advertisement
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STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1948
PAOK 4
PI Gamma Mu
State Alumni
To Hold Meeting Schedules Trip
Pi Gamma Mu, national honorary Social Studies Fraternity, will
A t Washington sponsor
a trip to Cooperstown toMrs. Bertha E. Brimmer, Secre- morrow. The bus will leave from
tary of the Benevolent Association, the back of Draper Hall a t 8:30
has announced the appointment of a. m.. and will return at 5:30 p. m.
Mrs. Olive Horning McDermott '17 Expenses for the trip will be $3.50.
to succeed Mrs. Agnes Nolan Un- This provides for bus fare and adderwood 20, the change of address mission to the museums but does
of Professor Winifred Decker, and not include lunch.
the fall meeting of Our Nation's Plans have been made to visit the
Capitol Branch of Alumni of New Fenimore House, Farmers Museum
and baseball's Hall of Fame. The
York State College for Teachers.
It has been announced that Mrs. public is invited to attend, accordAgnes Nolan Underwood '20 has re- ing to Marvin Wayne '49, and anysigned as Secretary of the Alumni one Interested may contact Wayne
Association to assume a teaching by 3:30 p.m. this afternoon.
position at Girls' Academy, Albany.
The office has also announced Faculty May Obtain Tickets
that Professor Winifred Decker, From Student Finance Board
former head of the German department who retired two years ago, Is Tickets which will admit faculty
giving up his Albany residence for members, housemothers, and husa home in Bedford, Pennsylvania bands and wives of students to all
and a summer home in Seabright, State functions presented by Dramatics and Arts Council and Music
Florida.
The fall meeting of Our Nation's Council, and to basketball games,
Capitol Branch of Alumni of New may be purchased from any memYork State College for Teachers ber of Student Board of Finance,
will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, No- according to Rodney Felder '49,
vember 6, at Keneshaw Apartments, Secretary.
Washington D.C. If anyone should
be in the vicinity a t that date he
is invited and should make reservations with the Alumni Office, according io Mrs. Brimmer.
GamfuU
Munro Announces
Music Group Openings
Openings are still available to all
freshmen and upperclassmen in
both the Women's Chorus and the
Men's Chorus, according to Jean
Munro '49, President of Music
Council. The operetta class, which
Is open only to upperclassmen, also
needs additional membership.
Women's Chorus will meet in two
sections: Monday and Wednesday
at 12:35 p . m. and Tuesday and
Thursday at 12:35 p. m. The Men's
Chorus, however, will meet Wednesday nights, from 7:10 p. m. to
8:50 p. m. and the operetta group
Monday from 3:35 p. m. to 5:25
p. m.
Students wishing to participate
in these classes should contact
the Music Department.
At a recent meeting, Residence
Council elected officers for the year
1948-49. According t o Mary Sue
Dunning, '49, President, the officers
Include Vice-President, Jeanne Moshier,
a n d Secretary-Treasurer
Frances Flanagan, Seniors. Other
members of the Judicial Board are
Mary O'Neil, Lucy Lytle and Jean
Valachovic, Seniors.
Between takes of my new
picture, THE LUCK OF THE IRISH,
I enjoyed many CHESTERFIELDS.
They're MILDER...
Ifs AW cigarette.
'
L. G. Balfour Co.
S T A R R I N G IN
T H E LUCK OF THE I R I S H
A 30TH C E N T U R Y - P O X P R O D U C T I O N
BADGES,
STEINS,
RINGS
JEWELRY GIFTS, FAVORS
STATIONERY,
PROGRAMS
CLUB PINS,
KEYS
MEDALS
TROPHIES
Write or Call
CARL S0RENS0N
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
"Portraiture At Its Finest"
EAST
(Continued frtm Page l, Column 8)
and others are expected to attend.
Hillel will hold its first social
function of the year on Tuesday,
October 19, a t 7 p. m. There will
be an evening of dancing, refreshments and a "getting acquainted"
period for all members, according to
Marvin Wayne '49, President. IZFA
will present a program including a
movie on Palestine. This will take
place in the Commons.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
PHONE 5-1913
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ate C
onege
Z-444
COMES
TO TAKE
YOUR PORTRAIT
OPEN 9:00 to 8:30 DAILY
Evenings by appointment
TELEPHONE 4-0017
•11 MADISON AVENUE
roFynuil i'/lK, li'.i.m & Mvm Tuiwuo Co,
ALBANY. NEW YORK.
ooutfir
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1948
VOL. XXXIII NO. B
State Fraternities Nelson Reports IZZZTZ'c^'T
fU^\ />ss?c]aiion * * N ^ - t
Plan Baby Party, Last Semester's j a w s fc-SS l "° f b t a t e ' t a m P u s Q « « " Today
B
lr\
| | _ |
CA
I
L
improvement on Campus?
Th
Costumes Will Include
D£ZP^
m e
R
n Z l ?„**"! W ! f ^
as
e
Vacancies T o Be Filled
uccaneers Brawl Honor Students •JT^^'SS&st To
mission
ALBANY, N. Y.
...„„...„..-.„.„-.....——.-.-——-..-----—---—-——-—-—----.---i
YOU* VOT*
Assembly To Feature Campus Commission Skit,
Nominations, Association Elections, Straw Vote
(We c a n t afford or-
'
chids this year, ,s. A. hasn-t
n
v
/SSUP
, J J U C
i ..
Public On Board Of Finance,
' Wfc/ll«*
,
C»..JL«» C-_:l:i-.
D
J
n , student facilities Board
A"« s ^ a s a j r r * -sa«rs sffa« *elat,ons Leaflet £g~&i°ffi&
average during second semester of g r e e n does not compliment the
i • •• f r* I
I j n l & M o n > nominations for Campus
Fraternities are planning two the year 1947-'48:
present wall color, and also the
T o H l O n
S c f l O O K &
P ^ m
^ H S ! ^
parties this weekend, including an
Class of 1948: Viola E. Abrams,
fact that their present position
' U ' " « " ^V.i'L'Uia deaUal Election,^and Student Assoannual event, and a rush dance.
Margaret A. Ardito, Harry C. Badat eye level causes a student to
, . b e e l n n i n e w o r l c vice-PresWent; o ' S A and° v«^,n
p
B
James Warden '51 has announced en, Eugenia Baranowski, Kathleen
catch his nose on the top or „ „ " ™, J " ? D w , „ „ 0 ™ £ S S I * T £» r f „ „„ f t f « t L l f £ - ' < f , „
T * ^
that time will be set back about Ann Bell, Ruth Bessel, Paul A. Bierbottom every time, the new
™? M ° h £ ? ^ f J W ^ v«£
M S M ™ ? £ ! S „ ? M ™
twenty years a t the annual Potter wisch, Martin Bortnick, Betty May
mailboxes constitute the most
^ L t 0 f l ^ « ™ i ^ M ^ J Z Z v
t^Jn^L^tw
ESEfo
Club Baby Party which is to be Brebeck, Jane A. Buchanan, Eleneeded
improvement
since
1 n ^ ^ n ^ K i T
^
scheduled for todays Assembly.
ampus
held at tne Potter House, 415 State anor Byrne, J. Stuart Campbell,
metal chairs replaced wooden
^ J ^ * ,
\ f n l
-Sr?v
f" °
Commission will try, by
C01
Street from 8 to 12 p.m. tomorrow Dorothy Causse, Vera Chudiak,
ones, saving the nation's nylon
T J ; t o JeanMcCabe 49, Direct- the presentation of a short, humor01 o t F l e s s B u r e a u
night. The dress, to carry out the Carol I. Clark, Elaine Clute, Cecelia
supply.
'
ous skit, to make the student body
This
theme of a nursery, is to be diapers Coleman, Mrs. Elizabeth Collard,
But, seriously, (sober, that is)
publication will consist of a more cno3clentious of its rules and
bnef
or shorts. There will be prizes for Margaret Curtain, Margaret C. now that we've got real mailhistory of State College and regulations,
wil1
the most original costumes.
Daly, Muriel A. Dando, Mary E. boxes instead of sawed-off filfeature an aerial picture of the
Nominations for Campus Queen
The committee heads are: Re- Davis, Gari Deliganis, Edith A. ing cases with their drawers
College campus. Listed in the pam- will also take place with the elech l e t wil1 b e t h e
freshments. Kenneth Ludlum '51; Dell, Robert Dickinson, Wilma P. missing, let's standardize our
P
various types of tion to be held next Friday. NomEntertainment, Albert Kaehn and Diehl, Hazel L. Engdalil, Joan E.
notes. It would be nice, too, if education offered, degrees, major inations will be held open until 4:30
James Jiusto '51: Decorations, Ben Farrell, Alice Fisher, Gloria L. Gilpeople picked up their mail at requirements and admission require- p.m. this afternoon.
Jackson '50.
bert, Anne V. Gilleo, Shirley M.
least daily. It may grow mellow
ments. An explanation will also be
Also scheduled for tills- week is
Harnpr V Rpitv Instructor in Graham, Margaret A. Grosbeck,
(also moldy) with age, but it m a d e of the method of application the straw vote of the National
Gladys M Hawk
Education and Mrs Beatv and Ar'
' Eleanor M. Hoisure clutters those mailboxes!
for admission and a list of fees and Presidential elections which is bet h u r J o i e s Instructor in Physics b i ^ G i l b e r t K H o l l d a v ' Barbara S.
.
expenses will be given. The last i n g conducted by the State College
page of the
and Mrs Jones will act as chacer-' H v m a n ' G l o r i a R - J a f l e r - E v e l v n H P u b l i c a t i o n will be de- N E W S . The results will be tabulatana MIS. Jones, win act as cnapei J a m i s o n B e f c t e j J o n e S | W a l l a c e v ^ •
Q ,
voted
to
pictures
of student life.
ed and announced In next week's
D (
oueb
Keene, Helen M. Kislee, Dolores A. |>|£W r dltZ I IdVS
Co-editors of the pamphlet are NEWS.
Announces Theme
Koenig, Arlene Lavender, Anna L.
'
Lindley De Garmo and Margaret
Elections
f o _ Vice-President to
Richard Hayford '49, general L evine, Edna M. Long, Marjorle E I J J. T
A
I V o n a d a ' Sophomores. Edwin Mor- f l u the office vacated bv th« »,te
e
chairman of the Sigma Lambda L o t z , E u g e n e McLaren, Sheila Ma- MOSt l O A n n U a
™K will handle the photography. a ' t i ^ o f H e U Engel will 1b% filled
Sigma rush party, has announced g l n e s S i T e r e s a K . Mahoney, LorAssociate oditors include Jean Hoff- from ™ „ n tL fnlfowW ? f , „ C
m&n
that the party will be held tonight r a l n e M alo, Paul O. Meadows, Eliz- Q
C
t
> w i l m a Whitney, Margaret Z , T h m
B / ^ S M '
at 8 p.m. in the Commons or "Buck- abeth E. Merritt, Ann Moselle, Wil- TreSS V-OnTCrenCC Youngren, Seniors; Earle Jones, n a m L w n ^ ' n r i n U n ^ WPIAPT"
et of Blood" as it has been renamed i i a m H . Mott, Jane I. O'Brien, Zana
William Dumbleton, Christina San- varAnHps «n thp qtndpnrwnJrrii «f
for the occasion. The theme is said M . Olmstead, Anna C. Pascuzzi,
New York State Teachers College zo, Junior.s; and Mary Eade, Gerald pfnanctS caused bv t h T L i m S l n n
to be a "Buccaneers' Brawl". Pirate
/Continued on Page 4, Columns/
Press Association will hold its sec- Dunn, Helmuth Shultz, Sophomores. n f R nhP W T,„.i»r <*.Q . n i t h V a T
ccstumes are acceptable for both
ond annual press conference today
5 J ? WnnintuT nJ,,-U £,* t lul
fellows and their dates.
COfTlfTl/ftee Formed ^fTT^^lT*"
W^ Tavlor TO AddreSS
wSdSSLJ S O U
toS
List Committees
V - U l f l f l l l l i e e I VI U l t T U
senting the State College NEWS luyiUI
I UMUUrtJii
Preyer will also be filled CandiThe heads ol committees are: In- T C^U-i.
kAc,mnrin\
o"? ^ ^ T l " , ! , w U i , b e fnn Pi CZnmmn A/ln
dates ior the Finance post"are Auvitations, Joseph Francello '49; Re- ' O O e / e C l A d e r T l O r / a /
Pulver, Rodney Felder, Mary Jane T / KjOmmO
mil
Hoffman
d r e Adolfson
a n d Jean
freshments, Harold Tunkel '50; En'
,
. _, Peris, Jean Spencer, Seniors; ShirSeniors while'David Glendav "in is
A
tertainment, Earlc Jones '50; Music,
^ Student Council meeting Wed- ley Wiltse, Ruth Cookingham, BernPi Gamma Mu will hold its first S S o r e c l for the 0DMitton
on the
Richard Thorne '51 • Decorations n e s d a > ' n i S h t a r e P ° r t oi t h e W a l ' adette Freel, Jean Hotaling, and annual meeting Wednesday at 7:30 p 3 w P , R Z r r t
P 81"011 o n ™
Robert Rouller '51 • Chaperones' eMemorial
Committee was present- William Dumbleton, Juniors.
p. m. in the Lounge. The first forty'
,. , '
Eugene Webster '51- 'Arrangements' d b>' Ai""-" 0 ^ Prochilo '50, CoIt is expected that State will play five minutes will be devoted to bus- (Continued on Page 3, Column V
John Hopkins '49-' and Clean-up' Chairman ol the group. This group, host for the convention next year, mess and to considerations of new
Albert Zimmerman 51
' consisting of Prochilo, Shirley Wil- officers for the year '48-'49 will be members. At 8:15 p. m., however, ' P A C | _ _ i _
D.'L-The chaperones for the affair are Jt sl len' l oAr su d r e v DKro c n . Harold Vaughn, chosen from the Junior delegates reports by Molly Mulligan '50, and
J\J L . I C C C S
IMOGT
Dr Wesley Childers Professor of
.
- Charles
Stokes, f ro m State.
Dr. Wallace Taylor, Professor and
Spanish and Mrs Childers and Dr M r ' K a r l P c t e r s o n . of the Music
Dr. Joseph Murphy, Director of Supervisor in Social Studies, will T
L;l|
\ / - - a - 1 - . .
Charles'? Stokes Professor of Mu- lDepartment,
and Dr.
Roy York, of Columbia Scholastic Press Associa- commence. The two speakers will I U I I I I
• dCanCy
h eM i l n e l a c u l t v
nas been asked
sic and Mrs Stokes
'
tion, will be the primary speaker, relate their experiences of the Into investigate suitable possibilities Also included in the program will ternational Collegiate Conference at
Rhoda Riber was elected Student
for a War Memorial for State Col- be a display of the various pulica- the U N which they attended in Council representative from the
N
N
WATERFORD,
NEW YORK
Tel. U-F13
HOLLYWOOD
The publicity committee of Smiles
would like to have duplicates of
pictures taken at the party a t Albany Home for Children Sunday
afternoon, according t o A l l a n
Campbell '49, Director of the organization.
Campbell also announces that
notices of meetings of Smiles Organization will be posted on the
bulletin ooard in lower Draper.
Religious Clubs Hold Picnic
Name Rei'dence Officers
GammU&iOH
(Cont. from last week's NEWSJ
F. Hall Regulations
1. No smoking.
2. No congestion in corridors between periods.
3. Single tile down annex stairs and
no gossiping on the way.
4. Papers in proper receptacles, not
on floor.
5. Do not congregate in front of the
MAIL BOXES.
G. Locker Room Regulations
1. No smoking.
2. Suitcases in shower rooms.
3. No eating lunch a t any time.
H Lost and Found Regulations
(See Alice Gersh)
1. Any articles that are found
should be put in the lost and
found box in the lower hall of
Draper.
2. When you find something, be
sure to put your name and the
necessary data on the Lost and
Found bulletin board next to the
janitor's office.
3. If you have lost something, look
on the above mentioned board.
Duplicate Pictures Of Party
At Home Sought By Smiles
* ?sy...'"
r>\er\n
CISON
_
Annnin^e
/ A p p o i n t s
0WA*
rcpaictrar
l&irf l \ t & > | l a l l G I
ltfe 6-
tlons from the
'
colleges to be rep- New York City this past summer, class of '50 In assembly last Friday
The committee, appointed by this resented.
All State students who are inter- to fill the vacancy left by Robert
year's Student Council, will explain
The purpose of this organization ested are invited to attend the lnt- Freyer, who failed to return to col-
its
Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Acting
President, announces the appointmerit of Miss Ruth Lapc to the position o Registrar and Miss Leona
Bmmerlind as Stenographer and
Purpose to Student Association is to discuss common problems of ter section.
duriiij this morning's Assembly, collegiate publications, to stimulate
Time will be set aside in next interest and to improve the quality best of the papers on exhibit at the
w e ek's Assembly for the committee of State Teachers College publica- conference in Buffalo last year, acto receive suggestions from the lions.
cording to Jean Pulver, Editor, delmembers of S A.
The NEWS was considered the egate In '47.
.
,
lege this fall. The results of the
"Who's Who" Election are being
withheld until confirmation is reeeived from the organization conducting the poll,
Because the theoretical quota for
y ^ ^ X Z T ^ r
K-kK^.rHrr?
M> Play Season Stars With Villains, Scoundrels, Frosh; ; ^ - f c * ~ » - J Comedy, "Heavy Stuff", Precipitate Headache For Directors
^Z^T^^ST^
Slt c n
lsonl
fourteeni
there
is a possibility that the last two
positions at Bethlehem Central
„ „ . „ , . . J f „,. ,^xrurJl, \x;vin»
Srhnol and in the Department nf The Advanced Dramatics Play
accepted foi Who s Who.
St.te before con iim t< S a e Col beas.n starts off with a bing! bang I oi AD class members arc: Joan George Kline '51.
Numerical Tabulations
biau utioii coming 10 eiaie uoi ^.^ & ^ J o ^ ^ ^ r ( ; c e l v l n g Farrell '50, Sets and Props; Dun
The committees are composed of: Quota = 111 X100 + 1 = 5551
oi t h o s e s h o L s
Miss wmmerlina attended Btatn L ' ,ul
' V i l l i "» J° 11CS R k l e i ' ' 4 9 ' L l g l U S ; J o u n P l ' ° n C h ' 5 ° ' J ° ' U 1 P a r r 8 U ' 5 ° ' L i g h t ; S ; K a V N°°,~
l
OollSe for two tears and was D
*
"
^
'«
'"«
P^y
providing that Costumes; Joe Keele '50, House; nun '50, Sets and Props; Earle
1 + i
k,u v emnloved as Asist-m t the h l « hu B e (?) brawny (?) chest can Rhoda Riber '50, Publicity; and Jones '50, Costumes; Joe Keefe 50, Candidates
1
2
S
s i ! r # t „ withstand the brutal beating it takes George Christy '50, Makeup.
House; Tink Witt Penn '50, Public- Feathers
„.. 2000
d
T-H-1 .rs .. prnrtra la
"»"K >'"earsals. The cast is still
(Oh yes!) The now gray hairs Hy; unci Joe Crucilia '50, Makeup. K l b e r
4200
5300
recovering from an attack of onion- Which Martin Bush has acquired
In case you haven t noticed, the Thompson
4600
5200
ltis
P*n A m i o m To Hftlrl
broujjht on when Joe Keefe ate are the result of trying to teach freshmen seem to be getting the Blanks
-. 300
600
ran rvmigos IO n o i a
^ ^ c e r U , n u u l e t h l n g s fQr s u p . D l c k Q u U a t Q f , l r t D[ck jUfit can% l e a d s l n m a n y 0f the plays. Better
l-irst hall Meeting Ihursday
Total
11,100 11,100
p e r
s e e m t o co-ordinate that exagger- sot on your toes, Sophomores!
Entertainment will be the keyHowever, despite these minor ated wink and the come-hither
Judging from the list of forthnote of the monthly meetings of difficulties, Jeanne Valachovic hopes look. Marge Lyons has adapted very coining productions of this semes- Fieshmen Receive Warnings
Pan Aimgos, State's Spanish club, to present a satirical comedy Tues- successfully that seductive manner ter, Hie Dramatics Class seems to p o r Viol'tions Of Tradition!
according to Audrey Jerue'40, Presi- day at 8 p. m. In Page Hull Audi- so popular with the ladies of the like the "heavy stuff," for George
dent. Spanish songs, dances, movies torlum. The cast Includes: Earle sixteenth century. By the way, Christy, Joun French, Kay Noonan,
Betty Adams, Gordan Bennett,
and skils are included in this year's Junes 51, Villain; Sue Dan/.ls '52, ladies, tills play proves beyond a and Rhoda Riber are planning to and Rosylln Locks, freshmen, have
plans. Mr. Frank Ciirrino, Instruct- villuiness; Jane Cook '51, Heroine; doubt that women rule better than present tragedies. However, Earle received second warnings from
or in Spanish, will act as Hie club's Ed Curvln '51, Hero; Joe Keefe '50, men — come and get the "know Jones and Tink Witt Penn promise Myskania for violation of a State
advisor. Miss Jerue has set Thurs- Father; Dave Sliepard '52, Play- how."
to have you "rolling in the aisles." College tradition,
day as the date of the first meet- wrlght; Ross Federlco '52, Aspiring
Bush's cast Includes: Roslland
So for the cleverest comedies,
Freshmen receiving three warning and urges ull Spanish students Playwright.
Lucks '52, Marge Lyons '50, Dick tearlullust tragedy and funniest ings will be compelled to make a
to attend.
The various committees composed Gotta '61, Dan Ryder '49, and farces, don't miss the AD plays.
public apology in assembly.
8TATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY,
meant t
Policy...
Gammon-State*
Vote 4b* Ifou* Odmll
By Tony Prochllo
Rehashing something that has been thoroughly
The Common-Stater is given the widest latitude as
By ARTHUR FURNIA
masticated and digested by the student body durauthor of this column, although Ms viewpoints do
ing the last few weeks is not the wisest thing in the Do you believe In Idealism? The Rep.—Urges extending old-age not necessarily reflect those of the STATU COLLBQB
world to do. However, another letter has been re- answer Is probably yes, for you, as survivors insurance program to a NBWS.
ceived and is printed in this week's issue pertaining future teachers, are depending on more realistic level.
WAR MEMORIAL
a certain proportion of idealism to
Education: Dem.—Supports fedFor a couple of years now there has been considerto the subject under discussion—whether or not we, compensate
for the new Packard r a i appropriation of 300,000,000 able agitation for a State College War Memorial.
'as students in a teachers' college should knock our- you won't be driving. A great many edollars
to start federal aid to edu- Committees have been appointed, only to end in a
selves out publicly for political ideas and radical Americans are idealistic. That has cation.
deadlock because of lack of funds, incomplete reparties.
been the dominant factor In the R e p —Favors equality of educa- search, etc. Once again, a committee has been put
foundlng and eventual rise of this U o n a l opportunities for all.
to work, and it's really anxious to get something
The NEWS has once again been attacked and nation
among the other nations of B u s i n e s s . Dem.—Pledges intens- concrete going. I t is considering the possibilities of
this week more strongly because of its "conserva- the world.
l v e enforcement of antitrust laws some suggestions and methods of financing them at
tive, bogged down, political adolescence." That's all On November 2, the American w ith adequate appropriations,
present, but to insure our having a memorial which
a matter of opinion. The NEWS has tried to main- people will once again have the op- Rep.—Declares small business has the sentiment of the whole student body behind
it, they must have your help. Next Friday in assembly
tain a fairly broad-minded attitude as far as the e- portunity to decide the type of m U s t be encouraged by correction you
will have the opportunity to make recommendaidealism they want by the vote they 0 f tax abuses,
lection and politics are concerned. Since school be- cast.
tions and to explain them. If you don't have an asHowever, that decision should T H g ARGUMENTS
gan, we have endeavored through our guest col- be rendered only after critical an- T h e ^ ^ c a n pe opie have been sembly seat, drop a note to Shirley Wiltse '50, or myumnists to secure writers each week who would alysis of the issues, the facts and t o Q r e a d y m t h e p a s f c t 0 v o t e f o r a self. The committee is working for you; show it your
in a worthwhile State College project.
present a different political opinion and represent he arguments Therefore as ideal- c a n d i d a t e a n d l g n o r e the platform interest
STRAIGHTEN
UP
before
ties
T h e l . e fore
a different party. Last week immediately adjacent lata and potential voters, it is well f t h e
worth the time to consider these c o n s i d e r a t l o n o f a n y r n o r e 0 f this
There's a stick in the spokes somewhere. The Junto the editorial attacking radical demonstrations three factors before you reach your a r t i c l e m u m f o r a n l n s t a n t a n d ior Student Council representative nominations
in a teachers' college was printed a column which
weren't posted until almost one week after those nomStUdy t h e m a j r
PknkS
°
° f b ° U l inations were officially closed. For many legitimate
backed the Young Progressives and Wallace. On THE ISSUES
pa! es
and otherwise reasons, a good many of the class mem' '
that same page was printed the letter to the editor The issues of this presidential Observe
the education plank, the bers could not attend the class meeting. They had no
campaign
are
expressed
not
only
in
expressing a different point of view. This is pre- the candidate but also in the plat- *?*»} ^ ^ . P 1 " * " i e \a*0T way of knowing officially die names of the nominees,
cisely what the NEWS is trying to do—express dif- form of the parties. The following P l a n k ' the civil rights plank and the who had declined, or the time nominations were to
llc
y P, lanlc o f b ° h P ar "?, s - be closed. This was Myskania's own little secret. It's
ferent points of view through its editorials and col- are the seven most important tT ho e^ na nP°
swer
planks
of
the
democratic
and
re"
these questions. Who important that everybody have his full say in class
umns so that the reading public may accept these publican parties. They are foreign advocates a 300
million dollar fed- government; to do so he must be informed. Where
e
r
a
l
opinions for what they are worth and form their policy, civil rights, inflation, labor,
support o f education? Who was the sllp-up?
opinions through their own thinking and analysis. social security, education and busi- wishes to increase social security to While we're at it—In the past, the rules have been
an adequate level?
What party
Criticism was made in the letter that "undefined ness.
dared to approach the disgraceful set up to allow for the closing of nominations at preTHE FACTS
cisely the same time. Last week Myskania was runand skittish references" had been used in the edi- The issues have been presented. civil rights issue? What party pro- ning
around frantically trying to get acceptances of
Now,
what
are
the
facts
concerning
duced
a
necessary
and
aggressive
torial. Likewise, generalizations were made in the
a couple of last-minute nominations. In all fairness
those issues?
foreign policy? In short what party to the nominees, it was necessary to break the rules.
letter. How can any person say that "from their Foreign policy: Dem.-Pledges n a s produced a platform of social
past record the NEWS editorial writers apparently full support to the United Nations; Planning for the betterment of the Why not be sensible? Let's change the regulations
concerned to allow an extra day for declinations.
feel that anyone revealing any distinctive variation promises necessary funds and a cAmerican
people? If you are sin- VOTE WISELY
el e t h e r e c a n b e o n l v o n e
sound
administration
of
the
Mar'
.
answer,
fiom their own phlegmatic stolidity has slipped
That was a good, clear explanation of the use of
shall plan; advocates adequate t n e Democratic party,
into the abyss of rank radicalism?"
armed forces to protect all counThis debate must be equally pre- the preferential ballot that we saw in assembly last
sen ted, therefore consider the same week. It's too bad some of the "clever kids" had to
In the first place, it is not our opinion that rad- tries' security
try to make a farce out of the system by turning in
ical ideas are right or wrong. We simply feel and Rep.—Promises financial a i d Planks o£ the Republican party, "that's me's" and Mickey Mouse write-in's.
within
prudent
limits
to
help
other
They
appear
to
be
worthy
of
little
wish to express once more that we do not think nations restore their economic in- consideration for they deal only in Today, we vote for a acw vice-president. It's an
that those people in TEACHERS COLLEGES can dependence
vague generalities. The party is important job, requiring a hard working, conscienavail themselves of as many radical ideas as the Civil Bights: Dem.-Calls on Con- making no promises because prom- tious person to fill it. Think carefully, and vote only as
as you're sure of yourself.
average individual. A teacher would not be a real gress to support the President on 'ses are oased on plans and the Re- far
PROGRESS
tire
civil
rights
issue.
Pledges
party,
publican
party
of
1948
has
no
plans,
teacher if he did not look into the various ways of
Well, the administration is really started now in
legislation to eradicate all at least none that its industrial
political thinking. Grant you that each person will through
types of discrimination.
backers wish to show the public. its efforts to improve student facilities. Those handhave his own opinion. However, as has been stated Rep.—Favors enactment of legls- The Republican party of 1948 has seme looking mail boxes strung out In a line are a big
toward breaking up the congestion that had made
and re-stated, there must be more caution exercised lation ending all lynching and mob the ability to present one face sav- step
such a fire-trap of the Commons. Let's not make this
violence;
favors
abolition
of
the
poll
"ig
item,
me-too.
However,
you
loyby those in the teaching profession.
al followers of purple elephants will progress useless by blocking the entrance, using the
tax
Complaints have also been heard that the edi- Inflation: Dem—Blames the Re- cry that in the labor and business space to stop for our between-classes chatter.
torial column of the NEWS should not have been publican-controlled Congress for planks, one finds some substantial THE RIGHT LIST
as though lots of students prayed to Minerva
used for the purpose of replying to the letter print- not adopting President's compre- promises. Definitely these promises lastSeems
semester. Check the Dean's List In today's NEWS;
program of price control., are substantial to the moneyed ined last week. The letter was not a personal letter hensive
Rep.—Asserts Truman adminis- terests and dare you deny this with it's longer by far than the one released a year ago.
to the editorial writer but to the NEWS Board as tration deliberately encouraged high t h e Inflation caused by non-price This should be very gratifying news to Miss Stokes
a whole. It represented the reaction to the opinions prices; pledges attack on basic control and the attempted paraliz- who last week expressed her concern over students'
disdain for scholarship. We are showing that
of a percentage of State College students as did causes of inflation by cutting gov- ing of labor with the so-called e- apparent
we do know the real reason for our being here, and
ernment
spending
qualizing
clauses
of
the
Taft-Hartboth the letters printed last week and this week.
Labor: Dem.—Advocates the re- l e y Labor Act? The record of the that we are striving for a good balance between our
This may seem like the old flag-raising technique peal of Taft-Hartley act because it 80th
Congress is too recent to deny scheduled and extra-curricular education.
r t 0 De
forgotten and the idealism THESPIANS
but there is an insignia which has been used on the has failed to bring industrial peace; t°0
Jeannie Valachovic and Marty Bush are opening the
favors
increasing
minimum
wage
°
sadly
lacking to be praised,
cover of the Alumni Quarterly and which will be from 40 cents to 75 cents per hour. YOUR DECISION
AD play season on Tuesday with a riotous farce and
used next semester on all envelopes leaving the Rep.—Pledges continued study to When you cast your ballot, rc- a powerful tragedy. Having seen the previews In class,
Alumni Office which reads "Our teachers mold improve labor-management rela- member that the candidate is only I can promise you a very entertaining evening. You're
cur nation's future."
tions in light of changing social part of the party. Remember the om testing ground. Come and let us know what you
STATE CCLLEGE NEWS
Established M a y 1916
conditions.
Social Security: Dem.—Favors increasing old age and survivors insurance hy 50%; reduction of ellglbility of women from 60 to 65
years.
platform is the basis upon which
that candidate will act. Remember
the ideals that America must follow if we are to survive in this
world. Remember and vote for your
ideals.
By the Class of 1918
BATING—ALL-AMERICAN
Vol. XXXIII
October 22, 1948
No. 5
Member
Dlslribulor
AiBOclnted Collegiate Presa
Collegiate Ul^eHt
The undergraduate nownpiii/iT nf the New York Hum College for Touchers; publlnhcil every Krlilny of I lie college
yeut by the NEWS licmrd for the Student Association.
Phones: I'ulver, Spencer, umi Kurliing, IMII-M; Lundiiu,
Troy, 275-W; Wulte umi Jerue, s-n'Ml. Meiuliera of the
newB staff may be readied TuoHduy und Wudiiumln; from
T to 11:30 P. M. at 3-IM07.
QamrnHHicaiicHd.
To the Editor:
Every year In the NEWS some
student has had a good deal to say
about the manner in which the library rules are enforced. They seem
to resent what Is, to them, a childish "patrolling.'
The fact remains that in spite of
this vigilance, It is next to ImposThe News Board
sible to work quietly and in peace
JEAN PULVER
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
in our library
ELSIE LANDAU . .
PUBLIC RELATIONS EDITOR
.Students— especially freshmen—
JEAN SPENCER
MANAGING EDITOR .simply do not realize how maddenROBERT VAN DAM
SPORTS EDITOR ing the sound of a whispered conVIRGINIA WAITE
CIRCULATION MANAGER versation cun be. Especially when,
MARION FURLONG
ADVERTISING
across the table, some poor bedevAUDREY JERUE •
ADVERTISING
illed upperclassman, lingers In ears,
G L O R I A DONATO
BUSINESS
is trying to cram a little history
R O D N E Y FELDER
BUSINESS through a Jaded bruin.
ROSEMARY STODDARD
EXCHANGE EDITOR
There are a hundred places on
RUTH COOKINGHAM .
. ASSOCIATE EDITOR
campus to converse or study-byBERNADETTE FREEL
.
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
two's. The peristyles, the Commons,
SHIRLEY WILTSE .
.
.
.
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
the Lounge, have no restriction
whatever. The tables in the cafeAll communlcatlonii should he uddrohxcil to the editor and teria are always available, there are
uiimt he Hlgueil. NiiincM will be withheld uuon rcuucHl benches in Draper hull, und under
V h ' U ' U
.7 . ..
The STATU nil,!,K<iri111 MOWN
mien no ru«|)oii«lli||l!y
for opinions expressed in lu coiumna or ('omuiunleiiilonij thu elms. The library is the one
place on campus where it Is possible
an such expressions do not iietvisurily reflect lt« vi.-w.
to find relative peace and quiet for
working. If thu students who wunt
to fraternize would carry their con-
versations outside, so many students would not have to go all the
way to the state library to work on
a term paper.
It is actually quiet there, unci until
our students have a more adult attitude, I will be the first to scream
for more and better monitors and
policemen to throw out. the gabbers.
Sincerely,
Bedevilled Student
To the Editor:
How many Instances of the following comments have we heard amoiig students? "Do you know
where the Forum meets?" or "Where
docs Potter Club play this afternoon?"
Such questions as these are asked
over unci over again and usually
one must must search for the answers among the labyrinth of posters, anouncements, and clippings.
A solution could be u weekly bulletin listing In advance "all"
the purticulur activities, what time
they commence, and where they
meet. Muny copies placed conspicuously about the school would end
this confused confusion.
PAOE S
• T A T 1 COUUtOE N I W « , f R I D A Y i OCTOBER 2 2 , 1048
©CfOMSII 2 2 , 1042
think of our work.
WADDYA WANT—BLOOD?
Dear Sophomores,
You should all drop dead! Last year, the Class of
'50 graciously went through helanhiwater to take back
all warnings given to you on Activities Day. Now, to
show your appreciation, you went out of your way to
pile them on the frosh on that same day. It's supposed to be a day of fun and good fellowship. You
clipped the kids for some fifty bucks—wasn't that
enough?
i signed i Peeved At You
College
Ca/endar
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22
7:00 p.m. Christian Science weekend begins at
Camp Pinnacle in the Heldcrbergs.
7:15 p.m. WAA hayrlde starting from Pierce Hall.
11:00 p.m. Youth Forum presents Albert Luthull und
Paul Harrison ul the First Presbyterian
Church.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER li!)
8 p.m. VI p.m. Van Derzee Open House.
« inn. 12 p.m. Potter Club Baby Party at Potter
House.
Tl'KHDAY, OCTOBER U)
3:30 p.m. IVCF Bible Class lo hear Rev. tlerhard
in Rm. 150.
4:15 p.m. Smiles open meeting In Rm. I l l for all
those Interested.
4:30 p.m. Rivalry Push Hull Game, Page Field.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
12 noon
Chapel mcetnig In Unitarian Church.
7:45 p.m. Newman Club meeting at Newman Hull
to present lecture on "Our Lady Of Fuliina."
THURSDAY, OCTOBER >8
12 noon
IVCF noon-ttinu worship In Rm. 23.
12 noon
Christian Science will sponsor Eininei
Confused
Herring on topic, "Do You, Christ?"
S C A T o Initiate
Youth Meetings
In Albany Area
I Z F A To Play Host
A t Saratoga Seminar
Loud Socks, Plaid Shirts, Jeans
Will Predominate At Soc-Hop
Nylons And high heels, or the blue
pln-strtpe suit will definitely be out
of place In Page Hall next Friday
night, for Commuters Club Is presenting its annual Soc-Hop. Socks,
the fancier the better, (because the
loudest pair wins a door prize) and
plaid shirts and jeans will predominate at the affair as the Commuters go all out to make this Hop,
under the general chairmanship of
Harold Tunkel '50, their biggest and
best yet.
Immediately after paying the
small but necessary price of 50
cents for admission, the public will
run Into the shoe checking booth,
which is under the direction of Helene Patlen '52. From here they will
proceed directly to the gym floor
where round and square dancing
will be in progress.
If time can be taken from dancing to admire the decorations, we
would find that Marion Oliver '50
and her committee have given the
gym the appearance of an old-style
Religious clubs SCA, IZFA, and
IVCF have released plans for this
week. Student Christian Association
has announced the initiation of a
Youth Forum planned especially
for the students in this area. InterZionist Federation of America will
play host to the Upper New York
State region at a seminar a t Saratoga Springs next weekend. The
speaker at the Newman Club meeting, scheduled for Wednesday, OctoDer 27, will be Rev. William Brenan. Bible classes sponsored by I n ter Varsity Christian Fellowship
will be held as usual on Friday.
The Youth Forum will present
two speakers: Algbert Luthull, a
Zulu chiettan, from Natal In the
Union of South Airica, who will use
as his topic the conditions of life
in Airica and Paul Harrison, a surgeon, who will tell of his years as
a missionary in Arabia. This program will be presented at the First
Presoytenin Church on State and
WUlet .Streets, tonight at 8 p.m.
r i i i w j , uie (JOiillllueelV UlUO Will
SCA has also named Tuesday, from
3.30 to 4:30 p.m as "Committee Hour present its Soc-hop in the Lounge.
in the Lounge". At this time, all the Campus Day will be Saturday,
committees of this organisation will October 30. The morning's program
meet and work together. Anyone will tea ture rivalry contests, tug-ointerested in working with these war, high jump, punting, distance
groups is invited to attend, accord- throwing, and cheering. The rival
ing to Kathcrlne Grant '49, presi- classes will search for banners in
ihe afternoon. Rivalry skits, crowndent of SCA.
ing of the Campus Day queen from
The regional seminar of IZFA, the class of '49 and dancing will
for which the State College chapter complete the aay's activities.
will act as host, will feature representatives from Cornell, Syracuse,
On November 3 Margaret WebBuffalo, Cortland State and R.P.I. ster's group will bring Macbeth and
The meetings will be held at Haw- Hamlet to the Page Hall stage.
thorn Inn, in Saratoga.
Students will be able to attend one
Rev, William Brennan will lec- of the productions via student tax.
ture on, "Our Lady of Fatima," at
The annual WAA tea has been
the regular meeting of Newman scheduled for Thursday, November
Club, Wednesday, at 7:45 p.m. at 4, in the Lounge.
Newman Hall. The evening's proState's students will celebrate
gram will 'ilso include the showing Armistice Day, November 11. School
oi film slides.
will be closed for this day.
Lecturer for the regular meeting
Thanksgiving recess will begin
of iVCF Bible Class will be Rev. Tuesday, November 23 a t 5:30 p. m.
Gerhard, who will discuss the Phil- and will continue until Monday,
ippines. The group Will meet today November 21) when classes will rein Room 150, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. sume at 8:10 a. m.
Next week has been designated as
Religious Book Week. At this time,
The sorority buffet suppers and
boJks wnich are acceptable to and formal dinners will be held the
recommended by the three faiths, week-end of December 3 and 4 at
Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish the respective sorority houses.
are publicized and brought to pubDecember 3 will also feature the
lic attention.
first basketball game of the year.
Focus on Future
Schmid Surveys
German Colleges
Recently returning from a tour
oi German colleges and universities
Miss, u c t y Claire Schmid writes in
tne Octouer issue ol "Mademoiselle"
ol the una view of the luture taken
by the German students.
Alter Nujsisin teil, the typical
German youth, disheartened and
disillusioned, searched for something to ml its place. But, she adds,
coiiuiuuiis ueliiiS what ihey are today in Lit l'lii.iny, and the luturo being so uncertain so as to appear
enveloped in a log, have caused
them to revert to many of the Nazi
ideas.
In regard to World War II, Miss
Schmid reports that the German
youth feels no responsibility towards
the war met still looks upon various
nuLonulities with hatred. In addition, they object to the French
"parading al every opportunity."
In one sentence Miss Schmid reviews the present setup in Germany. "It all boils down to nil attempt lo spread democracy with an
occupation army, which is nol by
lmiuiv a democratic procedure, to
ii people who have not been conditioned cither mentally or psychologically for thinking along I'.emocratic lines."
\. F. Honikel & Son
Pharmacists
Established 1005
Phono <l-»)3«
157 Central Ave.
ALBANY. N. Y.
<m, i m
m I.
I
"" '
barn with pumpkins and cornstalks
liberally and literally scattered around.
Not to be outdone in maintaining
the Halloween atmosphere, the refreshment committee under the
leadership of Lois Cruden '51 has
provided free cider (a keg no less)
and donuts for all.
During the course of the dancing,
a brief break will be taken and
special entertainment will be provided. Included among the special
features, arranged by Joyce Platner and Helen Marie Moeller, Sophomores, will be songs by a male
quartet, monologues by Delphine
Verch and Jackie Mann, Sophomores, and a tap dance by Miss
Moeller. Master of Ceremonies for
the evening's program will be Mitchell Bursowsky '52.
The dance Is open to all students,
so put the day, October 29, down
in your little black book, find a
date, and come down to Page Hall
gym.
Webster Group
To Brins Hamlet,
MacBeth to State
Dramatics and Arts Council will
bring the Margaret Webster Shakespeare Company to Page Hall Auditorium, Saturday, November 5, Miss
Webster's Company is currently
making its initial tour of this continent's colleges and universities
presenting "Hamlet" and "Macbeth. Its only capital district appearance is at State College.
Born in America of distinguished
English parents, the late Dame May
Whitty and Ben Webster, Miss
Webster has achieved top honors as
an actress, author, and playwright.
She is the author of "Shakespeare
Without Tears", and co-founder of
the American Repertory Theater.
Miss Webster has instituted this
tour with the idea of eventually implementing the academic course of
study by tying it in with the regular
curricula.
"Macbeth," the matinee performance, will begin at 2:45 p.m. Tickets
are priced at $1.20, with all seats
reserved. "Hamlet" will be presented
at 8:30 p.m., and again all seats
will be reserved. Tickets for this
performance will be priced at $1.80
and $2.40. Students may use their
student tax tickets for one perforFriday. December 10, the Inter- mance only and will be required to
Frsilemity-Inter-Sororlty
Council pay regular prices for the other.
will sponsor the all-college ChristTickets may be secured at Van
mas semi-formal dance at the AuCurler's Music Stores, the Madison
rania Club.
Music Box and the State College
Co-op.
Elect Abrams To Presidency
O f Kappa Phi Kappa Group
Kappa Phi Kappa has announced Sabol Releases Fall Semester
that Stanley Abrams, Graduate, Enrollment Figures A t State
has been elected President to
The Fall semester enrollment figsucceed Raymond Howard, now
a nlumber of the State College ures have been released this week
by Mr. Edward Sabol, Co-ordlnator
faculty.
Mervyn McClintock wos appoint- of Field Services and Public Relaed to represent Kappa Phi Kappa tions. Enrolled undergraduate and
at the annual convention now con- graduate students total 1416 persons. Of the entire student body
vening at St. Louis, Missouri.
McClintock will report the events 36% arc men and 64% are women.
of the St. Louis convention at the Veterans make up 16% of the student body.
next meeting.
:
'T • " * *
T
Assembly Today Lievestro Heads
To Feature Skit, IGC Programs
Vote, Elections On WROW
In cooperation with Intergroup
i Continued from Pag* 1, Column 5J Council, Station WROW has doIt was reported at Student Coun- nated, time, and made available, as
cil meeting Wednesday night that a public service, feature, a thirteenonce the Class Board of Finance is week series of weekly radio broadset up, with a standard set of books, casts. This action, according to Joy
the Veterans Administration will Simon, Chairman of IGC, reprepay class dues for all veterans in sents an outstanding challenge and
opportunity to the members of
regular attendance.
4;
(
to demonstrate their
A report by Susan Panek '51, State College
through the field of Interconcerning the proposed Rivalry. ability
and community relations. The
Bulletin Board was submitted. T h e group
will use entertainment
board will be made of plywood, with broadcasts
a medium of instruction and ena wooden frame around it, and will as
be hung in a suitable place where joyment.
the rivalry scores will be posted Christian Lievestro '50, who has
and kept up to date. The board will been selected to direct and introbe made by Mr. Richard Davis, who duce the new series, declares that
is the cabinetmaker on the main- the program will make It possible
talnance staff. The funds necessary to present leading speakers and
to cover the cost of the board will performers from many cultures to
be raised by Student Council, led the college and to the community.
Lievestro is a member of the Alby a committee composed of Harold
Vaughn '50, Chairman; James Bro- bany Artists Group and Is active in
phy '49, and Anthony Prochilo '50. musical oiganizations a t State, as
well as dramatic and literary groups.
Robert Kittredge '49, Chairman He has been employed by Capitol
of the State delegation, reported on District radio and television studios
the Intercollegiate Association Con- for a number of years.
ference which will be held NovemStudents are expected to particiber 19-21, at Brockport State
Teachers College, Brockport, New pate and contribute in the new serYork, and will be attended by rep- ies and Lievestro asks that anyone
resentatives of all eleven State interested should contact him for
further information.
Teachers Colleges.
A group, consisting of Donald
Langsley, Joy Simon, and Millard Grand Marshal Lists Heads
Smith, Seniors, and Edwin Kurlan- Of 48-49 Campus Committee!
der '51, was appointed to aid the
Perry Pless '49, Grand Marshal,
Constitution Committee in a study
of the Student Association Consti- has announced the new heads of
tution. It was also announced that the committees for Campus ComDorothy Parr and Frances Flana- mission. They include: Grand Margan, Seniors, have been appointed shal, Perry Pless '49; Commons,
Co-Editors of the 1948-'49 Directory. Florice Kline '50; Myskania Messenger, Joseph Zanchelli '49; Lounge
and Marshals, Virginia Norton '51;
Dunn Names New Officers
Posters, Renee Harris '50; Coke,
At a recent meeting of Sayles David Jack '50; Mailboxes, MarHall Annex, officers for the year garet Seaman '49; Mimeograph, Su1948-'49 were elected. According to san Miller '50; Record Player,
Gerald Dunn '51, President, Rich- Charlotte Skolnlck '51; Cafeteria
ard Feathers '50, is Secretary- and Annex, Lois Cruden '51; LockTreasurer, and David Caiman '51, Is ers and Halls, Martha Downey '51;
Lost and Found, Alice Gersh '51.
Social Chairman.
SPALDING
'Was
IN THE 1924 ILLWOKMCiUGAN S M C
RBDGRKNGE
PUT OH 'FOOTBALL'S
GREATEST OHE-A1AN
DEMONSTRATION...
HE CARRrt£> THE BALL
EXACTS AVE TIMES"
AMD SCORED EXACTLY
RVE TOUCHDOWNS'.'
^ -9 " y y - y - y
XMAS CARDS OUT MONDAY
Hallmark
Kravesi-Lamont
Brownie Block-prints
PERSONALIZE YOUR CARDS:
HAVE YOUR NAME PRINTED
10% discount on purchases of $1.00 or more
Stale College Go-op.
tiHr T t - t i r I f 1 Mil I
"•a?*j>
•TATE COLLKOB N*W»; MtlOAV. OCTOWH «*.
PAOt 4
Nelson Reports
Last Semester s
Honor Students
openly. The editors reveal their own
To the Editor:
The NEWS editorial writers have political adolescence by such undeonce again succeeded In shocking fined skittish reference.
the Intelligence of Its readers by its But, as the editorial develops, we
unfair and Irresponsible attacks on see that the above quoted comments (Continued from Page 1, Column 2)
the political opinions and activities are merely rationalizations of a Curtis Half, Wilma A. Phillips,
of members of the student body.
more "realistic" argument. We come Otorge J. Poulos, Angela M. Ricci,
Myra Rosenberg, Lucille A. St.
First, however, I would like to to the meat of the matter which Priest, Lillian M. Salani, Ruth V.
point out an inaccuracy made in the consists of fore-warnings on outside Seelbach, Mrs. Shirley Ames Spieditorial of two weeks ago. "Those influences. With blatant cynicism one, Jean Elizabeth Stapleton, Josheets of yellow matter" referred to, we are told to "watch our step. We seph W. Stenard, Dale A. Sullivan,
did not publicize the reception held do not have a complete freedom of Lewis A. Sumberg, Seymour H.
for Norman Thomas at Channing speech." In order to be "successful," Sundick, James E. Taylor, Marilyn
Hall. The circulars announced that we are advised, we should not feel F. Thomson, Paula Tichy, Charles
Samuel Friedman, a spokesman for free to speak out on "each and B. Trim, James F. Van Detta, Shirthe Socialist Party, would speak at every" issue!
ley Van Popering, Marionlee Watthe Forum of Politics, our campus'
Indeed! What are we teaching kins, Doris E. Wester, Alice J. Wilnon-partisan political discussion for anyway? This not-so-gentle liams, Shirley E. Williams, Orietta
group.
hint to curb any attempt toward B. Wolfe, Elizabeth C. Wood, MuLast spring, Forum of Politics an- advanced social thought is quite riel E. Woods, Eloise C. Worth,
nounced its program to present a disturbing. This is the counsel of- Frances M. Zinni.
spokesman from each political par- fered to teachers in whose responClass of 1949: Charles J. Amyot,
ty to represent their respective sibility lies the sustenance of our Jean M. Anderson, Dorothy C. Arnpoints of view. By the time this Is democratic way of life.
old, Jeanne Ashcraft, Mary E.
printed both the Democrats and
A lot of people, it seems, read Bacher, William C. Bahn, Jr., Jean
the Republicans will have had equal our paper; more than "many peo- P. Bassett, Albert F. Beninatl, Bertopportunity to present their views. ple imagine!" "Teachers are sub- ram W. Blasberg, Dorothy J.
It was also decided that each meet- ject to criticism." (Albany is es- Byrnes, Helen C. Callfano, Eleanore
ing would be turned over to that pecially guilty of this dubious ten- E. Carlucci, Frances T. Cembalski,
group In the student body support- dency.) "We are laying ourselves Philomena M. Cerro, Stanley Chwaing the political party represented wide open for criticism." My, my, lek, Clara Cipriani, Mrs. Marjorle E.
whether they be Young Republicans, of all things, criticism in a democ- Clark, Richard T. Clark, Knowton
Youth For Thomas, Young Demo- racy! What will we come to next? E. Coutu, Dorothy E. Daly, Oliver
crats, or what-have-you.
When are we going to grow up? H. Darling, Patricia M. Devlin, MaAccordingly, when Mr. Friedman Certainly we are subject to critic- rie V. Dickinson, Catherine M. Donof the Socialist Party was expected ism. For what reason should we be nelly, Juanlta Evans, Marie G. Ferto speak, the Youth For Thomas above it? Right here at State Col- nandes, Richard S. Foster, Charles
group on campus assumed responsi- lege there is a deserving need for D. Frail, Joseph A. Francello.
bility for Mr. Friedman's meeting. criticism. Where are the basic phil- George H. Frank, Robert L. French,
In order to sufficiently publicize the osophy courses necessary for a well- Irene M. Galloway, Bernard W.
event, Youth For Thomas placed rounded Intellectual outlook? Where Gornbein, Anne E. Gourley, Joan
personally addressed circulars in are the psychological laboratories C. Guzzetta, Helen M. Habermann,
the mailboxes announcing
the necessary to a teacher-training Robert H. Hardt, Persls A. Hockmeeting and its sponsorship.
curriculum?
ridge, Jean A. Hoffman, Betty C.
Now according to the affronted
It is just this sort of servility and Hohenstein, Marie Holtz, Mrs. Heleditorial writers of the NEWS, this social timidity which has gained en G. Hummel, Jean A. Ineson, Auis an "obvious example of the dem-« the teaoher profession its low rating drey A. Jerue, Jo Ann Joslin, Vironstratlons which are disturbing to in the public eye. When are we go- ginia D. Keller, Robert E. Kittthe public." In all fairness, we must ing to assume the responsibilities redge, Mary V. Krom, Elfriede L.
expect the NEWS to make similar both as citizens and as teachers Laemmerzahl, Marion R. LaFargo,
editorial accusations against New- necessary for professional respect? Donald G. Langsley, Ruth E. Leier,
man Club, SCA, Hlllel, IZFA, IVCF, Observe the lawyers in their bar Olive B. L'Heureux, Angelina L.
Commuters' Club, French Club and associations, the doctors in the Lisi, Lucy A. Lytle, Joyce E. Mcall other organizations on campus AMA. You will find no timidity Collum, Agnes J. Mclntyre, Norwho have been guilty of similar there.
man D. Madsen, Marie F. Markforms of public "demonstrations."
The fore-warnings continue to be ham, Mary M. Marscher, Jeanne L.
From what divine source the edi- brought closer to home. All veils Moshier, Marjorle J. Munro, Anna
torial writers of the NEWS assume are shorn; the final threat is un- J. Olln, Anita J. Olson, June M.
their guardianship of the political sheathed; "Our bread and butter lie Olson, Emory R. Osborn, George G.
morality of the student body Is down the street only four blocks Osborn, Lawrence Ostrander, Thelquite puzzling. Nevertheless, they away."
ma I. Pangburn, Dorothy E. Parr.
have taken It upon themselves, with
Last year, an outside source made William Pawluckle, Elizabeth J.
Immodest
self-righteousness,
to the invalidated charge that "crass Powell, Lorraine J. Rasmussen,
"focus" editorial denunciation on materialism" was being taught in Gerald S. Reisner, Daniel E. Rider,
"those people 'tinged' with radical the curriculum. We who have ex- Rose L. Rosen, Ethel S. Rosenberg,
views who blindly 'dive head-first' perienced the curriculum here know Patricia Rourke, Agnes E. Russo,
for something new." From their that this is untrue. But the atti- Samuel
Schallt,
Marvin
M.
past record the NEWS editorial tudes noted above certainly confirm Schwartz, Yvette Schwedock, Mary
writers apparently feel that anyone its presence on campus.
C. Scutt, Margaret I. Seaman, Jean
revealing any distinctive variation
Selkirk, William F. Sheehan, AbraIf
the
NEWS
editorial
writers
from their own phlegmatic stolidity
ham Sherer. Joyce H. Simon, Jeanhas slipped into the abyss of rank must engage In partisan attacks, ette M. Skavlna, Audrey H. Steigwould
they
please
offer
some
alterradicalism.
native with ideological substance erwald, Norma J. Swinyer, ClifIf the above quote refers to the rather than the purltannlcal de- ton J. Thorne, Helen R. Tlschler,
Socialist Party platform, as a sup- pravity presently exhibited.
Abraham Trop, Robert L. Tucker,
porter of Its program, I must proEmily
R. Uzanska, Marvin Wayne,
As for "flying off the handle,"
test. The Socialist Party has never
Lloyd L. Wheeler, Glfford W. Winthe
editors
have
already
displayed
felt that their program was "tinged
gate, Elizabeth A. Winkler, Carolyn
with radicalism." The Socialist pro- a distressful need for their own ad- J. Wood, J. Olivia Yunker, Joseph
vice.
gram Is a radical program and
L. Zanchelll, Hortense E. ZellenVery truly your".
avowedly so. If the NEWS editorial
gold.
Leonard A. Koblenz '50
writers feel that there Is any perniClass of 1950: Irwin M. Baumel,
cious congenital evil In a radical
Marjorle Bausch, James F. BlackPost
Sample
Folders
For
TPB
position, then let them say so, and
burn, Ashor Borton, Anna Buno,
debate the question freely and
Currently on display on the Martin Bush, Dorothy M. Butch,
Teacher Placement Bureau bulletin Carl J. Byers, Joseph Carosclla,
board, In lower Draper, Is a sample Sarah Caruso, Shirley easier, EdyVan Derzee To Present
folder of the type to be filled out the L. Compton. Dorothy Conaway,
Operin House Tomorrow by all Seniors and Graduate Stu- Jane
Condo, Ruth Cooklnglmm.
Van Derzee Kail will hold Its an- dents when registering with the Geraldine Coopcrman, Clifford N.
nual open house tomorrow evening Bureau These folders should bo Crooks, Henrietta L. Daub, Marie
Iroin 8 to 12 p. m. The entire house filled out and returned to the A. DeCarlo, Reglna F. Drlscoll,
will be open for Inspection and Flacement office before the end of Joyce T. Dubert, Robert L. Eaton.
everyone is Invited, according to the first semester.
Joan C. Erlandson, Seymour Fersh,
Everson Klnn '49, President,
Chaperoning the affair will be
Miss Catherine Ncwbold, Instructor
In History; Dr. Edward Cooper, InW h e r e all t h e S t u d e n t s M e e t
structor In Commerce, and Mrs.
Cooper; Mr. Frank Carrlno, Instructor In Spanish; and Mr. Karl
Peterson, Instructor in Music.
Dancing will begin at 10 p. in.
L. G. Balfour Co.
BADGES,
STEINS,
RINGS
JEWELRY GIFTS, FAVORS
STATIONERY,
PROGRAMS
CLUB PINS,
KEYS
MEDALS
TROPHIES
Write or Cull
CARL SORENSON
WATERFORD,
NEW YORK
Tel. 11-F13
1*4*
Paul F. Fllipi, Robert J. Frasca,
Lois Preedman, Kenneth George,
Mrs. Lucy W. Haemmerlein, Peter
W. Havey, Jean Hotaling, Stuart P.
Howell, Beverly A. Huber, Betty
Button, David E. Jack, Laura R.
Kaplan, Frances M. Kessler, John
M. King, Audrey Koch, Frances
Konopka, Clarence F. Larson, James
E. Burhans, Rosemary E. Lessard,
Christian Llevestro, Mary Lock•\nith, Mary A. Lynch, Marjorle
Lyons, Jean E. McNeil, Ruth Marschner, Virginia A. Mason, Norma
L. Miller, David S. Mooney, John
A. Moore, Geraldine Morris, Martha Murphy, Selma B. Nadel, John
V. O'Connor, Arthur P. Pedersen,
Arthur H. fedley, Joan E, Peterson, Doris A. Price, Mary TJ. Randall, Warren W. Reich, Beverly G.
Reynolds, Rhoda J. Riber, Arnold
S. Rice, Joan M. Romulus, Philip
F. Rose, Helma R. Rosenberg, Lorice Schain, William B. Schneider,
Grace M. Seeley, Judith Serebnick,
Vera H. Settle, Janice H. Seward,
Shirley M. Sheets, Barbara J.
Smith, Dorothy A. Smith, Walter
F. Solan, Jr., Reba E. Soames,
Catherine Stalker, Vivian L. Steele,
Malcolm A. Sterling, Ruth L. Sutherland, Lloyd A. Taylor, Earline S.
Thompson, Norene M. Thorson, Mabel E. Totten, Henry W. Traub,
Ethel Trop, Harold A. Vaughn, Lyle
S. Walsh, Shirley M. Warner, Richard C. Watson, William E. Werner,
Jr., Harold F. White, Lynn A.
White, Shirley Wiltse, June W.
Youmans, Peter N. Youmans, Marion E. Zimmer.
Class of 1951: Marilyn Allen, Cecelia M. A. Battlsti, William R.
Belanger, Morris I. Berger, Goldie
Brenner, IVtenzo J. Brown, Mary E.
Cahill, Donald Cohen, Barbara O.
Cooper, Inez L. Corcoran, Mrs.
Shirley Warner Day, Jeanine DeGroat, Alvin K. Dorn, Martha J.
Downey, Elizabeth C. Finch, Sue
Gallo, Joan L. Gates, Mary I. Gee,
Alice Gersh, David Glcnday, Leslie
A. Gofl, Evelyn F. Gross, Jean E.
Hamilton, Marilyn Hebert, Lois E.
Holland, Patricia Jal, James E,
Jlusto, Elmeda J. Kipling, Paul E.
Kirsoh, Robert Krciling, Michael
L. Lamanna, Marvin Lansky, Les-
Peterson Names
New Members
OF Choralettes
Mr. Karl Peterson, Instructor
In Music, has named the members of Choralettes for the coming year. Choralettes is a select
vocal group which meets regularly
to practice for various functions at
which it will sing this year, according to Mr. Peterson. The group was
organized officially last year as a
non-credit group and has participated in many of the school programs. The group has sung on the
local radio stations as well.
Those who have been appointed
to Choralettes are as follows: first
sopranos: Bernadine Snyder '49,
Grace Seism, Jean Roeck, Juniors,
Marilyn Cohen, Elsie Thorpe, freshmen; second sopranos: Lucille St.
Priest, graduate, Virginia Waite '49,
Phyllis Witt Penn, Lois Bassett,
Shirley Casler, Juniors, Claryce
Peretta '51; first altos: Ethel Gerstman, graduate, June Peters '49,
Joan Keyton, Audrey Koch, Joyce
Dodge, Juniors, Rose Mary Willsey
'51; alternates: Jean McNeil '50,
Mary Joyce Platner '51, Gertrude
Beekman '52; and accompanist,
Marjory Smith '49.
ter J. Leviness, Helen M. Lovelace,
Mary E. Macksey, Joan D. Mitchell,
Helen Moeller, Doris J. Myers, Raymond O'Day, Judith Oxenhandler,
Edith S. Paterson, Fredric Paul,
John M. Pelghtal, Joan Perlne,
Claryce J. Peretta, Mary J. Platner, Maynard R. Playfoot. Jewel L.
Follak, Louise Proctor, Sidonia H.
Racko, Raymond Rapacz, Mary
Lou Reed, Ronald H. Rockhill,
Howard Rosman, Robert Roulier,
Marie A. Sarantos, Helmuth W.
Schultze, Elsie E. Shaw, Gloria Silversteln. Fiances M. Skldmore,
Jeanette Teal, Edward C. Thomson,
Walter Wadach, Eugene Webster,
Natalie Welssblum, Sophie A. Wellsch,
Adds Refreshment
To Every Occasion
The Pause That Refreshes
W
BOniED UNDER AUTHORITY OP THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
© IV-td, [he Coca-Cola Co
- OPEN DAILY AT I A. M.\
' ZZ3
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6
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Albany Law
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6
8
Rivalry Opens
With Pushball
Rivalry between freshmen and
Sophomore classes will be Inaugurated in full force Tuesday with the
playing of the annual pushball
game. On opening day both classes
will be able to show its strength
in the game which he-men play.
Pat Dooley is in charge of the
Sophomore team and guarantees
that they will field a strong aggregation.
The Sophomores are seeking revenge for '.he 18 to 3 defeat suffered
at the hands of the Sophomores
last year. No one has been named
as freshman manager, but we have
been Informed that the Sophomores
are In for the time of their lives.
The scoring shall be tabulated as
follows: 'i points for crossing opponent's (foal line, 3 points for having the ball in opponent's territory
at the end of the periods.
Two Seniors are to be selected to
act in the capacity of coaches for
both classes.
Gents, Finks, KB
Press Leaders
With the Intramural football season half-way over Potter and St.
Mary's Angels lead the "A" League
while Van Derzee leads the "B"
League. KB and the Finks won in
their last outings to tighten up the
,
,, ,
, , . , .
race for the leagues leadership.
Rain and mud made Wednesday's
,
. ,
_,
games close and slow-moving. The
opening kick-off accounted for the
flrst score, in the VanDerzee-SLS
game, as Moiiaruy grabbed the ball
near his own goal lino and when he
tried to evade the charging line of
SLS he stepped into his own end
zone where he was tagged for a
safety. VanDerzee pushed over a
second period score on a short pass,
Wiley to Morlarity, to go ahead of
SLS: 6-2.
KB Takes to the Air
After the VanDerzee touchdown
the game was almost a standstill
due to Uic slippery field and wet
ball. While VanDerzee and SLS
were battling in their close game
KB edged out the Ham and Eggers:
14-13. With Sy Fersh in the backfield KB took to the air time and
time again and scored its touchdowns on passes to Milk and Waxman. The extra points were added
on passes to Berger and Milk. The
Ham and Eggers struck back with
touchdowns by Ludlum and Duncombe. O'Brien made the first extra
point, but I lie Eggers failed to convert after their second TD and
that decided the outcome of the
g, uiu ,
Potter Club romped over KDR by
the tune of 32-0 on Tuesday. ScorIng 25 points in the first half, Potter ran into a re-juvenated opponent in the second half. This half
saw a tightly fought contest with
Potter scoring but once. This was
on a run by Carter for his second
TD of the game.
Warden also
crossed into pay-dirt twice and
Lansky scored the other TD.
Also on Tuesday the Angels nosed
out the Finks M-13. In a game that
saw the Pinks come back after
trailing 14-0 to make a gallant try
lo lie up .he contest.
OTTO R. MENDE
THI
7Ae %Of* BUeet
BOB VAN DAM
Last Tuesday the fur started flying, Til then differences of opinion
had only reached the argument
stage.
It's easy to flare up in football
a n d h a r d t 0 c o 1 off
°
- B u * , t o &r}l~
one who stops and watches the
g n m e S | t h e flg*te l e a y e ft b a d o p m _
ion
of s t a t e
College. More lmportant is the fact that recreation is
the primary aim of Intramural Athletjcis. Next year, restrictions against fighting should be added to
the rules.
When the lights start, the recreation is gone. When the recreation is gone it's time to quit.
Tennis, Golf Rained Out
Tennis and golf have run against
bad weather. No matches have been
played this week. With the cold
weather coming, It looks as If the
tournaments won't be finished.
All-American Team
Our weekly ballot for "Collier's
All-American Team" had a few
changes this week. Here's the team:
Army
Yeoman
Missouri
Marusic
Notre D a m e
Fisher
Michigan
Wistert
Perdue
O'Reilly
Michigan
Rifenberg
Notre D a m e
Hart
Army
Gallffa
North Carolina
Justice
S o u t h e r n Methodist
Walker
Michigan
Tenlnga
h a s come to t h e a t t e n t i o n of
C
G
G
T
T
E
E
QB
HB
HB
PB
It
t h e s ort
P300 3s '0
Ilin
stuff that there are cer' ' around Stale who feel
that we need Varsity athletics during the fall, and other seasons,
which would fill in the gap left by
the absence of a Varsity football
team. Suggestions made Include
soccer, cross-country, ti'Eck and
field events in the spring, and lacrosse.
WAA Offers Life Saving
An announcement has been made
by WAA that the Red Cross will
sponsor both Junior and Senior
Life Saving classes at Hackett Junior High. These classes will be held
on Monday, Wednesday and Friday
nights from 7 to 9 p.m.
Registration and classes will continue through next week and there
will also be swimming for everyone
l
YcsUM'd.iy Po Iter met fh e Angels on .luesuuy u u u n i u i.iuuy
and I ho Kuniblt•rs played tl G e n t s . i r o m 7 to 9 p.m.
1NTK AMURAI
Team
Angels
PEP
Pinks
Gents
Ramblers
KDR
Potter Downs Scrubs
In Soccer Opener, 4-2
Competition in Intramural Soccer resumed this fall with Potter
defeating a stubborn Scrub team
4-2. The game was hotly contested from the opening whistle to the
final play.
Jim Warden started the fireworks
by scoring a goal early in the period. Throughout the rest of the first
period both teams displayed brilliant defensive play.
Midway in the secc.ui period, E
E P's offensive clicked again as
Jim Jlusto scored a goal from a
few yards out. Again the Scrubs
fought uphill and also scored at
close of the second period. Jim Marsiglio was awarded a penalty kick,
which turned into a well-executed
play with Nolan Powell doing the
scoring.
Second Half Tight
The final two periods saw both
teams display a tight defense with
the Scrubs dominating play in the
third period.
Plans for field events to be held
on Campus Day were completed on
Monday by the Rivalry Committee.
Races for both men and women
will be conducted.
In the men's categorie, football
passing for distance, a tug of war,
a relay, and high jumping will be
featured. Pat Dooley will take
charge of Sophomore entries while
Robinson, Peene, Wiley, and Sanderson will lead the freshmen team.
Esse Juengling has been appointed to supervise the freshman team
In the women's events. A threelegged race, an old clothes race,
fifty yard dash, tug of war and a
three man relay will be Included in
the women's division.
The field events will be held at
ten o'clock on the morning of Campus Day. Two points will be awarded for the victorious men's team
and two for the women. If any
one class takes both events, the
campus cup is assured them.
Practices by both classes will be
conducted throughout the coming
week.
Tumbling Team Plans
For Future Exhibits
The Tumbling Club, which meets
Thursday nights at Page Hall Gym,
welcomed u large group of freshman men and women this week
Quite a bit of new talent presented
Itself. A varsity squad was picked
and they will work
out Saturday
afternoons on r n w routines in addition to regular session work.
The trampoline Is the big attraction, and is of great interest to the
new members, who are anxious to
try it out. This will be the main
apparatus In any exhibition put on
by the Club.
The possibility of an Assembly
and a Tew outside exhibitions is
good this year, according to Coach
Hathaway. The varsity squad hopes
to accomplish a great deal in mat
routine and on the trampoline. Anyone interested in joining should
contact Al Holliday or Ruth Matteson.
i. v t l i i n ^ n
KOO'rBALL
"A" League
Won Lost Pts.
0
fi
3
2
0
4
2
2
4
0
2
\
0
2
0
•1
0
0
Ibis week's scores:
Angels 7; KDR (i
Pinks 8; Ramblers 0
EEP 32: KDR 0
Angels 14; Finks 13
Saints Saint Mary's rained out
KU
SLS rained out
VanDerzee I!; SLS 2
KB 14; Hum and Eggers 13
STANDINGS
WEDNESDAY
Team
VanDerzee
KB
H and E
SLS
Saints
St. Mary's
" B " Leag lie
Won Lost Tied Pts.
3
0
0
6
1
0
0
2
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
Mext week's games
Monday
KB vs Saint Mary's
and
H and E vs Saints
Tuesday
RIVALRY PUSHBALL
Wednesday
VDZ vs H and E
and
SLS vs Saint Mary's
Thursday
Gents vs EEP
and
KB vs Saints
THE ETON
Style 6559
•
RICH CORDO G R A I N LEATHER
•
S T Y L E D I N T R I M SLEEK LINES
•
D U R A B L E , TRIPLE SOLE
\ perfect llireesomo assuring you complete comforf
Florist & Greenhouse
Corner of
ONTARIO & BENSON
COLLEGE FLORIST FOR YEARS
Special Attention to Sororities and Fraternities.i-ESlJ"".***1"*"25
f o o f e o s o and
/ o m ; wear. See t/ioni
lodayl
State" Representatives
JACK BROPHY
GEORGE POULOS
WALT SCHICK
C O L L I * ! JIWKLKH
103 C E N T R A L AVE.
WAA will hold its annual hayride
to Miss Johnston's farm tonight.
The group will leave Pierce Hall a t
7:15 p.m.
Pat Jai and Phyllis Harris, cochairmen, have announced that one
hundred girls will attend the event.
A bonfire will be built and outdoor
entertainment, under the direction
of Ruth Matteson, will be given for
those attending.
From Pierce, the group will take
a Western Ave. bus down to the Plaza where they will board a Sling erlands bus to the Slingerlands
Garage. The three hay wagons are
scheduled to leave from that point
at 8:15 p.m.
Audry Weller, chairman of the refreshment committee, has assured
that there will be food for all attending. The party will end at eleven to give lreshmen time to return
to their dorms before 12 p.m.
A charge of ten cents is to be collected to help pay for the costs of
the hayride.
zwjuaatuuuastMmrt.rrgirriT.Ttr.Mw'-wxi.
W.
L.
DOUGLAS ^SHOE
•
Events Scheduled
For Campus Day
v
AS O F
DIAL 4-1125
SODAS — CANDY — SANDWICHES
Luncheon Served Daily
The Varsity Bowlers continue to
click as they swept three games
from Albany Business College Wednesday night at the Playdlum. By
smothering the A.B.O. five, the
State keglers assured themselves of
a first place tie with Siena. Each
team has been on the winning side
seven times, while losing only twice.
Fran Mullin came up with the
first 600 game for the Statesmen
this season, 625, and two others
smashed out better than 500 totals.
Mullln's 625 total Included games
of 231 and 224. while Diz Dickinson's 205 helped boost his total to
540. The other high scorer for the
evening was Don McDonald with a
neat 520.
Next week, the Varsity will tangle with Albany Law School who
has dropped eight out of their
lirst nine games.
3 To.
2
State
1
McDonald
175 160 185 520
S01
Carosella
154 147
Dickinson
177 158 205 540
155 294
Walsh
139
Mullin
231 170 224 625
166 147 313
Farley
STANDINGS
Intercollegiate League
Teams
Won Lost
State College
7
2
Siena
7
2
Albany Pharmacy
6
3
Eight returning lettermen of last
year's oasketball team reported to
last night's first practice session of
the '48-'49 season.
A tough twenty-one game schedule lies ahead of the "Peds" this
year, of which ten are scheduled
at home. The toughest games figure
to be with Hurtwick and Hamilton,
two schools that boast tall, experienced squads.
Coach Hathaway will be assisted
In coaching this year's squad by
Walt Schick, George Poulos, Robert
Merritt, and Andy Rossetti, in an
elaborate coaching and training
•system newly inaugurated at Stale
this year.
About twenty-five freshmen have
turned out for this year's team, and
they have been practicing for more
than a week In the Page Gym. Although Couch Hathaway has seen
no one of them who ho Is raving
about in Lie super colossal phrases,
he is giving them more time to strut
their stuff and win their berth on
the team, which this year will carry
fourteen men on the Varsity and
twelve on the J.V.
Kenny George will be this year's
varsity juptaln. Ho was elected at
the end of last season.
Ask /or it either way . . . both
trade-marks mean the same thing.
Home Made ICE CREAM
Angels, EEP, Van Derzee WAA To Hold
ABC Match, 3-0
Lead Football Leagues Annual Hayride
Vanity Sweeps
Varsity Cogers Face
27-Game Schedule
AMw^r MY
(<%**+l Off- Outul )
I
•
SWEETSHOP
j u j ^ ^
PAOI
STATB COLLtOK NEWS. FRIDAY. O C T O M R 88, 1048
CO., BROCKTON
15,
MASS.
4 5 2 13 It O A D W A Y — A L B A N Y
Men's Shoes Exclusively
M
LIWRARV!
PAOE
• T A T I C O L L I O I NKWS. OCTOBER 2 2 .
•
HowEagw Can You Gerf
Dr; Shields Mcllwalne hM replaced Dr. Harry W. Hastings as head
of the-English department. Or.
Hastings has retired after being a
member of the State College faculty
since 1914.;
Dean Stokes and Mr. Edward Sabol, co-ordlnator of Field Services
and Public Relations, are attending
the annual convention of the Mew
York State Association of Deans
and Guidance Personnel at West
Point today and tomorrow.
Sunday and Monday Mr. Elmer Mathews, Director of the
Teacher Placement Bureau, and Mr.
Sabol will be in Syracuse to attend
the annual meeting of the New
York State School Boards meeting. They will remain In Syracuse
to attend the Central School Principals meeting Tuesday.
Miss Ruth Wasley, instructor and
Supervisor in Foreign Languages,
has written an article entitled
"Courses of Study for Conversation." Her article appears in the
book "Twentieth Century Modern
Language Teaching" edited by
Maxim Newmark.
The Commuters' Club president raced madly down the.hall
in lower Draper to see if any
work-iivlng - students had signed .the committee list for the
Soc-hop. She blinked here eyes
and was amazed to find the
lists, particularly that of cleanup committee, complete;. She
.."wondered and still the wonder
grew" for the clean-up committee is the lowest, most unsophisticated, unpleasant task at State College. Then she realized
that this was the work of the
same pencil-happy student who
had signed up his unknowing
friends, Herman Schmbe, and
Herbert Cream for WAA lifesaving. He also had signed
George Washington Warzello
and Roscoe Van Boulder (dam,
that Is) for cheerleading, badminton, and checking hair ribbons at the next sorority open
house. Really . . . what next?
Offtr Graduate Assistance
The Graduate School of Syracuse
University had announced twenty to
thirty graduate Asslstantships for
women. Those chosen will fill positions as advisors and counselors.
QiUTch
FctltlirCS
College Dances
The combined Youth Group of
the Trinity Methodist Church has
announced the opening or the; "TrlCorner," for Saturday night dancing.
• "Tri-Corner" dances, which began
last Saturday, were organized after
a survey was taken of area college
needs for Saturday night1 entertainment. The dances will be directed and planned by college students. They are,for the enjoyment
of all area collegians, not just
Methodist students, and will continue throughout the year.
Mai Pappin, Albany band leader,
and State College graduate, will be
featured at these dances with his
eight piece orchestra. His specialty
is sweet, soft music, but other types
of songs will be played. Admission
Is fifty cents per person and students may come stag or with dates.
Dancing will be from 8-11 p. m. at
the Church, corner of Lark and
Lancester Street, and all of the
dances will be very Informal. Refreshments will be sold during the
evening and ping pong may be
played.
"Cuentos de Juan Timoneda," by
Dr. J. Wesley Childers, Professor of
Spanish, was published last month
by the Indiana University Press.
Dr. Childers' book has combined
sixteenth century Spanish folk tales
into a world collection, as Folklore
Series No*. 5.
A manuscript compiled by Dr.
Edward Shaw, Professor of Romance Languages, appeared In the
August issue of "Hispanic American
History Review." This article concerns one of many manuscripts
written by Jacques Cazotte, a
French writer.
Three members of the faculty
were chosen at the Lake Placid
Convention to serve as officers of
the New York Association of State
Teachers College Faculties.
Dr. J. Wesley Childers was elected vice-president; Dr. Caroline A.
Lester, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, secretary and treasurer;
and Dr. Edward P. Shaw was elected chairman of language groups In
this section, which includes eleven
State Teachers Colleges.
Dr. Reno Knouse, Professor of
Merchandising, served as vicechairman of the Workshop Conference on business and distributive
education at the annual meeting of
the New York State Vocational and
Practical Arts Association at the
Lake Flacid Club. The section of
the meeting was attended by thirty
educators In the field of business
and administrative education, and
by representatives from business
and labor.
1 smoked CHESTERFIELDS
between scenes while
making my new picture,
JOHNNY BELINDA,
they're MILDER...
ifs MY cigarette.
STARRING IN
JOHNNY BELINDA
A WARNER BROS. P I C T U M
IMS
*MTE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
Smiles To ChaperoneW R O W To Present
N Student Discussion
Children To Plays UMolly
Mulligan 'SO has announced
The future role which "Smiles"
will play at State College and in the
community will be more precisely
determined in the open meeting to
be held at 4:15 p.m., in room 100,
Tuesday.
Immediate plans include the
chaperonage of the children to all
the AD plays, beginning Tuesday.
t h a t Sunday, at 1:30 p. m., there
will be a transcription of a student
round table oh the United Nations
over WROW. Albany radio station.
This discussion was transcribed
at Lake Success last June. Miss
Mulligan participated in the program with students of this country,
France, Poland and Yugoslavia.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
PHONE 5-1913
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
State College New§
Z-444
ALBANY. N E W YORK.
Commuters Club
To Hold Soc-Hop
In Lounge Tonight
"Portraiture At Its Finest'
HOI.I.SWOOD
KAST
TO
COMKS
TAKK
YOUR PORTRAIT
OPEN 9:00 to 5:30 DAILY
Evenings by appointment
T L E P H O N l 4*0011
• U MADISON AVENUE
Copyilfhi lirit, Doom fc Mum TotMco Co.
1948
11:05
VOL.
XXXIII NO. 0
Prouty's Band To Lead
Round, Square Dancing
Commuters' Club is holding its
annual Soc-Hop tonight in the
Lounge from 9 p. m. to 12 midnight.
Activities for the evening will inelude round and square dancing,
refreshments, entertainment and a
sock contest.
Music will be provided by Jeb
Prouty and his orchestra. The
Lounge will be decorated with
pumpkins and corn stalks to carry
out the autumn and Halowe'en
theme. Cider and donuts will be
served as refreshments. Prizes will
be awarded for the most colorful
and unique socks worn. The orchestra will include callers to assist in
the square dances.
Name General Chairmen
Helen Califano '49, and Harold
Tunkel '50, are general chairmen of
the Soc Hop. The committees include: William Reynolds '51, Publicity; Helen Rodak '49, Tickets;
Lois Cruden, Paul LeBrun, Sophomores, Refreshments; Florence Albright '50, Orchestra; Marion Oliver '50, Decorations; Helene :Farlen
'52, Sho2 Checking; Joyce Platner,
Helen Marie Moeller, Sophomores,
Entertainment. Mitchell Burkowsky
'52, will serve as Master of Ceremonies.
Plan Informal Dress
According to Miss Califano. General Chairman, Soc-Hop is informal
and everyone is invited to attend
stag or with a date. Admission of
no cents per person will be charged.
Loud plaid shirts and jeans, or
skirts and sweaters will be in order
for the affair. Since shoes are checked at the door, everyone is urged
by Miss Califano to wear socks that
will withstand the wear and tear
of dancing.
By EVELYN WOLFE
Margaret Webster, Shakespeare's
greatest asset since the quill pen,
has turned traveling salesman by
bringing "Hamlet" and "Macbeth"
to campus stages across the nation
and Canada. As a result of this
lour, students who wouldn't otherwise sec products of the legitimate
theater will have an opportunity
n-t oulv to do so, but to help back
stage In setting up the prepared
se . and doing general jobs to help
produce the show. Expanding the
theater has been an idea of Miss
Webster's for the past ten years.
Her
experience
In
producing
"Twelfth Nltrht" for Maurice Evans
and Helen H a y s , brought her top
honors, and since thai time, diffusion of the theater has been one of
her prime Interests.
Interested in finding the public
reaction to \yr Idea of a tour by
bus to collides of flic land, she sent
out over five hundred notices of
her plan and was overwhelmed with
favorable replies.
Assembling
the best
possible
group for an efficient production
took time and careful selection.
After Interviewing 300 applicants,
she chose a troiipp of 22, headed bv
Onrol fl'Mi'lner. Alfred Rvdfr, Joseph Holland, Virginia McDowell,
Arthur O'Cnnnell, Norman Roland
and David Lewis-, staffed by three
department heads to cover proper-
Voters Maintain
College Precedent
TABULATIONS OF STRAW VOTE ELECTION
Participating in election—Voters
Non-Voters
Total
VOTERS
Class
1949
1950
1951
1952
Unlisted
Totals
Dewey
27
24
17
4
9
Thomas Truman
18
6
25
11
12
2
3
1
2
4
24
60
11
16
48
90
149
12
4
11
10
19
3
17
25
66
102
3
5
22
19
2
Totals
315
47
219
51
24
47
GO
219
11
51
71
279
02
Totals
396
Socialists Place Third/
Evidence New btrength
Among Campus Parties
Wallace Thurmond Blank
7
1
1
2
1
1
81
COMPLETE TOTALS
Vcters
81
Non-Voters .
315
178
638
816
NON-VOTERS
1949
1950
1951
1952
Unlisted
THOMAS E. DEWEY
Republican Candidate
Pless Announces Elections, Forum
Commission Plan Will Highlight
Perry Fless '49, Grand Marshal,
Today
has disclosed that beginning Mon- Assembly
day, Campus Commission will initiate a n w regulatory policy in the
Commons. A student will be available throughout the day at the
Campus Commission desk to approve posters, loan out playing cards
and ping-pong balls, give change
for the coke machine, and return
lost cr found articles.
According to Miss Pless, beginning
today any suitcase discovered in the
girls' lecker room will be removed.
If any luggage must be left in the
lMker room, it must be placed in
the locker shower section. For lost
suitcases, contact Martha Downey
'51, of Campus Commission.
Miss Fless lias asked for the cooperation of all students in carryingout these regulations.
Margaret Webster's Tour With
'Hamlet', 'Macbeth' Reaches State
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
29,
ASSEMBLY
State Students Choose Dewey In Mock Election;
Governor Tops President Truman By Margin Of 117
To Fill Civil Service Positions
The Department of Civil Service
of the State of New York, has announced posltiins to be filled
through Civil Service examinations,
Including the position of Senior
Account Clerk, Stenographer, TypIct, and Dictating Machine Transcriber. Other positions are open.
FRIDAY, O C T O B E R
asm
•**
lies, carpentry and electrical apparatus. Easy-to-asscmble sets and
the audiences' imagination will provide the aura of Dunsinane and
Denmark.
In tlie three centuries since the
Immortal Bard created his works,
no one has brought such a vibrant
quality of living reality into them
as has Miss Webster. In cutting
"Hamlet" to two and one-half hours,
she mourned every cut word. The
finished production is as complete
as Lime and facilities allow and will
provide tile best entertainment for
the greatest number of people.
Perhaps it is the spirit of her
mother, the late Dame May Whiffy, who shouted "I cannot make
two armies from eight people—I
must, fare "lie more!", that makes
Miss Webster what she is. Perhaps
It is the atmosphere in which site
has grown up, or perhaps it is just
a natural love to provide excellent
entertainment, but State will be given an opportunity to judge for itself when Miss Webster and her
troupe bring one of the season's delights to Page Friday afternoon
and evening. Admission will be by
student fee to one performance.
Those wishing to see both will be
required to pay the full price for
one. "Macbeth" seats sell for $1.20
anil those for "Hamlet" for $1.80
and $2.40 at the Co-op,
Election results, speeches and
uiori! elections are scheduled for
Assembly today.
Forum, under the direction of
Molly Mulligan '50, has charge of
the first half • of Assembly. The
other half of the period will be
taken up with the elections of
Campus Queen, elections of freshman officers, results of the VicePresidential, Student Board of Finance, and Student Facilities Board
(.lecti.tu. Suggestions for a suitable wai memorial will also be
made by SA.
HARRY S. TRUMAN
It was decided at Student Council
Democratic Candidate
meeting Wednesday night that
William Lyons and Audrey Koch,
Juniors, and Jerry Dunn '51, would
accompany Robert Kittredge '49, to
the Brockport Inter-Collegiate Conference.
A sheet will be placed on Mysk-.mia Eulk'tln Beard for those who
Bernadette Freel '50, was elected
are interested in signing to work
:>n improving the SA Constitution. president of tlie New York State
Teachers College Fress Association
The Student-Faculty Committee at the second annual conference
has been given the task of assign- held at New Paltz State Teachers
ing dales for social functions. The College last weekend. The next
committee is to meet from 12-12:30 conference
the
group
is
p. m. every day In Dean Stokes' scheduled to of
be held at this coloffice, starting Wednesday.
lege sometime in October, 1949.
John Jennings '49, President of The purpose of these conferences is
SA, announced that many state to improve college publications and
colleges have requested
copies to foster better relationships beof our Constitution.
tween teacher colleges of the state.
Represented at the meeting were
Jennings has also announced that
due to tlie large amount of business eight of the eleven New York State
which is to be transacted in assem- T achers Colleges, including Brockbly this morning, if is imperative port, Buffalo, Geneseo, New Paltz,
that everyone be in his seat by Oneonta, Flaftsburg, and Potsdam.
11:05 a. m.
Attending ironi State were: Rodney Felder, Mary Jane Perls, Jean
Pulver and Jean Spencer, Seniors;
Pedagogue Announces
and Ruth Cookingliam, William
Dumbleton, Bernadette Freel, Jean
Deadline For Pictures
Hotaling and Shirley Wiltse, JunMarie Hoi/ and Mary Jane Peris, iors.
Seniors. Co-Editors of Pedagogue,
announce that through the cour- Will Play Potter Recordings
tesy of the Hague Studio any perRecords which were made at the
son who has not had his picture
taken may have it done Monday annual Edward Eldred Potter Club
between i) a. m. and 8 p. m. Bnbv Party, October 23, will be
Those who live off campus may played over station WPTR, 1540
kilocycles, next week. The programs
visit, the studio at night.
Will be "Top of the Morning" which
Students wishing to use last is scheduled for 8:05 a. m., Monday
year's picture may do so if the and "Baby Sitters' Bawl" planned
studio Is notified and $1.25 is paid for 9:05 p. in., Friday.
for the service.
Glen Walrath, program director
Forty Seniors have not yet had of WPTR, who was graduated from
their pictures taken, and according State In 1942, will act as master of
to the co-editors, action Is ad- ceremonies on the "Top of the
Morning" show.
vised,
Fred To Head
49 Conference
Governor Thomas E. Dewey, for
trie second time in a State College
NEWS straw vote, was given preference in the Presidential Poll.
Governor Dewey's margin of victory over his chief opponent, Presioent Harry S. Truman, was in a ratio of almost 3:2 of the total vote,
which included 816 students, or
62.7% ol the Student Body, 21.9%
of whom are eligible voters. This
figure is more than double the 10.3 %
wno were qualified to vote in 1944.
Unlike the 1944 race, however,
this election was not close to the
point of being decided by only a
lew votes. The actual figures were:
Dewey, 396; Thomas, 71; Truman,
279; Wallace, 62; and Thurmond,
(by writt-in), 2. These figures indicate ;hat 48.5% of the student
body or 45.2% of the voters rae in
lavor of Dewey, while 34.2% of the
termer group or 33.5% of the voters
are hopeful for Truman.
Republican Traditionally
The vote this year is in keeping
with the tradition that State College
is Republican in its politics. Significant, however, is the fact that Mr.
Norman Thomas this year polled
8.7% of the total vote, or 13.4%
of those of the qualified voters. In
1944 Mr. Thomas could garner only
3 votes out of the 793 which were
cast.
Only once in the twenty-four
years that the poll has been conducted at State has a Democratic
candidate for President been chosen by the Student Body. This was
in 1936 when the Association chose
tlie late Franklin D. Roosevelt by
a very narrow margin, tout he went
on to win at the national polls by
an unprecedentedly large majority.
The Republicans returned to favor
in Students Polls, however, in 1940
and 1944 by narrow majorities each
time.
It is evident that straw polls at
State have very little bearing on
the national elections, however, and
by all indications this year a Truman victory would be predicted,
since polls in previous years have
acted almost invariably as negative indicators.
Forum W i l l Sponsor
Election Night Party
Forum of politics is sponsoring an
Election night party Tuesday in tlie
Commons, from 8 p. m. until 11 p. m.
Girls may stay until 11 p. m.. but
they must return to their respective
dormitories immediately afterwards,
according to Marion Furlong and
Margaret Seaman, Seniors, CoChairinen of the affair.
Miss Seaman states that the
party is being held to observe Election Day, and also to bring students of State College together to
hear eleeti6n returns. These election returns will be pasted during
tlie evening.
There will be dancing and bridge
games during the course of the evening, and refreshments will be
served.
Joy Simon and Molly Mulligan,
Seniors, are in charge of publicity,
and Seymour Fersh '49, will handle
the arrangements. No admission
will be charged.
The chnperones for the evening
will be Mr. Frederic W. Weed, Instructor In Political Science, Mr.
Raymond Howard. Instructor in
Economics, and Miss Frances Cummtngs, Instructor in History.
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