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•i STATE COLLEGE NEWS, THRUSDAY, APRIL 22, 1934
PAGE 4
Sports
Chatter
Directors Decide Rules
A s Players Workout
By
Pefe Marchetta\
One full month remains in. the
men's athletic program. This p r o vides plenty of time for the completion of a softball schedule. Now
that a four-team league is definitely
decided upon, t h e r e should be no
time lost in organizing a schedule
and setting the opening dates.
Time is a very important element
and the sooner the softball league
c a n start, t h e better.
Inclement
weather can play havoc with almost
any outdoor sport schedule.
This
is especially t r u e with softball.
Third Round Possible
T h e n too, only six games will
comprise one round. By starting
the league at an early date it will
be possible to play at least two
r o u n d s with a good possibility of
a third, how about beginning before
next week is ou?
Every year the people in charge
of softball find it very difficult to
get men to volunteer for umpiring.
This year the need for umpires is
greater than ever. It is essential
that competent persons are assigned
to govern games.
However, this
cannot be done unless enough people sign up and can be instructed
in the ground rules. In order to
facilitate matters and elminate possible arguments, we will publish
elsewhere on this page the ground
rules that will govern the softball
league this year.
Starting Time a Problem
The starting time for games this
year will present a problem to Gillen and Reed, who are in charge of
the softball league. Allowance must
be made for those players who have
labs in the afternoons, a n d there
a r e many. The absence of one or
two players will probably mean the
postponement of the contest as
every squad will have few replacements, if any.
We would like to suggest that
the starting time be set for 5:00-5:30
P.M.
This will allow sufficient
time for those having late labs and
also the games will be finished at a
time which will not be too late for
supper.
At present the only thing p r e venting the immediate advent of the
I n t r a m u r a l softball season is that
unpredictable factor called weather.
However, directors Ben Reed and
Dan Gillen a r e prepared to begin
the schedule as soon as the condition of t h e diamon in front of Page
Hall meets the approval of Presid e n t Sayles.
T h e four teams a r e ready and
after-effects of last week e n d s first
eager to "play ball," although the
work out left many stiff and c a u tious.
With the trophy at stake,
the competition among the four
teams representing EEP, the Finks,
the Dorm, and an independent team
composed of the remaining males at
State should be keen. Last year's
champions, the Ramblers, have combined with E E P , the r u n n e r - u p
squad.
F r o m all appearances the league
is going to be a batter's paradise
this year unless some new pitchers
are discovered. Even the disappearance of the lively ball necessitated
by shortaage of materials will not
be enough to allow t h e present crop
of h u r l e r s to check the hitlers.
The regular softball rules shall
apply to all games played in the
Softball League with the addition
of the following ground rules.
1. A batter may not run on ii dropped third strike.
2. On an overthrow which strikes a
spectator or any other obstruction
the base runners automatically advance one base.
3. A runner on third base can not
score on a. puss.d ball or wild pitch.
4. A ball falling through the trees
In right and center fields If caught
will be registered as a put out.
(This rule applies to right unci center fields only.)
5. Ball hit to right of designated
tree marker in right field and Into
Western Avenue will automatically
be a double.
Walking down the hall our eye
play of paper on the W A A bulletin
board. There in longhand covering
eight sheets of paper was the W A A
constitution.
A change h a s been
made. The W A A Flashes is to b e come a p e r m a n e n t part of the p r o gram, a paper to be published or
rather mimeographed once a month.
WAA will have plenty of publicity
next year, w h a t with its own paper
and probably the entire sports page
of the News.
A Plea for Beauty
Comes spring; comes the finish
of the tennis tourney. Money is
scarce, but beauty is important.
And just what are all these words
leading too? In a few plain and
simple ones—we need a new trophy
for the winner of the tennis t o u r n a ment. There is little of grace or
beauty in the present one, which is
the slightly b a t t e r e d figure of an
athletic girl clad in bloomers. Surely
the budget could stretch that far.
To the victor belongs the spoils,
but in this case the spoils, except
for the honor, a r e hardly worth
winning. Let's not let the episode
of the Stanley C u p be repeated h e r e
at State.
Paging Silver Q u e e n
Yesterday
someone
asked
us
about the horses o u t at the Ranch.
"I'd like to go riding, b u t I'm a
trifle afraid, since I've never been.
Are they very spirited?" T h a t i n nocent query brought Silver Queen
to mind. Dear, staid Silver Queen,
never willing to move faster than a
slow walk, snatching at every e x cuse to pause and sleep, she's a
horse that we would recommend for
any novice. Of course there are
other horses for those who like to
ride not just sit on a horse. T h e r e
are Captain and Ginger and King.
But Silver Queen with her placid
calm is the horse with t h e colorless
personality at The Ranch.
WAA announces that golf will be
offered as a sport this spring. Miss
Isabelle Johnson, instructor of p h y sical education, will act as s u p e r visor of the sport, and no captain
has been appointed.
Until t h e
weather permits, practice will be
held in t h e g y m on Monday, W e d nesday and Friday at 3:30 P . M.
Cages have been set u p for tee-off
practice.
Ten h o t u s playing is
necessary for credit.
Mary Now a n d Dorothy T o w n send, softball captains, wish every
group house which wishes to e n t e r
a team in the softball league this
spring, to submit t h e n a m e s of t h e
players before May 1. Only those
turned in before this date will be
considered eligible to play in the
league. Until the field is d r y , i n door practice will be held in the
gym on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday at 3:30 P . M.
Riding will s t a r t again S a t u r d a y ,
if the weather is pleasant. J u n e
Clark, captain, wants all girls w h o
wish to join the class that morning,
to sign the list on WAA's bulletin
board.
Tennis, badminton, and a r c h e r y
complete the spring sports c a l e n dar, but these will begin only w h e n
weather conditions allow outdoor
playing.
Officers for W A A Council will be
voted upon Monday a n d Tuesday
at the table by the W A A bulletin
board. Only those w h o h a v e fulfilled the r e q u i r e m e n t s in t h r e e
sports for the year in which they
are to be elected a r e eligible for
office.
Nominees a r c as follows: P r e s i dent: Kay Devinc, Kit Hcrdmnn,
Li-da LaSalle, and Dot Townsend;
Vice-President:
Rita Daly, Lois
Dann, Mary Domann, a n d J a n e
Pickcrt; Secretary: Georgette D u n n
and Natalie Bullock;
Treasurer:
Helen Bushncll and Mary Now;
Office Manager: Flo Garfall, Nora
Giavelli, and Mary Sanderson.
Girls qualified to vote a r e those
who have completed the r e q u i r e ments in one sport of the c u r r e n t
year.
T h e i n c u m b e n t president,
Win Jones, hopes that all t h e girls
eligible to vole, will take advantage
of their privilege.
T E N N I S MEN WANTED
Harry Kensky is having difficulty
locating enough tennis players to
carry through with the schedule
planned. All
"hidden talent" is
urged to get in touch with h i m
immediately. If a sufficient n u m ber of candidates do not report, a
repetition of last year's mid-season
cancelation m a y result.
G E O R G E D. J E O N E Y , P r o p .
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Women's Swimming
NORTH PEARL STREET,
Nears End of Course]
With the end of the swimming
season in view, Pat Latimer, c a p tain, has given a report on the r e sults of its activities. The season
was very sueeessful, both in athletic
and practical accomplishments,
Twenty girls have received credit
in the sport. Life-saving tests will
be held after Easter, and those who
succeed in passing will be qualified
us instructors. Tl-.i. will prove a
great asset to the Red Cross program of advancing swimming safety
through instruction.
Some gills may be interested
enough in the sport to continue
after the season is completed. For
these people, WAA will sponsor
swimming parties to the Six Mile
Waterworks, a lake at the end of
Western Avenue.', as soon as the
weather improves,
Experience in
fresh water will be a welcome relief
after swimming in a highly chlorinated pool all winter.
ALBANY, N. Y.
A L B A N Y ' S SHOPPING CENTER
FOR 83 YEARS
"BOY, THE HEAT AND WORK DOWN
HERE ARE SOMETHIN', AREN'T THEiT'^
Open 1'A enings
New Members
Percy Grainger
Moving-Up Day
To War Council
Student Association
Will Nominate Four
Contest Deadline Monday
Shop
BOHUD UNUIR AUIIIORI1Y Ge l i l t COCA COLA COMPANY BY
AVE.
State to Hear
The Class of 1943 has elected its
speakers lor Class Night, and also
its Ivy Speaker.
Verna Snyder Debbold will plant
thi' traditional ivy following tin'
Moving-Up
Day morning
ceremonies, and deliver the Ivy speech.
On Class Night, J u n e 12, Gloria
Canmiorata will relate the history
1.1' the Class of 1943, and Dorothy
lluyck will give the Class Prophecy.
Muriel Scovell will speak as Ihe
Class Put'I.
Following the Class Nighi program, the I'Usloinary
Torchlight
ceremony will be conducted in front
nl Draper Hall. At this ceremony,
ihe outgoing Seniors hand their
lurches tu their underclassmen successors
Snappy Men's
CENTRAL
Students to Elect
War Activities Council will p r e sent in Assembly this morning
nominations for freshman and S o p homore m e m b e r s to the Council.
S t u d e n t Association may then n o m inate two m e m b e r s from each class
who they deem worthy of m e m b e r ship on the Council. This inauguartes a new system which, it is
hoped, will quiet
dissatisfaction
which now current in the College
concerning the present system.
Of the six members of this year's
War Activities Council, Emily Blaisiar, is the only member who will
be leaving. The remaining students
are Trece Aney, Patricia Latimer,
Riiona Ryan, Fred Shoemaker, and
Mary Betty Stengel, Juniors.
Four New Members
The Council proposes to add four
new members, two from the present
Sophomore class and two from the
freshmen class.
The four nominees to be p r e sented for student consideration are
S u n n a Cooper and Ruth Hines,
Sophomores, and Nancy Randerson
and Maire Leibl, freshmen. These
students were deemed worthy of a
place on War Council because they
possess the necessary qualifications
of interest and ability.
Voting on these eight candidates,
lour nominated by War Council
and four by the student body, will
be held in Assembly next Friday,
May 7. It is hoped that this more
demociuuc procedure will end the
controversy
concerning
membership in War Council.
( a l l far Volunteers
More volunteers are needed to
help in War Activities work. S t u dents can help by volunteering for
bandage rolling at the County Court
House from 2 to 4 p. in. or from
7 to 9 p. m. Those who d i so
should leave their name in the Dean
of Women's Office. Translators are
needed to translate State War
Council phamplets
into
French,
Italian, Polish, and German. Volunteers a r e also needed to leach
plain sewing to girls of high school
age on Fridays from 3:45 p. in. to
4:45 p. in. Those who wish to aid
Russian War Relief can volunteer
to pack clothes nights and S a t u r days.
Anyone interested should look on
the bulletin board outside the Dean
of Women's Office for more information.
425 BROADWAY
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ALBANY, N. Y.
ALSO LADY DOUGLAS SHOES $ 3 . 4 5 - $ 4 . 4 5 • $ 5 . 4 5
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226 North Allen St.
Albany. N. Y.
The deadline lor entering compusilious in the I,eali Lovenheiin
Contest is Monday
All undergraduates 'J the College are eligible
lu compute-.
There are no restrictions regarding liiim or length ol the compositions submitted. The manuscripts
inns! he typed in double space and
be signed with a pseudonym.
Poems, short stories, and essays
must hi- submitted.
ews
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1943
Z-443
Seniors Elect Speakers
For Coming Ceremonies
SNAP INTO STYLE
WITH
SPORT COATS
SLACKS AND
SWEATERS
FROM
221
ollege
Women Prepare W A A Reveals
Sports Calender Spring Nominees
Softball Schedule
Awaits Approval
O f Saylcs andSun
PERCY GRAINGKR
Sororities Select
New Officers
Three more sororities chose their
1943-44 officers at elections held this
week.
The new officers for Psi Gamma
for Ihe coming year are: President,
J a n e Piekert; House President, J u n e
Banlham; Stewardess,. Angela S i raco; Vice-President, Kaye Devine;
Recording Secretary, Mary Betty
Stengel; Corresponding Secretary,
Hope Hathaway; Treasurer, Helen
Beckerle; Critic, Edith Beard. They
are all Juniors.
Beta Zeta elected the following
officers: President, Nancy Wilcox,
P n ident, J a n Shav. '44;
SeWotary, Ruth Blake, '45; T r e a s urer, Lois Bailey, '44; Chaplain,
J e a n n e t l e Cosgrove, '45; Marshals,
Jean Whitney and Georgette Dunn,
freshmen, and alumni secretary,
Georgette Loveekey, '40.
At a meeting Monday night Phi
Delta elected as President, Virginia
Moschak, '44; Vice-President, M a r jorie Breuing, '44; Recording S e c r e tary, Betty Hamilton, '46; C o r r e sponding Secretary, Roberta J o b son, '4(j; Treasurer, Elaine Harris,
'45; Marshal, Ethel Hclterline, '44;
Reporter, Pauline Clevan, '40; House
President, Irene Myers, '44; House
Treasurer, Dorothy Meyers, '45.
Kappa Delta completed its elections
naming
as Corresponding
Secretary, Jean Winyall, 15; Alumni
Son clary, Jean Brown, '15; Critic,
J u n e Carlson, '44; Chaplain, Lucille
Cranls, '41; Marshals, Shirley Ford
mid Ruth Elgie, freshmen; House
Pn idem,
Sally
Richards, ' I I ;
House Treasurer, Ruth Hines, '45,
Greig heard him and called him
"a genius such as we Scandinavians
must love;" the Times Union r e viewer attended a recital and lauded
his "unusual dynamic effects;" on
May 8 a State College audience will
have an opportunity to add their
impressions of tile Pianist-Composer-Conductor—Percy Grainger.
Music Council will present G r a i n ger with the College Chorus in a
40-minule program which will comprise the afternoon entertainment of
Moving-Up Day. The recital will
be held in Page Hall Auditorium at
4 P.M.
For more than half a century,
Percy Grainger has been devoted to
the piano, having made his first
public appearance at the age of ten.
Australian-horn, he was educated
in Melbourne and in Germany.
The k e e n - e y e d ,
fluffy-haired
pianist may well be called the
"patriot-musician," for he claims
his passion is "English-speaking
music" which includes works by
composers of the United States,
Britain, and his own Australia.
Ameiican
audiences
first
heard
Grainger in 1915. Three years latV,
while he was serving as a bandsman in the United States Army, the
musician became an American citizen.
Tours id' England,
Australia,
Smith Africa, Holland, Scandinavia,
and other European countries have
introduced audieni es to his talent.
Grainger's recitals are well sprinkled with work u the moderns—
Debussy, Ravel, i Melius, Albeniz,
^ a i p e u i e i , u e u , a/iu u u i u n .
"Molly
on ilia Shore,"
"Sheplierd's Hey," and "Irish Tune from
Comity Hey" as well as the more
famous
"Country
Gardens"
are
among Grainger's compositions.
Student of folksong. Grainger has
collected melodies from lands as
distant as the South Seas.
Admission to the recital is by
student lax tickets. General admission tickets may be purchased at the
Co-op or at McClurc and Dorwaldt's
for 85 cents.
Diploma, Certificate Deadline
In order to graduate, Seniors
must order and pay for their diplomas by 11:30 today. The deadline
lor teaching certificates is also today. Orders must be placed at the
table in lower hall of Draper.
Diplomas cost S2.50; teaching certificates, $3.00.
Seniors caps and gowns for Moving-Up Day will be distributed at
the Co-op next week.
Finance Board W i l l Present
^S-^BudgetThisMorning
Student Tax Reduction
C'mon, Becky, No Charge—•
W i l l Also be Considered
Forum Wants Old Clothes
Admission ain't gonna cost you
nuthin'l No sir, all you have to
do to get into Forum's Party
Friday, May 7, is to drag along
some old clothes.
Dames, games, dancing, entertainment, and concessions will
highlight the evening's fun. In
addition to this, arrangements are
being made to procure some extra
men.
Harold Goldstein, '45, will be
the Master of Ceremonies. Osnif
Serabian, '44, is in charge of
games, and Mary Betty Stengel,
'44, is taking care of the publicity.
A food ticket may be purchased
for 15 cents, which will entitle
the holder to sandwiches, coffee,
and doughnuts.
All proceeds will go to Russian
War Relief.
Forum's meeting Wednesday at
3:30 p. m. will clear up all lastm i n u t e details concerning this
party.
There will also be a
"hashing" of matters of current
interest.
Frosh Interviews
Begin This Week
Twenty high school seniors seeking admission to the College as
m e m b e r s of the Class of '47 were
interviewed here Wednesday, whiie
a second group of twenty will be
interviewed today. During the next
month, other interviews will be held
here and in high schools throughout the state by Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Dean, and Dr. Earl J. Dorwaldl,
Instructor in Hygiene.
Of the first group interviewed,
live applicants were men. Ninety
interviewees are scheduled to visit
the College during May, ten of
whom
are expected
tomorrow.
Other interviews will be field here
next Wednesday and May 7, 2],
and 28, on each of which dates
twenty applicants are expected.
The traveling interview committee's itinerary is as follows: May 10,
Utica; May 11, Syracuse; May 12,
Buffalo; May 13. Corning; May 14.
Binghamlon; May 13, Poughkcepsie;
May 10. Minoola; May 20, New York
City; and May 27, Watertown.
These visits by Dr. Nelson and Dr.
Dorwaldt comprise a portion of the
Publicity Committee's plans to incrca.se enrollment in the College.
Dean Nelson Clarifies Fifth Year Dilemma
Iiy J a n e Heath
Humors concerning rationing, and
the advance ol ihe Allied armies are
nnl ihe only false ideas that find
their way around Ihe hall.-, of Stale
College. The lutes I dilemma concerns the method of obtaining a
Masters Degree under the Five
Year program by students who are
planning to leach next year.
A release Iron) the Ofliee of the
I Iran ol ihe College, issued Wedno .day is an attempt to clarify this
I i .-.iliim n.r Seniors who upon graduation plan to teach rather than
return for the lilih year
Dr Milton G Nelson has announced Iwo plans, either ol which
may lie pursued by students who
intend to complete ihe .study lor a
Masters Degree al Stall'.
Plan A requires a student's attendance for one lull year at the
regular session of school. The release explained, "This is a part ol
the integrated live year course and
mi the fifth-year level consists ol
twelve hours of professional work
and eighteen
hours of content
study."
A section of the college catalogue
for 1943-44 is devoted to a full dos-
criptiun ol the program. The college catalogue is now in the hands
of Ihe printers and should be r e ceived from llieni about May 15.
Plan A, of course would necessitate
a person's leaving Ihe teaching field
lor a school year
Plan B, however, is designed lor
teachers who desire to remain al
their work. The Dean has a n n o u ii'd,
'This plan is intended to meet
ihe needs ol teachers who hold a
leu-year provisional or a temporary
certificate, who must earn thirty
hours of graduate credits, and who
wish lo earn those hours through
summer session study. The Class
of 1943 probably knows that only
majors in Commerce qualify for the
ten year provisional certificate. All
others will leach mi a temporary
certificate issued by and remaining
111 force al the pleasure of the
State Education Department.
The
requirements
established
under this procedure are outlined
as follows: "A minimum of eight
hours in Education (Philosophy of
Education,
Educational
Research
Problems, and two additional hours
in Eduiatlon as a d v i s e d ) " plus "al
VOL. XXVII. NO. 85
lea. I eighteen hours earned in an
approved
content
field."
Other
hours to make a tolal ol at least
thirty are to be d e n i e d to electives
which the student will select and
which must be approve 1 by the
Graduate Committee of th < College.
Il had been rumored that courses
necessary for completion of hours
lo earn a Master's Degree c.illld
not be taken in summer school. Il
is line, explained Dr. Nelson, that
certain courses olfered t:i students
working lor llieir Master's Degrees
at a full-year regular session a r e
not olfered to summer school s t u dents.
However,
these courses
have substitutes in the summer
school cui riculum
Regulations of the Stale Board of
Regents require that thirty semester hours of approved advanced
eour.es he completed bid..re a permanent license can be secured for
leaching
an
academic
subject.
Both of Dr. Nelson's proposed plans
meet these regulations.
The necessity for an alternate
plan has come as a result of the
large number of placements already
made in Ihe idass of '43.
T h e 1943-44 Budget will be p r e sented in Assembly this morning
for consideration by S t u d e n t Association. This Budget has already
been carefully considered by F i n ance Board before being turned
over to S t u d e n t Association. The
total budget is $10,824.30 or a d e crease of $2,028.45 over last year.
Such a decrease will insure a lower
s t u d e n t tax for next year.
Large MAA Reduction
T h e lower figure is d u e to may
factors, the chief of which is the
vitural discontinuation of MAA.
The comparison of the MAA a p p r o priation for last year of $2,238.75
and that of this year, $150, shows
how ihe decrease was possible.
This lowering in male enrollment
will be matched, it is hoped, by a
s u b s e q u e n t rise in the enrollment,
of women thus accounting for the
raise in the WAA budget. This,
however, was not enough to upset
the dillercnce in the two budgets.
T h e $150 allowed to MAA is thought
lo be sufficient to provide a sports
program for the men who will be
here and also a reserve, until the
war is over.
O t h e r organizations who lowered
their requests were Music Council,
Debate Council, Pedagogue, and
PTEB.
The
STATE
COLLEGE
NEWS,
D & A. Council, WAA, Student
Council, Myskania and Frosh H a n d book raised llieir appropriation.
Twelve or Thirteen Dollar Tax
This decrease makes possible a
$12 or $13 student tax for next year;
which is to be determined by S t u dent Association. A representative
of Finance Board, in addition to
presenting ihe Budget, v/ill suggest
two plans lor a lower tax The first
would simply authorize a $13 tax
which would fully cover the Budget
as it now stands.
The second
would suggest a $12 tax. It would
be covered by a surplus which F i nance Board expects to realize
from this year's Budget. A motion
from the floor by a Student Association m e m b e r will be necessary
lor putting into motion either of
these plans.
Many of the appropriations from
ihe 1942-43 Budget are being t u r n ed back to the Board. If a $12
student lax is authorized by S t u dent Association, it will necessitate
using $024 of the surplus. This is
based on 850 students and will not
deplete the surplus drastically.
T h e Infirmary
fund and the
Pedagogue appropriations are based
mi the assumption that 850 students
will be attending State College next
year
This is ihe last budget to be p r e I'lited by Finance Board as such.
Next year The Board of Audit and
Control will function in its place
with essentially the same duties.
The fact that Finance Board has
already reviewed the Budget does
not mean that individual budget
in ins may not be questioned by any
member ol Student Association.
Hylind Elected Editor
O f Freshman Handbook
.In,in Hylind, '45, was elected
i lilor ol ihe Freshman Handbook
l„r 1943-44 last Tuesday
I I n stall will include Jane Heath,
Edna Marsh, Marie De Chene, Lois
| ) ; i u \ , Sunna Cooper, Marguerite
Bosw'ick,
Dorothy
Myers,
Ruth
Hines,
Janet
Donahue,
Stanley
Gipp, and Barbara Putnam, all
sophomores,
All organizations wishing to be
repre enled in ihe Handbook are
requested to contact Miss Hylind or
any stall member as soon as possible.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1*43
StAtE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY APRIL 30,1943
PAG* 4
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1942-43
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MAA
Literary Annual
Debate Council
Student Council
Myskania
Secretarial Contingent
Frosh Handbook
Treasurer's Bond
Press Bureau
Pedagogue
Student PTEB
800.00
980.00
756.00
2,700.00
2,238.75
300.00
407.00
75.00
165.00
200.00
225,00
25.00
85.00
1,800.00
47.00
1943-44
$2,152.00
989.80
1,127.00
699.00
2,550.00
150.00
300.00
292.00
100.00
169.50
200.00
250.00
25.00
85.00
1,700.00
35.00
$12,852.75
$10,824.30
The News Board
FLORA M. GASPARY I
R. MURIEL SCOVELL*
CAROLYN BURROWS BEVERLY PALATSKY KATHERINE COUSINS
PETER MARCHETTA
JANET BAXTER
BETTY STENGEL -
-
CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
- ASSOCIATE EDITOR
- ASSOCIATE EDITOR
AH c o m m u n i c a t i o n s s h o u l d be a d d r e s s e d t o t h e e d i t o r
a n d m u s t be s i g n e d . N a m e s will be w i t h h e l d u p o n r e quest. T h e STATE COLLEGE NEWS assumes no responsibility for o p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d i n Its c o l u m n s o r c o m m u n i c a t i o n s a s s u c h e x p r e s s i o n s d o n o t n e c e s s a r i l y reflect I t s
view.
Tentative Itemized Budget
1943-1944-
At this point, it looks as if the tumult and the
shouting were going to die unexpressed. T h e
Activities Budget for the college year 19-13-1944
is not one that should provoke ninth controversy. There will be the usual fault-finders, but
with a §13 tax already assured, without any
budget alteration whatsoever, their protests will
probably be only a small pan of the budgei
meeting.
A very few organizations raised their budgets:
they are for the most part activities whose
expenses have been necessarily raised by present
economic conditions. In the case ol W'AA, the
increase in feminine enrollment more than
jusiilies the money asked. In the main, how
ever, most activities are either asking lor the;
same appropriation or are lowering their items
considerably. MAA's budget explains itself. A
drop from $2,238.75 to §150 seems extreme; it
is also inevitable. Moreover, the plight ol MAA
greatly simplifies this morning's procedure.
With the present §10,824.30 budget, students
will be assessed §13 next year, and a small
surplus will be left. With very little trouble,
the budgei could be cut to allow a SI2 tax.
What the final assessment will be, will be determined by the interest, or lack ol il, of the student body. Budgetary discussions in the past
have been spirited. They have been exciting.
perhaps the confusion did not achieve the proper
result; we know it did uoi in main cases. But
its presence was far more valuable than the
passivity ihat mu\ vers casil\ llauni iiscll in
today's Assembly.
L'pperclassmen in today's Assembl) will mis-)
llie* heal and luroi ol past budget meetings.
It ma) be that the budget will base been passed
when ihe noon-hour bell ring-., an almost unbelievable occurrence. Ii may be thai siudents,
ahead) lar stink in ihc sands ol anaths, will
remain platidl) in theii stale ol lethargy
iluotighoui. limes have i hanged.
Where, oh, where is the- "Budget lilues" le
liaiii.- And where is the cut-throai competition
between organization* loi lite ahnighh dollaili would be as worthwhile to as! "Where, oh,
wheie are ihe men ol Stale?" I'cihaps iluatiswei lo all three cjucslions lies "sale now in
the ,IIIII\ camps". Jusi who and jiisi whai will
l esiu M i l
ihose
ihiugs?
I hal answei ai leasi is plain ,\() 1 11 INC.
Slate College, 1913, can nevei recapture the
llavoi ol State College, 19-12, whethei il be in
icgaid lo sin h mundane ihings as finance* or
wheihci II be in icgaid io liicnds and loiinals
and basketball games.
STUDENT COUNCIL
Keys
Pedagogue
Co-op
Assemblies
STATE C O L L E G E NEWS
Printing
$2,268.00
7 0
Convention
n°
Pedagogue
40.00
Mailing
115.00
15 00
Co-op
Associate C o l l e g i a t e
press
o.oO
Photography
1000
40 00
Keys
Miscellaneous
25.00
440.00
$3,152.00
I>\ A
Advanced Dramatics
Plays
Elementary Dramatics P l a y s
Keys
President's Bracelet.
Stamps
Pedagogue
Productions
Miscellaneous
STATE C O L L E G E I'KESS
IUKE.lt
A c t i v i t i e s Day
1.00
P h o n e Calls
2.00
Stamps
30.00
Pedagogue
15.00
Keys
12.00
Supplies
(stationery, e t c . |
25.00
85.00
270.00
70.00
19.80
7.50
3.00
40.00
575.00
4.50
35.00
50.00
100.00
.MYSKANIA
Pedagogue
Movlng-Up
Day
Equipment ....
Election Supplies
Maintenance
Awards, Caps. G o w n s
40.00
I Hit.50
M l SIC COUNCIL
Winter Concert . . .
Quest
Artist
and
Expenses
Operetta
and Expenses
Spring Concert . . . .
Miscellaneous, Keys,
Ped., T u n i n g . . . .
151.00
95.00
140.00
2.00
315.00
255.00
119.00
Less I n c o m e
50.00
60.00
559.00
179.00
321.00
80.00
500.00
iimi.iiu
1,137.00
M I I A T h COUNCIL
Pedagogue
Coaches' Conference
Publicity
Stationery
Stamps
Debate
Equipment
(cards, p a m p h l e t s )
Home Debates and
local t r i p s
Assembly S p e a k e r s .
Keys
SECKETAKIAL
ENT
25.00
20.00
4.00
3.00
2.00
CONTING-
E x p e n s e s of Office
1 KOSII HANDBOOK
PEDAGOGUE
850 S t u d e n t s x $2.00 p e r .stu1NI IK.MAKY
850 S t u d e n t s x ,; . 0 0 p e r s t u dent
1 'KKASl KEK'S HON!)
LITEKAKV ANNCAI
8.00
100.00
100.00
30.00
392.00
GKANI) TOTAI
200.00
250.011
3,550,00
25.011
3011.00
$]10,82-1.311
I lie New Ordei ai Stale iniisi uoi share the
I,ne ol Hitler's New Older. Ii is here, and will
continue to the here loi unite a nine u> come.
And the shadow c>| whai has gone bclore uiusi
uoi hniclei ihe success ol whai ii here now.
A n d t h e A l e u t i a n s , f o r g o t t e n for
a while, c a m e into t h e n e w s with
a vengeance.
There were whispers
of a p o s s i b l e J a p o f f e n s i v e
there,
while A r m y
bombers
relentlessly
c o n t i n u e d p o u n d i n g at t h e a i r b a s e s
in K i s k a .
F o r t h e first t i m e s i n c e
N o v e m b e r , it w a s m e n t i o n e d i n t h e
N a v y d i s p a t c h e s t h a t C a n a d i a n fliers
h a d j o i n e d in 13 h e a v y r a i d s .
That
r a i s e d t h e m o n t h ' s t o t a l to t h e s t a g g e r i n g s u m of 142
Ikfoie us, ome again, we have the annual
budgei. . . .
There w a s some diplomatic cont r e t e m p s to w a t c h for t h o s e w h o
realize
the
importance
of
such
•By Lyn Burrows*
T h i s letter c a m e from Pvt. I r v i n g F i n g e r , n o w a
r e s i d e n t of C a m p M c C a i n , M i s s i s s i p p i . . . O n c e h e
t r e a d t h e floors of S t a t e C o l l e g e , w a s l a t e t o c l a s s e s ,
c r a m m e d for e x a m s , a n d d r a n k c o k e s in t h e A n n e x . . .
E v e n a s y o u a n d I. . . .
" T o t h e m e n of S a y l e s H a l l :
Greetings,
1 w a s s u r e g l a d to r e c e i v e t h a t l o n g l e t t e r f r o m
S a y l e s Hall.
T h a t l e t t e r w a s b e t t e r for m y m o r a l e
t h a n a d o z e n movie stars—well, a half d o z e n a n y h o w .
B e f o r e f s t a r t e d t h i s l e t t e r I h a d i n t e n t i o n s of m a k i n g it s e r i o u s , b u t t o d a y ' s m o v i e — a n A b b o t t a n d
C o s t e l l o p i c t u r e — s o r l a k n o c k e d m e o u t of t h e m o o d .
I w a s g o i n g to tell y o u w h a t 1 p e r s o n a l l y a m g o i n g
to f i g h t for. f w a s g o i n g to tell y o u f w a s f i g h t i n g
for a l l m y c o l l e g e m e m o r i e s .
State College ones
mainly.
T h e open houses at Sayles a n d Pierce, the
w o n d e r of a first d a n c e , t h e m i d n i g h t s n a c k s a t t h e
20th C e n t u r y Diner, t h e d a m n f u n n y b a l l a d s and
d i t t i e s w e s a n d u r i n g b l a c k o u t s , r a c i n g for t h e m a i l
a f t e r t h e 3:25 c l a s s , a n d , o h , s o m a n y o t h e r s w e l l
things.
I ' m n o t f i g h t i n g to f r e e t h e s e a s , to b r e a k
u p w o r l d c a r t e l s , to b r i n g i n t e r n a t i o n a l
security
N o ! I ' m fighting to s t e p o n a g i r l ' s t o e s a g a i n , listen
to a j u k e b o x r e c o r d of B i n g C r o s b y , o v e r a c o k e
I'm
fighting
for m y m o m a n d d a d a n d s i s t e r a n d
brother.
I n e a r l y c r i e d in m y c a k e o v e r
Sincerely
yours,
Irv.
T h i s letter goes by this board w i t h o u t m u c h c o m m e n t . . . It s p e a k s for itself . . . W a r c a n d o t h i n g s
to p e o p l e ' s m i n d s . . . It c a n c h a n g e t h e i r a t t i t u d e s
of t o l e r a n c e a n d w a r p t h e i r p e r s p e c t i v e . . . It is
t h e d u t y of e v e r y i n d i v i d u a l , to d e c i d e for h i m s e l l
w h a t h e is fighting for, a n d t h e n t r y t o b e a s n o r m a l
m e n t a l l y a s p o s s i b l e . . . T h e s t r u g g l e of t h e "lost
g e n e r a t i o n ' ' a f t e r t h e last w a r h a s t a u g h t u s t h a t this
t i m e w e m u s t find o u r s e l v e s . . . .
T h e r e o n c e w a s a n A m e r i c a n flier w h o w a s d o i n g a
g o o d j o b b o m b i n g m i l i t a r y o b j e c t i v e s in e n e m y - h e l d
F r a n c e . . . H e w a s shot d o w n , a n d u n h e a r d from . . .
T h e a s s u m p t i o n w a s c a p t u r e or d e a t h . . . T h e n his
w i f e in T r o y r e c e i v e d a t e l e g r a m f r o m h i m . . .
Address: England . . . He had escaped the enemy
c l u t c h e s * : i T C d o e s r e a d like fiction, d o e s n ' t il . . .
B u t it's t r u e . . . T h e p r i n c i p a l c h a r a c t e r : J a c k R y a n ,
of " T h e C l a y - P i g e o n S q u a d r o n " . . . T h e g o o d - l o o k i n g
g u y h a s h i s p i c t u r e w i t h s o m e f r i e n d s in t h e
Saturday
Evening
Post, A p r i l 24, 1943. . . .
A r t H o l i d a y s e n t a V . . . - l e t t e r to t h e N E W S . . .
M u c h t h a n k s for b e i n g k e p t p o s t e d o n c o l l e g e a c t i v i ties . . . O n e t h i n g b o t h e r s h i m . . . W h o w a s P r o m
Q u e e n ? . . . A r t , tell y o u r f r i e n d s w h o g u e s s e d P a l
L a t i m e r that they were right .
. Art likes England
. . . Escaped our winter weather . . . T h i n k s London
is q u i t e a c i t y , e v e n in w a r t i m e . . . I l e l m u t h Scfioen.
s p e c u l a t i o n s w o u l d h a v e it, m a y b e i n A l a s k a
. . Ai
l e a s t h e ' s left t h e A l e u t i a n s . . . H e g o t u s e d to
t h o s e s l e e p i n g b a g s , b u t n o w h e f r e e z e s s l e e p i n g in
a bed. . . .
C h a r l i e Q u i i i n w e n t to s e a a w e e k a g o on a
s t r o y e r . . . "Duffy" w a s here this w e e k . . .
j u s t g r i n s w h e n a s k e d a b o u t m a r r i a g e in J u n e
D a v i d D i c k s o n , '40, is n o w a full l i e u t e n a n t . . ,
on t h e U.S.S. D i x i e . . .
deShe
. . .
Still
CLOSER HOME
W a r Fronts by Ryan
A n d i n t h i s w e e k of t h e w a r t h e
head-lines
from
North
Africa
g r i p p e d t h e m i n d s of A m e r i c a n s .
The Axis armies reeled under the
combined
attacks
of
the
Allied
A n n i e s . A n ominous note followed
the c o m m u n i q u e s , as c o r r e s p o n d ents w a r n e d that every yard gained
w a s b e i n g p a i d for h e a v i l y i n e n o r mous casualties. T h e British Eighth
A r m y , o n c e t h e b u t t of r i d i c u l e
from t h e w o r l d a t l a r g e , c a m e i n t o
its o w n a s c o m p a r a b l e to s o m e of
t h e R u s s i a n a r m i e s . Il is n o w o n e
of t h e t o u g h e s t , m o s t fluid, a n d e x p e r i e n c e d a r m i e s in m i l i t a r y h i s t o r y .
The almost fanatical G e n e r a l M o n t gomery
h a d done his j o b well.
T h e r e is still m u c h to d o , of c o u r s e .
T h e G e r m a n s are by no m e a n s d e feated, a n d a r e forming n e w lines
c o n s t a n t l y . B u t t h a t t h e y will h a v e
to w i t h d r a w soon, o r p e r i s h w i t h
t h e i r b a c k s to t h e g r e y
Mediterr a n e a n , is a f o r e g o n e c o n c l u s i o n .
.By
OVER THERE
3.00
15.00
8.00
103.50
1511.011
WAA
Activities
Awards
Conferences
D u e s to USPHA
M a i n t e n a n c e of
Sports
Equipment
Printing,
publicity,
Ped. e t c
Misc. J a n i t o r s , p o s t age, e q u i p
•V
Please write again.
t h a t last letter.
STUDENT IWKT-TIME
EMPLOYMENT H I N D U
Oltlce S u p p l i e s . . . .
24.88
Mailing Expense . . .
6.90
Transportation Expense
3.10
Miscellaneous
.12
11X11.Htl
MAA
Current Fund
MAA Reserve
25.00
40.00
10.00
25.00
1011.00
$2,592.00
Less A d v e r t i s i n g
Subscription . .
O f Men and Money
Dr. Walker to Resign Position
After 35 Years As State Prof
Budget Table
doings, even though battles steal the
headlines.
Certainly, Nazi propagandists do. T h e y h a v e almost s u c c e e d e d in a l i e n a t i n g t h e P o l i s h a n d
R u s s i a n g o v e r n m e n t s in t h e s e c r i t i cal m o n t h s by d e m a n d i n g a n i n v e s t i g a t i o n of t h e f i n d i n g of P o l i s h
bodies that once w e r e s t r e w n over
t h e fields a b o u t W a r s a w ; it s e e m e d
more important
than the starved
faces, w o r k i n g a s s l a v e s in G e r m a n controlled
industries;
it
seemed
more important than the horrible
fate of J e w i s h P o l e s .
In all, t h e
N a z i p r o p a g a n d a m a c h i n e w a s still
f u n c t i o n i n g e f f i c i e n t l y in its m o s t
i m p o r t a n t task
stirring up hatreds
and m i s u n d e r s t a n d i n g s a m o n g the
United Nations.
But at latest r e p o r t s it s e e m e d t h e P o l i s h e x i l e g o v e r n m e n t w a s c o m i n g to i t s s e n s e s
and dropping the investigation.
T h e old s t o r y of t h e g r i m H u s sion b a t t l e s c o n t i n u e d w i t h
little
c h a n g e and with the same enorm o u s loss ol life o n b o t h s i d e s
In N o r w a y , t h e r e w a s a h e a r t e n ing p r o o f of S t e i n b e c k ' s m a l i g n e d
belief t h a i t h e ' flys a r e c o n q u e r i n g
the flypaper".
S a b o t e u r s blew up
four s h i p s a n d a l i g h t h o u s e in t h e
Oslo h a r b o r . H e r d - m e n win buttles,
but free m e n w i n w a r s .
In a t e l e g r a m to t h e s t r i k i n g m i n e
workers
in
America,
President
Roosevelt warned them that he was
p r e p a r e d to lake a n y steps n e c e s s a r y , fortified b y lis p o w e r us c o m mandei -in-chief
of
the
Armed
Forces.
J a c k M u r p h y is n o w a t o p s e r g e a n t m a n a g i n g t h e
l a u n d r y at O r l a n d o , F l o r i d a . . . L e o G i l a d e t t is in
OCS, A b e r d e e n P r o v i n g G r o u n d . . . Also at A b e r d e e n
and recently seen a r o u n d school, P a u l D c r O h a n e s i a n
. . . P a u l is t e a c h i n g a r t i l l e r y , a n d t h i n k s r a i s i n g
t h a t m o u s t a c h e is g o o d for d i s c i p l i n e
. . Jerry Saddlem i r e has been assigned to the U.S.S. Hale, a destroyei
w h i c h h e c a l l s "a t r i m l i t t l e c r a f t " . . . Bill D i c k s o n
w a s s e e i n g i n a c t i o n in t h e A t l a n t i c . . . H a v i n g
a p p l i e d for t r a n s f e r , h e h a s b e e n a s s i g n e d lo a s u b
c h a s e r . . . In c a s e ol c o n v o y d u t y , h e expii-s.se
a hopeful possibility
t h a i it m a y b e w i t h
Turn
Feeney.
H o w i e L y n c h is g e l l i n g to like t h e m e d i c a l corp.ut C a m p B e r k e l e y , T e x a s .
Q u o t e , " T h e y do sum j o b o n t h e b a t t l e f i e l d w h e t h e r p e o p l e r e a l i z e it ol
not"
. G e o r g e K u n z is b a c k at A v o n P a r k B o m b i m 1
R a n g e . . . He calls the m o s q u i t o e s ihere "B-17's"
H e r b L c n c k c r , A A F T T C , is in A t l a n t i c C i t y
D o e s n ' t h a v e m u c h t i m e to d e v o t e to I h e p e n
S k o l s k y a n d S l a v i n s t a r t e d b a s i c t r a i n i n g w i t h e i g h t -ei
s t r a i g h t h u m s ol K P .
. H e m i c c o m p l a i n s aboiil n dales
S l a v i n is s c h e d u l e d for A i r C o r p s A d m i n i
.S'pm-e roiisiiiiu'il .
. An r e e u i r .
trillion S c h o o l a f t e r b a s i c . . . .
The W e e k l y Bulletin
MEMO I t s
T o d a y is t h e lust day t o
o r d e r a n d p.iy loi youi
d i p l o m a s a n d tout-hint! c e r tiliiHtcs ut tin- t a b l e in
Lower Draper
Cups a n d g o w n s will he
available
in t h e
Co-op
sometime
nexi
week
W a t c h for p o s t e r s a n n o u ncing the exact day
T h e r e will he Hong p r a c tices every day n e x t week
T h e tlmcb a n d p l a c e s will
be Indicated by s i g n s a n d
postern, so w a n i. for t h e s e
too.
M'OKTS
a t e i s B r o o k l y n 1'olj
in llrst li-nnis m u t c h to
duy ut Kidgi.-lleld Courl
T h e m u t c h e s will begin ai
:i p in
( AI.CSDAIt
May 1 Vie dance ut HiiJ
let Hull, 8:110 till \2 |) ni
1
May 1 I I I I o p e n - h o u s e
ul Pierce Hull for I'II-M IHull iiinl c o t t a g e s
May
1 I'sl G u m m a vn
p a r t y , H p. m till 1 a m
May 6 F o r u m m e e t i n g in
t h e L o u n g e ut H HO p III
Sunna
Cooper.
T h e u r g e n c y f o r fulfilling p r e s e n t
d e m a n d s is e v i d e n c e d i n t h e i n c r e a s e d s a l a r i e s offered. T h e a v e r a g e
is $1,450.
This past year,
many
teachers received b o n u s e s in r e c o g n i t i o n of t h e r i s e i n t h e c o s t of l i v ing.
Dr. A d a m W a l k e r will l e a v e S t a t e
C o l l e g e a t t h e e n d of t h i s s e m e s t e r .
Dr. W a l k e r ' s eyes l a u g h e d again
as h e s u g g e s t e d t h e s t o r y of h i s life
could
b e w r i t t e n in " t h e s i m p l e
a n n a l s of t h e p o o r . "
Brought up
o n a f a r m in S t . L a w r e n c e C o u n t y ,
Dr. W a l k e r explained he w a s p r a c tically g r o w n u p before h e s a w a
Democrat; then he added
hastily
t h a t h e is, h o w e v e r , o p e n - m i n d e d
a n d t h a t h e q u i t e often " k i c k s o v e r
the
truces
to v o t e
for
another
parly."
S o o n t h e P r o f e s s o r of E c o n o m i c s
a n d S o c i o l o g y w.ll r e s i g n w i t h an
e y e to t h e f u t u r e
Till n o w h e h a s
m a d e n o p l a n s , b u t a s s e r t e d , "I
o u g h t t o find s o m e t h i n g to d o to
a s s i s t in t h e w a r w o r k , a n d 1 s h a l l
e n d e a v o r to d o w h a t I c a n to c o n t r i b u t e t o t h e n e e d s of t h e n a t i o n
at t h i s t i m e . "
Recital W i l l Benefit
Russian Relief Fund
H i l d a B a n k s , 15 y e a r old c o n c e r t
pianist, will give a recital at C h a n cellor's Hall at 3:30 S a t u r d a y aftern o o n , M a y , 15, u n d e r t h e s p o n s o r s h i p of t h e A l b a n y K n i t for V i c t o r y
Group.
S t u d e n t s will b e a d m i t t e d for 28
cents.
T i c k e t s will be on s a l e in
L o w e r D r a p e r b e g i n n i n g M a y 10.
P r o c e e d s will go to R u s s i a n W a r
Relief.
M i s s B a n k s is k n o w n to A l b a n y
c o n c e r t g o e r s for h e r b r i l l i a n t p e r f o r m a n c e in t h e M e n d e l s s o h n p i a n o
c o n c e r t o at t h e B e r k s h i r e F e s t i v a l
al T a n g l e w o o d
t h i s past
summer.
Tills IS y e a r
old a r t i s t
is t h e
y o u n g e s t e v e r lo h a v e b e e n c h o s e n
by S e r g e K o u s s e v i t s k y
lo be a
soloist a t T a n g l e w o o d .
S h e is a
p u p i l of A r t h u r S c h n a b e l , w h o d e s ci iiies h e r a s h a v i n g o n e ol t h e
finest m u s i c a l t a l e n t s in h i s e x p e r ience.
This concert has been a r r a n g e d
w i t h t h e c o o p e r a t i o n of M r R a l p h
Winslow,
music
director
of
the
A l b a n y Public schools, and with the
ollieials ol p r i v a t e .schools, a s well
as I h e M u s i c T e a c h e r ' s A s s o c i a t i o n
T h e s c h o o l in A l b a n y
(colleges
i n c l u d e d ) w h i c h sells t h e g r e a t e s t
n u m b e r of t i c k e t s will be g i v e n u
set ol v o l u m e . ) on m u s i c l o r its
.By Jane Heath.
To meet his d e m a n d , S E B h a d a p p r o x i m a t e l y 100 S e n i o r s w h o a r e
p r e p a r i n g to teach on Provisional
c e r t i f i c a t e s . T h e p o s s i b i l i t y of o l d e r
t e a c h e r s , w h o h a v e r e t i r e d from t h e
p r o f e s s i o n , is n o w b e i n g i n v e s t i g a t e d
a s a m e a n s of r e l i e v i n g t h e s h o r t a g e .
T h e n t h e r e followed a gay poem
in F r e n c h - C a n a d i a n d i a l e c t b y a
narrator with pepper-colored bushy
eyebrows.
His eyes laughed and
his h a n d s m a d e g e s t u r e s as Dr.
Walker
talked.
H e finished
the
p o e m , a n d t h e n told u s a b o u t his
old "old terns long a g o . "
D r . W a l k e r c a m e to S t a t e in 1908
to t e a c h e c o n o m i c s a n d s o c i o l o g y .
He took out a pencil, s u b t r a c t e d ,
and announced, "Thirty-five years
—awful long time." T h o s e y e a r s he
s u m m e d u p a s " m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g to
m e e t c l a s s e s e a c h d a y a n d to e n j o y
the fellowship and, I think, the confidence
and certainly the stimulation ol y o u n g p e o p l e in c o l l e g e '
Teacher Demand Poetess, Traveler, Psychologist
Avocations of New Math Prof.
iwamps SEB
A 150",, i n c r e a s e i n d e m a n d for
secondary school teachers has been
n o t e d in t h e S t u d e n t E m p l o y m e n t
B u r e a u , a c c o r d i n g to P a u l C. Bulger,
Director.
Venez
i c i . . . Come
here,
cherie,
And sit down by me so,
And I will tell you
storee,
Of the old tern long
ago
When everything
is
lovelee
And
all the b i r d i e s s i n g
And me, I'm young
and strong
like
moose,
Not afraid
of nolting.
. . ,
The F r e n c h - C a n a d i a n poem was
a b e l a t e d e n c o r e to D r . W a l k e r ' s
s i m i l a r p e r f o r m a n c e in t h e f a c u l t y
s k i t for t h e S t a t e F a i r , a t w h i c h
t i m e h e a l s o p l a y e d t h e v i o l i n in
the orchestra. Dr. Walker explained
b o t h of t h e s e t a l e n t s in a n i n t e r view W e d n e s d a y . H e m a d e a hobby
of
collecting
the
poetry
from
t r e n c h - C a n a a i a n s w h o w o r k e d on
h i s f a t h e r ' s f a r m in n o r t h e r n N e w
Y o r k a n d w h o l i v e d in t h e v i c i n i t y .
His o r c h e s t r a s h o w i n g he explained
modestly, "I'm not a musician; I
j u s t fiddle a l i t t l e . "
PAGE 3
M r . B u l g e r s a y s of t h e s i t u a t i o n ,
" W e n e e d t e a c h e r s in N e w Y o r k
State and good ones.
S t u d e n t s in
t h e C o l l e g e s h o u l d k e e p this in
m i n d in r e a l i z i n g t h e i r r e s p o n s i b i l ity o n t h i s c a m p u s , a n d in i n f l u e n c i n g h i g h s c h o o l S e n i o r s to e n t e r
the profession."
Cwrleiy
A''in ifrhot Itfr Xctui
D R . A D A M W A L K E R , P r o f e s s o r of
E c o n o m i c s a n d S o c i o l o g y , w h o is
r e s i g n i n g at t h e e n d of t h i s s e m e s t e r
after 35 y e a r s y e a r s of t e a c h i n g a t
Slate
Gondoliers Cast
Televise Operetta
T h e cast of 7'/ie Gondoliers
gave
its t e l e v i s i o n e d v e r s i o n of t h e G i l bert and Sullivan o p e r e t t a W e d n e s day afternoon
from
the General
Electric e x p e r i m e n t a l s t u d i o .
This
is t h e s e c o n d t i m e t h e O p e r a t i c S o ciety lias g i v e n a t e l e v i s i o n b r o a d cast, t h e first b e i n g l a s t y e a r w h e n
t h e y g a v e t h e s h o r t e n e d v e r s i o n of
Tlie Pirates of
Penzance.
Giving a televised b r o a d c a s t i n volved p r e s e n t i n g a n
abbreviated
v e r s i o n of t h e o p e r e t t a s e e n b y S t a t e
College s t u d e n t s s e v e r a l w e e k s ago.
T h e a r e a in w h i c h t h e a c t i o n g o e s
On is a b o u t 15 feet w i d e .
Two
c a m e r a s a r e u s e d in r e c o r d i n g t h e
a c t i o n , o n e for c l o s e - u p s a n d o n e for
longer distance shots.
A portable
m i c r o p h o n e set u p o n a c r a n e f o l lows
the principals
around
the
stage
One central control
man
d i r e c t s t h e a c t i o n of t h e c a m e r a
from a b o o t h o v e r l o o k i n g t h e s c e n e ,
t e l l i n g t h e c a m e r a m e n w h e n to
record a c l o s e - u p or a long shut.
T h e m a k e - u p n e c e s s a r y is veryslight.
T h a t w h i c h w a s u s e d for
most of
the cast
was
pancake
make-up.
Those who were
fort u n a t e e n o u g h to s e e t h e b r o a d c a s t
probably recognized t h e s a m e cost u m e s u s e d in t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n h e r e
at s c h o o l .
T h e s m a l l a r e a a l l o t e d to t h e
p l a y e r s m a d e it n e c e s s a r y to u s e
half of t h e cast in t h e F i r s t A c t a n d
the o t h e r half in t h e S e c o n d A c t .
O n e of t h e p r i n c i p a l s , J e a n M a e A l l i s t e r , '43. c o m m e n t i n g o n h o w it
all fell, s a i d , " I t ' s j u s t l i k e b e i n g
in t h e m o v i e s . "
Milne High Presents
First Play bv Seniors
T h e M i l n e S e n i o r s will p r e s e n t
Girl Hhi), a p l a y in t h r e e a c t s , in
P a g e Hall a u d i t o r i u m on M a y (i, at
8:30 P . M . T h i s is t h e first p l a y e v e r
g i v e n by a S e n i o r c l a s s at M i l n e
G e n e r a l a d m i s s i o n will be 44 c e n t s
a n d s t u d e n t a d m i s s i o n will be 128
rents.
S t a t e C o l l e g e s t u d e n t s will
he i n c l u d e d in t h i s s t u d e n t t i c k e t
price
T h e plot r e v o l v e s a r o u n d a y o u n g
college s l u d e n l w h o finds h i m s e l f
r u n n i n g a w a y from o n e g i r l a n d
chasing another
T h e f o r m e r is t h e
h o m e t o w n girl, of w h o m t h e b o y ' s
l a t h e r a p p r o v e s , t h e l a t t e r is t h e
m a i d , o r so e v e r y o n e t h o u g h t till
a c h a i r ol s u r p r i s i n g e v e n t s m a d e
them w o n d e r
library.
Watercolor Exhibit
T h e p r o g r a m will i n c l u d e B a c h
Italian
Concerto,
a lltujiln
Sonata.
c o m p o s i t i o n s by C h o p i n , S c l i u b e r l
/ m p r o m p t i i , '/'In- D e b u s s y G i r l unlh
F l u x e u Hair.
Minstrels,
Fireworks,
a n d s o m e p r e l u d e s c o m p o s e d by
Miss B a n k s h e r s e l f
Music
c r i t i c s of B o s t o n h a i l e d
Hilda B a n k s as being "remarkably
gifted," with " u t t e r absorption, keen
musical sense, a n d t h e basic q u a l i ties of t h e r e a l l y t a l e n t e d m u s i c i a n "
T h e p o s t p o n e d e x h i b i t of w a t e r c u l o r s by Miss R u t h E I l u t c h i i i s ,
A s s i s t a n t P r o f e s s o r of A l l , is nowd i s p l a y e d in D r a p e r H u l l , .second
Door.
Both s t u d e n t s a n d faculty
a r e i n v i t e d to s t u d y , c o m p a r e a n d
c r i t i c i z e t h e p a i n t i n g s of N e w E n g land a n d N e w Y o r k S t a t e s c e n e s .
T h e d i s p l a y will c o n t i n u e for t w o
w e e k s u n t i l M a y 10, w h e n il is to
be s u p p l a n t e d by a s t u d e n t p h o t o g raphy exhibit.
Student Employment Bureau has
recently
placed
more
people
in
teaching positions.
T h e following
a r e from t h e C l a s s of 1943:
Marie Bailie, A l t a m o n t , EnglishLatin-Spanish;
Karlene
LufT D e Palma,
Roessleville,
Math-Social
Studies;
Jane
Walsh,
Edmeston,
C o m m e r -e.
S E B . . a s a l s o p l a c e d a n u m b e r of
graduates:
M a r y C. B r i e r t o n , '42, R e m s o n ;
Mary
Carpenter,
'42, C o e y m a n s ;
J e a n E r a t h , '42, C a l l i c o o n , E n g l i s h S o c i a l S t u d i e s ; T h e r e s a H u n t , '40,
Greenwich, Commerce-Social Studies;
Gladys
K l u g , '42, O r i s k a n y ;
V i r g i n i a M c D e r m o t t , '41, R o e s s l e ville, M a t h - S o c i a l S t u d i e s ;
Esther
P r i c e , '37, l l i o n .
Memorial Garden Planted
To Honor State Alumnus
A g a r d e n, s t r e t c h i n g
along
Draper and Hawley Halls, has
b e e n p l a n t e d a s a m e m o r i a l to
t h e l a t e D r . C. E d w a r d J o n e s , w h o
d i e d in 1941.
Dr. J o n e s w a s g r a d u a t e d from
State College.
A former Superi n t e n d e n t of S c h o o l s of t h e C i t y
of A l b a n y ,
he was
renowned
t h r o u g h o u t t h e S l a t e for t h e c o n t r i b u t i o n s to e d u c a t i o n a l a d v a n c e ment. Dr. Jones has been identified in Who's
Wlio.
The meorial garden
contains
d e l p h i n i u m , lilacs, iris, a n d an a s s o r t m e n t of s h r u b s .
MRS. FEE, who was recently added
t o o u r f a c u l t y a s u m e m b e r of t h e
Mathematics Department.
S h e fills
t h e v a c a n c y lefl b y D e a n S t o k e s a n d
Or. Lester.
Newman Hall Chooses
Byrne Next Year's Head
M a r g o B y r n e , '4 1, w a s n a m e d n e x t
y e a r ' s P r e s i d e n t of N e w m a n H a l l , a s
t h e r e s u l t of r e v o l e s h e l d A p r i l 22.
Also elected were Agnes Fitzpatr i c k , '45, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ; B e t t y J .
M c G r a t h , '40, S e c r e t a r y ; a n d J a n e t
D o n a h u e , '45, T r e a s u r e r .
State graduates who are former
r e s i d e n t s of N e w m a n Hall will b e
g u e s t s at t h e a n n u a l a l u m n i r e u n i o n
slated for this w e e k e n d .
A "vie"
p a r t y h a s b e e n p l a n n e d for t h i s
evening.
T h e g u e s t s will a l s o b e
h o n o r e d at a b a n q u e t t o m o r r o w a n d
a t d i n n e r a t N e w m a n Hall on S u n day.
DO
Y O U
D I G
She writes poetry, she loves to
travel,
she's
a
psychologist.
A
g l a n c e i n t o t h e M A T H office w i l l
i n d i c a t e t h a t s h e is also. . . .
Mrs. F e e c a m e to S t a t e in F e b r u a r y to h e l p r e l i e v e t h e v a c a n c y left
by Dr. Caroline Lester and Dr. Ellen
Stokes.
Mrs. F e e began teaching i m m e diately after h e r g r a d u a t i o n
from
h i g h school, at which time a college
education was not required.
S h e left t h e p e d a g o g i c a l p r o f e s sion w h e n she married.
(Her puritanical
mother-in-law
believed
m a r r i e d w o m e n shouldn't teach.)
B u t o n e fine d a y , h e r v i l l a g e
school desperately n e e d e d a vicep r i n c i p a l . T h e B o a r d of D i r e c t o r s
h a d b e e n left in t h e l u r c h , a n d t h e y
p l e a d e d w i t h M r s . F e e to c o m e t o
their assistance. S h e did, with t h e
i n t e n t i o n of h e l p i n g o u t u n t i l t h e
principal could go to A l b a n y to get
a teacher.
He went.
B u t instead
of
bringing back a teacher,
he
b r o u g h t a temporary
license.
This u n e x p e c t e d position resulted
in M r s . F e e ' s s t a y i n g t h e r e s i x
years, sous contract.
When her husband's work brought
h i m to A l b a n y , M r s . F e e d e c i d e d t o
attend N Y S C T and get h e r longedfor d e g r e e . S h e c o m p l e t e d h e r e d u c a t i o n in t h r e e v e a r s , r e c e i v i n g h e r
B . A . in 1927. I n t h e fall of t h a t
year, M r s . F e e s u b s t i t u t e d at S t a t e
w h i l e w a i t i n g for D r . D o B e l l t o fling
o p e n t h e p o r t a l s of t h e m a t h d e p a r t ment.
With Dr. DoBell's arrival, s h e
w e n t to S t . A g n e s s c h o o l to " s u b "
lor a few d a y s ; a n d that, too, lasted
—for ten y e a r s .
M r s . F e e s a y s h e r h o b b y is a d o p t ing children.
B u t s h e also a d m i t s
h e r love for t r a v e l , h a v i n g t o u r e d
f r o m t h e Pacific C o a s t to F l o r i d a .
M r s . F e e is f o n d of S t a t e a n d
thinks the students very friendly.
Of S t a t e C o l l e g e us a c o l l e g e , s h e
s a y s , "I t h i n k S t a t e d o e s — a s w e l l
as a n y c o l l e g e I k n o w — w h a t it w a s
designed
to d o : t u r n o u t
good
teachers".
I T ?
Submitted by Ann Bishop
Weil Virginia University
0 * *
HOo*<
Rienow Writes
Book On Civics
" Y o u c a n ' t w r i t e a t e x t b o o k for a
n a t i o n , b u t t h e s t u d e n t s in a s c h o o l
should h a v e a t e x t b o o k that they
c a n a p p l y to t h e c o m m u n i t y
in
which they a r e living," said Dr.
Robert Rienow, Assistant Professor
of S o c i a l S t u d i e s , of h i s r e c e n t l y
p u b l i s h e d b o o k , Calling
All
Citizens.
Calling
All Citizens
is i n t e n d e d
p r i m a r i l y a s a t e x t b o o k for e i g h t h
a n d n i n t h g r a d e s in a c o u r s e g e n e r a l l y t e r m e d C i v i c s , a n d il m a y
be
fitted
into the s e v e n t h
grade
S o c i a l S t u d i e s c u r r i c u l u m of N e w
York State.
T h e t e x t b o o k is d e s i g n e d lo m e e t t h e n e e d s of a full
year course, but the author suggests
thai with p r o p e r selections, a o n e s e m e s t e r course, based on this book,
can be taught.
Dr. R i e n o w w r o t e t h e b o o k o v e r
a f o u r - y e a r p e r i o d . It is h i s s e c o n d
p u b l i c a t i o n , h i s first b o o k b e i n g a
technical
compilation.
The
new
b o o k is u n d e r
t h e e d i t o r s h i p of
Howard
R. A n d e r s o n ,
Associate
Profes.-.or of E d u c a t i o n of C o r n e l l
U n i v e r s i t y a n d D i r e c t o r of S o c i a l
S t u d i e s in t h e I t h a c a P u b l i c S c h o o l s ,
Dr. R i e n o w e x p l a i n s his theory
in w r i t i n g t h e b o o k ; " I n p r i m i t i v e
t r i b e s t h e c e r e m o n y a n d t r a i n i n g of
y o u t h at t h e t i m e of a d o l e s c n e e is
e n t r u s t e d to a l l t h e p e o p l e in t h e
community,
It is a t r i b a l m a t t e r
b r i n g i n g the y o u n g p e o p l e into Ine
tribe
T h u s , t h e local b a n k e r , t h e
local post m a n , t h e local
truck
d r i v e r , a n d t h e local p a r t y l e a d e r
s h o u l d h a v e a n o p p o r t u n i t y to t r a i n
t h e y o u n g p e o p l e in o u r c o m m u n i ties."
W i t h t h i s p u r p o s e in m i n d ,
Dr. R i e n o w w r o t e Calling
All
Citizens witli a d i r e c t a d d r e s s to t h e
p u p i l a n d w i t h a local a p p r o a c h
I'
!pa-Cola
Company, Long Island City, N Y. Bottled locally by Fr anchhed Bottler.
-•—v-*w*igiy^i!frfr3ite»„
'•rwmmmimm
A t*o
•*r-r*
. LIBRARY
STATE COLUGt NEWS, FRIDAY APRIL 30, 1934
PAGB4
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
1 M
Statesmen Meet
BPI Racketeers
In Opener Today
Sports
Chatter
By
Pete Marchetta
In spite of the many obstacles
furnished by the man shortage at
college and the inclement weather,
Harry Kensky, entirely through his
own efforts, has fashioned together
a tennis squad to represent the
Alma Mater in intercollegiate competition. When all hope was lost
for another varsity sport in this
year's
program,
Kensky
came
through with w h a t will u n d o u b t edly be the last varsity sport at
State for the duration.
His love for tennis and his i n t e r est in keeping State College in the
sports world inspired the c a p t a i n manager-coach to m a k e tentative
arrangements with other colleges
for a schedule, even before a team
had been organized.
We wish to congratulate H a r r y
Kensky for his indomitable spirit
to keep sports functioning. It is
this kind of spirit that must be
maintained in these times, not only
in sports, but also in every other
activity in the college. This e x ample is best set for us by the
"Business as Usual" signs which
adorn the front of b o m b - w r e c k e d
stores of w a r - t o r n Europe.
*
*
*
We were very much disappointed
to hear that the r e m a n t s of I n t r a mural Council have decided that the
Softball trophy will not be a w a r d e d
to the winner of this year's softball league. Council claims that
teams contesting are to few.
A four team league may be a
small one, but w h e n there is a
handsome trophy lying around not
being used, we fail to see why it
should not be presented to the
team that emerges champion. T h e
cup will also create a greater incentive for participation and help to
keep the league organized.
The individual prizes that I n t r a mural Council has planned to give
the members of the winning team
instead of the trophy may replace
the cup as a reward. However, we
still would like to have the " B u s iness As Usual" policy mentioned
above to be mentioned in State
College sports as long as possible.
*
*
*
Two weeks ago we mentioned
something about the reorganization
of our gym classes. So far no
action has been taken by anyone in
authority.
Soon
we hope, t h e
spring weather will arrive and the
gym classes can be held outdoors.
However, some definite plan must
be arranged before gym classes can
prove of any value outdoors. We
would like to suggest that periods
available for gym classes be listed
in the men's locker room so that all
men can sign up for those periods
which are convenient to them.
There may be some men omitted
by this scheme, as not all may have
free periods at the designated time
for gym classes. However, we a r e
sure that it will prove an i m p r o v e ment over the lackadaisical p r o c e d u r e now in effect.
Rain Cancels Hiking;
M A N at Ball Practice
The spring season is having a litle
difficulty in getting started. About
twenty girls signed up for hiking
but the outing a r r a n g e d for last
Tuesday was cancelled on account
of rain. Leah Tischler has been
appointed captain
Softball practice was held this
week behind the Dorm, but the
teams are still unformed. An added
attraction to the n a t u r a l appeal of
the sport was contributed last Monday by Ensign Bill Dickson, U.S.N,
who joined in the game.
Dot
Townsend and Mary Now, captains,
again urge teams which wish to
participate in the tourney to submit
the names of their m e m b e r s before
May 1.
RICES ALLEYS
Western and Quail
15c a G a m e fur School League
F r o m 9:00 A. M. to 6:00 P. M.
This afternoon m a r k s the opening
of t h e 1943 tennis season as the
r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s from State
meet
B r o o k l y n Poly on the Ridgefield
C o u r t s . This should be a fair
opener for the Statesmen since
B r o o k l y n Poly bowed to Columbia
last week 9-0. After this contest
the team will prepare to invade
N e w York tomorrow w h e r e St.
J o h n ' s will play host.
It would appear as though only
seven m e n at State are still d e t e r mined to keep this college r e p r e sented in intercollegiate athletic
circles a n d uphold the tradition of
w i n n i n g tennis at State.
These
seven men, the only candidates for
the s i x - m a n tennis squad, are all
w h o responded to the call of H a r r y
K e n s k y , captain, coach, business
manager, and only vetertin among
the seven.
His prospective teammates now
include " D u t c h " Erbstein, "Riz"
Hansen, and four yearlings, Chillemi, Ferber, Miner, and Rand, but
more will be welcomed.
K e n s k y ' s interest and efforts have
been r e w a r d e d as far as attainment
of a schedule is concerned, b u t the
unsettled weather of the capital
area h a s opposed outdoor drilling.
Despite lack of practice, the p o t e n tial racquetteers hope to upset these
opponents.
T h e n if weather permits and
practice becomes possible, they hope
to confront RPI, Cortland, and the
others pending. The several out of
town contests should make this season a success in one sense of the
word at least.
The tennis schedule which has
been a r r a n g e d to date is:
April 30
Brooklyn Poly (home)
May 1
St. John's (away)
May 14
R. P. I. (home)
May 21
R. P. I. (away)
Two matches are also scheduled
tentatively
with
Cortland.
Softball Trophy
In Not at Stake
I n t r a m u r a l Council decided at a
recent meeting that because there
are not enough teams contesting,
the softball title of champion would
not be challenged. In accordance,
the title cup will remain with last
year's winners, the Ramblers, until
State College gets running smoothly
on a post-war schedule.
The Intramural softball trophy
has had a relatively short history,
being in existence for only three
years. SLS won the cup the first
year and the Potter Club team
claimed it the year following. Last
year the Ramblers took over.
However, softball will still be
played. Dr. Sayles has given his
approval and the field in front of
Page Hall is available from 5:30
p. in. n every day but Friday. The
only drawback is the weather.
The typical Albany wetness has
thus far retarded actual league play,
although many of the fellows have
already been practicing,
Intramural Council had asked for
umpires and to-date, eight have
signed up.
There are four teams
altogether.
Gillen and Reed, in
charge, have decided that two
rounds of six games each will be
played, with one game going on
each night,
Rivary Game Wednesday
I'hi' Freshman-Sophomore
women rivalry softball contest will be
played Wednesday afternoon on the
aige field. The winning team will
be awarded three rivalry points.
1 'In'
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Kiley Sounds Call for Golfers;
It Could
Be
Even Grave-Diggers'
W
Acceptablej
^^,>'--.'/v.'.y
by
Ber t Kiley
"A leaf, a stone, an unfound
ball;
Oh lost and by the wind
aggrieved,
ball, come back again,"
(Apologies to Thomas
Wolje)
Wurz
At last the literary merits of the
women's sports staff have met with
recognition. Joan Hylind of the
sophomore sports staff has been e l ected Editor of the F r e s h m a n H a n d book. This breaks the hold which
the editorial side of the NEWS has
had on this position for m a n y years.
Joan, however, promises not to let
WAA dominate the Handbook. On
the staff, too, is Marie DeChene,
the other m e m b e r of the women's
sports staff. Congratulations to Joan!
If it wasn't that there's so little
point to adding any more water to
the atmosphere of Albany, we might
well shed a tear for WAA and its
spring sports season. Plans are all
made, captains have been chosen,
the girls are eager to participate,
but Mother N a t u r e refuses to c o operate . T h e r e hasn't been any
good w e a t h e r since spring arrived.
Only one ray of sunshine appears
and that is but a faint gleam. It
can't go on raining forever. Or
can it?
Some fair day in May, the s t u dents of State will be treated to a
unique sight. The girls in blue
and the girls in red (in other words,
the freshmen and sophomores in
their gym suits) will battle for the
enviable (?) title of "Queens of
Calisthenics".
M : ;s Johnson
announced this plan to the accompaniment of groans from the m u s c l e - b o u n d m e m b e r s of '45 and '46.
Seriously though, we think the
idea is good. As we have said in
a recent column, it is important
now, as never before, that American
women keep themselves physically
strong and healthy. Calisthenics,
with its emphasis on muscular c o ordination, is one of the best m e thods of accomplishing this result.
If the girls will support Miss J o h n son in her efforts and will take the
exhibition seriously, the idea can
be developed into something really
worthwhile. In fact, we would go
as far as suggesting that rivalry
points be awarded to the winner of
the exhibition.
T h e following is by way of a
eulogy and an inquiry. The State
College golf team (born 1942, died
1942) is m o u r n e d ; a timid plea for
five or more hackers capable of
touring IS holes in less than 150
strokes is proffered.
Golf!
T h e only varsity sport
where the athlete can puff dreamily
on a cigarette or pipe while giving
his all for the alma mater. The
sport where, after a hard, semicleanly fought contest one may r e lax over an ale, or, if the weather
be chill and the funds high—a spot
of
, where one's fund of
anecdotes may be increased
as
State's fair n a m e hinges on a putt.
Last year's intrepid quintet played two matches and lost two matches
—both to Siena. The score of the
first was 12-3; the score of the
second, 8-7, when, if a putt which
didn't, had—but where have we
h e a r d that song before?
Tripping o'er the lea, or, as was
more the case, slogging through the
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1943
rain, almost any afternoon
last
spring, could be found such links
giants as Dave (I'm getting more
distance on my dubs)
Bittman;
Howie Lynch, who for some reason,
probably female, always left early;
Dave Griffin, who for another r e a son, probably food, also left early;
"Long J o h n " Sussina, who never
bothered to look for his own lost
balls, but who would search infinitely for a buddy's, and who, in
an important match, corrected his
opponent's swing; Guess (I stand
too close to the ball after I hit it)
Who (see b y - l i n e ) ; and of course
that determined wrecking-crew of
Bartman, Morsillo, and Seifert.
Of this mighty array, only poor,
feeble Guess Who has been b y passed by the Road to Berlin. '46
has contributed Joe Biviano. That's
t w o - t w o from five leaves three vacancies to be filled before the m u n ificent City of Albany will contribute, for free, the use of the hills
and dales of (he Municipal Golf
course. If there be any aspiring
grave-diggers (sex no barrier) who
would care to play a little free golf,
and perhaps win the price of a
drink, contact Guess Who.
G E O R G E D. J E O N E Y , P r o p .
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
T r y Our Businessman's Lunch
60c.
198-200 Central Avenue
Spring Sporfs Series
Pat Latimer, captain of s w i m ming, announces that the final lifesaving exams will be held Tuesday
and T h u r s d a y nights of next week,
at the public baths.
Wednesday,
there will be a written exam at 4:30
p. m.
Of the twe' ty girls who
have received credit
I this sport,
Pat expects at least twelve to pass
the tests. Those juccessful in the
attempt will be qualified as lifesaving instructors.
n
0H, FOR AN ICE-COLD
COCA-COLA"
sWtwSSP^H
r
A
fM.
Jftgs^
ya*:T /•
U'M WRITING uamdsoyr
iHOW I WISH /COULD
60 00 WN TO THE
CORNER FOR A COKE
WITH THE 6A NO"
OTTO R. MENDE
"tm c o liegeJeweler"
103 Central Ave.
Atmosphere
Ttmsss
'».;:
Albany, N. Y.
GOOD FOOD
in a Friendly, Comfortable
A
airrtrrn at
at Quail
W~ ttJtsttrn
>-::::|xv.
In his letter home, even a general
in Africa recalled happy moments
with ice-cold C o c a - C o l a . There's
something about Coca-Cola, Ever
notice how you associate it with happy moments? There's that delicious
taste you don't find this side of
Coca-Cola, itself. It's a chummy
drink that people like riglu-out-ofthe-bottle. Yes siree, the only thing
like Coca-Cola is Coca-Cola, itself."
BOTTIED UNDER AUTHOR.TY OF THE COCA COtA COMPANY BY
ALBANY COCA-COLA COMPANY
226 North Allen St.
Albany, N. Y.
New Myskania;
Election Results
O u t T omorrow
All Star Program
Entertainment
At Party Tonight
Pictures above are the eight remaining m e m b e r s of the retiring 1942-4:1
Myskania. The armed services claimed Thomas Feeney, Howard Lynch,
David Slavin, George Kunz and Robert Leonard at various times during
the year. T h e eight shown above will tap their successors tomorrow.
Myskania Tapping Climaxes
Page Panorama Tomorrow
—By Dorothy Meyers "
ALBANY, N. Y.
VOL. XXVII. NO. 26
'Great Tradition' to Hold Sway
A t Moving-Up Day Ceremonies
D I A L 5-1913
Women Athletes Start
Golf, one of the new sports offered this spring, has begun. Practice
was held last Wednesday at 3:30 p.
m. in the gym. From reports on
the turnout, it seems that this will
be a very popular innovation
Miss
Isabelle Johnson, instructor of p h y sical education, is supervising the
sport. When the weather clears
and the ground dries, practice will
be held on the field in back of
Draper.
Z-443
What is Myskania? Almost a n y one in college will give you a different answer. "It's the most p o p ular and brilliant group of students
in school," "the chosen few, chosen
by a few/' "The leaders of the College." No matter w h a t we may
think of it, Myskania is here to
stay, i t ' s e e m s . Or at least twentyseven years of existence wlouid
seem to w a r r a n t some justification
for its continuation.
T h e Day of J u d g e m e n t for Myskania is M o v i n g - U p Day. The hopes
and fears of three years are, or are
not realized, as the case may be in
a few m i n u t e s of suspense unrivaled
by a n y t h i n g else in college experience.
The crowning of a king of E n g land has scarce ly as much pomp
and ceremony as the Myskania t a p ping has. Freshmen, peering over
from their balcony heights, are initiated into the most colorful i m pressions of their college years.
The Class of '45 was the last to
taste its excitement, the Class of '46
will soon know it.
Last May when the present Myskania was tapped, the suspense was
as high as ever. One by one the
out-going Myskania descended from
the stage, arms encased in their
long black robes, circled the a u d itorium, stopped and a new Myskania m e m b e r was born.
Then
came the r e t u r n trip, this time
there were two, up the steps, and
onto the stage to receive the plaudits of the assembly. Eleven times
was this repeated, until each m e m ber of the old Myskania had tapped
his successor. But this was not
the end, excitement rose even higher as two m e m b e r s returned once
more to round out the number of
new m e m b e r s of thirteen, the full
quota alloted to the organization,
a quota that is not often filled
Then il was finished and the new
group of leaders stood before us:
Bombard, Lynch, Feeney, Maltiee,
Scovell, Slavin, Blasinr, Vanas, Barden, Leonard. Kun/., llafley and
Jones.
Yes, it's a controversial issue, is
Myskania. Even the meaning of
its name is known only to its members, according to a custom established at its inception twenty-seven
years ago.
,
You may like it or not, tomorrow a new Myskania will be chosen,
for the t w e n t y - e i g h t h time. The
scene described above will be r e peated, with different actors but the
same characteristic suspense and
excitement.
You, too, will be
caught up in it, as is everyone who
witnesses it.
"Come Watch Us Move-Up",
Say Studenfs to Faculty
The faculty have watched us
sleep in class, copy papers, read
other people' tests right under their
noses, cut classes after looking them
right in the eye not 20 minutes b e fore, spill acids, knit while they lecture, write letters instead of taking
notes, and do everything but assignments
that we young aspiring
teachers would naturally do. Now
we'd like you to watch us move up.
This is just our own way of inviting you, the 'acuity, to the Movi n g - U p ceremonies tomorrow, b e ginning at 9. A. M.
Ryan Will Edit
1943.44 Primer
The Pv'uiier, literary annual at
State, elected Rhona Ryan, '44, to
head the 11)43-44 staff as E d i t o r - i n Chief.
Assisting Miss Ryan are Mary
S t u d e b a k e r , '44, as Literary Editor,
and Mildred Kirschenblum, '44, as
Business Manager.
The incoming
Senior stall' consists of Eunice Baird
and J o h n Daly.
Muriel Feldman, Ruth Fine, Elizabeth Howell, and Hoslyn Slole,
Sophomores, have been elected to
the J u n i o r Literary Staff.
Helen
Bushnell, Elizabeth Clough, Ruth
Hines, Janice Isken, and G e r t r u d e
Yanuwilz, Sophomores, will comprise the Junior Business d e p a r t ment.
On the Sophomore Literary Stall'
will be Marion Buetow, Virginia
Cornell,
Rosann
Hayden,
Isabel
Malluy,
Phyllis
O'Connor,
and
Esther lllal, all present freshmen,
The addition to the Business Stall
of Joseph Biviano, Sylvia Trop,
Nellie Glod, Robert Sullivan, P a t r i cia Dunning, Sonya Kadish, Betty
Williams, and Doris Quinn, freshmen, completes the /'rimer elections.
Nexl year's issue will be the see
ond in the history of this "Reader's Digest" size magazine which is
available at Student Tax.
{Catherine Martin, '41, retiring
Editor, says, "We have had wonderful cooperation this year, both on
the part of the Staff and student
body. We hope that each year will
result in a better magazine and
larger representation uf State College's literary work".
Forum is closing its successful
Russian War Relief campaign t o night with an Old Clothes P a r t y in
the Commons from 9 p. m. to 12 p.
m. This is the last chance to get
rid of your old clothes for a really
worthy cause. Sunna Cooper '45
chairman of the drive says "We
w a n t to show the students how
much we appreciate the way they
respond to our appeal by giving
them a real time tonight."
The "real time" will feature some
outstanding talent from the student
body, Harold Goldstein will play
the smiling host and genial Master
of Ceremonies. On the program
will be featured Dora Aungst, dance
soloist and Jean MacAllister, singing "Dark Eyes." There will be
two duet teams, the first Chapman
and Snow, who will sing "I'll See
You Again" from "Bittersweet" and
"Sweethearts" from "Maytime" by
Victor Herbert.
On the lighter
side Harold Goldstein and Edna
Marsh will sing "How Ya Goin' To
Keep 'Em Down On The F a r m . "
Additional attractions will be Lucille
Kenny, monologist and the M e r r i gals popular sextette who will sing
four numbers "By The Light Of
The Silvery Moon," "Volga Boat
Song," Fur Me And My Gal," and
"Smoke Gets In Your Eyes."
Committees for the dance are as
follows: Mary Betty Stengel; P u b l i city; Osnif Serabian, Games; Toni
O'Brien, Refreshments; Harold Goldstein, Entertainment.
Admission to the dance will be
either some article of old clothing
or one nickel. Following tire e n t e r tainment
program,
refreshments,
games, and dancing will follow.
The dance is open to all students
and an all-out attendance is d e sired.
"To Whom It May Concern:
From this date smoking will be
absolutely prohibited in Page Hall
at any rehearsal or activity carried
on there.
JOHN M. SAYLES, President."
Grand Marshal Hal Singer
Directions
According to Hal Singer, '43,
Grand Marshal, tomorrow's schedule of assembling, seating and
Moving-Up is as follows:
At H:U0 A. M. Seniors will Rather
In tin' Rotumill tttltl lli'Hl-lloor hall
or Draper which lends to the peristyle to lluesled. The Class of '44
will assemble In the aforementioned
p.r.style, the overflow on lluesled
ilrst iloor. The Annex stairs anil
the tunnel to Draper has been
designated for the Sophomores; the
lower hall of Draper from the women's locker room doors to the tunnel Into llnwley, lor the fresh.
In Page Hull, the Seniors will
occupy the center section of the
ilium floor w.th the Sophomores In
the right section (facing the stage)
anil the Juniors In the left section.
I'rishiiicn will take seats In the
center mill right sections of the
hulconv and In the niazzanine.
To the tune of "W h e r e, Oh
Where . . . " the Sophomores will
proceed In the rear of the auditorium, turn right, mid Die into the
stilts which the Juniors will leave.
'I'lic Juniors will take seats In the
center section when the Seniors
move riglil mid occup.v (he seats
vacated hv the Sophomores. The
(hiss of l<
' > will descend the light
>liiiis and occupy (he remaining
varan! seals on (he main Iloor. The
overflow will move left to occupy
the left section of the Imlrony and
(he mezzanine.
Telepathic Observations Reveal
Pre-Moving-Up Day Thoughts
"By Barbara P u t n a m
few men . . . I'm going to wear
Al a table in the Commons this
some comfortable shoes; last year
morning sat four girls, each with
my feet killed me . . Mustn't miss
an open book in front of her. Not
Percy Grainger . . . hope it doesn't
an unusual sight - but a close o b rain. . . ."
server would notice that not a page
It is with some difficulty that we
of any of the books was being
make contact with the cerebellic
turned, and thai four pairs of eyes
radiations of the Junior. It's mostly
were staring vacantly into space.
static. . .
Let's don our telepathic
ear". . . I'm a wreck! Absolutely a
phones and tune in on the minds of
wreck! . . . If I'm like this now,
these four co-eds, First the freshwhat will 1 do when they actually
man. . . .
start the lapping! . . I'll go crazy,
. . So tomorrow is Moving-Up
I know I will . . . Wonder how many
Day!
Wish 1 knew what we are
members they'll take . . . Hope Mom
supposed to do . . . Do we wear
and Dad gel here early I'd die if I
socks or stockings'.' . . . Hope it
had to miss anything . . . Oh, don't
doesn't rain . . . I'm going to look
let it rain please don't lei it
silly in that blue bow . . . I'd better
lain . . ."
go to bed early lonight . . . Gee,
The Senior looks serious anil
1 hope we win the skit and sing . . .
somewhat starry-eyed. We leel the
Oh dear, I'm so excited! . . . I just
same wav, after listening in. . . .
can't concentrate on this Math. . . ."
'"M"ving-Up Day! Il doesn't seem
The Sophomore wears a complapo:sible! Why, I just got here! . . .
cent smile.
Let's try her w a v e It will be queer, seeing those kids
length. . . .
taking our places . . . And when
". . . Moving-Up Day tomorrow!
we sing 'Where, oh where are the
It ought to be fun , . . I've got
grand old Seniors', it will be us
Myskania all figured out, I think
they're singing to . . . I never real. . . I'd better take a hanky, I know
iized before how much I love this
1 II weep over the Senior speech
place . . . Hope it doesn't rain. . . ."
. . . it's going to seem queer with so
By J a n e Heath
Aged by 29 years of tradition and
lavish with ceremony, Moving-Up
Day tomorrow will summarize a n other year of college activities. An
all-college pageant, the tapping of
the New Myskania, the a n n o u n c e ment of Student Association and
organization leaders for the coming
year, and a final showing of interclass rivalry form, in the main, the
day's program.
The four classes will assemble at
8:30 A. M. in Draper and Huested
Halls and in the connecting p e r i style.
At 9 A. M. the c a p - a n d gowned Seniors will lead the colorful procession to Page Hall a u d i torium where the ceremonies are
scheduled for 9:20 A . M .
Members of each underclass will
appear in uniform dress in their
respective class colors.
Class Speakers Open
Student
Association
President
Don Vanas will conduct the Page
meeting, first order of business
being the class speeches. Terrence
Smyth, '4G, will speak for the freshman class. The Sophomore Class
Speaker will be Marge C u r r a n .
Trece Aney, will represent the
J u n i o r Class; and Cliff Swanson, the
Senior Class.
Some of the suspense of the day
will be lessened by the a n n o u n c e ment of awards and election results,
which follows the class speeches.
The incoming officers of Pi Gamma
Mu, Pi Omega Pi, Commerce Club,
F o r u m , Spanish
Club, Newman
Club, and Hillel will be given recognition.
The awards include the
scholarship cup by Interfraternity
Council, and Press Bureau and
Potter Club honors.
The Seniors' farewell song, led by
Jean McAllister, '43, will precede
the
Moving-Up
ceremony.
Hal
Singer, '43, Grand Marshal, will
conduct the classes to new seats in
the auditorium. This procedure is
the epitome of Moving-Up Day's
symbolism.
Myskania Taps Next
The tapping of next year's M y s kania will follow. Tomorrow's t a p ping will mark the beginning of the
twenty-eighth year of Myskania's
existence.
The final announcements will
conclude the morning order of business.
The NEWS Board, and the
Primer and Pedagogue staffs will
be named. Also Debate Council
and Music Council officers and
members, Residence Council m e m bers, and officers of Dramatic and
Art Association, Student Christian
Association, and WAA and MAA
will be announced. At this time
result; of Student Association and
class voting will be given.
After singing the National A n ihem, the student body will file
from the auditorium and onto the
lawn in front of Page Hall. There
each class will form its class n u m (Continued on puye .?, column I)
Supplementary Issue Tomorrow
The Moving-Up Day supplement
of the NEWS will appear in the Rotunda of Draper Hall at 12 p, m.
tomorrow afternoon after MovingUp ceremonies.
The supplement, edited by Muriel
Scovell, Myskania member of the
NEWS, will contain the names of the
new Myskania, and all class and
organization officers. In addition,
tabulations of the votes for these
elections will be published.
f
I
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