liberal
Thus, to take and example, the
f r e e d o m s , b u t their u n e q u a l distriliberal principle of f r e e d o m of the
b u t i o n in s o c i e t y , against which
press for a long t i m e c o n t a i n e d a
radicals
revolt.
built-in
limitation:
only t h e
w e a l t h y c o u l d afford t o r u n newsp a p e r s . T o d a y as it b e c o m e s financially possible for small papers t o
be p r i n t e d fairly c h e a p l y , liberals
engage in activities of e i t h e r disc o u r a g e m e n t o r repression of t h e
The
editorial
staff
welcomes
u n d e r g r o u n d , left-wing, a n d cultu- your
opinions.
If you have a
rally subversive press.
column
you would like
printed,
contact
Sue Pallas at our office
Individual F r e e d o m First
"C 326,
457-2194.
ASP
Individual f r e e d o m is the first
principle of liberalism; e q u a l i t y is
not. A n d o u t of this d i s p a r i t y
b e t w e e n f r e e d o m a n d e q u a l i t y in
liberalism c o m e s o n e of t h e primary p h i l o s o p h i c a l differences be-
PAGE 10
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Northern
Ireland
Maligned by
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 11
THE ASP SPORTS
Press
Rossi Sparks
OPINION:
Since m y arrival in t h e United
States I have been surprised t o
learn t h a t Catholics in N o r t h e r n
Ireland are " r i o t e r s " and " m o b s "
(United
Press
International),
" c r o w d s of r o c k - t h r o w i n g C a t h o lic y o u t h s " (Chicago T r i b u n e ) ,
and " g u n m e n " and " t e r r o r i s t s "
(the w o r d s appeared seven limes
in a single New York T i m e s article).
I must confess that I never
tbought of my relatives, friends,
neighbors and fellow c o u n t r y m e n
q u i t e that way. T o me they are
oppressed,
unemployed,
disenfranchised, g h e l l o i z e d and very
h u m a n people w h o bave been
goaded and frustrated into mill
taney through mistreat merit by a
hostile British army and ;i ruthless, intractable Protestant major
ity
Not so long ago a near relative
nl' mine in N o r t h e r n Ireland was
told poml blank by D e n y hospital
officials lo w i t h d r a w her nursing
application when she revealed she
had a t t e n d e d a Catholic s e c o n d a r y
school A n o t h e r relative, despite
imprcsMVr qualil'ir.il m n s , e n d u r e d
'JO years in l be government education offici- in Belfast without any
p r o m o t i o n , nor did any o t h e r
Cat ho he e m p l o y e e in I he office
receive a p r o m o t ion d u r i n g t hat
time,
A Catholic a c q u a i n t a n c e of mine
was a p p o i n t e d to a civil service
post Because he had a P r o t e s t a n t
n a m e , he was not q u e s t i o n e d initially about w h e t h e r he had attended
Catholic
or
Protestant
schools Just prior lo assuming the
post, however, he was q u e r i e d on
the point. He never got the job.
Danes Bumble To Victory in OT Thriller
n a n t l y C a t h o l i c ) Irish Free S t a t e
and are fiercely c o m m i t t e d t o
c o n t i n u e d union with Britain.
In Bruce Maimin
T h r o u g h their Unionist party,
this p o p u l a t i o n has maintained
unshared and u n i n t e r r u p t e d control of every source of power in
Ulster since 1922. They have d o n e
so at the expense of a half-million
Catholics w h o live in tin- N o r t h ,
w h o are overwhelmingly working
class, and w h o generally cherish
aspirations for a united Ireland
lie m n ,
'ha!
Nil.
i,r ihi
i
k
e
d
tircat 1),mini.-I, College 7H 11" nl 'Hi rill
lhe I'imer.sllJ
li'll'
- a l , I.,..
nitlhi her,
riii- ii
:..i iin- D.-ini".
so
Huh Mossi Hnssi look
I ml .'I' I h.' I lanes after star i
John tjlnilIrofclll fouled urn with
less than 2 m i n u t e s In tin in
regulation Innv
Ni'ithtT team was sharp in Lhe
first hall' hut Albany was able to
build a ten point lead However
the Danes were never able to
break the name w i d e open Hartwick hung in there as they closed
the score to 39-3*1 at halflime
They were led early by Mike
Reed, who scored 16 p o i n t s , hut
only 2 in the s e c o n d half.
The Danes displayed fine ball
control t h r o u g h o u t Coach Sauers
In
Unionists bave in effect disenfranchised the Catholic population of Ulster by gerrymandering
electoral districts, revoking proportional r e p r e s e n t a t i o n , and refusing I heir elected representatives
even junior ministerial and committee jobs
T h e rale of u n e m p l o y m e n t has
always been high in Northern Ire
land, and Catholics and Proles
lanls have always felt a sense of
compel il 1011 lor what jobs 1 here
Currently
the
unemployment
rale in Ulster is about I d ' ; . hut in
Catholic g h e t l o e s il runs as high as
ID"; because whal jobs exist are
largely controlled by wealthy Protestants and by the Unionist Party, w h o s e welfare govern men I is
the largest single e m p l o y e r in the
province. When C a l h o l i c s c a n find
e m p l o y m e n t il is invariably in
menial, low paying positions.
McCulling ( L N S )
N o r t h e r n Ireland has a "separate-but-equal" school
system;
b o t h sides want it that way. But
while P r o t e s t a n t schools are fully
s u p p o r t e d by tin- g o v e r n m e n t ,
Catholic
schools
receive
only
two-thirds aid from the governIf you lived in Ireland, the ex- ment
amples I bave just cited would be
T h u s Catholics are forced to
superfluous. Everyone in Northern Ireland knows t h a t Catholics subsdi/.e fully by their laxes Protare discriminated against Nor d o estant e d u c a t i o n and to finance
tin- Protestants make any effort to from their p o c k e t s o n e third of
hide the fact, the m o t t o of the the cost of their own education,
ruling party, in fact, is "A Proles
lant government for .1 Protestant
University e d u c a t i o n is virtually
people "
inaccessible to the Catholic popil
laliou Q u e e n ' s University is locaT h e r e are o n e million Proles ted in Belfast, an overwhelmingly
U.nts ni N o r t h e r n Ireland, t w o
Proleslanl city When plans lor a
thirds of the p o p u l a t i o n there second university were a n n o u n c e d
Descended from Scotch and Kng a few years ago it seemed uievita
lish c o l o n i / e i s and belonging l o all ble that the new school would
classes, they are o p p o s e d I., any come to D e n y . N o r t h e r n Ireland's
association w i t h the ipredonii second largesl city Deris I known
in
p r o Bill ish
quarters
as
L o n d o n d e r r y ) .seemed I he logical
choice for mans reasoi
hut Us
p o p u l a t i o n is p r e d o m i n a n t l y Caih
ohe
The Proleslanl government ulti
mately built the New University
of Ulster in Colraiive, .1 tiny t o w n
just b e y o n d c o m m u t i n g distance
Irom D e n y
with
. r c o n i K T h e hull was
Ihrown into Rossi lull he slipped
III lhe h a c k c o u r l .mil wisely held
lhe I...II ... the IHI/.-, , s o u n d e d
Five IlllllUlrs ..I overt imc was
llow used i,, del ide ill. c o n l e s t .
Harlwick .pin kl\ named the lead
with iwo ha.skels. flic Danes were
II.imp.-..•il In llieir i n a l n l n . 111
How has this blatant oppression
and the battle against it. been
reported by the U.S. media? Basically, they have followed the
official British line-aline t h a t not
even British newspapers are accepting.
the U.S. press against the minority
cause in Northern Ireland is provided by Life Magazine. Recently a
photograph showing an IRA man
armed with a rifle standing in a
Belfast street appeared in a number of publications here and abroad.
T w o a c c o u n t s of the d e a t h of a
T h e photograph was printed in a
y o u n g Catholic in Belfast suggest
s o m e t h i n g of the n a t u r e of this conservative Irish newspaper, the
Irish
I n d e p e n d e n t , a news source
l y p e of misrepresentation at o n e
generally u n s y m p a t h e t i c to tin;
of its more subtle levels.
IRA. T h e caption read, " A n IRA
T h e first a c c o u n t , which care- m a n , armed with a U.S. Ml carfully differeuliat.es whal actually bine, shelters near a blazing barrihappened from British Army alle- cade during the gun battle in the
gations about the y o u t h ' s guilt, Markets area of Belfast. Above
appeared in I he L o n d o n T i m e s . him hangs a Tricolour "
S e p t e m b e r 21: "In Belfast, soldiers shot a man aged about 'H) in
I he New Lodge Road today after
an explosion blew a wheel off an
a r m o u r e d personnel earner. T h e
Army churned thai the man was
i h i o w u i e pel rol b o m b s "
T h e American account of this
same event is remarkably different , il implies the guilt of the dead
man by ulent l fyi..g him with >i
g.opp whose •.mil 1! est: hlishes,
lb- s exonera 1; g the Bnti.h A . m y
of il e killing, ''hi account ap,,e..red ni t h e Chicago ''rihuni the
•an.e day "British troops sear
ching lo. arms in the Catholic
New I od',e (toadarea today s h o t a
youii" man who was one of a
group h'-iiing gas< tine b o m b s :*l
an armore 1 e; , "
Il is not possible t o convey the
misery, hopelessness and trustra
tion which are the lives of North
urn Ireland's Catholic minority It
is p e r h a p s best s u m m e d up in a
phrase 1 saw scrawled on a Belfast
Perhaps the most graphic and
wall this s u m m e r It asked, " I s
betraying e x a m p l e of I he bias of
there a life before d e a t h " "
T h e very same photograph in
Life Magazine carried the caption,
" C r o u c h e d beneath the Irish Republican tricolor, a professional
IRA terrorist who goes by the
name of Joe awaits a counterattack by the British infantry during
the battle of Kb/a St reel "
Has television coverage been any
b e l t e r " Unfortunately not. Ill
ih'vi\t the c o m p l e t e nature of U.S.
acceptance of the British point of
view about events in Northern
Ireland is aptly represented by the
fact that much of the daily news
coverage offered by television networks s l o o often the propagan
dislic reporting of BBC-TV,the
British government station, rather
than the considerably more comprehensive, more balanced and by
no means radical coverage of Radio-Television of Ireland (RTE).
'-v«c**A,.-,w\Ji
As for the little i n d e p e n d e n t
coverage by American television
t h a t does take place, it struck m e
as revealing t h a t all the television
c a m e r a m e n I saw over a t w o
m o n t h period in N o r t h e r n Ireland
last s u m m e r were on t h e o p p o s i t e
side from me, lurking side by side
with g o v e r n m e n t intelligence photographers q u i t e literally behind
the shields and under the protection of the British A r m y . (Incidentally, the p h o t o g r a p h s a c c o m
panying t h e Life article men
tinned generally s h o w the b a c k s
of British soldiers in the foreground; Life's p h o t o g r a p h e r l o o
was, literally and m e t a p h o r i c a l l y ,
on the side of the A r m y ) .
The Harlwick Coach is not
pleased with l i e proceedings as
his Warriors a n uiidttcd. ?()-<>S. In
rlit.- (ileal D a m , .,
make ill.-ir foul shots as both Bob
put on a serai-freeze m i d w a y into
lhe first half, as b o t h Rossi and
CsUiallroechi t o o k t u r n s holding
the ball just past m i d c o u r t Delay
of game was culled on Hartwick
because they failed t o guard their
men. Coach Roy C h i p m a n was
outraged at the call and a tech
pica! foul was called against the
Warriors' c o a c h .
T h e Danes came out running in
the second half as Byron Miller
led lhe team to a n o t h e r ten point
lead Albany then went dry P o u r
m i n u t e s elapsed
and the Danes
could score only o n e h o o p Hartwick was able to close within 2
points Q u a t t r u e c h i was forced to
sit on the bench with four personal fouls a n d the c a p t a i n ' s absence s h o w e d . Willi 7 : 3 9 lo go in
regulation lime Kevin Mulcahy
sunk t u n foul shots to give Hartwick lhe lead lor lhe first lime
since the opening m i n u t e s of the
game.
Reggli S m i t h ol Albany came
riglu b,u k ..ml hit .. clinch basket
to put lhe Dane., hack in front
The Warriors scored m i c e incivasini: I heir lead
|
Us
All
- closed In within iui Inn
ill
eh
l i d 111
Illinium- Mill. . hu .. '.!.. lo.iler l o
chow
T h e n Rossi t o o k c o n t r o l . After
stealing lhe ball, he picked up a
foul and m a d e Iwo clutch free
Ciirtiss and Smith missed o n e and
one s i t u a t i o n s . T h e tide t u r n e d .
With Albany I railing BS-6S, S m i t h
was fouled by Miller of Hartwick
after a missed Warrior s h o l . Millet
protested v e h e m e n t l y and was given a technical foul.
A college technical allows tinopposing team a foil! shot plus lhe
two foul s h o t s by S m i t h and
possession of t h e hall. In l h e
pressure s i t u a t i o n S m i t h sunk
l, lh r ul sh ls
"
"
"
" ' " I Rossi m a d e
••"' technical l o lie t h e score
liH
-6K.
t h r o w s In lie the score 62-62
Harlwick came d o w n court hut
gave t h e hall up o n a cosily
3-second violation. Dave Welcllons
of A l b a n y was fouled, hut only
iunde o n e of Iwo foul shols lo
give lhe Danes a stint o n e point
lead. Sieve Schweitz of Hartwick
was then fouled and he m a d e the
firs! shot l o tie the score He
missed lhe second and the hall
was knocked mil of b o u n d s by
Hartwick giving A l b a n y possession
Tni
' Danes missed a shot and
Hartwick l o o k c o n t r o l . T o n y Qui" o n e r s ol Hail wick was fouled but
missed the shot a n d the hall rolled
" n Harlwick mil of b o u n d s . Al'''my next showed that they a r e a
grcal hall c l u b . T h e y c h o s e to play
llM l h l l i l s l
'
'
*>">' •"»«'" I b o u g b there
W11s
""'"' l h i m •' m i n u t e t o play,
'-' ni '. v pas-sed I he ball a r o u n d as t h e
enpacity crowd cheered t h e m o n .
Wilh
••'" s e c o n d s left m the
overtime, Rossi glanced at t h e
GOOF:
lor llinsc of you who noticed,
lasi Friday lhe basketball headline read. "Dunes llnusehroken
by Ulicii." when in actuality it
should have read "Danes Housebroken by Ithaca." We wish lo
apologize lor lhe error, and lo
thank all of those nice people
who so thoughtfully pointed
out the error to us.
love,
akin d.. ed.
clock and Ihen hit a -'JO Tool j u m p
shot which proved to be game
winner, T h e r e w e r e still 1 s e c o n d s
left. However t h e clock started t o
go on t h e blink, Il read zero, b u t
was finally reset t o 1 s e c o n d s .
Hartwick threw a long pa.ss t h a t
was saved from going out of
b o u n d s . T h e Warriors were able t o
get oil' ;i single shot thai h o u n d e d
off the rim. In this confusion t h e
clock never moved from four se
eonds and suddenly went b l a n k .
Finally the referee ruled lhat t h e
game was over, and lhe jubilant
Danes exiled lo a standing ovalion.
Matmen Pin
Williams
by K e n n e t h A r d u i n o
T h e Albany S l a t e m a t m e n
won their second struight m a t c h
(-12-121, S a t u r d a y against Williams College, T h e m a t m e n were
led by Jeff A l b r e c h l , Larry Frederick, Richard M o o d y and Al
Mercer, who all pinned their
opposition
Mercer I 1IHI lbs)
had the (juickesl p m healing
Mike H..I,ins,,,, I,, L' n,in. ,,nd :.::
sec A l h r e r h l ' s anil M o o d y ' s pin
..Is., .Mine in the second pel mil
MUKINi)
W h i l e Fl
II, 111.
!
, l>
fly
llnrd period Other vici
- cmnc til T o m Hull and
I.nil II.en o n forfeit. With
Uuih Villi, hurt. .\lh.,ni again
li.nl l,. forfeit lhe h c m y w e i g h l
division Albany's next m a t c h is
h o m e ..II Satiirda\ against C W.
I'osl
AtMnMo£ Fraternities
imlhwk
But actions speak even louder
than words.. In August of this year
Geoffrey J o h n s o n S m i t h , Undersecretary of Stale for the British
Army and former television reporter, visited the U.S. to "ex
plain' on American radio and
television the role of the British
Army in Northern Ireland and t o
make clear " h o w utterly appalling
were the activities of IRA gun
men "
The following m o n t h J o e Cahill,
a prominent s p o k e s m a n for lhe
Catholic population of Belfast and
a m e m b e r of the provisional I R A ,
had his visa revoked in m i d a i r as
he was on his way to the U S . to
c o u n t e r S m i t h ' s visit, and raise
funds for his a r m y .
(The ostensible reason lor the
revocation was a political c r i m e
c mimilled by Cahill in the UtMJ's
.1 crime for which Cahill had
already served his time in prison I
Hnld currenl news coverage,
lainted In misunderstanding, di*
toiiion and seniiMM'iii.ihty, is re
phtced with r e p o i t m g l hat de
senhes the news 111 the broad
eontexl of class, e c o n o m i c and
political n'ahlies, the lessons ol
ll
" ' I "idle struggle now taking
place in Northern Ireland will he
losl lo the niajonts oi Hu A m e n
can reading public.
CENTRAL BEER & SODA CORP.
Mermen Top Bridgewater
In Ira Mo/ille
1330 Central Ave.
459 - 3483
around the corner from campus
(below Fuller Road)
All Popular Brands Of Beer & Soda
At Discount Prices
In Bottles & Cans
Co.u-li Kelly's swimming I.-am pu In .1 their record
lo I 3 Friday, when they he,.' William Patterson
C
ge of New J e r s e y , f.K hf,
Bill I h u t , l.es I'lircU, I'.-le lleisleiiliabi'i. and
I .i-nn it- Van Ryu learned up to win III.- till) >d
nledley relay Their l i m e of 1:0.'i 2 set a new varsity
record Ken Weber, a freshman captured Ills first
victory o i tile vear in lhe 1.111)11 yd Ire.-style Ills
lime Wi.is a c o m m e n d a b l e 1 2 22 II Coach Kelly was
pleased l o see Weber win lhe race after ., ..-..sou of
second anil third place finishes In the 2(111 yd
iiulividu .al medley, van Ryu took I'nsl in 3 I (I 3
Remain illg Wills llieliuled I lerslellh.lber in lhe'.'.IHlvd
biltterfl i Willi j lime ol''J 17 <i II. .'i III 'in "'in.Ml
baclistn ,1,,- will, .. I...I '.' "I II. .mil ' m I(> n ,.i lhe
.nil yd Irceslyle with a a: 27 .ft.
T u r n i n g to diving, Bob Cantor clinched firsl place
111 the o n e meter diving event while Isaac Wilson
followed in second Wilson also placed in Ibc t h r e e
llleler diving event by securing first,
Al the end of every m e e t . Coach Kelly enjoys
h a n d i n g lo o n e of his al hleli-s a plaquesignifying the
most valuable s w i m m e r of I ha' meet. In this case, it
had l o lie Wilson "Isaac bad lo win lhe three m e t e r
,. wm the meet for u s , " Kelly slated afterwards,
Next S a t u r d a y , lhe swimmer., go up against
Hrulgewaler SI.lie College of Massachusetts. Coach
K.-llv Mil's Bridgewater looks strong o n paper, b u t
Ins leaiti'will he Irving lii reverse ii loss bv lhe score
,,| ,.s ...', las! year
see a pro
-.PROFESSIONAL •
;-SKhNSTRU'CT0R
.'C. OF'AMERICA . ,
f
.srffc&jir,
- keg 'iidtst w .^ock Bud - Bal - Piels - Schaefer - Carling
for
I"
fundamentals
tap equipment available
Attention Sororities
n i i i l t i l e i l f > >• H i t ) i
.tO.uiv Sliul.vii P t i
PAGE 12
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUbENT PRESS
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
i———
PAGE 13
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Caucus on
INTERESTED FOLK
GRAFFITI
ings
for
Women's
faculty
1 2 : 3 0 - 1 : 3 0 ; March
Come
about
listen
the
Within.
to Satsang.
True
Divine
Find
Knowledge
Light
out
that
April
is
Kghtt.
Meet-
women.
Feb.
WHAT TO DO?
1
6,
12:30-1:30:
12, 1 - 2 : May 2,
12:30-1:30.
The Music dept. is i n i t i a t i n g a series
of
H U 2 9 0 . All w o m e n are i n v i t e d .
Mission, Tues.
Jan. 25 <it 8 p m m LC 4.
r*<MIH.CHICMi
.CIHICAIVACCIG J7M5 | ~ - i
•fottfoti
I-i.irig.
and
••••••••••••••••§•••••••••>•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••—•••••••••••••••<•»•«•"»•»•••»•
I
Gay
lhat
with
Alliance
through
Iho
bookstore
YOUR USED OR UNWANTED ITEMS
of SNO (Students
Open A u d i t i o n s for TELETHON
The SUNYA
nounced
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
^LL
There w i l l be an i m p o r t a n t
MAJORS & MINORS
PEACE & POLITICS
has an
their
An information
elforts
assistance
from
Ihe
a Gay
section
of
staff,
clinic
for
students
interested in pre-medical,
and medical
be
held
technology
TUGS.
pre-dental,
programs
Feb.
to 9 : 3 0 p.m.
Bookstore. Such b o o k s as What Every
this i n f o r m a l meelmy for the
Homosexual
ment
Knows
by
R.O.D.Ben,
son and 77ie Same Sex-An
ol Homosexuality.
Appraisal
The A l l i a n c e w i l t
meet every Wed. n i t e at 8 p . m
of
Drs.
in Bl
Fishman,
Sciences
Pearcy,
for sale
housing
sell to highest offer. For informa-
personals
Ride wanted t o N e w York City,
Fri. Feb. 4 after 2. Call Debbie
Stereo,
Symphonic
200
Peak Power. Call Larry
7-4715.
RIDE
New
WANTED:
Haven
area.
Patadal apt.
Attention
Bridgeport,
Any
weekend.
faculty
and
Sale:
Multi
438 1 2 8 1 .
Component
Relalstic
STEREO:
STA-65B.
Relalstic
CAN
I MAKE
IT?** A
block
new
book by a recent law graduate for
prospective
law
students.
S T A - 6 5 B . Multiplex receiver. Mint
$2.95.
condition. Call Howard 4 8 2 - 7 0 1 8 .
Milwaukee,
$ 1 2 5 (or best offer).
through your bookstore.
Kroos
Press, Box
Wis. 5 3 2 1 7
or
evenings.
For
interview
salary,
call:
Mr.
Mother eager to hire girl to help
basis.
home, on
Hours
hard Martin
Africa,
female;
order
Roommate needed for 4 person
Chevy.
services
FOR
All
Expenses
15071,
San
month + utilities; Call 4 6 5 - 3 0 4 7 .
436-1271.
Free
Diego,
HC
area.
Nicely
furnished,
returned
FOR
SALE:
Henke
ski
boots;
from
a
year
in
level. Call Bobbi 4 8 9 - 3 1 9 6 ,
Female
Near
share
4
Bus~$58.
bedroom
Institute
speaker w i l l he Prof
of
James
Packer f r o m Northwestern University
His
lecture 'Urban
Design
Architecture
in Roman
Imperial
club
w i l l have a meeting at
by
Or
Quad starting Tues. Jan. 25. A n y o n e
interested in taking courses this semes
interested
ttfr must attend.
lounge
Ostia'
CA.
join
pedigree. Reasonable.
guitar
Roger. 4 5 7 - 8 7 4 2 .
489-6473
lessons.
fishing
and
to
were
in
the
program
announces
its
attraction,
the
Troupe
a
group
of
y o u n g p e r f o r m e r s already masters of
this most unusual a r t . T h e t r o u p e w i l l
p e r f o r m o n the PAC M a i n Stage o n
F r i . Jan. 2 8 at 8 p . m . T i c k e t s : $1 w /
Council
w i l l sponsor a
lecture
Five, 3 hour,
7-10,
Advanced
and slide show by painter A l l e n D'Ar
First
cangelo. Wed. Jan. 26 at 8 p m in F A
Physical Ed. 207 Thurs
126 A l l are welcome to attend.
q u a l i f y y o u must have c o m p l e t e d the
Aid
classes
course
will
be
given
in
within
the
past
3
selling
answering
phones
food,
by
lectures
Meditation
Maharishi
Mahesh
on
as taught
Yogi
will
be
p . m . i n the CC Assembly H a l l . F a r t h e r
A mandatory meeting for all those
m
introductory
Transcendential
given o n Tues. J a n . 25 at 1 2 : 4 5 and 8
years.
interested
Two
Jan. 27. T o
i n f o , call C o n n i e at 4 8 2 - 0 6 0 6 ,
buttons,
Yoga
be located on a farm on the coast of
the U n i t a r i a n C h u r c h , 4 0 5 Washington
freshments. Discuss c o m i n g events
ma|nnng in any sub
participants should have a
I IV
Theru w i l l be a meeting of students
faculty
who
wish
call
to
work
or peace
on
projects
in HU
25.
or
>d
leave
yum
Puerto
H U 340
meeting
of
on Tues Jan 25 at 7 30
-il
The semester''
ai tivities
Business
Interested
in a trip
Winery?
Come
meeting
Rico's
to
In
other
TELETHON
'72
political
be debated on Sat
A tten tion
doing
Sight
Studen
ts-
Brotherhood
our
next
7pm
Jan
status
will
29 in CC 375
S|>eakers include
Point
mental
mi
unable to at
and
and
modi
f or
din
25 at 7 3 0 in B A 210
7-8476
Women's Lib
Ci
in
to
artist
intermediate
ject, but
Juno 25
Mime
student t a x , $2 w / o u t .
Art
Seoufopoulos,
summer
from
7pm
guest
Essence
group of Reed College students It w i l l
Re-
Greece
at
Council
second
See Friday's ASP for Ihe place
circle
Poros,
us
will
founded and
Niki
w i l l offer its annual
Indian
and
H U 354, Refreshments f o l l o w i n g lee
Institute
Theatre
First
in
8 p m l o m t e . Jan. 25 in 1 C 12. A n y o n e
be given on Wed. Feb 2. at 8 p.m. in
The Aegean
be given
Assembly
summertime
experi-
community
of
beginning
have
of
golten
together
to
live in
the
and study w i t h one another
man Manuel Barrios. Jacieto M a r r e i o
duung
i n f o r m a l atmosphere. If y o u are inter
the
summer
lans and Jews, and Soma Marroro of
ested w r i t e
Ihe Puerto Bican Socialist
1156.
to
in
a
free
and
Alan W a l w o r t h ,
Reed College,
Albany,
and
t o be offered at
6 : 3 0 - 8 : 0 0 . The first class in a series
of the National Conference of Clmst
Wed. Jan. 2(i at H p.m. in BA
for
students
Ave.,
country
Party.
class
Nova Scotia and in essence w i l l be a
8
will
on
begin
439-5027
after
Tuesdays
on
from
Jan. 2 5 ,
Call
3 p.m. for i n f o , and
registration.
Box
Portland,
Oie.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
97202.
1 19. Sponsored by the Business Club.
I urtftei m i n i m a l
I i:i
all Smve ui "torn
tin; |uire Ho u
AMERICAN
LIGHT
THE
GREAT
Suggestions
WAR.
lb
"ill
II""'-
II_^. w —frrcnlffifl'
apt.
is an
small c o m m u n i t y o l 2 5 sludenls w h o
will be organised.
Immediately.
Institute
In- Israeli
' " I . - ,,.
H :«)
Dancing
i"
nn-
llus
!>"'"•:
S H K I H U I I ihe H y i n
u|)|l|||1
s
,„,,
Needed:
Community
1|k |n(|
,„„„,„„
pmtilums.
neetl
ol
,„„,
Many
help
Student
Service
„f,„s,,„rt,ilm"
"I
the
agenriBS
art' in Hit- inner
in
i llv.
Stu,I,,,,!•. w h n have nu i .11 or < annul
International
III . A
Coffee House .'.' YV,'l,'l
iiv
-. its -••-,
w i t h W.i.l '.".,11
and
fly
of
afraid t o ask. Call 3 7 7 - 9 1 3 4
Aid classes w i l l
inforBanjo
about
weeks
wanted
6.
465-4012.
Afghan pups. Well-bred, excellent
know
always
scholars w h i c h is being set up by a
France
willing to tutor at any undergrad
or
you
w i l l be held on Jan. 31 at 7 3 0 p rn
There w i l l be a General
third roommate for 3-bedroom apt.
students
766-2753
M o n . Jan. 3 1 . 8
and
Center
odds and ends (or
in C o l u m b u s
Italy w i l l be s h o w n
name.
Love,
grad
call
Fishing
at Colonie
undergraduates
and L i t t l e
tend,
need
male
everything
in CC 130.
Scholt
civil rights rally
Anyone interested but
Dear Bam,
Unlimited's Fly
Tying
August 5 The program is intended for
either peace studies
Carol
Fly
8:15 p.m. Slides of Italian A m e r i c a n
and
seeking
Call
26 at
openingll
Five. 2 hour, 7 - 9 . Standard
directed
Italo
Jan
art
at
Need a French tutor? Student just
S.
paid,
per
Studenti
is
starting
6 p m at the G y m . Be ready to s w i m by
inexpensive. Call Wes 465-8444,
STUrpo-
Degli
center
F a c u l t y , staff, students, please pick u p
Volunteers
SCUBA
Alliance
Don't worry. Everything will be
Albany
mation—Write, Jobs Overseas, Dept.
Box
$40
near
463-1904.
Call Gloria
Bill 4 5 7 - 5 0 5 6 .
E6,
student
apartment-mate,
Typing done in my home 8 6 9 2 4 7 4 .
PRODUCTS.
$3000
92115.
Ave.,
bodroom;
Date-A-Tron is coming!
Call
good condition; woman's 8%; $ 2 0 .
overtime,, sightseeing.
Western
Grad
fessions and occupations, $ 7 0 0 to
monthly.
on
own
Student
meeting Wed
on Tues. Jan
Near
Europe,
etc.
Bob
okay. Really!
463-7960.
America,
59
in
Fri. Jan. 28 in the S U N Y A
gallery.
applications immediately
standard
(L'AMeanza
Share our house with us-male or
Two
• *••»
JOBS
Call
case $ 4 0 0 . Guild 12
sale:
revolution
Advance readings
Italian-American
American!)
A pink-checked nightshirt?!?!
regular
flexible.
Australia,
included,
457-4772.
AVON
OVERSEAS
$50/month,
Martin D-28 Guitar 12 string plus
d o w n t o w n dorms. Phone 4 3 8 - 3 8 0 6 .
DENTS:
Draper,
Stuyvesant Plaza. Call 4 8 2 - 6 8 8 3 .
For
in disorganized
share
4 6 3 0065.
Send
string $ 3 5 0 . Call Bill 4 8 2 - 0 9 3 0 .
Allen 8 6 9 - 2 2 8 5 1 1 1 , 5 - 6 : 3 0 pm,
to
3709A
Part-time pleasant sale and display
hour
needed
from
utilities
Anti-
care
SCUBA courses w i l l be F r i . Jan. 28 at
available f r o m M. H o w a r d . H U 309
Sexy Body:
furnished apt. own bedroom. One
LIKE
Topic
anti-imperialist
India and Pakistan.
Ever, Punkin
I
Lounge
for
day
w i l l be
I love you so very muck.
Roommate
SCHOOL-WILL
Fireside
•feudal,
Stereo
house
per
(2)
ators available on rental basis for
IT?
$3.65
or
completely furnished. Call evenings
your office. Call 459-7200.
For
STE R E O : .
work.
{1)
roomate(s), 5 min. from Campus,
"LAW
help wanted
needs
staff:
Delmonico 5.5 cubic foot refriger-
System. Call Steve 4 5 7 - 3 0 7 2 .
Call A r t y 4 7 2 - 5 6 1 8 .
the
Go Sheboygin Beavers go.
766-4978
Group.
First meeting Toes. Feb. 1 at 7 30 in
watts
for details.
Study
The
Wed. Jan. 2 6 at 8 p . m . in B A
Depart-
Rollins, and
The next Archaeological
Marxist-Leninist
test
media
w i l l be
Trout
in H U
America
tion call Joel, 4 5 7 - 3 0 3 0 .
qualification
all
STORE
GARDE
Winn
all.
ride wanted
pool
FREE
for
MUSIC
on
Organi-
help!
7.30
The
meeting
of Nursing
concerts
o p e n i n g concert OFF
129. A l l members must a t t e n d .
The
128 during this semester. It's open t o
For Sale: Ticket to Copenhagen,
zation)
'72
p.m. in CC
Ballroom. We need your
248. Conducting
Biological
Jan. 26, 7 - 1 0 . 3 0
will
1, f r o m
books has been set up in the Campus
Wed.
unusual
called
,1
TERIVPAPERS UNLIMITED
h
'
.'H
, M , M I |,ul,li,
••.. I', I ,,ll,„
v.,,1.
• ,|.„
-,, „,
'-
inmsi , ,11,111,>u
„., , ! „ , „ _ Llrnvi-IMI,
I C I I •-I..-II-, ,11 K p n ,
••v.-, I 1, A
Call
I"-
,, „ ,
l>./_h-:nl
,.,,n-,i
llullspul 1,10, in
•..
b,„l„H
„
,
, „!•„
,,„„„_
II
,,,||
lit.1 ,i , i i . . - ', w i n , - I- Mi'-.
(
M, t
',.'.:
• '
.IW.-it
,
11lii
"WE GIVE RESULTS"
295 HUNTINGTON AVE.
N
wall boys, I am back
again to shit all over
your suite floor.
•V 5*. -
**K0W
With /!>•
DIPPl
(617)267-3000
•
THt
LIGHT
BOSTON, MASS. 02115
11/.
CLASSIFIED FORM
on Thursday February 3
to discuss opportunities
in retailing.
!
H. -i
i
I'
Psychology
Re'.
I
T o t a l no.
of w o r d s
?0 \
i T0TAI, ENCLO:
For
each d n t e $
I
Nobes
House
only.
UJfliBi limWs Snlliols
18,
JfJJ
fllsc _ Hssui ScrrJEn Sarials
Lounge
2:00
on
and
between
to
and
2:00
•Si
Phone
§J
the
be
the
1:00
and
Wednesdays,
and
3:00
on
be
' Hitched
$$
•888
House
4H9-8573.
at
7 : 3 0 81 1 0 p m in L C 1 8 . |
D. H. LAWRENCE'S
WOMEN IN LOVE'
111/^ ,11 llm C i i i n n i u n i l v Se
I.ICI
Ollice
LCB
30
••0*
Volunteers
are needed
lor
"-lead
Start,
.i p i e s i l H i n l p i . n i i . i i i i , i n n n
The
office
available
financial
yoai
of
Financial
is Feb,
Aids
tin
loi
lies
federal
the acedemje
for
tiling
the
1,1972.
COMMUNITY
"Hi"'
l
applications
assistance
1972-73. Deadline
application
DENTS
rlnsmiii,
A
C hapel
i l t.nnily
swviiM
,,,,1,1 v , „ . i||ve even H I I,,,ill ,,l \ , « "
,,i„ t i e i w
i H: I 1 , , i ' „ i i : . « r I m
Friday, Saturday
1,1.,
Jewish
in
i§J;
|
/ .1'
4 5 ? '181)11
between
Mondays
Inn
Ill
1 ues.
Questions^
will
i,I,He i n l i i l l i u i l l i i l l i ,il
Address
H ,••
II , -I, , l i . - m " .
1 I C .'
Circuit
W u l k . I in .lleil -il . ' t ' f i N n . I'tUll S i . ,
Name
ORIENTATION
ill 1 r
I,nn
lunsdays and Thursdays. He can also
1
F R E E w i t h tax card a n d I D I
advisor
I ,!•
-
w i l l he held
Coalition
Palroon
. \ , V , 1'IM
im
wist. I-
for Collet;
students
Paul
1
I'll!
1 PI,,,11.1111
Department
ii,,- sinumtei
Students
••"•-•'
"
;
Call Jeanne Ciamer 7-4275.
follows:
PRO-
-.peill .111,1
Auditions
i„,,
SERVICE
•
1,11.
/-.i,l 1-1.
SUNYA
j Ad i s t o r e ; id a s
M
l,n-u,n\
Lin. 25 in CC 3 1 b s t a l l i n g al / p . m .
can see
at the State University of New Y0
l,,i
" 1 . . 1 . Ill
MINUS
, ,il
T h u r s d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 7 . 7 : 3 0 in L C
the Zayre represenV*ivn
Educational
Mil il in.l. I 1 i i u e l c s h ' i l H I 1 M I In
! D a t o ( s ) ( ad 3 s t o r u n
You
Service
t,lupins, h u l l , ..I » l i
Ave, A l b a n y , N.Y, K!203|
COMMUNITY
GRAM
Stop smoking: .> m e m
| I'rOO Washing"ton
I..
AMERICAN
Schedule
1 in
Ihe
bolder concept
in
retailing
GREAT
Placement
.'/
W-".
WAR.
:rwtmt!tit
zavue
.offers
f
IHHI
II- L i l / ! ! ,
SERVICE
STU-
l l m n.i-,1 semester has been ,i
real success. M o r a I I . i n
100 aijencios
h.lve h.nl lni|h pi.use till
Hit, sluilont
vulunteei-. .lllil
Ihe
ui,l|,i'il\
,,l
-.luileiiK nave r l u s " -heil l l i ' i i
Ihe
uvpen
I'nvi'S .1-
lev.ml , n , l e . i I I I I H I i,Mi
mini
1,,-
,<M
Musi
Muilenls
,n
TICKETS:
Riding
Thursday, Friday
1 0 til 2 in tho C C
DEADLINES: 1 or Tuesday Paper, Sunday 1 1:()() p.,,,
or Friday Paper, Wednesday 11:()() p.
wmmm^^mmmmmmmmm^^^^
Lobby
Club w i l l I H I I I I ., MI.IIUI.Il..i v
nu'eiiiul
II'.M,
I Inns.
Ah
Inn. .'7 .il
intllinstml
in
/ n.in. in
|,,u,in,| ,,|
„„|
„ u i l i n i s w i n . have helped tu
keep c o m i h u n m
,,,,,,,[,1111.
My
SCIVICII
spei Ml
III.inks
>
mil
1,, Ihe
leinuinilul
uleinbel-, ple.e,e . i l l e n i l ,
New si heilule nn 1'un li M,nun w i l l be
S l e u i i n i l CnuitnitUm I i " ttltm M ' l v u e
biiynnd
Hie ,
,1 i l u t y ' l l m l ,
discussutt.
M i Kinley
PAGE 14
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
ALBANY STUDENTPRESS
Emerson, Lake, Palmer and Mussorgs*
PAGE 15
Things
"r"
P%
The Arts D e p a r t m e n t of tlic A S P is going through a period of
transition. As it b e c o m e s m o r e a n d more apparent that the
term " a r t s " is an all-encompassing o n e , we feel very insecure
about putting o u t an arts section ol a newspaper with a
I
clique-like corps of " s p e c i a l i s t s . " We feel that il can have,
more of a c o m m u n i t y a t m o s p h e r e il people like ihe reader
send in something which is an expression of h o w they feel
•SB-3
about anything relating t o ihe a i l s . We promise not lo shy
away from political i m p l i c a t i o n s in what y o u say if y o n
promise to be h o n e s t .
i
Therefore, regard this S U N Y A R T S c o l u m n as a p r o p o s i t i o n ,
as a recruitment o i l e r to a n y o n e w h o is dedicated and truly
interested in any w a y , s h a p e , or form in t h e arts al Albany.
Wc are looking for p o e l s , p h o t o g r a p h e r s , graphicists, reviewers, all who are e n t h u s e d about the a i l s . We would like the
ASP arts section t o be a c o n s t a n t outlet lor all ihe creativity
in the heads of any ol us ( y o u ) .
by Sieve Aniinol
So now lhal we're all agreed that rock has changed
very little with these rapidly moving times of ours,
now that we are aware that what was once a strong,
proud rock bastion is now fortified by only a
handful of our most relentless superstars, now lhal
we realize thai there are many intrinsic values lo
rock music the best of which we do nul wish lo see
drowned amid a sea of souped-up rcverheralion and
chordal as well as tonal stagnation, where do we go
from here'1
rendition of Mussorgsky's famed bit of program
music, "Pictures at an Exhibition," and it is
probably the most promising stuff we've had from
them to dale.
All respeel is due lo Lake's written, vocal and bass
work and Palmer's pervasive poundings. However,
Ihis rendition of "Pictures at an Exhibition" is
clearly Ihe exhibition of a greal organ player at his
best. This album has its most sensational and also its
most sensitive moments when Keith Emerson lei
loose lo work those marvelous keyboards of his.
Keith Emerson in conjunction wilh his very able
associales Greg Lake and Carl Palmer have given us
good reason lo be hopeful. Refugees from The Nice.
King Crimson and Atomic Rooslei respectively..
these musicians bring llien separate yel inlerwuven
ideas inlo agragatio't now called l-.nieisun. lake and
Palmer.
The current work of these people is I lie nicking
lllllHllillllll
tuinmnitiiimg asm
mm
In Iracing where such an idea as this has come
from, il is important to note lhal Emerson came
from a band which inighl he considered a pioneer in
the attempi to popularize ihe incorporation ol'
classical essences into a very definite rock structure.
The icsiills were no! spectacular. The early Nice
material and much ol something Ihcy did called
llllltuninnn
'
M|i|
nun
..pollack
"The Five Bridges Suite" flowed about as smoothly
as sandpaper down your back. But it functioned
well as beginning both for the consuming public and
Emerson.
Now the team of Emerson, Lake Palmer and
Mussorgsky have collaborated on a piece that
demands our fullest altention. I'm not sure about
what my classically-minded friends will have to say
about this album, but I consider it a tremendous
salute lo a composer when successful super-rockers
such as I;LP devole so much energy lo one of his
pieces.
Wo are very pleased when we see a so-called
"super-group"
search feverishly lor a new
direction lo lake their music al ihe risk of losing a
bit ol their following. We are even more pleased
when Ihe results turn out lo be as fluid as "Pictures
at an Exhibition."
llll.ll.llll l l U m i j.imiifti.fl ill 11 i.tl.l 11 n
t
A particular appeal is e x t e n d e d to the Third World s t u d e n t s ,
because they arc t h e o n l y ones capable of t r a n s m i t t i n g their
individual culture to o t h e r s , and wilh a true awareness of
the uniqueness o f what they k n o w I hey can oiler. We hope
people will c o m e o u t from behind their d o o r s and show
themselves and their t a l e n t s as beautiful and desirable free
commodities. For art h a s to be " c o n s u m e d " in order to
exist.
To get things u n d e r w a y , a general Arts D e p a r t m e n t interest
meeting will be held on T h u r s d a y , J a n u a r y 27th al 4 : 0 0 in
the Campus Center 3 2 6 (the ASP O l l i c e ) . II you cannol
make it there yourself, have s o m e o n e bring us your n a m e ,
or give us a call at 4 5 7 - 2 1 9 0 . We are awaiting your arrival
and we'll welcome y o u heartily. You need not have any
specific area in m i n d ; just think " A r t s " a n d all i h e images
that term conjures in y o u r bead. II the images are colorful
ones, you'll want to be present at the meeting.
thinking stereo components?
The Subjective Filmgoer
RADIO
ELECTRONICS
by Robert Vcrini
THE GO BETWEEN is first and
foremost a .story about m e m o r y
the tricks it can play u n us and
what happens when wc let it rule
our lives. Told with c o n s u m m a t e
skill and sensitivity by
du inrceic tnonr
-.»,.• 1.1.14 .» n . i i i i v n >
u y
now in her eighties, who ironically
calls upon him In act as gobelwecn o n c e again. T h r o u g h this
duality ol' s t r u c t u r e ihe profound
effect nf thul s u m m e r ' s activities
on Lew's entire life is made brutally clear: he has never quite
lo escape
ihe rob' of lb
t>W<* . I Ii Hable
V
I,
"J
Joseph Losey and s c r e e n w r i t e r
Harold Pinter, this film a d a p t a t i o n
.,r
t i . . . L.P,
i ii
<<
..
of the
Hartley
noveli mi
than deserves t h e Grand Prize il
won al this year's C'anne., Film
l'"i'sl ival.
The story of Leo Colston is told
from I wo perspectives. We see linn
first us a 1,'l-year-okl spendine. lb
summer of lillio „i t h e M.-uid.sley
•'state in central Enuhiud, llnoiie.li
» series of e i i e u m s l a n .
be h.
comes the bearer of s.
sages between lenanl fanner Ted
m i d d l e m a n , Ins view ol lovi
having I n spoiled irreparably l>\
.i
i.
those
lr;ie.ic events in which
In
w.is .in imwitiine,
participant,
When Leo leaves Man.ill lor the
last lime we .ire mil told whether
be cdelivered tins final message.
lie. Ilie film's
and
nil ears " T h e
first word:
l>»*l is a ihlTcrcnt eouiilry. I'll
d o lhiri«s dilTcrenllj ll
Ii lh.il
lltlosi will) .
those words .ii.- not so
harness and Ihe arisloenilie
Marion Maudsley, wilh whom Leo
hlms
''H' is infatuated. Himullaii
In,
minimum
ol di.-ilue,
screenplay, bill I
III i l . unlike III,
.eripl hn Hi.
si.IB- |.l.,v
St'muil,
lu
e l . u i u I'm Ihe
ll.irllev.
"verbal evin
eelel.r
Pint
OOUsly, UUeleill Ibiounholll Ihe
him ni-e scenes of Leo ill Ihe ,i,;e
of sixty, revisiluiB Ihe area ol thill
summer ; „ „ | eallii,,. , „ , Marian,
As usual Puller has employed
-•••••••••••••••••••••!••••>••••••••••••••••
||
i
ll
SCHNECTADY
141 ErleSlvd.
ALBANY
79 Contral Avo.
GLENS FALLS
707 Upper QlunSt.
PITTSFIELD
42 Summar St.
9:30 lo 6 PM
Dally
Tuoiday-Thuriday
9 AM- S PM
9 AM-B: 30 PM
DAILY
Monday -Thursday
Friday
0 AM- 9 PM
Tel, 462-9601
10 AM-9 PM
Dally
Saturday
9 AM-6:30 PM
9 AM- 0 PM
Dully
Thuri. & Fn,
9 AM- 9 PM
Tal. 792-9992
Tal. 499-1420
Till. 346-6111
techniques and improvisation, t h e
t r o u p e d e v e l o p s its original material by totally experiencing today's events and issues. T h e result
is an unusually involving, topical
and exciting p e r f o r m a n c e , o n e
which y o u won't want t o miss.
Tickets with s t u d e n t tax are $ 1 . 0 0
each, with general admission at
$2, T i c k e t s can be obtained at t h e
d o o r or at t h e P.A.C. Box Office
Mon.-Fri. from 1 I -1 p . m .
TENNIS EVERYONE!
CO-ED G R O U P T E N N I S INSTRUCTION
(Both faculty and S t u d e n t - B e g i n s week ol J a n . 31)
ji
10 week s e s s i o n - 1 h o u r each week
M Personally conducted by U.S. Tenuis I'lolcssional, UAVT
I i KORNRIilCII, one ol ihe nation's I'oiemosi to s insliuclots. Koine
!o be held al SOU I
IINNIS A N D :
''Wand Southern Hlvd. I lliiuw.n l-xtl -Ml
I|
i
Al Scientific mtprc'ich t„ Illuming ramus including lilt n' Vitlm
flup/oy, Oscillating Ball Mucliinas. Stmko Duvtilnims. ""-'
Bl Each ijroufi himttut tu ti
c
' Participants will be given 10% tlm Mint tin I"" si"*!11'""•'"•"''*
01 Cost $45.00 In fiDison
B) gall 1360838
"••••••••••••••.a
I
•
•
•
J
a
nasties," word games thai tend l<
act as oblii|uc implication rather
than as concrete s t a t e m e n t T h e
result is ihe most completely
reab/.ed work of Pinter's career.
T1IK (it) BETWEEN is also ihe
lies! ol' Losey's films, combining a
real compassion for his characlers
with a cool, objective assessment
of their motives and actions T h e
d i re!' I iir's vision
is superbly
carried
out
by
photographer
(Jerry Fisher, whose vivid depiction of Ihe English c o u n t r y s i d e
expert I v c o m p l e m e n t s Ihe story
and makes I be film, wilh Ihe
exception of The
Conformist,
visiiidK Ihe lovelies! ol ihe year
Wilh .ill ihis brilliance behind
i h e camera,
nevertheless
hip
honors (it J lo the a d o r s
Julie
Christie and Alan Bales d o Iheii
hesl work in years as Ihe young
lovers whose difference in station
foredooms their relalionship. As
Mrs Mnmlslrj Margaret Leiglltnll
is, as usual, magnificent, and
Michael Kedgrave porlray.s [ |„. ,.|
der Leo with painful h o n e s t y . T h e
• cat pu'l un- stealer, however, is
young Dominie Guard as the gobet w e e n 1 honestly can't find
words lo describe fully
this
amazing performance, combining
a c o m m a n d of t h e acting craft
astounding for o n e so young with
a naiural naivete and sensitivity
lhat 1 suppose are simply a gift of
God Unq n e s t 10 n u b ly lIusyounH
man has a greal future ahead of
luiu
Alphaviilc.
Each will be s h o w n
with episodes of Flash G o r d o n
serial.
T h e first film in the Albany S t a t e
Cinema series will be When Worlds
Collide, this T h u r s d a y in LC1H. It
is free with tax card and ID.
*****
T h e Eighth S t e p Coffee House
14 Willetl ST., Albany
UPCOMING
EVENTS
******
T h e Music D e p a r t m e n t p r e s e n t s :
Friday, J a n u a r y 2H, Art Gallery:
THINK LAFAYETTE
COLONIE CENTER
Northway Mali
OPP
SEARS-MACY'S
itfE. 8
ALBANY
OPEN EVES
TIL 10
T i l . 469-7660
Friday night: It's Mime Time!
T h e a t r e Council's second Guest
Artist Presentation of tin- year,
T H E KSSKNCK MIME T R O U P E ,
will he performing on Ihe P.A.C.
Main Slagi. Friday nighl, H:t)t)
p.m.
Essence
Mime,
under
the
direction ill' lien Reelll, is performed of a n u m b e r of y o u n g
Capital District artists w h o have
been training in music, d a n c e ,
aerobatics, m o v e m e n t ,
juggling
pantomime.
Synthesizing
and
talents
Ihrough
e
n
semble
these
FREE MUSIC STORE featuring
electronic compositions of Phil
lips, N o v a k , G o l d s t e i n , Doell ant'
Chadabe.
Monday,
January
.'(I, Main
Theater:
LOU
HARRISON
PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE.
For .Science Fiction huffs, Ihe
Albany S t a l e Cinema is s p o n s o r
ing a Science Fiction film Festival
on T h u r s d a y s Those films l o he
shown are When Worlds
Collide.
Invasion of the liody
Sruitehers,
The Time Machine
7Vie Thing,
Forbidden
f'lanet,
The Day The
Earth S(,,od
Still,
War of The
Worlds
and Ihe Godard
film,
I feel as if I'm running out of
superlatives, bul t h e y ' r e all deserved This picture is greal. See
il, stalling Wednesday (.Ian. U()lh)
al Ihe llellman
Chicago JoiinujIisiH Reyic\v/LN$
Tues,, J a n . 1 H—Sk ip Evans, virluoso a u t o h a r p i s t in a program of
traditional and c o n t e m p o r a r y folk
music
Wed., J a n . 1 9 - Pete and D o t t y
Spore in an evening of traditional
folk melodies
Thurs.,
Jan.20—
Open
Discussion Night-topics selected by
the Audience
Tues.. Jan.2f) - Open N i g h l - D o
your o w n thing on o u r slage.
Wed.,
Jan.
2(iReader's
Feeder Presented by Mike VVilliams and J a k e Bryan, this unusual
p r e s e n t a t i o n will include plays
read by several players.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 16
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
Vol. LIX No 3
State University of New York at Albany
—-»
Friday, January 28, 1972
RKltflui
Ar A I M * '
ll«U|
L
> wi«
1 0 * Put
01,'H
Ul'll
0«M
t MM (M«
I
4
ftlUIUIl
« C*"U|A
* lt«<j|
ttNCMt iiaiotr
*CNt«*L CMtNitmr
'
!
J
s
( U N t M f M r C*Uut<Jf
M
tf* TlMtirr* * / ( # » • • •>
<«ra4r*
+wp*rw.t
Il
Mr«l«.« I'. — ,
«
" K i t l f im r
1/
1/
"•Ml
"It
i'11'
/ ' / ) ( ' CIICIIIV
Kill people,
is IIOl
li'hu shall we lire with
The enemy's
iiiinii' is
'lite
IUIIIIC is iu>
CIICIIIV'S
'i
*****;
i'
v .y
i'J
V&J,.
pCOJ'lc
i
1
J
then'
"n<^<"r «e
cruelty
conscience
It's IUIIIIC is hatred; It's name is
It jt a group of plhintoms
" r * " >
bitterness
lite enemy wears ii coiit of doctrine
The enemy wears the lalsc front oj freedom
It wears a deceiving
appearance
It sifts our worth
People, oh people have compassion
for the weak
People, oh people have compassion jor the innocent
Have compassion
lor the sellouts
Have compassion
for the cheats
Have compassion
for those who pity us
The enemy's name is unjust
accusation
'The enemy's name is ignorance
It's name is ambition
It's name is jealousy
It's name is jealous
hatred
The enemy is no stranger
It lies here, inside each one
»y
IM•ir
*
'The enemy is ilcsiriug eyes
The enemy is an arrogant head
In it lonely head
In a narrow mind
In the dream oj conquering
People, oh people love people
People, oh people love people
Love people
forever
Love people night and day
Love people as hand in hand
4
M
*'i4
V
"I
""I
'•*
«»aj
is not people
Kill people,
who will tee live with
^
The enemy is no stranger
It lies here i nside each one oj us
'Cf,
CHILDREN'S
SONG
* * r ^o^
*«*•«
^
^>
>n..
" "M
h,„
t
tf,,.
'"/^
»,.rJ
^
^C,.„
*"»**..
yn
"•r .
"tie-
f/
V °n.
ort
^
""<"•>„
t0
•+.
'' '*'•"y.nr,
'«'W
then?
r
"lr
0/7
»/>«'o«.
VIETNAMESE
l
*„.
ir,r
'«t„
.
' "n
">t>lr.
""t
'"PI
f
* » '«»*
/.
,
'''In
-rrt
"^
1rn,
" » rv
**K
'"0/
more and more
as people
lite enemy
0
ft;
^
' " ^
'*h
»n
'"(>
*V
' " n . _,J *° ***
"fltf
•'*/,
'***
"A,
*«•/,
"m;
"o
'">„ "I ' / ) , o,
'or
•*/
*"Cr r,
»«.
> o' O f
S/U: IS IT SATISFACTORY?
an in-depth examination....see page 5
several views....see page 8
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