advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 8.
PAOC 6
News Views:
1956
PQnUuf. Owe* *1U* Z*cUa*uje Hurley Speaks
By ANN RIDLEY
For N A A C P
Cramming—The desperate hours.
Chinese Nationalist Veto Weakens
A Kansas State College student
a little digging and came up
Their Position In Security Council did
with these Shakespearean comments
By DOMINIC DeCECCO
The Nation . . .
A recent editorial in the Journal
American reveals that inside sources
predict t h a t Eisenhower will run in
1956. We still stick to our guns and
say he will decline the nomination.
Republicans of course cannot start
politicking until Ike makes his decision.
Democrats are confident of winning majorities in both houses of
Congress because they have fewer
seats in contest in the Senate (15
with 7 in the Solid South) and can
lose some seats in the House and
still retain control. Adlai Stevenson has started his band wagon
rolling and seems to be leaving the
other Democratic hopefuls far behind. Harriman is finding it quite
hard to convince other Democrats
about his qualifications. Kefauver
got off to a slow start and is still
lagging to lack of financial support.
Considerable mention has been given to Ohio's Governor Frank Lausche as a possible dark horse candidate.
Communism . • •
For all those interested in Communism in the United States, the
U. S. News and World Report has
an excellent article entitled "A
Handbook for Americans, How to
Detect the Activities of the Communists in the U. S." The article
is taken from a report issued by the
Senate Internal Security Subcommittee on "The Communist Party
of the United States of America."
The article is well written and very
revealing. Should be a must for all
students.
The World . . .
We were very much relieved to
find that the United Nations had
not lost some of its sense of universality when they admitted 16
new members to up the total membership from 60 to 76. Considerable
opposition was given by
the
U.S.S.R. and Nationalist China.
China vetoed the bill because it
objected to the admittance of Outer Mongolia and then Russia pro-
ceeded to veto all non-Communist
nations. Later, In emergency session, Outer Mongolia and Japan
were dropped and the rest were
admitted without incident. The new
members to the U.N. are: Austria,
Cambodia, Ceylon, Finland, Ireland. Italy, Jordan, Laos, Libya,
Nepal, Portugal, Spain, Albania,
Bulgaria, Hungary and Rumania.
Now most of Europe and Asia is
represented, making it more like
the world organization it should be.
Nationalist China lost considerable
prestige when it vetoed the admittance of Outer Mongolia because
in 1945 it recognized the sovereignty
of Outer Mongolia. China's seat on
the Security Council was also jeopardized because many U.N. countries question whether China really
represents the Chinese people or
just Formosa. Russia now has a
good talking point for the admittance of the People's Republic of
China.
on college life:
Studying in the library: "More
lights, you knaves; and turn the
tables up, and quench the fire, the
room is grown too hot." Romeo and
Juliet.
Cramming at 7 a.m.: "It is not
for your health thus to commit
your weak condition to the raw cold
morning." Julius Caesar.
Fountain pen leaked: "Out damned spot! Out, I say!" Macbeth.
(from the Indiana Penn)
Also from the Indiana Penn is
the following: "Girls are like newspapers: They have forms, they always have the last word, back numbers are not in demand, they have
great influence, you can't believe
everything they say, They're thinner than they used to be, they get
along by advertising, and every man
should have his own and not try
to borrow his neighbor's."
A few definitions found in the
Daily Californian and reprinted in
the Reflector of New Jersey State
Teachers College are:
Cut—Being where your class isn't
when it is.
Finals—Hell week at the wrong
end of the semester.
Some advice for those with a
heavy foot on the gas pedal from
the Xavier University News.
"Sing While You Drive"
At 45 miles per hour, sing;
"Highways are happy ways."
At 55 miles per hour, sing:
"I'm but a stranger here."
At 65 miles per hour, sing:
"Nearer my Ood, to Thee."
At 75 miles per hour, sing:
"When the roll is called up wonder, I'll be there."
At 85 miles per hour, sing:
"Lord, I'm coming home."
A Kansas State professor summarizes the difference between a
college student and a high school
student in this way:
"When you walk into a high
school class and say 'good morning', the students reply 'good
morning.' But when you walk into
a college class and say 'Good
morning', the students write it
down.
Students and faculty members
have been invited by the Albany
chapter of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People to hear a lecture by Mrs.
Ruby Hurley on Sunday at 3 p.m.
in Friendship House of the First
Lutheran Church, 181 Western
Avenue. Mrs. Hurley is Southeast
Regional Director of the NAACP,
with headquarters in Birmingham,
Alabama. Admission is free.
The speaker will report on the
successful integration of schools in
her hometown of Washington, D. C.
When Emmett Till was murdered in
Mississippi last summer, Ruby Hurley was sent by the National Office
to investigate the facts of the case.
When the White Citizen's Councils
organized to prevent the integration of schools and to intimidate
Negroes through mob violence and
economic pressure, Mrs. Hurley was
sent to give advice and to mobilize
support for the NAACP branches
under attack.
study your government In action.
ALBANY,
NEW
YORK. FRIDAY, J A N U A R Y
13,
^m
1956
Vrra*
l<k0L. XL NO.
26
Lawrence, Smith To Serve As Co-Editors OF '56 'News';
Richard Sauer Assumes Position Of Managing Editor
Board Elects
Dettmzr, Szarck
Associate Editors
Oral Interpretation Students Plan
Selections For Whitman Evening
The Whitman Evening for English Majors and for Seniors minoring in English will be held in Brubacher Upper Lounge Thursday.
Members of the Oral Interpretation class, directed by Agnes Futterer, Professor of English, will give
"When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard
Bloom'd," and selections from "Song
of Myself." The Collegiate Singers,
under the direction of Professor
Karl Peterson, will give Normand
Lockwood's arrangement of "I HeatAmerica Singing," the first performance of this music in the Capital
District.
Whitman materials in the Upper
Lounge. Whitman himself will appear in an unusual disguise,
Any students who would like to
buy a season ticket, to include this
Evening and the Spring Evening,
may purchase one for $.50 from Dr.
Vivian C. Hopkins, Richardson 4.
Single admissions may be obtained
at the door, for $.25.
SC Discloses
Exchange Plan
Marcia Lawrence and Thomas
Smith, Juniors, will serve as CoEditors of the State College News
for 1956, states Aileen Cochrane '56,
retiring Editor-in-Chief. Richard
Sauer '57, has been elected to assume the duties of Managing Editor,
while Miss Cochrane will continue
on the Board as Executive Editor.
As a result of a News Board
meeting Sunday the following were
elected to serve as the 1956 News
Board: Associate Editors: Marie
Dettmer and Joseph Szarek, SophPublicity Relations Editor,
Left to Right—Richard Sauer, Marcia Lawrence, Thomas Smith, Juniors. omores;
Keith Yandoh '57. Continuing on
the Board in their former positions
are Joseph Swierzowski, Sports Editor; Mary Ann Schlotthauber, Business-Advertising
Editor;
Joyce
ATi
— J I I _ •
J U J i.i
^/-.i.,
,
,. Meyerman, Circulation Editor; and
<7a *7Ae /VeoJL GUle^l . . .
pert. There will be an exhibit of follows: the student must have
Joh*n
BeinerSi Associate Feature
Editor, juniors.
„ .. . f t, D , _ ,
Retiring from the Board are Carol
Luit, Honoi •ary member;
Ann
Dorothy Rasmussen, senior sports
Editor, Seniors; and Esther GoldCo-^ubUc £ t t ! J n f M l S f " ' 5 ' ? '
As the only organized means of communication on
maintained a "C" average for the c a m p u s t h e N e w s is d e d i c a t e d t o c o n v e y i n g t h e t r u t h t o
Writing Common-Stater for the
preceding semester: he must not t h e s t u d e n t s , n o m a t t e r h o w it h u r t s .
I t is n u m b e r e d M o n a h a n ^ i f D a v T d ^ F e m k e ^ n -
Fair Committee be on probation; he must be wen iii the minority among college newspapers in this country iors.'1™ '' ''
'
versed
in
curricuiar
and
extra-curi
n that it is solely a student-organized, student-edited,
luests Choices
P o n i l 0 . i c Cl%*sl~** rlcular activities - T h e liHl submitted student-censored newspaper. Always be proud of this and i^?,l!'tl0!1,Lt,r,n1li!;tilt!!!11 ™HI
of ethe
KSheila
e q ULister
e S t S'57, Secretary
LhOIC
S ,s subject to approval by me Dean, never dishonor it in any W
State Fair Committee, announces Applications will be available today
that all dormitories and organiza
tlons'should get their first choice
for concessions In by Wednesday. A
list
of chairs,
materials
as
tables,
etc., needed
should such
also be
included.
s
P a c e w l u b e P ' - o v l d e d f o r t n e P u r " t r y i n g ' t o g a i n t h e i r o w n e n d s w i t h o u t c o n s i d e r a t i o n Of
LTco^UHbite^nd 1 wVaf h e ' S l S t u d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n , y o u Will t h i n k , s o m e t i m e s , t h a t y o u
^g^tott^p^^'n^p- h a V e r e a c h e d t h e d a r k e s t d e p t h s a n d Will n e v e r a r i s e a g a i n ,
Council.
plications will be judged by Student A t t i m e s y o u m a y t h i n k it S n o t w o r t h t h e t i m e , e n e r g y ,
A list of tentative activities has worry, tears, and sacrifice that go into it, but looking
been listed for use by the visiting back on your 26 issues you won't regret one minute of it
students. They Include: the All Col- and will wish it was just beginning again.
lege Revue; meetings with the adIn 40
violated ,one. tradition
, . , years
. , , , the, News
, has never
,,
,.,
ministration, Myskanla and Stuwhich
stands
far
above
the
rest—"The
News
alwayslike
comes
students
the
dent Council; interviews with the out on Friday and as long as there are
paper and a tour of Albany.
ones on the staff this past year, this tradition never will
The committee for State Fair
includes: Chairman—Marilyn DeSanta, Secretary — Sheila Lister,
Treasurer—Frank McEvoy, Boosters
—Elizabeth Stapleton and Barbara
Davis, Juniors. Faculty Coordinator
—Alan Weiner '56, Publicity—Jo- Students making this trip will
seph Szarek, Prizes Barbara Mc- use the college station wagons. They
Gough, Sophomores.
will have to pay for the gas and
the drivers.
Miss Lister adds that there are
a few first choice concessions still The number of delegates has been
open. State Fair will be held Feb- set at four. The deadline for apruary 25 lliis year.
plications Is Tuesday February u.
D & A Presents Eva Le Galiienne
In Two Saturday Performances
Satisfy Yourself 'with a Milder, Better-Tasting smokepacked for more pleasure by exclusive Accu-Ray
Dramatics and Arts Council is
presenting Eva Le Galiienne in
afternoon and evening performances on Saturday, January 21, announces Lenore Hughes '57, Publicity Director for Dramatics and Arts
Council.
The more perfectly packed your
cigarette, the more pleasure it
gives . . . and Accu-Ray packs
Chesterfield fur more perfectly.
To the touch . . . to the taste,
an Accu-Ray Chesterfield satisfies the most . . . burns more
evenly, smokes much smoother.
Miss Le Clalllenne's progiam will
consist of excerpts from Oscar
Wildn's "Birthday of the Infanta"
and "The Happy Prince." These arttwo of Wilde's most famous stories
written in poetry.
Firm and pleasing to the lips
. . . mild yet deeply satisfying to
the taste - Chesterfield alone is
pleasure-packed by Accu-Ray.
CHESTERFIELD
MILD, YET
THEY
0LIIA.HI \ Mum Tumi co C<x
The afternoon performance will
begin at 2:30 and the evening performance at 8:30 p.m. Tickets will
go on sale Monday in lower Husted.
Students can secure their tickets by
presenting their student tax cards
at the booth. For those who are not
students, tickets will be $1.00 and
Si .50 for thi! evening performance,
The program will take place in
Page Hall and all the seats are reserved
Miss Le Galiienne has long been
noted for her work on Broadway
and recently appeared in an NBC
Television spectacular. Degrees that
Miss Le Galiienne possesses are
Doctor of Literature and Doctor of
Historic Literature. She has recelveel more important honors than any
other member of the Theatrical profession. The Society of Arts and
Sciences awarded her their gold
medal for "vitally affecting our national cult tire." She was the first
woman to receive this honor. Miss
Le Galiienne was awarded the Pictorial Review Prize of live thousand
dollars for outstanding accomplishment. "With a Quiet Heart" is Miss
Le Gallienne's latest book. It is tin
autobiography and has been publtshed by the Viking Press.
£ $
Y o u will f i n d m a n y n e w f r i e n d s a n d m a n y m o r e e n e - Richard
at the voting booth in Husted. A m j e s; you will be pressured by groups and individuals
Forum Sponsors
Legislative Study
Charles McHarg '56, Chairman announces that Forum of Politics is
sponsoring a Legislative Seminar for
the students of State College on
Monday at 4 p.m. at Brubacher Hall
in the Government Room conducted
by Mr. William O'Reilly, legislative
assistant to the New York Stale
Senate. O'Reilly will speak on the
operation of the Legislature, followed by a discussion period. In the
evening there will be a reserve gallery in the Assembly chamber for
thirty students so that there may be
first-hand study.
Every student Is urged to consult
the Forum bulletin board in lower
Draper for further details and to
sign up for this excellent chance to
Z.460
Dr. M. E. Orenander will read
a paper on "The Platonism of
Whitman and T. S. Eliot," which
Jean Hageny '56, Chairman of
she read at the meetings of the MLA Exchange, announces that
proChicago. David Greenberg will play «ram w i U b e c a n ' l e d o u t w i t h t h e
an original piano composition. University of Connecticut this year.
As I leave my desk, having edited the 40th volume of
Guests will be the members of the The dates set are March 7 through the State College News, and turn my "editorial ruler" over
English Department of the Milne ,i
to you, the Co-Editor of the 41st volume, I relinquish one
School, librarians of the College and
. y, '
, , . ,. .
, , ,,
,. '
, .? .
.,
the Milne Library, and others inThis year's plan will
01
tne
most
sausiying,
yet
at
tne
same
ume,
terniymg
jobs
terested in American Literature, in- Sophomores, Juniors and
include in the extra-curricular field. It is a job full of responsieluding Professor Harold " ' ' "
,
..
--.Seniors, b i l i t i e s t o t h e S t u d e n t s , t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , t h e t r a d i t i o n s
of Union College, a Whitman "ex- ™ e qualifications have been set as 0 f t h e N e w s a n d t o y o u r s e l v e s .
Carlson Speaks
O n Education
Speaking at the recent Conference
on Higher Education in New York
State at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, on December 9, President William S. Carlson of the State
University of New York said that
New York State's support of higher
education lags.
"Any a n a l y s i s " h e explained,
"makes clear that New York is well
telow the national average in its
support of higher education in proportion to per capita Income of
its people. . . . "
As a by-product, President Carlson
said, 10,000 more undergraduates
leave New York each year than
come in to attend public colleges.
He warned that pressure of growing population would force many of
the out-of-state schools to turn
away New Yorkers, thus increasing
the burden In the State.
President Carlson reported that
Education Department estimates indicate that by 1970 the number of
high school graduates In the state
would rise from the present 116,000
a year to 230,000.
State College Netws
be violated.
For standing by me this past year and giving me advice and encouragement, I owe many thanks to the News
Board; secondly, for their criticism, understanding and
commendation I thank the Administration; thirdly, I am
grateful to the printers and publishers of the Hudson
Register-Star for their patience and cooperation in our efforts to meet the deadline; and fourthly, my heart-felt
thanks to my staff who have been wonderful and have
never let me down.
Something I shall never forget is that wonderful feeling you get when the paper comes off the press and you
can point with pride and say— "I helped to produce that."
I sincerely hope, Marcia and Tom, that you have as nice
a year as I have had.
Mlmi Coclinmr
nnd
th
f
W
to t L £ f f i 0 f & « r t £ :
Keith
Coddington,
Ann
Ridley
Yandoh, juniors. New
° u b cz-rtl^lllu
Frank Vetosky,
chad Salzman.
Promoted to
Susa^Canril ^ael*
Arthur Plotnik, Mi-'
freshmen,
Reporters on the
58,Richard
nnd Zacharie
were:
Powell
Robert Kampf, fresh-
sports staff
'57, Warren Leib
elements and R<>
The new and old Boards will be
feted at a banquet this evening at
O'Connor's Restaurant, at 6:30 p.m.
College Explains
Exam Schedule
Because of college beginning a
week later than usual last September, it has been necessary to confine the January examination period to one week, and to end classes
Thursday, January 19, at 12 noon.
Examinations will begin Friday,
January 20, and continue up to
and including Saturday, January
28. As a result of this shortened
exam period, it has been necessary
to reduce all exams to two hours,
including exams for three hour
courses. In order to arrange all the
'Pedagogue' Photographs Organ/zaf/ons, examinations in the time period on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
Officers, Members In Bru Upper Lounge there are three exam groups, while
on the other days there are only
Pedagogue will photograph or- 10:45, Sophomore Class President two.
ganizations, their officers, and ac- and Ol fleers, and Student Council
In order to begin school by the
tive members tomorrow In the Up- Members; 11:00, Freshman Class
per Lounge at Brubacher starting at President and Officers, and Student middle of September every year, it
9:30 a.m., states Carol Lull '50, Council Members; 11:15, Student is necessary, once every six years, to
Editor of Pedagogue. Photographs Hoard of Finance and Outing Club; move the starting of college up a
will be taken by William Gillette 11:30, Student Association Officers; week and this happened to be the
11:45, IXSJA Council and Affiliates. year.
'57, Staff Photographer.
The afternoon schedule is as folOrganization heads have been noInstead of starling examinations
tified of the scheduling of then lows: 12:00, Music Council; 12:15, for second semester on May 31, as
Radio
Guild
and
Press
Bureau;
groups. The schedule is repeated for
is stated in the College Handbook,
the convenience of active members. 12:30, Primer and Campus Commis- exams will begin Monday. May 28,
The morning schedule Is as fol- sion; 12:45, Debate; 2:00, SUB: 2:15, allowing nine days for exams at
lows: 9:30, SCA and Canterbury; Commuters' Club; 2:30, Athletic that time.
9:45, IVCF; 10:00, Newman Club; Advisory Hoard; 2:45. WAA; 3:00,
10:15, SMILES and Forum; 10:30, AMIA; 3:15, ISC; 3:30, IFC; 3:45,
The examination schedule for
Junior Class President and Officers, Residence Council; and 4:00, Vet- this semester is printed on page
four of this issue.
and Student Council Members; erans Society.
PAOK
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S . FRIDAY, JANUARY
PAGE a
A Tribute
A Last Look
With this week's issue of the News we
mark the end of the editorship of Aileen
Cochrane. The News Board and Staff have
been proud to be your associates.
Under your leadership the State College
News has initiated the eight-page issue and
increased its feature space. The entire student body has been guided by your forceful editorials.
Those who have worked in the Publications Office with you, Aileen, have admired
your firm decisions and efficient commands. You have devoted much time and
energy to our school paper. We, the NEWS
Board and Staff, 1955-56, thank you.
A few years back the retiring editor of
the News spoke these words: "It is very
easy when leaving a place, to look back, remember the pleasant experiences and say
that it has been four good years . . . (but)
. . . while looking at the past and judging
its value, it is better sense to point out the
weaknesses of State College and its people."
As a retiring Editor, we also look back
and see the one weakness standing above
the rest; one, perhaps, of which we are least
aware, and that is, the emphasis placed
upon the group rather than the person.
State College places a great value on belonging to a group and prides itself on the
feeling of "brotherhood" and broadmindedness concerning these groups. The liberalness and broadmindedness viewed on the
outside turns into prejudice and narrowmindedness when the group is viewed from
the inside.
Individualism is feared and frowned upon
to such a degree that anyone attempting to
exercise it is immediately ostracized and
ridiculed. For educated college people training to be teachers, a profession publicized
as one of the most tolerant, we are not exercising the intelligence attributed to us
which caused us to be designated as the
"cream of the crop."
A person who dares voice an opinion contrary to that held by the group is immediately labelled a "radical," and is given no
chance to explain his opinion or how he
arrived at it. Some of these "radicals" have
insight into our problems and can see a
remedy, but the moment they dare to suggest one, they are "persecuting the group
unjustly" and "trying to stir up trouble."
To say they and their work are unappreciated is the understatement of the year, yet
their ideas are often the ones taken, followed and acclaimed, but their origin is
never admitted.
We are not condemning this "Hi, gang!"
feeling so prevalent at State College, but
are calling for a little more tolerance, understanding and true broadmindedness on
the part of the students, who are soon to be
admired and respected as shining examples
of adulthood, by the next generation.
Extortion?
If you were the custodian of $10,000 and
it was your responsibility to care for it and
see that it was spent wisely, would you let
someone else make the decision on its disposal without your approval? Of course not,
but that is just what you are doing, all 1700
of you who have not yet cast your ballot on
the purchase of a college camp. While it is
not perhaps your money alone, other classes
in past years have placed you in charge of
it and expect you to consider carefully before letting it go.
Vote either way, "yes" or "no," but for
heaven's sake VOTE!! It is your responsibility to help make the decision, not just
your neighbor's. You won't be sorry later
if you act now!
A New Proposal . . .
Student Council endorsed the new revised budget procedure as presented by Student Board of Finance Wednesday night.
As we see it, this plan, while eliminating
budget discussions by Council, still permits
the long, drawn-out budget Assemblies
where SA goes over each individual line,
wasting valuable time.
We feel that while this is perhaps a step
in the right direction, there could be a better, more efficient system devised.
A Social Problem Finds Its Way To The Curriculum
A p r o m i n e n t economist has s t a t ed t h a t Increased a u t o m a t i o n In
American industry will bring about
social changes a t least as g r e a t as
those wrought by t h e I n d u s t r i a l
Revolution. W h e t h e r or not this is
true h a s little bearing on this a r t i cle, but it indicates t h a t we are
on t h e threshhold of an era of p r o found changes in our cultural p a t terns.
W h a t is perhaps one of t h e most
significant changes, one t h a t is a l ready u n d e r way is the increase in
t h e a m o u n t of leisure time available to t h e Individual.
T h e m e r i t of this movement c a n not be judged In and of Itself. An
abstract fact like a given n u m b e r
of free hours per week takes on
value only when we consider how
By DAVID KLEINKE
these h o u r s are spent. And even
now t h e observer can note t h a t t h e
use of leisure is not of such n a t u r e
to encourage a great deal of o p t i m ism.
Criticism of television, motion pictures a n d t h e effects of t h e a u t o mobile is deep and far-reaching.
Yet by and large, it is exactly these
things t h a t are used to while away
t h e free hours. They all instill in
the individual a dulled and warped
sense of values. T h e "happy little
h o m e " a n d anemic love stories of
t h e great majority of movies and
television productions are not d e signed to provide intellectual c h a l lenge. T h e automobile has done
more to disrupt traditional American values t h a n every social critic
from Alexander Hamilton to H. L.
Mencken. J o h n Doe's fond boast is
t h a t his car can travel faster, more
comfortably and with greater show
of wealth
t h a n his neighbor's.
While his car is probably among
the best in the world, he often loses
sight of where it has taken him or
w h a t he h a s missed. (Notice, for
instance, the desecration of the
Adirondack Mountains with commercial fools' paradises.)
A logical solution to this problem
can be found in the writings of
those who tried to justify the worst
excesses of early industrialization.
If leisure time is not being used
wisely, take away the leisure time.
Let a m a n spend his every waking
moment producing goods.
The one hole in this .solution is
simply t h a t in doing so, the man
ceases to become a m a n ; he is born,
lives, begets and dies an economic
unit, n o t h i n g more. But m a n was
not put on this earth for the sake
of molding General Motors into an
even more awesome Goliath. He is
E S T A B L I S H E D MAY 1 9 1 6
a highly complex being capable of
abstract thought and creative reav T H E C L A S S O F i a i a
creation. By not taking part in
First Place ACP both, he renounces his humanity.
First Place CSPA
A more satisfying solution lies
J
a
n
u
a
r
y
13,
1956
No. 26 in education. As it stands education
VOL. XL
Members of Hie NEWS s l u f l may be r e a c h e d T u e s d a y and Wednesday from 7 to has prepared nearly everyone to be
11 p.m. at 2-3326, Ext. 11. Ptionea: C o c h r a n e , 2-703O; Bwlerzow.skl, 2-91)43; O o l d s t e l n , able to take part in his society only
3-2612; Kcndlg, 5-6921.
as a producer; it has stidly neglectThe
u n d e r g r a d u a t e n e w s p a p e r of the N e w York S t a t e College for T e a c h e r s ; ed the vital leisure. In order to inpublished every Friday of t h e College y e a r by the N E W S Hoard for the S t u d e n t sure a better use of this leisure,
AMocUtlon.
education on all levels must take
I d l t o r - l n - C h i B f it long look at the society oi today
AILEEN COCIIKANK
Cu-I'ubllo R e l a t i o n * Editor
KSTIIKH GOLDSTEIN
.
.
.
.
Co-1'Ubllo R e l a t i o n s Editor and even a longer one at that anDAVID K E N D I t i
llusine**-Advertising Kdltt r ticipated for thirty years hence. It
MAKV ANN KCIIUITTHAUHKH
Circulation Kdltt r is then up to the curriculum expert,
JOYCE MEYKKMAN
Aeioclate Editor
HABC1A LAWRENCE
a.s well a.s the local .supervisor and
A i i o e U l e Editor
BIOBABD 8AUEB
Feature Editor teacher, to realize the needs of toTHOMAS SMITH
Associate F e a t u r e s Editor
day's elementary school pupils and
JOHN KKINEKH
S p o r t s Editor then, by considering these needs,
JOSEPH BWIEBZOYVtiKI
Senior Sports Editor
DOKOTHY B A S M U S S E N
embark on a sweeping change in the
Staff F h o t o i r o p b e r content ol classroom work.
JOHN KNAJ*r
Ail c o m m u n l c » t l o n » uliould be a d d r e s s e d to the editor and must be signed. N a m e s
It Is beyond this scope of tlii.s artiWill be w i t h h e l d on request. T h e B T A T E COLLEOE N E W S a s s u m e s no responsibility tor
o p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d ln Its c o l u m n s or c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , as such e x p r e s s i o n s do not cle to .suggest changes. It has loin e c e s s a r i l y reflect Us views.
ns purpose merely the presentation
of the problem and the suggested
channels for the problem's ameliuqgl^lt,
oration.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
13,
4
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S , FRIDAY, J A N U A R Y
1956
Ln,
i-*
{i
ir£
Extra-long vacation?
Go-mmcn-Stated
Bv T I N A P P and DEVINE
"All's well t h a t ends well!"
AND-All's well t h a t ends.
W H I T E ELEPHANT
Well, it was tried, and we think it stank. Ever since we e n t e r e d this
college, there has been agitation for a representative type of g o v e r n m e n t ,
and this semester we got it. About the only thing it accomplished was
to prove its ineffectiveness. T h e representatives did little more t h a n pass
financial motions. On any m a t t e r of importance, the deciding vote reverted to S t u d e n t Association for an absentee ballot, and we feel this is
where the vote belongs permanently!! P e r h a p s democracy became u n wieldy in Athens, but the enrollment of this college certainly does not
indicate a similar condition here. Especially t h e enrollment of "active"
members. We hope the people who wanted this so badly can now see its
impropriety. Henry David T h o r e a u (re Miss Hopkins' class-R.T.) firmly
believed t h a t " T h a t government is best which governs least." T h i s fiasco
would have delighted him no end!
WHERE IGNORANCE IS BLISS
One week from today will see a revival ol t h a t old tribal custom
exams. Although they do have a charm and flavor peculiar to t h e past,
they clash dreadfully with modern tastes and d e m a n d s . Remember, the
four years spent in this college are to most of us our last opportunity to
develop our social maturity. Even the Administration, in deference to
this fact, has done its bit by reducing all exams to a m a x i m u m of two
hours. W h e n classes begin conflicting with our e x t r a - c u r r i c u l a r activities,
something must go! (Us?) Therefore, clown with the a n a c h r o n i s m of
academic emphasis!! P.S. Did you know Eva Le Galliene is listed a.s a
conflict?
NOBLESSE OBLIGE
This being an age of mechanization, we a r e n ' t too surprised to see the
streets around school lined with cars. But it doesn't seem quite right to
u.s t h a t the faculty should have the sole use of the only available parking
lot. After all, the students are a.s much a p a r t of the college a.s the
faculty. As a m a t t e r of fact the ratio is approximately 10 to 1. If our
memory serves us correctly, there was a time when . . . but let's just chalk
it up to progress.
AN OUNCE O F DISCRETION
Beautific smiles and charming ways are not, indicative of a second
visitation of S a n t a Claus, but r a t h e r of t h a t quaint college r i t i n l known
as "rushing." And in the crocodilish words of the wondrous wise soothsayer, Walt Disney, "Don't be taken in by his great big grin, he's imagining
how well you'll look inside his skin."
l!).r»0— 1 8 7 - P . U .
Certainly was a grand t u r n o u t for the opcniiiL of "Dairy ol a Scoundrel" Wednesday night. After the cast spent ;i m o n t h s in rehearsal, they
must have been extremely gratified. We weren't .sure we were in the right
place—it looked like a n o t h e r hearing on the Warrensbttrg camp.
TO OUR SUCCESSORS
"Fools rush in where angels fear to tread."
Insidious Disease Infects State;
Watch For Danger Signals
By ART I'.VI.AZZOI.O
An insidious disease of seasonal
4. A new-formed habit of bringoccurrence, is at the present time ing pen and pencils to class along
afflicting great numbers of students with notebooks, d n more severe
here at. State.
cases students resort to having paWith an unbelievable speed it lias per in the notebook.i
succeeded in spreading throughout
5. An Increasing
preoccupation
the student body until even the
most sturdy among u.s have suc- by the male .students with the winkcumbed to its awful presence. Be ings of Selective Service.
6. A feeling t h a t your instructors
prepared! Know it "Seven Danger
Signals" and with the proper pre- art! sadistically plotting s o m e t h i n g caution yoti may be spared with only or-olher in the near future.
a mild case. Do YOU have any of
7. A constant muttering to no one
these tell-tale symptoms?
in particular about, .such things IUS
"cramming,"
"No - Doze,"
"black
1. Glassy eyes.
2. A peculiar facial expression coffee," •lhii.se wicked tt o'clocks'
which exhibits weariness, fear, un- and "who's got last year's e x a m s ? "
certainty, and an appearance of
What's the cure? There is none!
general bewilderment.
However [he symptoms can be
3. A sudden .surge ol interest in greatly reduced in severity by one
such hitherto ignored items as text- last desperate act an act so forbooks, lecture notes, the library, eign to our way of life if grieves
ami the instructor's voice.
me to mention if . . so I won't!
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24
9-11 a.m.
12-2 p.m
PI 1
D349
Ma 22
Sc 1
Call No. 394 H150
Call No. 651 D211
Call No. 395 D210
Call No. 652 D301
Call No. 396 D301
Call No. 654 D301
Call No. 397 D146
Call No. 656 D i l l
Call No. 398 D300
Call No. 657 D i l l
Call No. 399 D i l l
Call No. 658 D211
Call No. 400 D302
Call No. 659 D i l l
Ed 260
R33
Call No. 662 D302
M a 25
D349
Call No. 663 D209
Ma 27
La A
D140
Call No. 416 D201
L a 220
D140
Call No. 417 D i l l
Mu 6
D303
Call No. 418 D341
Hy 216
D346
Ma 28
Mu 1
Call No. 420 D i l l
Call No. 530 D303
Call No. 421 D206
Call No. 531 D304
P h 201
D137
So 209
Ma 26
D201
So 208
Call No. 412 D304
D201
Call No. 413 D211
Call No. 414 D211
En 26
Call No. 304 H250
Call No. 305 R31
HE 1
Call No. 631
Call No. 632
Call No. 633
Call No. 634
Call No. 635
Call No. 636
Call No. 637
Call No. 638
La 8
Co 211
Ed 114GS
Ed 209
Call No . 162
Call No 163
Li 310
S p 103
Ch 140
ES 4
P h 118
Hy 223A
Dill
D349
D349
D303
D349
D349
D349
D301
D201
D211
D304
MONDAY, JANUARY
12-2 p.m.
Hy 4
D349
Ma 111
D146
Ec 105
D211
Bi 119
H250
Ch 18A
Call No. 703 D300
Call No. 704 D303
Call No. 705 D i l l
D206
D211
D209
R35
R33
R33
H250
D346
State 'Wrestlers Defeat RPI 25-5;
Lose Gropp For Entire Year
By ZACH CLEMENTS
T h e "pick 'em up and knock t h e m
down" motto was exemplified to a
tee last S a t u r d a y when the S t a t e
College wrestling team defeated the
R.P.I. m a t m e n by a score of 25-5.
T h e m a t c h was held a t the Engineers' gym but even t h e change of
scenery could n o t help t h e m avenge
a defeat suffered a t the h a n d s of
the S t a t e s m e n at the latters' gym.
Clement Leads
Loop With 566
T h e S t a t e College Men's Bowlins League resumed action last
Sunday after a two week Christmas
layoff and it looked as though t h e
loop leaders—Team No. 4—lost none
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25
of their touch as t h e y took 4 points
-11 a j n .
12-2 p.m.
from T e a m No 6
En 2
P h 18
H150, 250
Call No. 269 D301
Ps 10
Clement Rolls 566
D349
Call No. 270 D349
Joe Clement, the loop leader kept
Ps 12
Call No. 271 D349
his high s t a n d i n g by rolling a 161Call No. 852 D i l l
Call No. 272 D349
189-216—566
5 -— triple.
• • : T- e a m m a t e Fred
Call No. 853 D211
Call No. 273 D i l l
Willi, the r u n n e r - u p in the s t a n d Ed 300
D301
Call No. 274 D303
ings as of now, backed up Joe with
Sh 13
D140
Call No. 275 D i l l
a 555 thirty-frame score including
Li 228
D202
Call No. 276 D349
games of 211-135-209. Al S t e p h e n Ps 113
D202
Call No. 277 D201
son led the losers.
Call No. 278 D304
Tuttle Leads Way
Call No. 279 H250
Al T u t t l e paced the way for
3-5 p.m.
D209
La 2
T e a m No. 5 as they dropped the No.
Co 6
D349
Col 125
2 team, 3-1. Al had a 463 triple. Old
En 106
Call No. 82 D300
reliable, J o h n Zidik again paced his
Call No. 310 D i l l
Call No. 83 D300
squad by rolling a high 496 triple.
Call No. 311 D206
Call No. 84 D209
Senior S t a r High
Ge 1
Ed 221
R35
In the final m a t c h ol the loop
Call No. 480 D211
Li 1
R31
Team No. 3 paced by the work ol
Call No. 481 D210
P r 205
Senior star Dick Wemple downed the
R35
Call No. 482 D2U
Bi 106
No. 1 team, 3-1. Another new liosh
D202
Sp 115A
D304
Ge 3
roller, Tom Sullivan, paced the losD146
Hy 241
D302
ers with a 470 triple.
Hy 122A
R20A-B
So 107
D304
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21
9- I I a j n .
2-4 p, m.
Bi 22
D349
Py l
Ed 20
Page Hall
Call No. 610 D211
Ed 21
Call No. 611 D i l l
Call No. 109 R33
Call No. 612 D349
Call No. 110 D301
Call No. 613 D201
Call No. III D211
Call No. 614 D301
Call No. 112 Dill
Call No. 615 D349
Call No. 113 Dill
Call No. 616 D349
Call No. 114 D211
Call No. 617 D303
Call No. 115 D303
D209
La 103
Call No. 116 R31
Co 3
Ed 213A
H250
Call No. 48 H250
Ed 251
D209
Call No. 49 D304
E n 213A
R35
Call No. 50 H251
E n 229
D346
Co 319
D240
S h 260
D206
Ed 22
D346
P r 104
D304
Ed 114ML
R34
P h 200
D207
Ed 114SS
Hy 233A
D341
Call No. 154 D302
Ps 214
D346
Call No. 155 D300
Hy 101
R20A-B
S h 112
H150
S h 173
H150
En 232
D240
Ge 111
D207
PI 2
D140
BI 303
D207
D140
Ch 17
D140
Hy 214A
R20A-B
Mu 4
9-11 a j n
1956
Costly Win:
Exam Schedule
FRIDAY, JANUARY 20
9-11 a.m.
12-2 p m.
EC 3
D349
Hy 2
Ch 108
Call No. 782 D301
Call No. 712 D i l l
Call No. 783 D349
Call No. 713 D211
Call No. 784 H150
Ge 2
O304
Call No. 785 D303
P r 109
D209
Call No. 786 D349
S p 110
D304
Call No. 787 D349
Ed 301A
Call No. 788 D i l l
Call No. 196 D241
Call No. 789 D349
Call No. 197 D301
Call No. 790 D201
Call No. 198 D301
Call No. 791 D300
Call No. 199 D201
Call No. 792 D302
Call No. 200 D241
Call No. 794 H250
Ed 301B
D201
Call No. 795 D304
Ed 114Ca
D210
Call No. 796 D210
En 215A
D210
G k 203
R22
Sh 139
D206
Co 109
R31
Li 323A
R33
Co 120
D211
Ge 103
R31
Co 318
D241
Bl 214
R3i
Ed 114E
Hy 271
D300
Call No. 148 R33
Call No. 149 R34
Ed 114M
D140,141
Ed 225
D241
Ed 309A
D137
En 271
R35
Li 222A
D206
Ge 110
D137
Sp IB
D346
Bi 14
D246
Bl 210
D346
Ch 206
D207
Hy 3
Call No. 798 R20B, 21
Call No. 799 R20A
Hy 220A
D207
3-5 p.m.
Sp 9
Mu 5A
D349
Call No. 514 D200
Call No. 515 D202
PI 100
D146
13.
THURSDAY,
9-11 ajn.
D349
D146
D210
D201
Co 2
En 38
Ma 24
Sp 2
Sp 3
Call No. 509
Call No. 510
Call No. 511
Hy 120
D206
D2U
D211
Dill
Bi 101
Call No. 680
Call No. 681
H250
H150
3-5 p.m.
Pi- 1
Call No. 440
Call No. 442
Call No. 441
Call No. 443
La 1A
La IB
La 112
Co 13
Call No 66
Call No 67
Ed 114C
Ed 203
Call No. 158
Call No. 159
Ma 23
Ge 9
Sp 137
Ch 103
Hy 243
Bi 125
En 121
JANUARY
26
12 2
En 3
Call
Call
Call
Call
Call
Call
Call
Ed
En
Bi
Bi
Ph
Ps
Bi
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
218
225A
13
122
116
215
25
9-11 a.m.
Ma 21
D207
Call No. 390 D211
Dill
Call No. 391 D201
D300
Ed 114Cb
D209
Dill
Dill
Hu 123
D301
D300
Ma 222
D201
D302
Sc 2
D301
D200
Hy 2B
D349
Ph 1
D211
Gy 4
D201
Call No. 775 D304
D300, 302 Call No. 776 D303
Co 1
D304
Call No. 41 D301
D304
Call No. 42 D201
D207
D209
9-11 a.m.
D209
So 4
D246
D349
En 19
D206
Call No. 300 D211
H250
Call No. 301 D i l l
D349
Call No. 302 D i l l
p.m.
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
D201
D301
D302
D304
H250
D246
D210
Dill
D346
D241
D211
D206
D241
D349
£fi&U SpxULtflU
Sports Spotlight shines on Bruce
King who scored 24 points for
WWABT. On Wednesday, King, one
of last year's varsity men, led his
team to a victory over the Wheatie.-..
IVIaxson Second
T h e r u n n e r - u p spot goes to Carl
Maxson who scored 20 for Sigma
Lambda Sigma. Although the team
went down to defeat, Maxson continued his s h a r p shooting from the
outside.
Congratulations Bruce and Carl
for last week's fine showing.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 27
12-2 p.m.
Pr 2
Call No. 445 D i l l
Call No. 446 D i l l
Call No. 447 D301
Call No. 454 D301
Ma 110
D303
Pr 3
D349
Pr 8
H250
Co 19
Call No. 72 D304
Call No. 73 H150
3-5 p.m.
Sp 1
D349
La IC
D241
Co 212
D210
Ed 23
D206
Ed 215
D206
Ed 216
D304
En 8
D300
En 246
D300
Li 117
R31
HE 121A
D240
Bi 21
Dill
Bi 313
Dill
Ch 18B
D346
Gy 214
D210
Py 126
H150
SATURDAY, JANUARY 28
Coach G a r c l a ' s boys are still u n defeated a n d this win was t h e m a s t
impressive of t h e season. This shows
t h a t the g r a p p l e r s are steadily i m proving and could really give any
<•»«•*•— - » --m a t•c h' .
team a good
Harvey Leads Way
The Ped a t t a c k was
paced by
Wayne Harvey who has extended
his undefeated season to three
straight pins. Wayne, who is t h e
lightest m a n on t h e State squad h a s
yet to be beaten since wrestling a t
S t a t e College. Dave Goldberg, who
is also undefeated this season, d e feated his opponent while garnering
three points for t h e Ped cause. Ozzie Leahy r o u n d s out the list of t h e
i n d e f e a t e d by defeating his opponent, 3-0. Don Bindrum, who In his
last outing was held to a draw, d e feated his opponent by a 3-0 margin,
Big Ed Weaver, the freshman
standout, really rase to the occasion
by
tllol ou
' 8 h l y defeating his m a n
"'id p u t t i n g five points in the bank
for the Peds. Mike Newman, in his
first outing for the Statesmen, won
over his opponent by a 3-0 score.
Gropp Hurt
By tills time the Peds appeared
certain to sweep t h e match since
they were winning by a 25-0 margin
and their heavyweight ace, Bill
Gropp, was scheduled to wrestle in
the closing bout. In the middle of
the contest, however, Bill sustained
a ill .I'X'iiled elbow and was forced
to ti'llie thereby giving the Enginwi'd their only score of the day.
(•'Ill was taken to a hospital and
bis anil put In a cast. He is well
mi the way to recovery but it not
expected to r e t u r n this season.
Coach Garcia feels t h a t Bill's loss
will h u r t the team as far as the
heavyweight class and the general
balance of the team is concerned.
Coach Garcia has asked this reporter to issue a n o t h e r call for
wrestlers since the team at present
is lacking in d e p t h and badly in
need of men. If any man h a s had
wrestling experience he i.s urged tc
0 v...^v...^.,w. m. is cuycu t>u
get in touch with Coach Garcia and
to get in on t h e wrestling program,
A kAI A
A Ml A
jf/gfjf
Sigmund S m i t h '56, President of
the Senior Class, states t h a t Seniors
may order their graduation a n nouncements at the Co-op now.
T h e price is fifteen cents per a n nouncement. T h e deadline for ordering is February 15.
Seniors may order personalized
n a m e cards from the Co-op. If you
have the copper plate, the price is
$1.7.r> for one hundred cards. The
personalized n a m e cards and t h e
copper plate can be purchased for
$3.00-$4.00. T h e price depends on
the type of printing desired. These
cards must be paid for when they
are ordered.
By BOB BACKER
during the game, State was ahead
by 15 points and Courtesy led by
Al Bernardo's 28 point output rallied but saw It fall a point short as
the final buzzer sounded.
Beat Danbury
Tuesday night's game turned into
a rout almost a.s soon as the teams
took the floor. Danbury was h a n d i capped by a noticeable lack of
height which enabled the forces of
Sandy Bernstein to control both
backboards.
Welch, Craves High
Darrel Welch and Hon Graves
had a field day under both baek-
boards while Davie again hitting
well, found the range for 27 points,
hitting mostly from outside the keyhole on one-handed j u m p shots.
Three other men hit double figures
for the J.V.'s, Ron Graves (15),
Mike Flahive (11), and Bob Fierro
(10), while the Danbury club had
three men also hit double figures,
Bill Naves (16), Ed Cox and Bili
Pepin each hitting the cords for
10 points. T h e final score was 80-56.
Coach Sandy Bernstein lias been
working hard with his team ami
the past three games have displayed a greatly improved squad
PlaV
'
GotTIBS
Next week's schedule is as
lows:
J a n . 14—Sayles vs. SLS.
VDZ vs. Hilltop.
EEP vs. Rousers.
Vets vs. K B .
J a n . 16—APA vs, Potter.
Wheaties vs. Rousers.
Jets vs Loose Ends.
J a n . 1 8 - V e t s vs. SLS.
Hilltop vs. WWABT.
Raiders vs. Jets.
J a n . 21—KB vs. Potter.
Wheaties vs. Seinops.
Bernstein s Junior Varsity Squad Captures Three 22
Straight Beating Utica, Danbury, Courtesy Mart
Last Tuesday night at Page Hall,
the S t a t e junior varsity won its
third straight victory since t h e
s t a r t of the new year. Having lost
their first four starts, the J.V.'.s
started their present string by walloping the Utlca J.V., 72-46. They
then encountered Courtesy Mart
and came out one point up in a 901)0 contest. They were led in scoring by the fast-improving Jerry
Davie who has thrown in fiftyseven points during this three game
win streak. Davie scored 21 points
followed by steady Bob Plerro's 20,
and Mike I'iahive, 17. At one time
rtl
Although eight games were played this week, the results are n o t
available. At
Monday
evening's
games, the scorebooks for two leagues were misplaced and the commissioners hope t h a t they will be
returned in time for Saturday's
contests. Anyone having information a.s to t h e whereabouts of t h e
lost books is asked to contact Joe
Purcell.
One,
Seniors Order
Announcements
/~*
LCf Q e r S
&
HOOD
Sullivan
G n u t-.s
Davie
Welch
Tlbblts
Sii-fiino
HubriKlit
Slsco
fol-
*7wa, *Jlt*ee
DANBl'KY
PG F T
TO
4 3 11 M i ' l l l l o
4
5 0 11 Holssel
1
0 I) 0 N a v e s
a
7 I 15 Cox
3
i:i 1 27 O ' l l a m
I
3 (I li Z u r l n s k u . s
u
0 Morclo
(I P e p i n
U
2
T
Is
2-1
P T
0 8
0 11
•1 18
I) 10
(I 2
0 0
(I 8
4 111
8 56
Herodus
Total*
STATU
Fluhive
Mi'no
Sullivan
Graves
Davit'
Welch
Tlbblts
Steluno
Hubriuhl
Slsco
Herodus
Totals
P G )•'
li 5
111 0
COl'ltTKSY M AltT
FQ P T
II 0 22
II I) I)
0 10
10 28
0 0
1 7
0 2
2 18
Jerry
ill o n s i r i n
M miss
D e n i a l do
21 T h o m p s o n
4 Huwdurd
0 Hurns
II A r o n o w i t z
Scon
11
•1
Tol.ils
37 1ft 8!)
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S , FRIDAY, J A N U A R Y
PAGE
13, 1 9 5 6
3
Student Council:
State University Dean Lanford Announces Plan
SC Reviews Budget Procedure; Discloses Plans For Junior Professional Semester
The sixteen week professional s e - for everyone in t h e class of 1957
Elects N e w Committee Members For Expansion
mester of the class of 1957 a n d each have already been made. An offBy MARCIA LAWRENCE
W i t h S t u d e n t Association budget Hageny '56, C h a i r m a n of t h e C o m coming up for review a t t h e begin- mittee. Applications for delegates
ning of n e x t semester
S t u d e n t for t h e exchange are available today
Council took immediate action Wed- a t t h e voting desk in Lower Husted.
Council then adopted a n a g e n d a
nesday n i g h t to recommend t h e
adoption of a n e w budget procedure for today's meeting of the legislature
by S t u d e n t Association. T h e h e a r - which will meet for the last t i m e
ing on t h e S t u d e n t Board of Finance today. T h e legislative power of S t u proposal was preceded by a discus- d e n t Association automatically r e sion of this year's Exchange P r o - verts back to t h e assembly of t h e
gram with t h e University of Con- whole after today's meeting.
necticut a n d a proposal from t h e
David Kleinke '57 was appointed
Rivalry Committee.
to the Constitutional Review C o m Council unanimously recommend- mittee a n d B a r b a r a Maaloe '56 was
ed t h e adoption of a new budget n a m e d C h a i r m a n of t h e Committee.
S t u d e n t Council then voted to
procedure. U n d e r this new system a
non-voting committee of three from continue t h e book exchange p r o g r a m
Council would meet with S t u d e n t begun last semester. Margaret A n n
Board of F i n a n c e to review t h e bud- Kinsler '57 was elected C h a i r m a n of
gets. I n case of a controversy or a t h e Committee.
majority vote of t h e council repreTwo freshmen, Ella Mizell a n d
sentatives t h e b u d e t would go t o George Harris, were elected t o t h e
council. If there is n o controversy All-College Revue Committee.
the budget goes directly to S t u d e n t
Sigmund S m i t h '56, C h a i r m a n of
Association where a two-thirds vote t h e Rivalry Committee, reported
is necessary to m a k e a n y changes in t h a t t h e committee was working on
the budget. T h e proposal is discus- a rivalry booklet, which would be
sed in detail on page 6.
available to all freshmen, wou'd
T h e final plans for the Exchange contain t h e rules, directions, .judgProgram with t h e University of ing sheets and total rivalry points of
Connecticut were presented by J e a n rivalry.
Self-Made Sociologist Answers
Long Debated Query On Campus
By ART
Ever sinr-d t h a t famous essay e n titled " W h a t is a boy?" appeared,
every idiot t h a t c a n hold a pen h a s
done some kind of take-off on it. I,
too, can hold a pen. . . .
A S t a t e College boy is poverty
with tobacco stains on its face,
cynicism with acid b u r n s on i t s
fingers, a n d t h e "Hope of t h e F u ture" with monstrous taps on its
black bucks.
A S t a t e Colege boy is a composite
. . . h e h a s t h e energy of Lionel
Hampton, t h e sincerity of a phony
S a n t a Claus, t h e shyness of Gypsy
Rose Lee, t h e kindness of t h e Albany police, t h e imagination of
Outing Group
Plans Excursion
Outing Club is p l a n n i n g a trip
to H a r t Lake n e a r Mount Mclntyre
in the Adirondack Mountains, a n nounces Sue B a r n h a r t '56, C h a i r man. T h e group will leave on t h e
afternoon of J a n u a r y 29 a n d return
early on J a n u a r y 31. T h e cost per
person will be between $3.50 a n d
$5.00. Ski lift fares will add to the
expenses.
Ski areas within ten miles of Lake
Placid include Scott's Cobble, Fawn
Ridge, Old Mac Donald's F a r m ,
and Whiteface M o u n t a i n . Additional
information on t h e proposed trip
may be secured by checking t h e
Outing Club bulletin board in lower
Husted.
Religious Clubs Plan
Tour, Ski Weekend
Canterbury Club plans a tour of
Trinity Institute Sunday and IVCF
is planning a ski weekend.
Canterbury Club will meet. S u n day a t 7:30 a t Brubacher Hall,
announces J o a n Van Dusen '57,
President. T r a n s p o r t a t i o n will be
provided to Trinity Institute, which
the club will tour. A dance i.s scheduled to be held Immediately following t h e tour.
IVCF is making plans for the ski
weekend which is to be held F e b ruary 3-5, states Ann K a m m e r '56,
President. T h e cost ol the weekend
will be $4.00. Interested student.-,
are asked to watch for further details which are to be announced by
posters and on the IVCF bulletin
board.
Joe's Barber Shop
N. L a k e \ \/e„
W a s h i n g t o n Ave
2 BARBERS
We A i m T o I'll i t t s e
53
Near
PLOTNIK
Micky Spillane, t h e aspiration of
t h e Albany hoods, a n d when h e
wants something, it is usually 8 6 ' ;
proof.
He likes Bru women a n d brew,
South Hall a n d eight-ball, vice, ice,
short books, good looks, snow, dough,
"weeds," rich keeds i rhymes come
h a r d these days) . . . as a m a t t e r of
fact one could summarize a n d say,
if it's spiked, it's well liked.
He is n o t too m u c h on s q u a r e
dancing, squares, Hedrick's, P a r k
lights on d a r k nights (last r h y m e , I
promise), H a r v a r d , bulletin boards,
dorm food, a s h trays, p s e u d o pseudos, dirty dollar bills, clean dollar bills, presidents other
than
Washington iTavern) and Madison
iHou.se), marks, morals, mirrors,
and maids.
In a S t a t e boy's pocket one m a y
find a crumpled letter from t h e
dean, a biology scalpel scarred from
many battles with worms a n d frogs,
the slide from a slide-rule, a broken
cigarette, a dark blue dollar bill
and an uncovered pen, a lame l i g h t er, a n d a key to Pierce.
A college boy i.s a magical creature . . . you can lock him o u t of
a class, but not out of the commons. You can get him off your
mind, but you can't get him off t h e
ping-pong table. "He i.s a n o account, girl-chasing
bundle of
worry. But when you come home a t
night with only the shattered pieces
of hope and dreams, he c a n m a k e
them sound mighty
insignificant
with four magic words: You look
beat, m a n ! "
AD Class Schedules
Try-outs For Plays
T h e Advanced Dramatics (Mass
plans to present three laboratory
plays Tuesday evening, February 21,
1956 a t H/M) p i n . in Draper 349. a n nounces Richard Feldman '57, P u b licity Director for this group of
1)1 a,vs.
Feldman also slates that the Advanced Dramatics Class will hold
tryouts for two of the plays, " T h e
End of T h e Beginning" by S e a n
O'Casey and " A n a da Capo" by
Edna Vincent Millay, on Friday,
February 3, at 4:00 p.m. in Draper
34U. Richard T m a p p Till will direct
the former, and Paul Seual '57 will
direct, the latter
T h e S t a t e University of NewYork h a s disclosed plans for a two
million dollar expansion program
here a t S t a t e . Construction on t h e
new Western Avenue dormitory is
slated to begin t h i s s u m m e r a n d
will be ready for occupancy in September, 1957. T h e new facilities will
house 200 girls. Several homes, i n cluding those housing two sororities,
Chi Sigma T h e t a a n d G a m m a K a p pa P h i , will be demolished to make
room for t h e structure.
Negotiations a r e also underway
for t h e sale of Van Derzee Hall, a n
Alumni Association dormitory housing 54 men. T h e sale of t h e State
Street mansion is being m a d e in
anticipation of additional dormitory
facilities becoming available.
Two o t h e r building.s a r e slated to
be erected completing t h e quadrangle; one a 300 bed dormitory a n d
a new dining hall seating 1,000.
T h e second dormitory will also be
built on Western Avenue, extending
from t h e middle of t h e block to
Partridge Street. T h e dining hail
will face a wall to be erected from
the Western Avenue e n t r a n c e into
the c a m p u s site.
Plans for t h e future include a new
gymnasium a n d a million dollar
library. P l a n s for t h e library should
be ready in a year.
KafUtcU
fCapetA
by JOHN REINEKS
Subversion!
Those tricky Reds are up to mischief again at t h e Madison. They
cunningly side with a boy accused of
m u r d e r only to further their cause.
O h they're tricky, these Reds! Glen
Ford is in it, a n d so is Dorothy M c Guire. T h e y add such a romantictouch. T h e picture is Trial, and it's
just that.
Boo-Iloo a t S t r a n d
class thereafter will consist of eight
weeks of off-campus teaching a n d
eight weeks of Education 22, Educa23, and Course " X " in t h e major
field, announces Oscar E. Lansford,
Dean of the College.
The eight week teaching period
will find most students off-campus.
Those who are leaders in s t u d e n t
activities will be given preference in
assignments. Tentative Assignments
Federal Exam
Open To Seniors
Majors in Latin a n d Spanish will
remain on campus for their s t u d e n t
teaching because of the limited
number of majors in these fields.
They will be assigned to full-time
teaching for half-day sessions a t
Milne for the entire semester. T h e
rest of t h e day will be spent in
classes. Latin majors will take Greek
203 and Education courses; Spanish
majors will take Spanish 232 a n d
Persons who cannot meet the Education courses.
J a n u a r y 18 deadline should file as
T h e second eight week period of
soon as possible thereafter to obtain consideration for future exam- the professional semester will c o n inations, in this continuous pro- .-•ist of three courses: Education 22,
Education 23. a n d Course " X " in t h e
gram. Those who filed after Nomajor field. T h e " X " courses in t h e
vember 18, the deadline lor the
various major fields a r e : Commerce,
first examination last month, need the second Methods Course; English,
not, file again a n d will be notified English 271 for majors who a r e n o n where to report for the written test. speech minors, and Speech 260B for
College men and women who pass- majors who are speech m i n o r s ;
ed the first Federal-Service Exam- French, French 203; G e r m a n , G e r ination la.st month, and the F e b r u - m a n 201 or 202; Latin, Greek 203;
ary 10 examination, should be elig- Mathematics, Math 112; Spanish,
ible for a job next spring. An estim- Spanish 232; Biology, Biology 106;
ation of 7,700 Federal openings at Chemistry. Chemistry 126 or C h e m salaries ranging from $3,670 to istry 141; Physics, Physics 219; AB
$4,525 annually will be available with a Science major-minor, Biology
106; Social
Studies,
Social
during 1956.
Studies 200. T h i s course was forFederal teams, planning to visit merly called Social Studies 271, a n d
many college campuses before F e b - consists of selected problems in t h e
ruary 10, will explain the details of Social Studies and a critical analysis
the program. Inquiries m a y be of problems of concern to Social
made and application blanks ob- Scientists. T h e approach is historitained a t college placement offices. cal with integrations of the m a j o r
In many cases, examinations will theories a n d techniques of the sobe held in cities in which colleges cial studies as applied to some of
are located, for t h e convenience of the problems found by men in t h e
modern world.
the student.
G a t e of Hell is being held over at
the Delaware for all the lazy people
who haven't seen if yet. Tins i.s a
very unusual film and beautifully
photographed. Why not pinch yourself awake and n<:'.J
Last but not least
I've been seeing movies about the
last frontier since 1 was six, and
now there's a new one at t h - Palace
called i yes, you guessed it i T h e Last
Frontier. II stars Victor Mature and
Guy Madison, They rule horse s
Don't cry if you miss it; we haven't
seen the la.st of the last frontier yet,
believe me not in our life ione
College Calendar
FRIDAY, J A M AKY 13
Girls! Girls! Girls!
It's Staying!
Besides teaching, off-campus s t u dents will participate in discussion
groups a t their centers where they
will be able to air comcnon problems a n d evaluate their teaching
experiences. In t h e 1956-1957 c a t a log, s t u d e n t teaching will be listed
as Education, 114 S.T. a n d off-campus discussion groups will be listed
as Education 118, seminar in S t u d e n t Teaching. Eight hours credit
will be given for these courses combined.
On February 10, College Seniors
and Postgraduates will have a n o t h e r
opportunity to try for a career in
the Federal service, the Civil Service Commission announced today.
T h e second test under t h e FederalService E n t r a n c e Examination prog r a m will be held on t h a t date. T h e
deadline for filing applications i.s
J a n u a r y 18.
J a n e Wyman and Rock Hudson, the
"serious d r a m a " c o u n t e r p a r t of Martin a n d Lewis, a r e lending their collective talents to a new movie, All
T h a t Heaven Allows. This is the
story of a woman torn between two
Those interested in Federal m a n loves -young Rock Hudson and old agement internships should file for
Conrad Nagcl. Watch J a n e get torn the February 10 examination, s t a t for two hours, and in color too, lie- ing their interest. This will be a
fore .she makes up her mind. I'm written test with an oral test folsurprised heaven i.s allowing it.
lowing later.
At 8 p.m. J a n u a r y 14th, at Philip
Livingston School, nine gorgeous
finalists in the Miss Albany Contest
land a girl from State, Helen Paris,
i.s one of t h e m i will parade around
and look beautiful in gowns and
bathing suits. They must also display cultural ability.
They will
i imagine this) read poems or sin."
or draw and, on the level, t h e winner could be Miss America someday.
Reader, this is history in the making, and you can see it all lor fifty
cents.
c a m p u s center h a s been established
on Long Island, a considerable distance from Albany, where supervisors a n d s t u d e n t teachers will live.
In t h e future, more centers will be
established t h r o u g h o u t t h e s t a t e .
Veterans Sociely
Schedules Ball
10:00 a.m. Assembly, Final meeting
of legislature.
6:30 p.m. News Board Banquet at
O'Connor's R e s t a u r a n t .
SATURDAY, JANUARY II
Sauersmen Drop
Games To New
Haven, Uticans
This was a week of basketball
record breaking, a n d the UticaS t a t e game saw a new record set by
a visiting player, as Don Dabrovoic
of Utica sank 44 points a n d led his
team to a 107-85 victory over t h e
Peds last T h u r s d a y in Page G y m .
His 44 points bested t h e Page record
of 41 set by a n o t h e r Utica player in
1951, Karl Luebbert. S t a t e ' s passwork was bad, a n d Utica took a d vantage of it, a n d moved to a 45-35
half-time lead. G a r y Holway. with 26
points for t h e night, Don Mayer a n d
Dick Causey, each h a d five fouls a n d
left t h e game before t h e final buzzer.
Utica sank 42 fouls, a n d S t a t e e a r n ed 21 points from t h e foul line.
OUT O F MY WAY. Sig- Smith is pictured above, coining in for a
Minon Hits on Sets
J a c k Minon h a d a good eye for set driving- hivup. Two Danbury players try to stop t h e Ped c a p t a i n while
shots, and took second top scoring Don Mayer takes in the proceedings, in the background.
honors with 22 points.
I TICA
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S t a t e Drops Fifth To New Haven
S t a t e lost, its third straight game
a n d fifth of the season last T h u r s day in Page to a fast moving New
Haven team, 7H-(iS). New Haven held
leads of 7-1. 35-20 a n d 37-24 before
taking a half time edge of 39-2B.
Both teams displayed fine passwork,
but New Haven with a tricky player
by t h e n a m e of Del G a b b o leading
them, outplayed S t a t e in the first
half.
J o h n Rookwood was t h e s t a r of the
second half for S t a t e , as he scored
15 points in this half. S t a t e finally
caught u p a n d went a h e a d . fil-fiO.
Their lead didn't last too long, as
Del Gabbo put New Haven back into t h e lead with a c|itick four points.
T h e Peds tied R up again, (17 all.
only to fall behind as Sig Smith and
G a r y Holway fouled out.
NI:\V
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FREE LUSTER-SIZING
Klull anil Fold Wa.sh
PAOC 8
By BOB KAMTF
During t h e past week, we sat and this game, among t h e m are Jack
watched three good basketball games. Minon's long set shot in the first
For the varsity cagers, if was a half, closing New Haven freeze, J o h n
superlative week in the sense t h a t Rookwood's fifteen points in the secthe Utica game was good, the New
ond half, and the near " S u p e r m a n Haven game was better, a n d the
ish"
comeback of the S t a t e squad.
Danbury game was best. T h e first
game was a thirty two point del'eat, As a matter of fact, S t a t e was down
the second, a nine point loss, and by as much as fifteen points at one
the third, a forty one point victory. time in the first half.
However, in terms of good basketOur huts are off to a fighting
ball, the New Haven game was by
far the best of the three. State did S t a t e squad, which is now back on
win its third game of t h e season the sunny side of final score figures.
from Danbury, but Danbury was a
much smaller, and less talented
team.
Many Thrills in the New Haven
Game
The game of the week then, was
last S a t u r d a y night's contest with
t h e New Haven five. S t a t e lost, b u t
they made a real contest out of a
game that could have been a sour
showing. Down thirteen points a t
halftime, the Peds came to life in
the second half, and kept nipping
away nl the New Haven lead. With
less t h a n six minutes remaining, the
Statesmen went ahead by one point.
Then, they lost their two top scorers
on personal fouls, a n d New Haven
opened a nine point winning margin
t h a t left, S t a t e on t h e losing side of
t h e victory door. T h e liiuil score
means only defeat when one looks
at the way the game was played. It
was played well.
We have moments to remember of
A reminder ol this past season's
s o r e r became evident early last
week when Hie New York State
Coaches and Officials All-Star soccer poll was made public. Five State
players were appointed to a place on
the poll
Named to the first string squad
was the hard-playing Ped fullback,
Curl Maxson Placed on the second
team was standout goalie, Tito G u glielmone. and Slate's high scorer,
Paul Hammer. Al Ledderman, the
Peds' recipient ol I his year's most
valuable p l a \ e r award was inenl ii ned for the third team
F r e s h m a n Gary Holway set a Page
Gym record by scoring 33 points
Tuesday night, as t h e Sauersmen
tasted victory after losing three
s t r a i g h t games. S t a t e capitalized on
Danbury's lack of vertical altitude,
and wound u p with 41 points ahead,
102-61. T h e victory for t h e Peds was
their third in eight starts. Danbury
h a s yet to see t h e light of a victroy,
and h a s a 0-7 record.
No sooner h a d t h e g a m e begun
when Joe Anderson dunked a j u m p
shot, Holway h i t for five points a n d
S t a t e moved o u t front with a 7-1
lead. Smigala h i t for Danbury's first
field goal after about two a n d a half
m i n u t e s of play, a n d their S t a t e
pulled t h e carpet out from u n d e r t h e
Danbury squad, a n d begun h i t t i n g
from all angles. W h e n t h e half
ended a n d the dust h a d cleared out
of t h e Danbury's Five's eyes, t h e
scoreboard read, S t a t e 54, Danbury
30. Gary Holway hit for 18 of his
33 points in t h e first half a n d Sig
Smith garnished ten.
State Hits Century Mark
Holway Hits Record
S t a t e fans found something to
really cheer about in t h e closing
eight minutes as Gary Holway h e a d ed for Bill Walker's a n d J o h n
Centre's record of 30 points by a
S t a t e player in Page Gym. W h e n
G a r y arrived a t 30, h e kept going
until h e reached 33, one short of t h e
S t a t e record held by Si Pels! w h o
scored 34 in a n away game in t h e
'48-'49 season. Coach Sauers saw
it in his h e a r t to give t h e Danbury
boys a break, a n d pulled Gary from
t h e game. Dick Causey replaced h i m
and garnished eight points himself.
With a secondary squad on t h e
court, S t a t e h i t t h e century m a r k for
the first time this year. Everyone on
the squad scored. T h e Peds h i t for
24 of 38 fouls, a n d Danbury h i t for
50% of theirs, 25 of 50. It was certainly a team victory for t h e Peds,
who a r e now o u t to stop a rumored
good P l a t t s b u r g squad, tomorrow
night in Page G y m after t h e 7 p.m.
preliminary game. Next week end
it will be Pace on Friday n i g h t in
Page, a n d New Paltz away on S a t u r day night. After these games, t h e
Peds t a k e a break for t h e finals, a n d
won't see action again until F e b r u ary 3.
T h e Peds slowed down a bit in t h e
second half, but not for long. J o h n
Rookwood duncked in four fouls,
and Holway h i t for seven more
points before t h e half was seven
STATE
minutes old. Danbury showed a
little more life at t h e s t a r t of t h e H o l w a y
half, a n d Karcheski dropped six S m i t h
points through t h e hoop to keep M l n o n
Rookwood
Danbury alive. However, life wasn't M a y e r
worth living for t h e Danbury squad, A n d e r s o n
as S t a t e moved toward t h e Century C a u s e y
Hoppey
mark. John Rookwood fouled out P i e r r o
early but not before entering the Plahlve
double figures with ten points.
Totals
33 Bf 12
DANBIJKV
FO
13
7
1
2
a
4
4
2
1
2
F
7
2
1
0
6
2
0
0
0
0
—
,
3!) 24
T
33 Leonard
10 MacCormlck
3 Karcheski
10
Smiifala
12 Mahiinna
10 Jowasky
II
4
2
4
—
102
Mcllllo
Naves
Murdock
Totals
S P E E D Y — J o e A n d e r s o n is p i c l u r ed a b o v e . ,loc r 'centl.v w o n a berth
on t h e starlinii live for b i s i m p r i ' s sive p l a y i n g .
15c
. 1 0 c per pound
Felicia's Beauty Salon
53-A No. Lake Ave.
(Near Washington Ave.)
" J I M M Y " - H a i r Stylist
Telephone 3-9749
217 Western Ave.
Aids
College Outlines
Review Books
Vis Ed Cards
for AAAA's
Barkis & Noble COLLEGE OUTLINE SERIES
BOOK SALE
Many Useful and Enjoyable Titles
at Prices Unbelievably LOW.
Albany, N. V.
Phone 6-8610
WINNERS!
Lucky T a x Card
for Week «»!' December 12, 1955
NumbersJoan Eignor
WATCH R E P A I R S
SPECIAL S T U D E N T P R I C E S
for Week of January 3, 1956'
Sanford Bernstein
SAMUEL ERINGER
for Week of January i), 1956
Arlene Green
3:2!) Western Ave.
8-7741
Name Brand Watches & Jewelry30'! discount lor S t u d e n t s
PO P
3
6
3 5
4
4
0
0
0
0
1 7
0 2
0 1
1 1
._ —
T
11
11
12
12
0
t
2
1
3
til 2 5 111
EXAM
Gerald Drug Go.
7 HOUR LAUNDRY AND GLEANERS
SHIRTS
A Peek ^UiatUfU *Jlte tJfoop,
Poll Names Maxson
To All-State Booters
KEI-AX and RECOVER
SNACK BAR
2
1
II
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT
at the
13, 1 9 5 6
Peds Down Danbury As Holway Sets Record Mark;
Cagers Play Host To Plattsburg Tomorrow A t Page
T h e Veterans Society has a n - 8:30 p.m. Basketball, Page Gym,
nounced plans lor a Veterans Ball,
S t a t e vs. P i t t s b u r g h .
to be held on Friday. March 2, at 10:0.) p.m. P o t t e r
" T w i n Date
the Ten Eyck Hotel Ballroom. Music
Party," Brubacher.
will be furnished by J o h n n y Costas
and his orchestra. No date has been
St'NDAY, JANUARY 15
set for the sale ol bids, which are
to sell lot- $3.50.
7:30 p.in Canterbury Club lour to
Trinity Institute.
The Friday preceding the ball,
tin- organization will vote by secret T l l t ' R S D A Y , J A M AKV 1!)
ballot for the queen who will be
crowned and presented with a gilt 7:31) p i n . English Evening, Upper
at the formal. The eleven members
Lounge al Brubacher
ol the Vet's Executive Council will
pick five finalists ol all the girl,-, SATl'RDAY, J A M ARY :>l
from the group houses, sororities,
2:3(1 p i n . Eva Le Gallienne, Page.
and commuters.
8:30 p.m. Eva Lc Gallienne, Page
T h e Vets, at their Friday meeting,
elected David Palmer '57. as then- Sl'NDAY, . l A M ' A R Y ill
new Social Chairman. He succeeds
Salvalore Zacciiro '58, who resigned Afternoon Outing
flub
Trip to
his po.sl.
l a k e Hail.
iOK Quail Street Near Western
PRESCKH* HON FOR EXAM WEEK
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S . FRIDAY. J A N U A R Y
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S , FRIDAY, J A N U A R Y
PAGE 6
13,
1956
News Views:
Students To Pay SBF Announces Budget Revision,
Kamp Constitutes Threat To Country R e g / S f r a t ; 0 n Fee Minimizes Student Council Action
Bv PreachinQ Second-Class Citizenry ester
Reg
istration for the second s«n- Student Council at
will continue through Tuesday Wednesday discussed
*
*•
By DAVID KENDIG '57
There are a large number of conservatlves still in the United States,
despite many prevailing opinions to
the contrary. They manifest themselves in highly respected organizations such as the American Bar
Association, the American Legion,
and various other patriotic groups,
including the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial
Dames etc Their publications have
a fairly large circulation, such as
Facts Forum, National Review, and
the Hearst papers. The conservatives are rightly concerned with patrlotlsm. the legislative influence in
national affairs, foreign aid and
other topics of interest to all Americans. Their spokesmen have
ranged all the way from such respected Americans as former President Herbert Hoover, and the late
Senator Taft, to men like Senator
McCarthy, and Gov. J. Bracken Lee
of Utah. Unfortunately, the conservatives, much as the liberals and
ultra-communists,
have
allowed
themselves to be used by some very
peculiar individuals, and it is the
purpose of this column, in Its concluding issue to discuss one of them
in some detail.
Joseph Kamp is listed as the director of The Constitutional Education League, with headquarters
at Madison Avenue, in the Canadian
Railways Bldg., in New York. In
a musty office, on the eighth floor,
Kamp .pursues an interesting occupation of grinding out hate, and
misrepresentation on almost any
subject
you can name.
1
His central thesis is that the
United States is being undermined
by a Jewish Gestapo, namely the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'ritfa. They not only captured control under the administrations of
Roosevelt and Truman, Kamp
states, they also run Eisenhower
and have for some time. The Constitutional Education League supported
Taft in 1952, but do not presume to
'think Taft supported them, • in fact
he repudiated the organization.
Taft, during this time, was captivated by the Jews, too. An example
of propaganda disseminated during
the Eisenhower campaign, was a
newsletter bearing the headline
"Moscow Tells Eisenhower." Kamp
hastens to explain, (in small print)
in a later issue that by Moscow, he
meant Warren Moscow, a reporter.
He says he was only 'kidding." I
think the illustration will prove
helpful.
A series of articles appeared about
Kamp in the New York World-Telegram by Fred Woltman, a Pulitzerprize recipient for his articles exposing Communism. Kamp retaliated with a pamphlet on Woltman,
whom he affectionately calls "Red
Fred."
Kamp lately has served as the
head of the Committee for McCarthyism, which rallied the support
of innocent conservatives to McCarthy's side, during the Senator's recent investigations. And the prize
is his latest pamphlet on The American Bar Association and the
Ford Foundation. In this, he sets
forth the profound thesis that if you
buy a Ford automobile, you arc
helping the Communist cause.
Kamp's ravings might be dismissed as mere bigotry, and in our most
charitable views, as illogical reasoning, except that his influence is
astounding. Kamp's publications
played an important role in the
Congressional
Investigations
on
foundations, when B. Carroll Recce
allowed himself to be influenced,
to a great deal, by them. And at
the recent American Legion Convention, his publications on Unesco,
undoubtedly influenced the resulting vote against the organization.
Kamp is, of course, anti-Communist, In fact, he tells you that he
has been fighting
Communism
longer, and earlier than any other
man in America. He has also done
a good job fighting Congressional
Committees who have asked him
for lists of his members, which he
refuses to divulge. Kamp was several times coted for contempt of
Congress. All of which leads us to
bemoan those conservatives, who in
their quest for undoubtably earnest
reform in government, contribute
money to, or take the advice printed
in Ins "Headlines and What's Be-
hind Them."
Hart's current campaign is to
get the United Nations off Atnerican soil. In order to pursue this
objective, and similar "economic
aims" he has joined up with the
proposed nation wide Anti-Negro,
Pro-Segregation organization recently founded in the South. There
are many, many more like Kamp
and Hart, who through their preaching of "second class citizenry," and
un-American garbage, constitute a
grave threat that we often overlooK
in our concern for the Communists,
Their influence is extreme and
anyone who doubts it might find it
interesting to study their effect on
the present Governor of Utah.
Unfortunately, the only thing
that is worse than liberals, duped by
"Communists," to this writer is the
tragic story now going on of conservatives being duped by "Fascists"
who are quite profitably, undermining our country.
ester will
continue
through
Tuesday
states
Edward
Sabol,
Coordinator
of Field Services. Everyone is asked to adhere to the schedule so that
the entire process may be expedited
quickly and efficiently.
Sophomores
M-R Today—A.M.
S-Z Today—P.M.
Freshmen
A-L Monday—A.M.
M-R Monday—P.M.
S-Z Tuesday—A.M.
College Revue Posts
Skeets For Workers
The sign-up sheet for crews for
the All-College Revue is now posted
on the Revue bulletin board in the
Draper peristyle, announces Joane
Ginsbur.g '56, Technical Director.
Anyone interested in constructing
sets or working on props, lights, costumes, make-up, publicity, ushering,
programs, or tickets should sign up
Immediately.
their meeting
the following
two plans for a revised budget procedure and voted to recommend the
passing of the first plan by Student
Association. The plan was amended
to read that three members of
Council form the committee meeting with Student Board of Finance.
Student Association would not be
able to vote on the budget as a
whole, but would be able to discuss
the separate lines and move to accept or reject individual lines by a
two-thirds vote after it had been
to Student Board of Finance.
The main essence of the first
plan is to alleviate the Student
Council step in order to avoid repetitious work and save time. Budgets will be presented to SBF for
review. For this budget period 3 or
4 non-voting members of Student
Council would be appointed to sit
in and review the budgets also. Only
those points which were considered
controversial by SC representatives
would be referred to Student Council. The budgets which SBF passed
would be considered final. They
would then be presented to Student
Association for approval. Changes
could be made by Student Association only by a two-thirds vote.
The second plan aims to cut out
Student Council altogether. Budgets
would be presented to SBF for review and would be reviewed by Student Association in open hearings
at which time anyone could question, uphold, suggest changes and
justify the budgets. Student Board
of Finance, after deliberating this
testimonial would take action on
the individual budgets. The budgets
would then be presented to Student
Association for final approval. They
would vote only for total individual
budgets (for example SC $900).
They would not be allowed to change
lines within a budget at this time.
That would be the purpose of open
hearings.
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'TT«
Z461
SORORITY PRESIDENTS: Eleanor Bogan, Sigma Phi Sigma; Jean
Hallenbcck, Phi Delta; Evelyn Ncumeister, Psi Gamma; Thomasina Pagan,
Chi Sigma Theta; Patricia Atwood, Beta / e t a ; Jane Whitehurst, Gamma
Kappa Phi, Not photographed: Barbara Salvatore, Kappa Delta.
Sororities Climax Rushing
With Buffets and Formals
ALBANY,
NEW
YORK. FRIDAY, F E B R U A R Y
lO,
1956
VOL.
XLI NO. 1
S A Debates Budget Procedure
A t Today's Assembly In Page
Student Board of Finance's proposed
changes in the SA Constitution will be discussed in this morning's compulsory assembly in Page Hall. The seating chart for
SA assemblies is posted on the Student
Council bulletin board in the Husted Building. The changes, approved by Student
Council, will put the constitution in accord
with the revision in budget procedure. The
changes under consideration are these:
New Step Minimizes Council Action
To change the present number ten in
Article Eight, section 4m to number eleven,
and to insert in its place a new section
which will read: "There shall be three nonvoting representatives of Student Council
(one freshman, one Sophomore, one Senior,
and the vice-president of SA) at SBF budget meetings. Only those issues which are
considered controversial by two of these
representatives shall be referred to Student
Council for its recommendation.
Sororities will climax their rushTlie theme of Gamma Kappa
ing of freshmen women this week- Phi's formal dinner is Cinderella
end. Five sororities will hold buffet Bali. June Studley '57, chairman,
suppers tonight from (i to 9 p.m. announces the following commitFreshmen will be entertained Satur- tees; Arrangements, Judy Swan;
day from 7 until 11:30 p.m. by seven Favors, Ann Vincent, Sophomores,
.sororities, announces Patricia At- Decorations. Beverly Mclntyre; Enwood '5fi, President of Inter-Sorority tertainment, Marjorie Jellcy. Juniors.
Council.
To delete Article Six, section 4m, under
The theme of Kappa Delta's formLa Cafe De Paris is the theme of
al is KD Wonderland announces the informal dinner of Gumma powers of Student Council. This section
Joan Lopnt '56, Chairman. The Kappa Phi. Barbara Hungerford '57,
other committee chairmen are: Dec- is the general chairman. The other reads: "To approve the yearly budget,
In the past, organization budgets have
orations, Josephine Giuliano; Ar- chairmen are: Arrangements, Bar- which shall be submitted to it by the Sturangements, Dolores Price; Enter- bara Weinstock; Food, Lois Underbeen
submitted to Student Council by Stutainment, Patricia Wilson, Juniors; wood, Juniors; Entertainment, Mil- dent Board of Finance and to submit the
dent
Board
of Finance, and then to Student
Favors, Barbara Dumont; Menu, died Beisswanger; Favors, Margaret budget to Student Association."
Jane Meara, Juniors; and Cigarette Rochford, Sophomores; and DecoraAssociation. The plan under discussion toGirls, Susanne Russell, and Lorraine tions, C h r i s t i n e DiNorcia '59.
day will minimize Council's action in that
Kozlowski, Sophomores.
Phyllis Roberts '57, Chairman of Student Board of Finance To Take
only controversial points will be brought
Kappa Delta Saloon is the theme Beta Zcta's formal dinner, announof Kappa Delta's buffet dinner. ces that their theme is BZ Heaven. Budgets to SA
before it. The new plan, it is hoped, will
Jean Kubas '56, chairman, announ- (Continued on Page H, Column I)
expedite
the passage of budgets.
ces the following committees: ArTo change Article Eight, section lc, numrangements, Jane Meara; Decorations. Ann Kinsler: Entertainment,
The plan for the revised budget prober nine under the powers of Student Board
Judith Stevens; Menu, Patricia
of Finance. This article now reads: "To cedure was drawn up by a special budget
Burke, Juniors; Food, Joan Lopat
'56; Cigarette Girls, Barbara Mcdraft
the yearly Student Association Budget committee, a joint undertaking of Student
Dowell '57 and Margaret Toth '58.
and
to
submit it to Student Council." With Council and Student Board of Finance.
Colonial Gardens is the theme of
The Student Association asembly
Psi Gamma's formal dinner. Rita at 10 a.m. today in Page Hall is changes, this section will read: "To draft Members of the committee include: Sue
Hohnke '57, chairman, announces compulsory for all students whose
the following committees: Decora- names appear on the seating chart the yearly SA budget and to submit it to Barnhart, Theresa Barber, Bruce King,
tions, Nancy Hughes and Mary posted on the Student Council bul- Student Association. Changes can be made Seniors; Michael Maxian, David Kendig,
Lou Meiser; Entertainment, Mary letin board in Husted. Attendance
Juniors.
Knight, Juniors; Menu, Gretchen will be taken by Council members. by SA only by a two-thirds vote."
Hurd; Place Cards, Janet Scnez, This morning's business concerns
Sophomores; and Tables, Shirley constitutional changes and a proHaman '5G.
posed amendment. The proposed
Chi Sigma Theta's formal dinner changes in the SA constitution
theme will be Chi Sig Castle. Sheila which will put it in accord with the
Lister and Carol Allen, Juniors, arc new budget procedure and an
the co-chairmen of the event. The amendment to the constitution from
other committee chairmen arc: Dec- Student Council regarding an addiorations, Carole Rising and Doris tional duty concerning non-budget
Student Council, at its Wedncs- Kampf '59. The term of office for
Sterzinar; Favors, Barabara Struck; organizations wi both be discussed, day night meeting elected one Sen- the Senior runs until Moving-Up
Connecticut
Caterers, Mary Gaiss, Juniors; EnterTwo foreign students, Andrea ior, one Junior, two Sophomores, Day of this year, while all others
tainment, Marilyn Leach and Eileen Wildi, Graduate Student, and Ber- and one freshman to serve on the will remain on the committee unAlbany State is planning to exLalley. and Programs, Christine gitta Gottlow '57 will speak on their temporary Camp Board. Those til February of next year.
change
four students with the UniMelillo, Sophomores.
homelands and their impressions of elected were Robert Levy '56; David
vera:t
y o t Connecticut lor a period
The Chairmen of the bullet dinner the United States in behalf of State Kleinke '57; John Stefano, Robert Students and Faculty on Board
of Chi Sigma Theta are Eleanor Fair.
These students will serve on the of four days during the early part of
Kopccek, Sophomores;
Robert
Roncy and Mary Pagidas, Juniors.
board with four faculty members March. Delegates will be chosen by
Showboat is the theme. Chairmen
cither to be appointed by President student Council.
of the committees arc: Theme, Asor chosen by the StudentConspiracy; Collins
sunta Fusco '58; Food, Marcia Local Sleuth Uncovers D&A
Faculty committee. Stefano was The qualifications set forth by
Lawrence; Entertainment. Bernicc
appointed temporary chairman un- Student Council are as follows: 1.
O'Connor; Favors, Margaret Wil- Wandering
Minstrels To Invade Campus til the Board meets and elects its Applicants arc to lie either Sopholiams; Decorations, Barbara Strack;
own.
mores, Juniors, or Seniors. 2. AppliCostumes, Mary Stowell, Juniors,
Please . . . listen to me! Someone written by Arthur "Death of a Salescants
must have a minimum averSong Sheets, Essie Goldstein '56.
must believe what I have to say . . man" Miller and he has won a Hoard Duties Numerous
The Camp Board will be respon- age of 2.0 or C, and not be on proWomen Rule the World is the it will be difficult I know, but 1 Pulitzer prize and he has won a
theme of Sigma Phi Sigma's formal swear that every word is true . . . you Critic's Award and it is about Salem sible for the setting up of initial bation for the preceding semester.
dinner. Joan Kushner and Paula must believe thai 1 actually heard and it is about witches and please regulations governing I he camp, 3. Applicants should be very well
planning for building construction, versed concerning State College's
believe me . . .
Segal, Juniors, co-chairman, an- what I am about to tell you!
nounce the following committee
fi seems that iplease keep this
As a matter of fact, the play ac- financing, and determining the na- curricular and extra-curricular acchairmen: Entertainment, Marilyn iliueti D&A Council has invited one tually concerns the conditions in ture of the permanent Camp Board. tivities.
Chenfeld; Programs, Rita Chris- Hobtirt and William Smith Co-or- Salem during 1692, when the state
The Council requires the following
man, Juniors; Favors, Rlinn Krels- dinale Institution to perform their and religious powers combined to Progress Reports Submitted
The temporary Board will be re- information on application blanks:
berg; Decorations, Ellen Lelberman, latest production, "The Crucible," conduct witch hunts imuch more
Sophomores: Taxi's, Joan Sle-gal '56. at . . . at . . . State College! How- exciting than banner hunts) and sponsible to Student Council. Re- name, telephone number, Albany
ever, that isn't the whole story. I trials. It centers on the highly ports of progress will be submitted, address, class, scholastic average for
should Council deem it neces- preceding semester, major, minor,
happen to know ithrough sources I dramatic effect these hunts and and
SBF Requests Books can't
possibly reveal > that D&A is trials had on the people in this sary to bring some decision of the activities ioffices held, club membergroup to Student Association, it will ships, Rivalry activities, sports, etc.)
renewing their policy of former setting.
Five categories Included m activities
From Organizations
years, which was, believe it or not, Before they come to take me away, be done.
are
S. A., class, sports, publications
SA
Purchases
(ami)
Inviting a college with a noted I must tell you one thing more . . .
The books of a collage organ- dramatics department to present a there's not much time left. 1 disThe suggestion to purchase a and other. Students are asked not
i/.iitions must be completed and production hen i that's State Col- covered that this entire production college camp came from the Sur- to list sorority, fraternity, or dormihanded in to Dr. Phinney by Moli- icge for etc.i, in order to give the is being directed by Professor E. E. plus Committee last October. Bruce tory aclitics.
duy for this month's auditing, an- student body i that's you) an idea of Griffith tnot to be confused with King and Jean Hagcny, Seniors, Applicants are also asked to give
nounces Sue Banihart '50, Chair- what type and style of plays are e. e. cummings, although I don't comprise this committee. In Janu- a brief statement concerning what
man of the Student Board of Fin- bciug given at. nearby institution know why in the world It would be), ary the decision was made by Sm- they think can be gained from such
ance,
other than Joe's Casino, of DownNow you know the whole story, dent Association to purchase the an exchange program.
Miss BamhtU't stresses that un- town Albany fame.
Not even the names have been Warrensburg campsite by a vote of
less the hooka are presented by tills
No . . . please don't say that . . . I changec' to protect the innocent, 397 for, 283 against, and 12 blanks, Application blanks may be obtaindate, the vouchers will bo held up swear by Minerva that I'm feluig primarily because no one Is inno- The total vote was 692. The cost of ed from Jean Httgeny '56, and should
and will not go Into the Business the truth
cent. I beg of you . . . see this the camp, $10,000, will come out of be returned to Miss Hageny no Inter
Office until they have been audited.
And
and "The Crucible" was thing for yourself . . . if you dare.
stu'plus.
than Tuesday of this week.
Student Council
Assigns Seals
Council Selects Five Students
Student Council
For Positions On Camp Board Plans Exchange
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