Stokes Will Play Three bonatas A t

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LIBRARY
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACM rr " A
ALBANY, f t Y,
PAGE e
•TATE COLUME NEW*. FRIDAY, OCTOIER 4, 1*46
State College News
Dilemma Continues As State Vet Occupies Trailer
Stokes Will Play Three bonatas Housing
A trailer doesn't have all the
person. Wives seem to be a n exThirty-five of our more fortuadvantages of dormitory life, but
cess commodity In this modern
nate vets—those without wives—
are other points to comworld of veterans and college
At First Music Council Concert there
have had the good luck to find
pensate for the midnight "bull
students. That's what poor Vicaccommodations in a cigar fac-
State students will have the opportunlty to listen to some clas- themes, one vigorous, t h e other
steal music when Dr. Charles P. quieter. The usual procedure Is a
btokes appears in Page Hall, Mon- vigorous, quick allegro followed by
aay evening at 8:30 P. M. in Music an andante or adagio in contrast. I t
Council's first concert of the year, 's slow and lyric In character. The
Dr. Stokes, Professor of Music, as- third movement is strongly rhythsisted by his wife, Margaret Ander- mic in character and provides relaxson Stokes, will execute three son- ation for the listener. Most sonatas
atas—two for violin and piano and follow a form similar to this,
the other for viola and piano.
The first sonata on the program
The sonata Is a work for one or ! ? J 0 " a > *$* J S j J E L * f V i ? U "
more soloists in several movements, g M S B ? %$KW$&
* & /
each having its own form. Throughfflf^'aT
l ^ i i & f f i . u?* »*
out the sonata there is a manipula- «"**•• . h e first movement has a
tion of ^wo contrasting main S & f l ^ J
ffifff
jflg
adagio and the sherzo movements.
This sherzo movement was one of
Beethoven's own inventions In the
sonata form to lighten the general
mood. I n conclusion, the allegro
movement is the rhythmic rondo
with the sounds of drums and trumFor the first time :n State history pets mingled in the victorious theme
the Oerman Department is over- in a final presto,
crowded, according to Mr. WilThe second sonata on the proliam Meyer, Head of the Depart- gram is Sonata opus 21 by Dohnanyi.
ment. The German I class, con- Dr. Stokes has expressed his belief
sisting of 78 students, will be dlvid- that this is one of the finest modern
ed Into three sections, two of which works written for violin and piano.
are being taught by student assist- The quiet first movement is followants, Mrs. Arlene Vetter Paetow, '47, ed by the second movement without
and Luke Zilles, '48; the German II a break and after a calm trio, leads
class, in which 52 students are en- to a powerful climax. A soft repetirolled, will be cut in half and Mr. tion of the first allegro theme ends
George Kunz, '47, student assistant, the sonata.
will teach one of these classes.
As a closing selection, Dr. Stokes
All three of the assistants are ma- w111 P la y t h e Sonata No. 1 for viola
jors or minors in German and are a n d P i a n o by Y ° r k Bowen. Of the
pursuing further the study of the v e r v f e w selections composed for
language while teaching it. Mrs. viola > t h i s Js one of the best works
Faetaw will have a double major of its kind, according to Dr.
and minor in German and mathe- Stokes. The themes of the sonata
matics. When asked whether or not a r e accompanied by sentimentally
she enjoyed the prospect of teach- expressed harmonies. T h e first
ing the German class, Mrs. Paetow movement gradually gains in force
replied that she couldn't say just yet, a n d a graceful cantabile movement
but she finds German both an in- leads to the finale containing pasteresting and an enjoyable Ian- sages of dramatic emphasis,
guage.
sessions," and campus capers.
Victor Miller, a graduate student at State, didn't know what
he was getting into when he took
the marriage vows, this summer.
It's hard enough to find a place
to live, minus a loving wife; but
with one—well, the fates seem
to be against the unfortunate
tor found out. However, with
hopeful heart, he proceeded to
shop for a home—a trailer, to
be exact. And one fine September morning, Mr. and Mrs. Miller
set out from Cortland in pursuit
of education. Now they are settled comfortably eight miles outside of Albany.
tory. After Dean Nelson's appeal
to the people of Albany for
rooms, the Salvation Army offered the use of an empty building
for a dormitory—a former cigar
factory. Someone should write a
book. "Life at State, or How to
Live in a Cigar Factory."
Dube Announces Posts
For Campus Commission
Campus Commission appointments
for 1946-'47 have been announced by
Judith Dube, '47, Grand Marshal.
People holding onice are: Beverly
Slttig, '49, mimeograph; Pearl Pless,
'49, Lost and Found; Mary Jean Carver, '48, mailboxes; Helen Kisiel, '48
and Marlon Vitullo, '47, poster committee; Helen Lengyel, '48, Commons; Rita Shapiro, '48, vie committcc; Joseph Zanchelli, '49, Coke
machine; Lawrence Appleby, '49,
P.O., locker room, halls, Lounge,
Campus; Elsie Landau, '49, annex
and cafeteria; Marlon Vitullo, '47,
Mary Jean Carver and Rita Shapiro, Juniors, Joseph Zanchelli and
Lawrence
Appleby,
Sophomores,
marshals.
0
|ncrease
The State Stars, the college swing
band, have organized for this year
and are now available to play a t
c i a s s functions or in the Commons.
The band consists at present of
Marvin Wayne, '49, sax; Jack Klrby,
>48, trumpet, Donald Dickenson, '49,
drums, and Helen Lengyel, piano.
The orchestration cannot be increased until a tenor sax instrument
has been found.
IN OR OUT
COMES
TO TAKE
YOUR PORTRAIT
OF THE BAIL PARKS
THEY SATISFY
MILLIONS
811 M A D I S O N AVENUE
T E L E P H O N E 4-0017
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
U-CmSTERFIElD
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY. N. Y
ALL OYER AMERICA-CHCSTERFIEID IS TOPS!
tmii'iii i
CopyrightTOTliociin & fcmu TOUCCQ C»,
TOMORROW
VOL. XXXI NO. 4
1946
Activities Day, the formal opening of extra-curricular activities
and rivalry, will commence tomorrow at 1:00 P. M. in the Commons
with the signing up for extra-curricular activities, followed by the traditional banner ceremony. According to Frank Woodworth, '47, President of the Senior Class and chairman of Activities Day, the evening
part of the program will consist of a Bonfire Rally, Snake Dance add
dancing in the Commons afterwards until 11:30 P. M.
Hillel Outlines
Weekend Parties
.
btate
TI -O PiH: .i.ot l1dDi _r».
i*.„_
c
i
bunday
f~L..,~L
i n rirSl r s e r o r m V . n u r c n
a„i^™^«
D,mu„„t
0KD»™ an
Solomon n*i«
Minsberg,
'47, President
Sign for organizations
Various clubs and organizations
will have tables set up in the Commons where freshmen and upperclassmen may sign up for the extracurricular activities in which they
wish to participate. This will be the
first
opportunity for the freshmen
to display their interest in the different organizations. Those organizations to be represented are: Dramatics a n d Arts Council,^ Music
^
0ouncU(
Debate
CouncU(
of Hillel, has announced a series of chemistry Club, Inter-Group Gounweek-end parties, and Mary Telian, cil, Classical Club, Commerce Club,
'47, President of Student Christian French Club, Mathematics Club, Pan
Association has outlined the pro- * * • * « f
^SSSiTSSSS
gram for State College Sunday. STATE COLLEGE NEWS, Primer,
Plans for the coming week have Pedagogue, Intervarsity Christian
also been released by Ann Cullin- Fellowship, Student Christian Assoan, '7, President of Newman Club, elation, Newman Club, and Hillel.
A Splash Party at the Y.M.C.A. Banner Ceremony
. 5 „i„« * w i ™
Healey, Richard Hlsgon, Doris Ives,
Pool at 111 Washington Avenue will
. . ,
_.„
interdaSS livairy.
T , „ V o r Teresa Jones, Adele Knsper, Mildred
The program will begin as Baser K o r m t t n S t ! l r a a Krelsborg.
open the first of Hillel's week-end T n e signing-up procedure will end
welcomes the freshmen, followed by ioul Limbacher, Beverly Link, George
parties. Members are to bring their a t 2 : 3 ° p - M - when the traditional
the sineine of the alma mater. Ruth Lovocky, Suzanne Montgomery, Paulino
own suits to the swimming party Banner Ceremony is scheduled to
m e sioguig ui uw »1 »
cpniors Myers, Colin Nager, Muriel Navy,
Bentley and Alice Randall, beruors u{nnchQ P t t o k o r i s h i r l o v paasow, Mlwhich will start at 7:15 and end a t be^^ Woodworth will give a brief
and members of Myskania, will ex- rh.u,\ p a rrettn, Anne Peterson, Mar8:30. A dance from 9-11:30, in Hillel speech, followed by the hanging of
main the traditions and rivalry rules garet Pohl, Dorothy itider, Carmela
Hall a t 441 Washington Avenue, J h e Senior banner. The singing of
x
i„„if„ ni-nr mmicunriprstandlnes
Russo, Gloria Russo, Helen Shuro, Joan
l s u
a
e
l a
t o Clarify a n y
" o "
" " ^ Smith Genevieve SmlthUng, Mary Sulwill follow the Splash Party. There the banner song will follow.
thc freshmen may have neiore Allen,
„,,„„_ vRoberta
Gornldlno Van
l r g | n l l l Tucker,
is no charge for either of these activ- A U c e w l l U a m S | P r e s i d e n t of the
Van Ailkon, Edna Van
open rivalry begins.
es
Roberta
Edytlio
Weaver,
Mollie
'
Junior Class, will then present the
Arlene Golden and Agnes Mcln- l'operlng,
Wolustoln, Norma Werner, William
Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta s d
,. , . 1 5
„ , blue banner to the freshmen, and
d „.„ n b
tyre, Sophomores and co-chairmen We.vanl, A. Evelyn W'ulfr, Genevieve Rho
was formally reorganized at a l,e aSunday
at
J.1&
and
^..10
buses
will
o m m i t t e e f r o m t h e 0 1 a s s ' . .«,
ve 411
of the entertainment, have written Voting.
wprinMrinv Snri nfTipf.v«
Washington Avenue for a commibiei. irom me oia&s, 01 50
m,..im
1
IIIHH
of
I0J7—.loan
Alvoraon,
Rulli
meeting
Wednesday
and
otticers
,.
,
.
,
..
°
,„
will
accept it.
and directea a skit which will then
d f l p r Thn
" " " ""~"',."7i TT,""" -iomVorc nf t h f Beniley, Catherine Hyruin, Catherine elected for a term of one year. Past t " e 1 P l c n J c a t t °^ ^ a a a e r - ihose
wlshin
to
t o th e
presided U'D for,bu
S s reservations
*°
be
presented.
The members
trie n i l „ . | /HOIIMI
p M t p U . CauBlmui,
| n cupoioss,Kdwnrci
Thol.na Cohen,
Carl Consul Owen Bombard
f Picnic may sign B o n f i r c
Class
of '49 participating
are:otJean
o v e r a n a t l e n d a n c e o f. 21
1
_ members.
_
tin fnv hue
rncpvvntmnc atatthe
r.nocamp
namn
Hnborl Tonilirt, Cl.vile Cook, Anna o f f i c c r s
Hoffman, Margaret Hoeffner, Marie
booth
in
lower
Draper.
At 7:30 P. M., the student body will
Martini uavldsnn, DoroGreco, Jean Pulver, Agnes Mclntyre, Cunningham,
gather a t a Bonfire Rally on the
I.IUMI Ueiillc, Anita Det.ugfc'o, Patricia
Oflicers for this year are: Curtis SCA
Arlene Golden, Delores Kloster, Ma- M ltouvllle, Clralmm Dniiciin, Elounor Pfaff, '48, President; Richard Beach,
State College Sunday will be ob- dorm field. Harold Weber, '47, asrion Hawkins, Beverly Sittig, Fran- Ilurlieeii, Thomas I'Vu'ioy, Leonard '48, Vice-President; Glen DeLong, served on October 27 in the First Re- sisted by Joseph Zanchelli and RobKreeilman,
Uerlrude
Cllrvlu,
iOllore
Graces Flanagan, and Margaret SeaI.aura Ileernuinee, .lean llonibtiry '48, Treasurer; Ray McNamara, '48, form Church, Clinton Square. Rever- erts Baker, Sophomores, will be h i
man. Ushers will be' R o ^ t s o " Dorothy Uladlk, Mary iioneharik, Helen Secretary; Alan Stone, '47, Athletic end Clee will preside over the serv charge.
Baker, Joseph_ Zanchelli, Marc a llullu y t . (iml) ,, Ai.m. Uughas, G1 or a D i l . e c t o r ; n n d R o b e r t Merritt, '49, ice and deliver the sermon. Dr.
The bonfire will be lit on top of
^L 1 \nd e l Ha n roWO y 'Meam
« " & . M , ^ S « n ^ T i M u . i i p 8 f f l Social Chairman. The next meet- Sayles will read the scripture and the terrace A pep rally will be con
link, and Haroia ummm.
|ns|.v
J l l s l l n „ s L u w l S i siUrley Me- ing will be held Monday night, Oc- Mary Telian, President of S.C.A., ducted with the college cheerleadAftor the entertainment, mi n^
Conneii, iaiiaiibctJi MOUOWQII, Gloria Htober
21, to discuss future activities, Cwill
explain the purpose of State ers, Betty Brennan, '47, Dorothy
o
Hall, there will be dancii^
" J | "°%\™% $?'XX
C a & o MieheT i s t o r y
^ e Sunday. The choir will be Skelton, '48, Mary Cheatham and
Commons to the musicof the g State M»J»[»n«i. ^ t ^ ^ S r o t i T Moraount
Gamma chapter was first organ- made up of twelve S.C.A. members. Jean Ineson, sophomores, leading
Stars. Fiances uianagan, *», "»=> J o h n N l l b o s l n y i
i z e d a t s t a t e college in 1915, and is olive Mang, '47, with the assistance the cheers. Helen Kisiel '48, Songcharge of refreshments.
vivian NiuiBun, ciaronee oarr, Arlene & member of the national fraternity, of Norma Schryver, '49, has com- leader, will lead the student body in
oil"r""VirowHkl Rosalie Pooter DOCIB On this campus, it has been inactive pleted the arrangements for the group singing. If the weather does
ijuinii, iioburt Rnnilolph, .lean 'ueetor, for more than three years. Other service which will be held at 11:00 not permit outdoor festivities, stuUiirii Heed, Uuth UuynoiUB, Butty clmpters of Kappa Delta Rho are A.M.
dents will assemble in the Commons
l o c a t e c l ftt C o r n e 1 1
Jiu^'rrieia'tt
' Oolgate. Perm
for the pep rally. After the Bon.laeauellne'smo'uf'noa^sTnUh^Xnfn State, Michigan, Illinois and Fresno Canterbury Club
Are Rally there will be a Snake
f „ nn D „
Stewart, Mary sticKtlt«, Mary siolfo, state Teachers College.
Friday, October 25, at 8:00 P. M. Dance to the Commons, where there
Shirley Taylor, Robert Teeter, Mary M c m bers
Canterbury Club is sponsoring a will be dancing until 11:30 P. M.
1
,
The fraternity members are Dr. round and square dance In St. AnLois Hutchinson, '47, Chairman of i .;;"!'";,,,, X i ' a""rau | WtiKnor 'warc h u r c h o n t h e c o r n e r of
Inter-Group Council, has announc- ^ , l H w " " k . W i ^
ed that the council will hold a sem- Weiner, PriBciiia Weinutoin, Joanna thematlcs, Joseph McKean, '40, Western Avenue and South Main
IDloiinnr
Wil- cSteven
( .„„„,, T»„U
, ,.Shirley
. u, Whipple,
,,„ •,-,,, ii,,!,.,,
7i,„„i,w.
Bull, UI
'41, uvtartn
Edwin Tinlctoli
Holstein and Avenue. Refreshments will include Mieras, Mcintyre
inar Tuesday at 3:30 P. M. In Room Wells,
2. There will also be a social at the &
/ ' ' ' i n "."•:!".': I','' ^ m S o a o n , b , C ' Paul VOmt, '42, Owen Bombard and a taffy pull and w 11 be 15c. Jean
home of Dr. Margaret Hayes, Assist- CI«HH of 1048—Viola AbrimiK, Shirley George Hudson, '43, Harry Baden, Henry, 47, President of Canterbury Win Council Elections
ant Professor of Education, on Sun- Anu'H, lOthoi Angle, Margaret Aniiio, Raymond Verrey William Marsland, Club, has extended an invitation to
Marian Mieras, '48, and Agnes Mcday, October 31, a t 1:00 P, M. andft !t^!:mnv"ki:'n:To!ul,8Balnum!,'Ann0U8BSr" Al Stone, Russell Blythe, Warren everyone.
lntyre, '49, have been named Staan open meeting on Monday at 3:30 ,„„, Kiuhieen Hell, Jeanne ltigeiow, Mve: Walker, Seniors; Zollie Privett, Ray- I V C F
, ,
in Room 206. Ruth Seelbach, '48, is i.yn iioeieher. itetty BreboeS•
"'"''I'v" mond McNamara, Curtis Pfaff,
mter-Varsity Christian Fellow$ ! n L C 40 £ ™ S j Z ^ n ™
%2!lJ*
!
preparing a pamphlet entitled, "You "••'•'•
! ; ; ? V t aKlianor , Byrne, isV M
r
M
S
Richard
Beach,
Glenn
DeLong,
Junconference
at
Camp
V
" " " k "oiy Jelections
S ^ ^ L t wconducted
" " S ^ T to
s
n
l
p
w
l
l
l
h
o
l
d
a
« Chti^hik, R i o ] i a l . r i -Rnnnh. Olnnn DBl^nff. J u n - »ui„ „,ni W « M „
»»«„„„„„* n
*•«..*«•*«<»
neir
A result
" ' will
- " be
'
"
' t"o l-",,',",',^
•'"" siurloi Uimiin.
'imio, Mar
fui*.^£
and' I.G.C."• "which
given
Mnrv I?.'
m.' D7.vla
Davis, iors;
iors Robert Merritt, Dante Zaccag- P l r m a o l e l n t h e Helderbergs Friday ,f,t " n8 ™ ^ M v ^ i . n
ni« DiaroBorlo, Gone- nini, Dale Wood, Sophomores. All n l g n t October 20. The theme of the ^V 1 ^ t tft e d, b * J?o h* ^ B? U?e s^ 3
^
11
T t M e n meeting, the speaker's
fe'S^wS^XS^
^ • " " ' ^ " r ' & l S ° ^ S ^ n f e r e ^ ^ u V ^ »wny
™ C u««''"«
« return
™*to^ col»
e a T f t b«l l e r i w l ^
l o d I d» not
panel will discuss "The Teacher's ui'iieo! 'May Giovannioiio,
Virginia toft campus to join the armed christian?"
lege this semester.
Rnif. in Tnter-aroun Education." Oroen, Mnrgare! (IroeHlii'elv, UorlH forces.
Muriel Owens, »40, President, has
The topic under discussion a t the (Continued on Page 4, Column SJ
requested students to bring all ques- Numerical Tabulations
seminar will be "The Results of
tlons
107 x 100
K
a
v
c
S
p
o
n
s
o
r
s
P
o
e
t
r
v
C
o
n
t
e
s
t
concerning their faith to be
Racial Attitudes." Anyone who is
T A I •
Quota
ToJa»
„ V ^ P 0 " ' 0 " „ , r y v - o n ' " 1 answeerd by O. Stacey Woods, the
+ 1 5301
interested may attend either of Z i m m e r 10 A p o l o g i z e I o a a y
Sammy Kayo, well-known orchos- m Q l n s p e a k e r . Mr. Woods is the Gen1 +1
these meetings.
For B r e a k i n g 3 T r a d i t i o n s
tra leader, is sponsoring a poetry e m l s e o r e t a r y of Inter-Varsity
Candidates
1
The purpose of Miss Seelbacli's
contest In connection with his pro- christian Fellowship in the U. S, Devlin
3300
pamphlet Is to acquaint the new
Myskania announces that Marlon gram, "Sunday Sorenado,
from
Canada, and Is visiting this area Houck
3400 430t
students with the work of I.G.C. Zimmer, '50, has received a third October 1 to Fobruary 27. The con- fnonr d t h e flrst t l m e m t n r e e y e a r s
Molntyre
4800
Miss Hutchinson has announced that warning ln violation of State Col- test will bo judged by Kate Smith,
Blanks
300
3M
there will be council members at the lege tradition and must apologize radio singor, Tod Malone, collector
Newman Club will hold Its annual
I G C . desk ln the Commons Mon- before Student Association in assem- of American pootry, and Vornon tea Sunday, October 20, from 3 unTotal
10700 lOTOt
day, for new students to sign up.
bly today.
Pope, oditor of Paovant Magazine til 5 P. M„ in Newman Hall at 741
The chairman has appointed the
prosh beanies must be worn on
First prlzo will bo $800, second SJSSMSJ* .?.H!LI ™„l
rr^'^Jl
67 x 100
stated
following committees for the social campus between 8 A.M. and 5 P.M. priz, $200, third, $100, other prizes President,
'""""
" that Katherine Quota
+ 1 = 3351
Tronsor,
'48,
has
been
named
chairat Dr. Hayes' homo: Alethia CheatBeginning Friday, all men In the of $25 total $0215, The poom win1 + 1
nmn
ham and Rose Berg, Sophomores, freshman class must wear some sort ning flrst prize will bo published
'
Candidates
1
and Dr. Hayes, entertainment; of class identification in order to In Pageant Magazine, and bo road
The tea will be followed by a Coleman
1000
Marilyn Skolsky, '47, Elolse Worth, participate in rivalry events, Sopho- ovor the Sunday Serenade Pro- Smoker from 7:30 until 11 for all Diffln
1100 1001
'48, and Dr. J. Allen Hicks, Profes- mores are asked to report the names gram.
men at State, Those who did not Mieras
3108
sor of Guidance, clean-up; Celena of any freshmen who do not comply
Students who wish to enter, may meet the new Chaplain, Reverend Pfaff
1100 MOJ
Axelrod, '47, Miss Hutohinson, and with this rule, and a list of all those Bocure an entry blank in the NBWH Clyde Edward Smith, last night a t Blanks
400
441
400
Dr. Theodore Standing, Professor reported will be kept to prevent vlo- Office. Rules for tho contest are the meeting will be Introduced to
— of Economics and Sociology.
lators from taking part ln rivalry,
printed on the entry blank.
him Sunday night.
Total
8700 fRM
IGC To Conduct
Seminar Tuesday
"Portraiture At Its Finest"
EAST
Jones Abandons College
For Staie Historical Post
x
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
for NEWS
Activities Day To Initiate Extra-curricular
Program For Freshman Class Tomorrow
Returning Vets
Formally Reinstate
Kappa Delta Rho
Orchestration
HOLLYWOOD
FRIDAY, O C T O B E R 1 8 ,
Dr. Louis C. Jones, who has
been with the English Department for twelve years, has abandoned the battlements of State
College in order to take a position as head of the New York
Historical Association, in
The Class of '47 ranked highest State
Cooperstown. He will take up
Myskania To Explain last semester with 34% of its mem- his
duties next June at the terbers on the Dean's List. The Jun- mination of his sabbatical leave
Rivalry- Rules;- *Baker
iors wl
ii
t h 28.4%, rated second place,
from State College.
W i l l D e l i v e r A d d r e S S while '46 and *49 completed the list
Wlth
During his twelve years a t
~ imoc= m ni r«-Pivp
25% and 22% respectively.
State, Dr. Jones taught a course
The Sophomore Class will receive
of
m
m e m b m of the
in American Folk-Literature—
the freshmen tonight at 8.00 P. M. c l a s s
^
g4
one of the first of its kind to be
in Page Hall
Robertson Baker, D e a n , s
• fche J u n i o r
33
included in college curriculums.
President of the Class of 49, will
^
Qf 2 g 2 w e r e n a
For several years he was also
preside a t the preliminary!meeting ^ S e n l o r g a n d 6 3
^ m
ftesh_
connected with the "Journal of
which will consist of * e singing of
American Folklore," a quarterly
the alma mater and the reading and
magazine with selected articles
explanation of traditions and rival- C|,IHH o f inio—Einino Alton, Mildred
,__.
ry rules by Myskania. There will be Anselment, Mildred Barnard, Joan Ber- o n ^e ^ ^ ^ a n d folklore of
entertainment
and
dancing
after,
America.
D a u p h l n e C a r p e n t o r | F l o r a Concn
' - . ™ 4 n i J . n t pnri rin.nr.ine after- L
brloh,
Ludlma Burton, Uuth Cupula,
AmoH„Q
At present, Dr, Jones is in the
wards.
Kuthryn Coston, Margery Cramer, MurlThe purpose of the reception is anne Davis, Theinia Elliott, Frank Virgin Islands, on a Guggeni.«,«
fniHfirst
t
n
eivp
t
h
e
freshEvans,
C.
Elizabeth
Faust,
Herbert
two-fold, first, to give me iresu
,h
heim Fellowship, recording the
Q
Ade]n Q
men the opportunity to meet uieir J u l l | i G e o r e g | H e n r y G G r m o m l i N e l n e
antics of local ghosts, in his
rival class;
second,
t o i n s t r u c t G i 0 , i | Virginia Greenman, Jean Griffin,
book, "Ghostlore in New York
t h p m r o n c e r n l n s t h e t r a d i t i o n s a n d Blancho Halt, rrisciiia Hayes, Mnrjorio
State."
zilles, a veteraa of world War ii, State Stars Seek Tenor Sax
J
ALBANY, N E W YORK,
Sophs To Greet Nelson Names
Freshman Class Honor Students
In Page To-night For Lost Term
Students To Teach
German Classes
was stationed in Germany during
the war. He commented that being
in the country gave him a more
practical knowledge of the language,
and also a chance to see what the
people and country are like. He has
studied German for six years, and
is working for an A.B. degree with
a major in English and a minor in
German.
Kunz
Kunz, also a veteran of the recent war, has a proficient knowledge
of the German language. Included
in his Army jobs was the position of
interpreter for the Office of Military
Government in Berlin during the
early months of occupation. He is
also working for an A.B. degree with
a major in Social Studies and a
minor in German. Kunz says that
he is privileged to be able to teach
a college class while only a student
himself.
Z-444
SIGNUP
**+***,*•... 11'*mm»mm*.,
—Awww
•TAT* COLLCai NIW»,
P»AOK g
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established May 1916
By tht Clan of 1911
Vol. XXXI
October 18, 1946
No. 4
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Preaa
Collegiate Dlgeat
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York State College for Teachers: published every Friday of the college
year by the NEWS Board for the Student Association.
Phones: Tessler, 3-0888; Lusock, 8-1811: Pender, Ounlay,
2-8120, Kuni, 8-0287; Skolsky, 4-1607. Members of the news
staff may be reached Tucs.. and Wed. from 7 to 11:30 P.M.
at 3-0407.
The News Board
MARY
r.
TBSSIER
IDITOR-IN-CHIIF
BERNARD M. SKOLBKY
ANN
LUSCOK
LORNA KUNZ
PATRICIA
SHEEHAN
VIRGINIA DAY
MARTHA DUNLAY
MARGERY PENDER
CAROL CLARK
ANN
MANAGING IDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
STOUTS
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
MAY
MARJORY
ELMORE CLARK
•
.
EDITOR
SPORTS EDITOR
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
•
ASSOCIATE
•
EDITOR
fa
gmoki*^,
FRIDAY, O C T O M R 18, I M C
PUaUl
For the last two years the registration at this College was at a
point where no traffic difficulties
existed. At the present time we
have a maximum registration with
the result that the corridors are
filled with people, particularly the
lower corridor of Draper, at the
time classes are passing. In former
years it has not been of particular
concern that students enjoyed smoking a cigarette while passing
through the lower hall of Draper between classes. Now, however, the
press of the crowd is so great that
the smoking of cigarettes has established a dangerous situation.
I am appealing, therefore, to all
students—veterans and others—to
refrain from smoking In the corridors. This request has come to me
from Campus Commission, and I
believe that they are presenting a
very good point of view. They have
assumed that at the present time,
Necessary Evil? . . .
Another wartime casualty has returned to State. The editorial "Open Season on
All fraternities were disbanded a few years ago Frosh" must have been precisely the
needed to convert the uswhen college reserves were called to active service, Influence
ual rushing tension into an unbut KDR has made the first move toward general bearable friction. And how many
freshmen must have been shocked
reorganization by meeting officially and electing to read about the insincerity of "be
nice to frosh".
officers.
The natural assumption is that Potter Club, SLS Rushing is certainly just as trying
for the upperclassmen as it Is for
and KB will begin similar action in the near future. the freshmen who is being rushed,
The issue at present is this: How will the return for tension between classmates as
well as bitter disappointment at the
of fraternities affect the school in general?
loss of a rushee is unpleasant, to
It is common knowledge that before the war both
fraternities and sororities constituted a large pressure group in college activities, particularly in important elections. This practice almost disappeared
during the war years, when it was no longer
necessary to be backed by a so-called social organization in order to receive a school office.
say the least.
We definitely agree with the editorial that "this Is a challenge to
Inter-sorority Council"; a matter to
be discussed by sorority members
and revised, if necessary, for the betterment of college life. But we also
firmly believe that sorority topics
should be brought to the floor during the second semester, when the
It is to be hoped that such conditions will not be sorority system Is no longer a mysresumed when fraternity reorganization is complet- tery and can be discussed openly by
ed. Greek-letter groups can serve a useful purpose the entire college.
here if they confine their activities to a social level
—which is supposedly their only reason for existence. Although frats will not have houses this year,
they will eventually be able to acquire quarters
and augment inadequate college housing. It is only
when such groups go beyond their primary functions
and seek to exert pressure on the college as a whole
that they become undesirable.
The fact remains, however, that
meanwhile upperclassmen will be
"rushing" frosh, not for the artificial motives of cute kid" or
"smooth" as stated by the editorial,
but because the rushee is the type
of woman with whom the sorority
member would like to live for her
remaining college years; the type
of person whom she knows will keep
faith with and work for her sorority.
The selection of new members is
the only means the sorority has of
protecting its future.
Now that the swing toward reorganization is definitely underway, we can only ask that members
stay within the ethical bounds of their groups. Fraternities have been known as a necessary evil in the The Editorial's last paragraph has
past. Will they become so again?
theoretically stated Its purpose: "The
simple act of postponing pledging".
It is, however, impossible for us to
overlook the former parts of the editorial, the words of which must have
bewildered many freshmen as It
described the "twenty-day friendFRIDAY, October 18—
ship" and "the old story with all its
,8:00 P.M.—Sophomore reception for freshmen In original fallacies". We cannot rePage Hall
strain our indignation at such attacks and would like to have "falSATURDAY, October 19—
lacy" explained.
7:15 P.M.—Hlllel Splash Party at YMHA, 111 Washington Ave,
Meanwhile, during this "silent
period", please, NEWS, let our newsSUNDAY, October 20—
paper practice the ordinary decency
2:30 P.M.—Hlllel picnic at Thatcher Park. Meet at by not debating an issue which cannot be openly discussed, until the
Hlllel Hall.
functioning of sororities is under3:00 PJM.—5:00 P.M.—Newman Club tea.
stood by everyone.
6:00 P.M.—Newman Club Smoker,
A Sorority Member
MONDAY, October 21—
8:00 P.M.—Christian Science Organization meei'ng To The Editor:
In response to a letter which apin Room 101, Draper.
peared In the October 4 issue of the
NEWS, I should like to avail myTUESDAY, October 22—
13:00—12:30 P.M.—Music Council recording hour, self of your pages to state my opinion of veterans' organizations among
Room 28, Richardson.
the student body.
8:30 P.M.—5:00 P.M.—Meeting of Pan Amigoa In
Lounge.
Granted that the majority of
8:30 P.M.—A, D, Comedy, Drama in Page Hall.
State's present traditions, pranks,
and extra-class activities are JuvenWEDNESDAY, October 23—
ile to most of us, It Is for us to aid
12:00—12:30 P.M.—College Chapel Service in Unitar- their maturation, not to out ourselves off from the rest of the stuian Chapel.
dent body. We might call the nonTHURSDAY, October 24
Veteran students at State adolescents If, and I believe I Interpret Mr.
7:30 PJM—Pi Omega PI meeting in Commons.
College Calendar - - - -
"
while we are establishing a new habit of procedure, some people are
apt to forget, and, while engaged In
conversation, light a cigarette.
Members of Campus Commission
have, under this assumption, approached those who have lighted
cigarettes; but certain students have
refused to dispose of the cigarette
or go elsewhere.
In any type of democratic situation the welfare of the entire body
should be the concern of each individual, and it seems to me to be
socially intelligent for anyone to
refrain from smoking in the corridor and more particularly, if a
person forgets and does light a
cigarette to accept a request to remove same with good grace,
The cooperation of the entire student body is a matter that will be
greatly appreciated by Campus Commission and, I may add, by myself.
M. G. Nelson, Dean of the College
Sultan correctly, they are not mature; the business of the adolescent,
according to a sophomore text, is to
stop being one. At the same time,
the duty of the veteran is to stop
being one. It would be ridiculous
for parents to refuse to associate
with their children merely because
they are juvenile; it is equally ridiculous for men calling themselves
mature to withdraw from association with others. It is an anti-social attitude, and easy proof that the
maturity which this group prides itself in having attained is a pseudomaturation, similar to the pseudosophistication to be found in many
high school sets. The crux of the
whole problem of adjustment (a
mountain which has been made into a mountain range by well-intentioned people trying to isolate some
neurosis for every ex-soldier or sailor) lies herein; and the problem
calls for a solution rather than segregation of those men who have
"Interests In common which they
do not share with the remainder of
the student body."
%
MuU
Freshmen Team
favored To Win
By MINDY SKOLSKY
COURSE IV—THE LAST SUPPER
(Taking it for granted that the significance of the
Nuremberg trials is understood by all of us—)
According to the Associated Press, the last supper
of the condemned Nazis consisted of Cooked porridge, bread, and coffee. On the other hand, the
United Press released the menu of the last supper as
sausag, potato salad, bread, and tea. The discrepancies in the menu start us off on a train of thought,
and before we know it we arrive at the following alternatives: (1) the Associated Press reporter thought
that the American people would resent hearing that
Nazi murderers lunched on sausage in these meatless
Weeks, and so thoughtfully changed the menu; (2)
the UP reporter was an amateur tea leaf-reader while
the AP man was a Brazilian, (and there's an awful
lot of coffee in Brazil); (3) the UP reporter had been
raised on the theory that a child should have some
hot cereal each day of his life and as a result had become conditioned against even seeing the word "porridge."
The fact that bread appears on the menus seems
to disprove the adage that bread is the "staff of life."
It would be interesting to learn the various types of
bread that were served.
In an effort to remain an individual to the bitter
end, Hermann Goering alone had potassium cyanide.
No one, except perhaps Senator Taft, can deny that
the 11 Nazis received their just desserts.
B. M. S.
Gammon-State*
.Of Checks and Balances.
The Common-Stater is given the voidest latitude as
author of this column. His viewpoints do not necessarily reflect those of the State College News.
A SAD NOTE
We bring sad news this week. Monday we Dragoned
to Watervliet and injulred about the possibility of
receiving substlnence checks by Xmas, and the true
word was spoken in jest. Our contact man had no
idea that school had begun here, and several Individuals inquired about were not even on record. So we
left. Tuesday brought a brief Interview with Mr.
And I would appreciate some In- Townley, VA representative at State.
formation on this type of interest:
Much woe. His Inside opinion was that checks would
Is it beer guzzling and reminiscences? I should think that Ameri- not arrive in any near future—six weeks to three
can Legion or Veterans of Foreign months before the postman would bring the good
Wars would supply this sort of In- note.
terest for those who desire It. It
Reasons: The same staff that last semester handled
seems rather Incongruous that any
group of men who supposedly grew 3,000 cases in this district has now 15,000 cases to
very tired of seeing one another contend with; the finance office moved and the
constantly all through the years of old "lost in transit" applies to many records, et ciruthe war should now wish to pro- dera ad nauseam.
mote an organization which would
So, in collaboration with the Part-Time EmployInsure that very state of affairs.
Furthermore, any such organization ment Bureau, we shall publish available jobs as they
runs every risk of becoming a sel- come up. Here's what's to be had now:
Man for fountain service. Split hours. Food & pay.
fishly introspective group sessions
merely of safeguarding to them2 men for outside work. No details.
selves that part of glory of war
Telephone operator, nites. Meal & money.
which they earned; it runs every
Man to clean apt. 2-3 hrs. weekly.
risk of becoming an association for
Ushers. All theatres.
the promotion of the mutual beneFor complete information on these jobs see Mrs.
fit of its members. Any lessons or Malseed
in the Dean of Women's office.
experience gained by servicemen
during the war belong to the coun- OUT ON A LIMB
try as a whole and should be shared
with the entire population as much
We recently checked into that seasonal football,
as possible, for the better Interests the St. Mary's Housing Project—perish the thought.
of the nation and the world.
From first-hand observation and what little unofficial information there was, we start sawing. Some
In the final analysis, any veterans' apartments should be available for familied vets by
organization on the campus becomes 1 December. The dormatory section, 2 a room, with
a discriminatory group, since by the grace of supplies and an unknown element, may
definition membership is limited to be open by 15 January. The matter of preference rethose men chosen by lot to wear mains one of those mysterious "we have no informa• • •
uniforms, provided they were physio- tion'' secrets.
With so many students eating out and not having
ally fit, The campus of State College is at present blessed with the personal facilities at their disposal, Common-Stater
disappearance of college discrimin- will run from time to time "finds" which we run
atory groups misnamed "fraterni- across. We are plugging no one. We have no affiliatlos", and I for one am opposed to tions with any of the places mentioned. The Informamove to discriminate against fresh- tion is given for your acceptance or rejection.
Eating houses. The Pewter Pitcher at 115 Lark ofmen who were too young to be
drafted, or those upperclassmen who fers woll-balanced, tasty dinners at very reasonable
were not physically fit, or those of prices. Takes an hour to eat, but is well worth it for
any class whose contribution to the those who must eat out most of the time.
war effort was in some capacity
For Chinese and American food, the Canton Resother than as members of the arm- taurant at 23 South Pearl is good. Prices reasonable,
ed forces.
fast service, Never too crowded.
I agree with Mr. Sultan that no
veteran will rejoice in having a paper tag tied around his neck to substitute for a metal one: but Mr. Sultan apparently wishes to use the
discharge emblem as another tag,
and for me that one 1B as unwelcome as any other.
Arthur N. Collins, '48
Although a little late in the season, we like to
comment on th officiating at the lntra-mural football
games. Adversely. We don't mean to criticize the
Individuals, for as such they deserve praise for undertaking the Job. But the job done Is sad. If gym
classes concentrated on producing officials for games
Instead of whatever their object Is, the classes would
have a purpose other than a consuming time, and
our lntra-mural leagues would be more inviting.
Today at 4:30 the Frosh Blue Jays
will meet the Soph Red Devils to
determine three of the coveted rivalry points given to the winner of the rivalry football game.
The game will be played on Page
Hall field and is the first of men's
rivalry games held this year.
From the present outlook, the
frosh appear to have some advantage over '49 in that part of the team
has played as a unit in the M.A.A.
intramural league. Kennie George,
captain of the Blue Jays, is a fast,
shifty player formerly known for
his football career at Philip Schuyler High School in Albany. Supporting George, is a team that has
proven itself a strong and steady
combination. Left-handed Sy Fresh
has earned his reputation as '50's
best passer while Hoyt and speedy
© ESQUIRE, INC., 1946
Tom O'Brien will be on the receiving end of the pigskin. Carosella, alReprinted from the October issue of Esquire
though he is shorter than the average football player, makes up for
his lack of height by his speed on
the field of play while McGrath— "Take it easy, now—remember
whose side you're on!'
fast and shifty, and Pried—heavy
lineman and excellent blocker make
MAA Bulletin . . .
up the remainder of the team having
William Marsland, '47, President
previous playing experience.
Ben
of MAA, has released for publicaJackson, now playing in the intration the results of balloting on the
mural league for Sayles Gentlenew constitution of the Men's Athmen, is a man to watch in the game
letic Association. The results are as
today and Tom Trainer with former
follows:
high school experience to back him
The coming of the cold weather
Approved
Disapproved
up also appears as a threat to the
seems to have been a stimulus to
112
1
Red Devils.
tennis. The singles tourney lacks This new constitution will go into
However, the Sophs, realizing but one match to complete the first effect immediately.
their lack of experience in playing
Nominations are now open for the
together have been holding practices round while the mixed doubles have following offices on the Executive
to polish up their working combina- already started the second series. Committee: Vice President, Clubs
tions. Bob Kittridge will lead the The completion of the second and Recreation—must be '47 or '48.
men of '49 followed by Walt Schick, round will bring the singles tourney Vice-President, Managers—must be
a shifty player who can "nab any- to the semi-finals. Due to an uneven '47 or '48. Secretary—must be '48.
thing within fingertip reach" and number of contestants, Fran Mul- Financial Secretary—must be '48.
Joe Zanchelli, a powerful and fast len was carried over to the second Any member of the Men's Athplayer. Two of '49's best linemen round and defeated McClintock, 6-0, letic Association is eligible to make
are Mert Thayer and Nolan Powell, 6-0. McClintock in the first round nominations. They must be subdepending on their weight for ef- had beaten Dickinson 6-0, 10-8. Mar- mitted in writing to the President of
fective power.
golin was defeated by Hoyt, 6-4, 6-1. the Association and must be signed
The game promises to be a fight In the Rabineau-O'Donnell match, by the person making them. Nomto the finish although the concen- Rablneau took the first two sets, inations will close at 11:00 A. M. on
sus of opinion slightly favors the 6-3, 6-0. Christy won through for- Friday, October 18.
Freshman team.
feit by Stone and Kloepfel downed
A complete list of the nominations
The referee of the game will be Read 6-1, 6-2. Root was victorious will be posted on the MAA bulletin
Red Evans '47 with Bill Marsland, over Marsland with the scores 6-0, board for one week following the
Jr. '47 as umpire and Stan Gipp '47 6-2. The Feeney-George match re- completion of nominations. Voting
officiating as Head Linesman.
for the above officers will take place
mains to complete this round.
on Friday, October 25. Balloting will
Weather permitting, the mixed be secret and a preferential ballot
World Series Summary
Taking a 4-3 thriller from the doubles semi-finals should be played will be used.
• * *
Boston Red Sox Tuesday, the St. off by the end of next week. The
MAA opens its first golf tournaLouis Cardinals won the 1946 World Dickinson-Beckers team started off
well
against
Kloepfel
and
Valentino
ment this week-end at the MuniciSeries. It was their sixth championtaking the first match 2-6. The next pal Golf Links tomorrow and Sunship In nine series tries.
two
sets,
however,
brought
victory
day.
Seven new records were made and
Kloepel and Valentino. Feeney
A match has been scheduled for
nine others equaled during the to
and O'Grady easily defeated Sulli- the week following completion of
championship games. The new rec- van
and Sweeney in the first two the tournament between the MAA
ords Included:
sets, 6-1, 6-0. The Marsland-Quinn
1. Three outfield assists -on throws duo lost the opening game 4-6 to champs and the faculty. Golf into the plate in one gam by both Wood and Mahoney but made a struction classes during the winter
teams (Slaughter, Williams, Dimag- quick come back by winning the re- for those interested have also been
planned.
glo).
maining games 6-2, 6-3. Stone and
2. Two outfield assists in one In- Callahan were victors over Evansning by one team (Williams, Dl- Young winning 6-2, 7-5.
Maggio).
3. Three players on one team makWith the return of organized tening four hits in one game by both nis tournaments, the tennis trophy
teams (Moses, Kurowski, Garagiola). will go back into circulation. Flo
4. The most assists by a second Garfall, '45, was the winner of the
baseman (Doerr).
cup In the last tournament which
5. The most hits by both clubs in was played in 1941.
one game (29, Cards 20, Sox 9).
6. Thirdbaseman starting the most
double plays in one game (Kurowski).
Where all the Students Meet
7. The Cards' Harry Brecheen
contributed the best individual performance by becoming the first lefthander In World Series history to
win three games In one series.
MAA Tennis
Ends First Round
MADISON
OTTO R. MENDE
THE
COLLEGE J E W E L S *
SWEET
785 Madison Ave.
RMMrB
FRIDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1 0 4 6
Rivalry Football Game Today
On Pase Hall Field A t 4:30
. .
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All communications should be addresB.ed to the editorr and
must be signed. Names will be withheld upon request.
The STATE COLLEGE NEWS assumes no responsibility
for' opinions expressed In its columns or communications To the Editor:
as such expressions do not necessarily reflect Its view.
During a period when ethics forbid the mention of sororities between
freshmen and upperclassmen, we
wonder if the State College NEWS
has not become the "Voice of the
Independents?''
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,
SHOP
Blue-Jays Defeat Football Forum
Bf FRANK WOODWORTB
the delay In starting cawed
Myskania Line bySince
inclement weather and other difficulties, the Intramural football
league has been favored by good
In Tug-of-War weather and has progressed favor-
Line-up
Lashinsky
Telian
Sweeney
Bentley
Tessler
Cook
Alverson
Randall
Hutchinson
Conley
Hilt
Margot
Combs
169
120
129
130
121
140
128
129
132
133
133
159
155
Morley
Bowen
Madison
Cleary
Jackson
Adams
Lee
Kenzie
King
Kline
Hutton
Wlltsey
Trainer
Pharmacists
ALBANY. N, Y.
Luncheon Served Daily
'.OPEN DAILY AT 8 A. M>
Another glaring trouble has been
the matter of referees. We recommend that MAA adopt a resolution
to reimburse referees with the stipulation that those referees engaged
be well informed on all rules and
technicalities. We realize that It
is not all the fault of the fellows
who have done their best to call
games as fairly as they knew how.
In many instances referees were
pressed Into service from the sidelines which is seldom a good policy.
In several games it has been apparent that the players have charge
rather than the referee and it was
a case of the team who had the
best lungs winning the decisions.
Not only has this constant bickering held up the games, but it has
tended to make the games unnecessarily rough and dirty. We realize
that football Is not a lace pantle
game but it has been obvious that
many of the games would have been
better played if they had been under better control.
At the present time the league is
being led by the Ramblers who have
powerhoused their way over all opposition to date for a record of 4
wins and no losses.
The Frosh are In 2nd place with
3 wins and 1 loss. Van Derzee Hall
has won 2 games, lost none and
tied one.* The Finks have won 2
and lost 3 games. Next in order are
the Sayles Hall Gentlemen who have
won 1 and lost 1. The grads have
yet to score a win but have one tie.
The Raiders are In last place with 4
defeats.
'Ranking Is determined on a point
system. Wins are awarded 2 points;
ties, 1 point; and losses, 0 points.
ALTHOUGH BASKETBALL15
THEON1Y AMERICAN-BOW
MAJOR SPORT IT WAS
PLAYEP IN 75 COUNTfyES
BEFORE THE WAS,
. AND THE RECORD
CROWD TO SEE A
GAME IS 2 8 , 0 0 0 .
AT P E I P I N * , CHINA
IM 195 B
THE FAMOUS SPALDING
IAST-B1ET BASKET BALL
. . FIRST WITH COACHES
AND PLAYERS ALIKE
Home Made ICE CREAM
ESTABLISHED 1101
FMONS 4-SOS6
I S 7 CENTRAL AVE.
ing basketball season. The first
thing that is causing trouble to all
teams in the fact that very few
teams are starting their games on
time, with the result that these
games have to be played after it gets
too dark to see either players or the
ball.
^pALDING
ALBANY, N. Y.
SODAS — CANDY — SANDWICHES
hope to see avoided during the com-
190
113
140
122
140
131
115
123
181
124
128
130
180
103 C E N T R A L AVE.
H. F. Honikel & SOB
ably. However, there have bean
many drawbacks this fall that we
Outweighing the members of Myskania by twenty-nine pounds, the
Frosh out-tugged them to win the
tug-of-war last Tuesday on Huested Field.
The frosh used a system of pull
and rest, which appeared to the
many spectators a reenactment of
the Volga Boatman song. Morley,
in the front, gave the signals which
were passed along the line to Tom
Trainer who had about three feet
of rope to work with on the end.
Not only did the men of '50 "lend
weight" to the line, but the women
were no slackers either.
Myskania, on the other hand,
(or we should say on the other end
of the line) had nimble Lashlnsky
in the front, while Combs brought
up the rear. Tellan, the featherweight of the team, was behind
Lashinsky, followed by , Sweeney,
Bentley, and 121 pound NEWS editor Tessier. Middleweight Cooky was
in the center of the line followed
Alverson, Mrs. AKR, Hutch, Conley,
Hilt, and "Champ" Margot.
The weighing-in ceremonies started at four-thirty with Phil officiating and members of all four classes
checking the weights.
The center of the rope was "approximated" (with Myskania getting the short end) and the tugof-war was started. The freshmen
started pulling and Conley (In Mr.
AKR's white monkey-suit) was literally and figuratively pulled and
dragged over the "established" finish line.
StWm
•AOt 4
Irma O, Rosen, Myra Rosenberg, Elcnnuru Schneider, Shirley Schneider,
(''ranees Sown, Jean Staplcton, Dale
Sullivan, Marvin Sultan, Irene Saurek,
Paula Tiehy. Shirley Van Popering,
Dorothy Wade, Dorothy Walejslo, Marlonlce Watklns, Jack Welnsteln, Ray
S, Weiss', Doris Wester, Donald White,
'Continued from Page 1, Column %) Robert White, Alice Williams, Shirley
Hatthwaite, Marjorie Harland, Gladys Williams, Eleanor Winkler, Orletta
lluwk, Eleanor Holblg, Raymond How- Wolf, Elaine Woods.
ard, Barbara Hymnn, Bette Jones,
Wallace Keene, Dolores Koenlg, Rita
<J)OM of 1919—Joan Anderson, Marilyn
Kopec.
Avalear, William Bahn, Frederick BaJanet Lnltne, Helen Lengyel, Annalee ron, Marie Bennett, Blanche Berka,
Levine, Walter Lowerre, Jessie Lud- Regina Bollenbach, Martin Bortnick,
lutn, Sheila Maglness, Evelyn Mattlson, Stanley Chwalek, Clara Cipriani,
Ann May, Paul Meadows, Blliabeth Knowlton Coutu, Atda DeBramo, Floyd
Merrltt, Marian Mierus, Miriam Mlll- Decatur, Ronald Dixon, Mary Dunning,
mnn, Beverly Moore, Anna Pascuzsl, Snrn Ethal, John Fay, Corlnne Felgln,
r
" • n,'.i|.i-<».i .it Wnlnn
Mary Qulnn, Mary Regan, Angle Ricci,
S A To Name
Commuters PlanDean Announces
Campus Queen Club Party
Honor Students
Audrey Popp, '47, president of
Candidates Today Commuters'
Club, has announced
that the club will hold a Hallowe'en
f
LIBRARY
•TATE C O L L I O I NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18. 1040
Three financial resolutions will be Party on Friday, October 25, in the
presented to Student Association in Commons from 8:00 to 11:30 P.M.
assembly this morning and voting Albert Read, '47, chairman of the
on two of them will take place., car pool sponsored by Commuters'
Nominations for Campus Queen will club, has stated that the car pool
be followed by an announcement of system is working out very well.
the Activities Day schedule and a club members will be admitted
short pep rally.
free, but non-members will be charge
_
.
m««M—
d twenty cents admission. Tickets
To vote on Motions
may ^
obtalned at the table
m
Financial resolutions from Cam- the lower corridor of Draper Hall
pus Commission, the Pedagogue, and beginning Tuesday.
- .; _ _
Dramatics and Arts Council will be n aRs ebaede n haa s announced that there
introduced, and Campus Commis"quest from the Admlnsion wiU ask "that $151.27 be taken tatratton
that
students participating
m tne car
from the surplus to purchase a new
P 0 0 1 a s riders should obvic and speaking system for the ttain
the permission of w111
their parents
o d o 80> T n l s Mtion
Commons"
absolve
the college from any responsibility
Because of great increases in in case of accidents. Read urges all
printing costs the Pedagogue will commuters to co-operate in this
ask "that $800 be taken from the project.
surplus to cover the necessary addiThe college medical board has rational publication costs of the year- quested that all commuters watch
book."
the club bulletin board for a notice
from them.
Dramatics and Arts Council will The first issue of the club newsintroduce a motion to the effect paper, "Tommy's Tattles", has been
"that $200 be taken from the sur- published. If any commuter has not
plus to supply necessary equipment received his copy, he may contact
for sets for the Advanced Dramatics Estelle Siegel, '49, Editor,
plays."
The Campus Commission and D«StA
Council motions will be voted on today since the Student Board of Fir
nance has waived the requirement
of tabling motions for one week because of the necessity of immediate
action. However, the Pedagogue resolution will be tabled until next Compulsory class meetings will be
held at noon on Monday to elect atFriday.
tendants and ushers for the Campus Day crowning ceremonies. NomWill Nominate Queen
inations will also be made for the
Candidates for Campus Queen MAA Representative Council.
must be Seniors and are to be nom- A new system of electing attendinated on the basis of both beauty ants and ushers is being introduced
and popularity. Nominations will be this year, whereby each class will
by ballot, and voting will take place nominate and elect its own reprenext Friday. The identity of the sentatives.
queen will not be revealed until The candidates will be chosen enCampus Night.
tirely for beauty but may not be
Frank Woodworth, '47, chairman nominated for an attendant or
of Activities Day, will announce that usher if they were selected for the
the signing up for college organiza- same position in other years.
tions will begin in the Commons at From the nominations for MAA
1 P. M. tomorrow. At 2:30 the tra- Representative Council, four memditional banner presentation will bers will be chosen from each of the
take place. The Seniors will hang upper three classes. Voting for MAA
their banner beside the banners of Council will take place all day Friformer Senior classes and the fresh- day, October 25, at a table in the
men wil receive theirs. Blue and Commons balcony. Only men are
eligible to vote.
white.
During these meetings the ComBetty Brennan, '47, Dorothy Skelton, '48, Jean Ineson and Mary mons and the Library will be closed.
Cheatham, Sophomores, the college
cheerleaders, will be in charge of the
pep rally.
At a Student Council meeting held
Wednesday night Eloise Worth, '48,
was appointed chairman of Campus
THE
Day.
The Student Board of Finance has
announced that this year faculty
tax tickets for admission to college
functions will be $3.00.
However, this amount will not include a subscription to either the
News or the Pedagogue. The tickets
will provide for admittance to all
those performances which are covered by Student Tax.
Members of the Student Board
of Finance will contact all members
of the faculty for the sale of these
tickets in the near future.
TO
H
OPEN 9:00 to 5:30 DAILY
811 MADISON AVENUE
2 B A R B E R S - N O WATTING
SI* Central Avonae Albany, N. Y.
TELEPHONE 4-0017
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
DIAL 51903
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
lee-soe
CENTRAL, AVKNUK
ALBANY, N. Y.
ALL
ME
I CAi - r iMnPtCa T
e i rLD
i •»
mm*i**
fib*, OVER
vun A
Mm
eR
nu
T rc oRcr i IE
IS T
OPS!
JMMMsiUikMMUU
;.,,¥:;.U,;v„..w,..-.i-;.
Religious Clubs
List Activities
SA To Choose
Campus Queen
During Assembly
YOUR PORTRAIT
Barber Shop
VOL. XXXI NO. 8
For Four Hour Hunt
Elections for freshman class of- not only the present but the future educated until teachers are paid [••'
•-- ,— — as well—namely the teacher short- higher salaries than janitors and f .
From Draper To Page
ficers will be held at the close of a g e , w h a t factors and problems milkmen."
Assembly today. Nominees for the n a v e m a c i e t n e teaching profession
Other drastic measures have been
The Coronation of the twentypresidency of the class have dis- s 0 undesirable that registration in and must be taken to obtain better
fifth Campus Queen tomorrow night
closed their platforms in speeches m c s t teachers colleges remains below pay for teachers. The strike by the
at 8:00 P. M. in Page Hall Auditwhich were delivered Monday, Oc- p a r ?
Norwalk teachers is only a sample of
j orium will climax the traditional
tober 2, at freshman orientation.
j a s t Saturday's storm of what is to come if immediate imwhen
: ceremonies of Campus Day. OrThere are eight candidates com- nearly 3,000 broke over the Capitol, provements are not made. Governor
. ganized rivalry will open with the
peting for the presidency of the t h e Teacher's Union of the C.I.O. Dewey has taken one step towards
men and women's field events at
Class of '50. These are: Richard voiced demands for immediate ac- this end by organizing a special leg10:30 A.M. outside Page Hall, folFeathers, Robert Freycr, Donald tion on increases in teachers' sal- islative committee.on the state edulowed by the Banner Hunt from 1:00
Hoyt, John Lang, Charles Margo- a r i e s . R 0 S e Russell, legislative rep- cation program to. hold hearings
to 5:00 P.M. and the freshmen and
lin, Martha Murphy, Joan Romulus, re sentntive of the union, was November 15, preparatory to the
Sophomore skits at 8:30 PM. to the
and Irwin Teitelbaum.
among those who stated that they presentation of recommendations to
Auditorium. Eloise Worth, '48, is
Feathers' Platform
wanted a $1,000 yearly raise for all the Legislature.
general chairman of Campus Day
The essentials of teamwork are members of New York City's teachThe economic status of the teachevents.
talent, efficiency,accuracy, maximum ing staffs and a state-wide mini- er is not the only problem present,
effort, willingness, oneness, rip- m u m pay of $2,500 yearly.
A lack of essential freedom and recField events for men and women
roarin' good times and the key to Teachers have always been under- ognition exists. For example, the i
are scheduled to begin at 10:30 P.M.
success which teamwork is. As presi- p a i d I n 1 9 4 5 m o r e t h a n 2 7 > 0 0 0 s m a i l town teacher has to lead an
as the second athletic contests bedent of our class I would work with teachers received less than $600 a abnormal and limited life. Smoking
tween the rival classes. Events for the
you and for you so that working to- y e a r
the by women is frowned upon while
Q f a l l fche teachers m
men include a seventy-five yard
gether we could find the key that c o u n t r y i 2 0% of them received less their social associations are at the
dash, limited to three entries from
will open the door to success.
$1200. Average salaries in constant scrutiny and interference
tnan
each class, a football throw for disFreycr's Platform
various states ranged from a scan- of the public. In order to hold her
tance, and one for accuracy, a footThe Rivalry Cup, loads of. fun and d a l o u s $ 6 5 0 i n M i s s t s s ippi to a hard- position, the teacher must, in most
ball kick for distance, and a two
ELOISE
WORTH,
'48
good marks
be the
aim attain
of the j y a{ j e quate $2,700 in New York, cases, remain single as well as make
man relay race. Two points for riClass
of '50. should
Foremost
in the
her political opinions and utterances
valry will be awarded for the class
ment of these goals, however, should
conform with the local supervisor's
winning three out of five field events
be democratic living and fair play.
conception of "The American Way
for the men.
The talent and spirit is here. We
of Life." Even ideas on progressive
Schedule Field Events
have what it takes—don't let the
education are often classified as
Sophs take what we have!
Field events for the women will
radical. In short, teachers—male
Hoyt's Platform
consist of two women's relay races,
and female—are supposed to be unlimited to three entries, a fifty yard
1. Honesty, Sincerity and Devoderpaid, spinsterly and saints.
dash, an old clothes race, a tug of
tion to Duty.
SLS, EEP, KB List
An additional fault is the false
war with ten from each class par2. To Guide rather than rule.
SCA Will Sponsor
as
Inter-fraternity Officers emphasis on- the academic« degree
ticipating, and a Rooster fight,
« ^ i V / ^ . CIO
3. To Support the Class of '50 in
a qualification for teachers. Results
State College Sunday which is limited to five entries. Two
all its undertakings.
Sigma Lamba Sigma, Edward Eld- —instructors become writers, scholpoints will also be given for the class
Lang's Platform
red Potter Club, and Kappa Beta ars, and research workers who inei- State College Sunday will be ob winning„ three
*...w out
„ u u ,of five of the
My idea of a president is one who fraternities were reorganized this dentally and reluctantly teach also, served this Sunday according to women's field events.
can see nil sides of a problem and w e e k, following meetings to elect
In
the
insistence
on
the
label
"Mas
Edna Sweeney, '47, is in charge
iU„ -.. «.w ...o.c„ clll , c UJI wic muei mas- Mary Tellan, '47, President of Stucome to the best solution. The lead- 0fflee,.s a n d
representatives *-*-•to ter ~«
of *-'•-'•
Arts," *there •is a tendency to md(jant
Christian Association. New- of women's athletics while William
er should try to encourage everyone inter-Fraternity Council,
n C1
neglect to furnish the youth on our
ub has completed plans for Marsland, '47, is general chairman
to participate in the activities not y^g Elects Officers
the'same" ones over'and over" "if" °\at *'"""'* " " , c e r s
schools with Masters of Teaching. a Hallowe'en Party, and Hillel has of the men's events. Thomas Trainelected that's what I'll try to ac- « A L . V n ' J J T i* g M o l ? d a > \ nfcht,
& it any wonder that during the outlined a program for the coming er and Robertson Baker will direct
complish
Gcoige Kunz, '47, was elected Presi- last two years nearly 40,000 teachers activities of Brandels Club, the the activities of the freshmen and
IVIaiKolin Platform
ol Sigma Lamba Sigma, and have left the profession for other z i o n i s t section of Hillel.
Sophomore classes, respectively
l e res ntatl
College b, a »cRuth
and. pecuveiy.
Ruth FranIf thefi^shman olaoi n l a o . thPir : P f,
ve to Inter-Fraternity employment?
«SCA
— • -is sponsoring State
- •
. . « . . Madison
._..
Sunday at the First Reformed e v e nl \t s WiU direct freshmen women's
" „ r "esnman
_places thenI council.
Joseph
'48 is
confidence
in me, class
as President,
Vice-President
'and Roulier,
Social Director,
Church, Clinton Square. The day
' and Margaret Seamen, Sophwill work with and for the class. I Robert Wilcox, '49, Secretary, and
has been held yearly at the same m o r e activities,
shall strive to uphold the college Raymond Howard, '48, Treasurer,
time for approximately 6 years. The Start Banner Rivalry
traditions, to make a good name for Charles Capel, '47, was chosen Athpurpose of the program is to unite
The Banner Hunt will begin at
the Class of '50, and to win rivalry. ie tic Director, Richard Zeller, '49,
all students in one church for a 1:00 P.M. and continue until 5:00.
Here's wishing success to the Class i l l l r | Harold Ashworth, '47, Pledgespecial service with the Albany resi- The banners must be hidden twentyes '50.
Masters, and Samuel Dickeison, '48,
dents who regularly attend the four hours before the hunt, on the
Murphy's Platform
unci John Lubey, '49, representative
church. The service will begin at campus or in the buildings, with
If I am elected president I will do LO Inter-Fraternity Council,
11 A. M. with Reverend Clee of the the exception of the executive ofmy best through the co-operation
Members of Sigma Lamba Sigma The annual Truth and Conse- ™ s t Reformed Church delivering fices. Each class is required to in/Continued on Page <>, Column 1> include John Caramia, Henry Gel
h e s sermon
ermon
r
h n M M «••"(
„ ,,,-,^i„.. » , . t the
<»»> two members of Myskania
' Dnv
' J o.ini-m
- Sayles, form
y u c l - quenoes Show this"7ear"under"the
mon-1, and Edgar Tompkins, gradu- direction of Phillip Lashinsky '47 President of the College, will read where it has been placed. Five points
ate students; Joseph Higgins, Paul anc\ Eloise Worth '48 will be pre- t h e s c r i P t l l l ' c all 'd Miss Telian will will be awarded the class finding
To H o l d Commuter:
Lh(;
Barselou, Harold Ashworth, Robert sented in assembly this morning s P e a k o n t h e a i m s o f S C A '
'' i v a l b a i l n e l ' "* it is kept until
t h e el cl
H
D
T
'
White, George Kunz, Arthur Soder- Voting will take place for Campus Choir Members
' of the year and placed in
a l l O W e e n T a r t y I O C . a / Unci, Clarence Carr, Charles Capel, Queen, for representatives to MAA The choir will be made up of the d' he en l hands of the Presidnt of Stu• nvmec Cnpprm, Earle Snow, Sen- Council, and for freshman class of- following SCA members: Joan AlAssociation before 8:00 A. M,
A hallowe'en party .sponsored by iors; Luke Zilles, Joseph Roulier, fleers. The Campus Day schedule verson, '47, Florence Mace and Jus- o n t ' 10 morning of Moving-Up Day.
Commuter's Club will be held in Arthur Russel, Samuel Dickeison, w ni be announced and discussion tine Maloney, Juniors, Jean Delklrk Thomas Trainer is in charge of the
the Commons today from 8:00 to Charles Trimm, Raymond Howard, n n f | voting will fake place on the and Bernacline Snyder, Sophomores, wBanner
Hunt for the freshmen,
11:30 P. M. Audrey Bopp, '47, Presi- Walter Lowerre, and J. Michael resolution and amendment concern- and Rosemary Willsey, Marjorie c lhalsl se Robertson Baker will lead the
dent of Commuter's Club, lias an-' Hippick, Juniors; Richard Zeller, Al \ne the appropriation of $1,000 from Southwick, Lllii Lee, Leonard Weeks,
of '49.
nounced that the party is open to DeWeerdt, John Lubey, and Robert the surplus fund for the Pedagogue. Hal White, Barton Asher and Ben Myskania to officiate
the entire student body, but that Wilcox, Sophomores,
Sponsor for the Truth and Con- Jackson, freshmen.
The following members of Mysthere will bo a twenty-five cent ad- KB Reorganises
sequences Show is the Snafu-Sudsy- Newman Club
kanla will be on duty during the
mission charge for non-members.
Kappa Beta elected Stanley Ab- sifted Soap Society and has as its The Newman Club Hallowe'en afternoon: Mary Tessier and Betty
The entertainment will feature rams, '48, Louis Rabineau, and Har- representatives, "Solomon" Sulluvan, Party will be held at Newman Hull Rose Hilt, from 1 to 2; Joan Alverround and square dancing with old Koblenz, Seniors, as represent- (Phillip Lashinsky), and "Savage Thursday from 7:30 to 11 P. M. The son and Edna Sweeney, 2 to 3; Alice
Henry Barber, '4H, calling the atives to Inter-Fraternity Council, Sadie," (Eloise Worth).
program for the evening includes Randall and Elizabeth Mnrgot, 3 to
squares. A Skit, "Bluebeard's Wife," at a meeting Monday evening. No Candidates for the show will be music, games and the traditional /Continued on Page S, Column i)
will bo presented, with. Morton officers were elected but committees taken from the audience and as Hallowe'en ghost stories. Special
Thayer, '49, starring as Bluebeard, were formed to take care of Alumni m a n y consequences will be given as entertainment will be presented by f\'Becj Choir Pianist In Milne
Cider and doughnuts will be served Membership, locating property and t i m o allows. All soap commercials Eloise Worth, '48, who will render n
following the sk<t.
programs for the future. This was w ni t>e sung by the Gruesome Pour- comedy number. Helen
Kiesel
Roy York, Jr., Instructor of
Donald Hoyt, '50, will act as mas- their first meeting since Movlng-up ,SOnie, Phillip Lashinsky, Frank and Mary Jane Glovannoni, Juniors, Music in Milne High School, has
lor of ceremonies, and the following Dnv reunion, when forty members Woodworth, J. Michael Hippick, will sing solos. There will be re- announced that State College stucommittee chairmen have been ap- were present.
Seniors, and Miss Worth.
freshmen Is and dancing.
dents may rehearse with the Milne
pointed: Anno Gouiloy, '48, refreshMembers of Kappa Beta Include At a meeting last Wednesday
Margaret Lyle, '48, Chairman of band and choir. Drummers and picinents; Valetta Combs, '48, decora- Joseph Levin, graduate student, night Student Council approved the the event, has appointed the fol- colo players are needed In the band,
tlon; Clare Croedon, '48, recreation; Harold Koblenz, Louis Rabineau, Myskania Constitution as it was pre- lowing
committees:
decorations, and a pianist and male voices are
Audrey Schmuy, '40 publicity, Helen Paul Wagner, George Erbsteln, gented by Phillip Lashinsky.
Catherine Donnelly, '49, Chairman, also needed for the choir.
Culifuno, '40, entertainment; Jae- Leonard Freldman, and Harold p i f t n s 'for a student Union Day Paul O'Leary, '47, and Marion FurAll groups meet in Room 336,
queline Smead, '47, tickets; Olive Gould, Seniors; and Stanley Ab- n n c ) f01. u student-Faculty Tea were long, Leona Emnierling, Joseph Milne; the band rehearsing daily
MaoDowell, '47, reception. The clia- nuns, '48.
discussed but as yet no definite Fruneello, Sophomores;
refresh- from 8:30 to 9:16; the choir, 10:54
psrons will be William Meyer, Pro- Potior Club Holds Flection
plans have been made.
inents, Margaret Seaman, Arlene to 11:39 daily and on Tuesday and
feasor of German, and Mrs. Meyer,
Elections for Edward Eldred Potter
Results of the freshman elections Golden, Aida da Bramo, Sopho- Friday from 8:30 to 9:15, Students
and Dr. Ralph C, Beaver, Professor Club were held Monday night, at w m be announced next Friday in mores, and Joan Green, '48; clean- must attend at least one rehearsal
in mathematics, and Mrs. Beaver. (Continued on Pane a, Column S) assembly.
(Continued on Pane <i, Column I) each week in order to participate.
b
TAKE
Evenings by appointment
AT 8:00
Annual Crowning Of College Campus Day Queen
To Climax Traditional Ceremony Tomorrow In Page
Men Reorganize
State Fraternities
COMES
CENTRAL
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1946
TOMORROW
;
"Portraiture At Its Finest"
EAST
Z-444
CORONATION
Frosh To Select Registration In Normal Schools Frosh-Soph Classes To Compete
Below Par Due To Low Wages In Morning Athletic Events
Officers Today
Shortages! Although shortages of The Chairman of the American Insugar and hershey toars exist, stitute of Physics recently stated:
- .,
During Assembly soap,
Banner Battle To Rage
there is one shortage that affects "American youth cannot be properly | p p
HAGUE
STUDIO
HOLLYWOOD
State College News
Robert Kaiser, Virginia Keller, Robert Kloepfel, Blfrleda Laemmersahl,
Marlon I,uFuro, Bonnie Lewis, Olive
I'Heureux, Angelina List, Thomas
Linker, Lucy Lytle, Joyce McCollum,
Agnes Mclntyre, Norman Madsen,
Marie Markham, Imogene Mayer, Geraldine Morris, Vivian Morter, Marjorie
Munro, June Olson, Thelma Pangburn,
Barbara Parry, Ethel Rosenberg. Yvette
Schwedock, Shirley Shapiro, Abraham
Sherer, Joyce Simon, Marianne Standing, Harold Story, Anne Sulich, Marvin
">'•«", nitn Whiting.
Classes To Meet
Monday Noon
Finance Board States Price
Of Tax Tickets For Faculty
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHER^ Q
N, v.
Habcrmunn, Helen Hcnnlg, Persia
Hock ridge, Jean Hoffman, Betty Hohcustein, Gilbert Holllday, Marie Hols,
Mary Horan, Helen Hummel, Mary
latauro, Helen lvanyshyn, John Jennings.
•ittiitftiliiiutt^
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