Myskania Announces Numerical Election Results

advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SATURDAY, MAY 9,1941
PAGE I
State College News
Myskania Announces Numerical Election Results
Tnte 1
Prcaldent
Lynch, Howard
Vanai, Don . . . .
Blanks
Tote 2
Vote 1
Vote 3
Student Association
276
848
15
634
Vote 1
MAA
VIce-Preildent
Aihworth, Harold
Beyor, Fred
Latimer, Patricia
Byan, Khona
Shoemaker, Fred
Carroll, Patriot
Blanks
148*
37
102*
83
120
37
17
872
Vote
Vote
Representative
..
02
. . 8.18*
..
10
..
Ill
. . 180*
..
17
Gunrlno, Eugene
210
214
5
Sonnrleuder
Chapman, .lean
•101
o34
•'• •
127'
02
101*
01
W
«0
13
034
Cooper, Sunna
100
103*
102
108»
197
IlliiKinun, Hurley . . . .
Halley, Lois
l.oHurd.i, Ciirnielina. . .
Meniiillo, Erriost
Smith, .loan
Cox, Dorothy
DiiiKinnn, Hurley
Putnam, Barbara
Southwick, .luiio
Snow, Farle
Blanks
Vote 1
Vote 2
II
"ill*
54*
104
Vice-President
As'liwoiMii. Harold
Balrd, Eunice
Shoemaker, Ifrcd
Verrcy, lla.v
Blanks
5B
28
15
2
101
no*
32
47*
24
1
in I
Clius Historian
Dorrance, William
Pcrlmun, Bernard
KyerNOii, Jennette
Vincent, Ruth
leiiiuks
Secretary
Do run,
Kay
l l a n l e s l y , Georgia
Moeliak,
Virginia
Speaker
Ferris, Frederick
Wnlruth, Glenn
Hlrsh, Ira
Passow, A. Harry
Blanks
PollieniiiK,
Vlrifinlii
Kockcustle, Ituth
Simmons, Elizabeth
...
•Ill
'~:t*
:nr
42
11
18
Hi
101
111
V o t e :i
no
HI
Mury
Treasurer
Davis, Leonora
V o t e II
30
154*
(12*
H
Cheerleader
HiltllUlil, .lime
lliltulilio, Dolly
Blanks
I'faff,
«•:
Hurold
-is*
28
85*
i
134
(1(1
17
1(17
143
ItepreNvlitHtlve to MAA
lliiiiibnnl, Otven
Flax, Arthur
Guariuo, Eugene
Heed, Edward
Blanks
KM
111
111
33
ill
ill
:s7*
42
20
«:i :
8
III
KM
1117
(13
OB
Nil
II
'Jis
Scrablan,
34*
Blanks
87 •
U
Harnett, Collin
Crumm, Nora
llooley, John
Jaciihsen, Gertrude
Faulk, Dorothy
Lubey, John
Tischler, Leah
Baskln, Gordon
....
HO*
311*
22*
10
15
10
14
^1
170
Songlcudei*
Chapman, Jean
Cook, Carolyn
I'litiium, llarlmru
Blunks'
08*
35
(IK*
0
Hi*
10*
II
Oil
57
J
153
00*
53*
33
III
.'III
I
153
(17
HI
n
Paul
8.7
111
(Ill*
28
21
nil*
5
II
43*
38
HI
13*
47*
35
17*
20
W A A Munaifcr
(iiavelli, Nora
Merger, J o a n
Stuart,
Helen
Blanks
153
35
ftfi
in
0
181
Ill
20
^7
0
ItciiicMcntutlvc t o F i n a n c e lluurd
Baileii, Harry
Brown, Jean
('upuiiiiii, M i c h a e l
Hull, Nancy
Moron, liny
28
•_'l
32
III*
US*
20
III*
sit
ollvtfl, Arthur
VVIllpulu, K l s i e
Blanks
I'uhlli'lly Cliulriuuu
UoslwU'k, M a r g a r e l
Uyck, .limnetic
Carinuny, Belly
...
tioldslcin, Hurold
11 in.-:-, l t l l l l t
Itooth, Jane
Skavlnu,
Al
SHU, Lucille
Wlii.vnll, Jean
08
10
7«
4
148
Opening Feature
Freddie Gray to Play
At Graduation Dance
C o m m e n c e m e n t weekend, this year,
will begin a s usual with t h e a n n u a l
Alumni Day, p l a n n e d by t h e S t a t e
College Alumni Association. May 30
Is t h e date for t h i s reunion. T h e
events for Alumni D a y include a
Coffee Concert a t 9:30 A. M. in t h e
Auditorium, t h e Alumni D a y L u n c h eon a t 1:00 P. M. a t t h e Alumni
Residence Halls, a n d t h e President's
Reception a t Pierce Hall.
A tour of the Parrell Mansion a n d
special class reunions are also
planned for Alumni Day.
Torchlight P a r a d e Climax
I n t h e evening, Class Day events
of t h e Class oi '42 will begin a t
8:30 P . M. in Page Hall Auditorium.
T h e program will begin with a welcoming speech by P a u l Merritt,
President of t h e Senior Class. J e a n n e t t e Ryerson will p r e s e n t t h e Class
History, a n d Mary Klein will read
t h e Class Poem; L a u r e t t a Servatlus
will read t h e Class Prophecy. Tiie
evening will be climaxed by t h e t r a ditional torchlight ceremonies in t h e
front of Draper Hall. At this ceremony, t h e Class of 1942 will be
inducted into t h e Alumni Association.
On Sunday, May 31, t h e Baccalaureate Service will t a k e place in
Page Hall, a t 1:30 P . M.
Senior Breakfast will take place
a t 8:30 A. M. on Monday, J u n e 1.
T h e C o m m e n c e m e n t ceremonies
are scheduled for Monday, J u n e 1.
Those who a r e to t a k e p a r t in the
ceremonies will assemble a t 10 A. M.
in front of Page Hall. Those who
are taking part in t h e academic
procession include t h e Board of
Trustees, t h e S t a t e College Faculty,
a n d distinguished guests, besides, of
course, candidates for degrees. Reverend F a t h e r William Cahill, P r o fessor of Philosophy a t t h e College
of St. Rose, will give t h e Invocation,
and t h e Reverend D r . B e r n a r d J.
Bamberger, Rabbi of Temple Beth
Emeth, will give t h e Benediction.
Bombard Resigns
ll'i
r>:i
42
37
llll
W
Up
II
U
Blanks'
IVm. R. Horruiice
Is Commencement
T h e Commencement weekend will
come to a close with t h e a n n u a l
Senior Ball planned for t h e Colonie
Country Ciub. However, Marjorie
Gaylord, General C h a i r m a n of t h e
Bail, stated t h a t if t h e r e were too
many objections to this a r r a n g e ment, the Ball would take place in
the Ingle Room of Pierce Hall. T h e
dance is planned from 9 P. M. to
1 A. M. a n d Freddie G r a y a n d his
orchestra will furnish t h e music.
Miss Gaylord is being assisted by
the following
committee
heads:
Arrangements, Alfred Stiller; O r chestra, Nicholas Morsillo; Bids
Delores Galonian: Publicity, David
Hayeslip,
1117
Issue Editors
A. Hurry I'ussow
Alumm Keunion
Members
ui
Signum
Laudis,
honorary scholarship fraternity, will
distribute the degrees conferred by
the Board of Trustees in behalf of
the Regents of t h e University of t h e
S t a t e of New York, while t h e newlytapped members of Myskania, senior
campus leadership society, will usher
at the ceremonies.
Senior Ball a l Colonie Club
Cheerleader
Cooper, Sunna
d o u g h . Belly
Her l l h i i n n r s s l a u ,
S m i t h , .loan
Blanks
Z-443
170
134
hoard
mi
87
ill
18
20
153
1-13
40
BS*
li.'l*
II
.MAA R e p r e s e n t a t i v e
Beach, Hick
G l p p , Stiui
llipptek, Julius
Kiilliniin, Warren
Me.'.'atnara, III!)'
M u l l l n , Krun
I'rlvelte, Zollie
Koillier, J o e
Blanks
743
WAA l(.|irc»enttttlte
Greeiriun, Juno
Halley, Luis
Toiler, i:iliclinaj
Blanks'
40*
1
II
in I
01
S»*
Frank
171)
t:i*
Htixlo', .lani'l
Urn voile, Hotly
Vote :l
44
20
300
;
Vote
171)
BO
II
B8
112
208
IVAA Munuger
Ackley, Mafjorle
Jones, Winifred
Luberdit, .Marie
Hlunk*
Hetty
WAA Kepreselltulire
Bushmill, Helen
Now, .Mury
Sanderson, Mary
Blanks
I!
in I
143
Representative to finance
llnrtmnii, Itobert
Flux, Leo
Klrcher, .lolin
Smith, .luck
iilanks
Secretary
Archainhaiill, Harold . . .
Broiigliton, Audrey
....
1
10
38
Ill
I)
Sbolsky, llvruard
Stengel, Mary
07
70
102
14
-8
12
1
Boaril
I'll j>c, Vincent
Soulhwlcli, .(tine
Snow. Earle
Blanks
(Istllf
54
Bl*
170
Songlcaiier
l-'.ilitor o f F r o s l l l l a n d l i o o U
Alley.
""...'!
120*
Treasurer
•in
208
Huiiiclt'uder
(.'ox, Dorothy
Ilingiiinn, Hurley
30*
28
Curtis
Wondworlli,
Blunks
151
57
138
114
03
10
3
Simmon, Josephine
Tussoiil, Joseph
Terrlll, Caroline
Blunks
07
78
12
32
—
President
(iarfull, Florence
Sticclna, .Inliii
Wood, Eunice
Blanks
170
WAA Manager
Dcvliie. Kutheriiie
Dninuu, Mary
llcnlinan, Kit
Blanks
Itopresentutlve to Kluunce
.Marshall, Verne
Mould, John
Reed, Hen
Blanks
148
SiiiKer,
51
211
McCunn,
Vote 1
Vice-President
Dee, Peggy
Meniiillo, Krnesl
Itepresentotlve to MAA
Marslaiiil, Willllllli
Miller, William
10!
20
US
2
Oammarota, Gloria
Groenberg, Solomon
Perretla, Michael
-1
33*
34*
5-1*
12
104
82
10
00
00*
33
40
170
70
1^
Representative to WAA
Breunlg, Mary
LaSallc, Lodti
IMelcort, Jane
TowiiNciHi, Dorothy
Blanks
380
candidate.
134
ill
143
Vice-President
Mildred Muttlee
Secretory
113
70
I
104
18
•J7*
Vote 1
V o t e :t
2
Class of 1943
President
Felgenbaum, Harold
Fecney, Thomns
Blanks
elected
0(1
Terlio, Allan
UllUlks
401
Class of 1945
Ml*
154*
30
Treasurer
Crnnlss, Lucille
•11
48
Counsellor
0
22*
IS*
8
indicates
Howell,
loi
Evans, Madeline
Duffy, Marion
Grluter, Gerry
Halbreich, Florence
Boldface
134
o4*
27*
17
23
14
12
17(1
22
7
52
18
2
loi
CIIIHH
101
President
Combs, Holier!
Sovik, Marlon
Young, Itichnioiid
Blanks
10
* Indicates candidate for revolt';
Vote I
Vote 3
145
230
281
.. :w:t
Class of 1944
101
Ivy
..
142*
190*
380
2530
401
JJ
2(1
«*
-_
I lii»» Prophet
HervuthiM, l o r e t t a
Sommers, Roy
Tibbetts, John
Blunks
204
13ft
.. mi
. . .17!)
..
Class of 1942
Cluss Poet
Duren, Murgot
EllinBliam, Leah
Klein, Mary
Blunks
..
..
Vote 3
141
034
Cheerleaders
Baskln, Gordon
Dee, Peggy
Harris, Blaine
Mullln, Fran
Sprentier, Martha
Soulier, Joe
Tischler, Leah
Blanks
04
120*
114*
12(1*
'.0(1
80
272
401
Secretary
N S F A Representntlve
Bnlrd, Eunice
Lichtwurt, Doris
Marshall, Verne
Miirshmd, William
O'Lenry, Paul
Shay, Jennette
Blunks
Vote 2
Edwin J. Holstein
ai*
12
13
vi*
!I7*
«•
s
17
IS*
II
18*
170
18
in
_10
Q
153
07
As Head of Com Club
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, MAY 15,194S
Papas of New Fight Song
Applauded by Student Body
"We a r e both very h a p p y about
t h e whole affair," beamed proud
papas Holstein a n d Graves, r e ferring, of course, t o their newly
released "Fight Song." "Since
S t a t e needed a fight song, a n d
since nobody else was writing
one," explained • Holstein, "Lea
a n d I j u s t decided t o do our bit."
And so these budding lyricists
started tinkling on t h e piano
a n d writing a n d erasing a n d r e writing some more. As Graves
put it, "First we'd c h a n g e t h e
music to fit t h e words, a n d then
we'd c h a n g e t h e words back t o
fit t h e music."
No copyright, n o advance p u b licity s t u n t s , n o faculty preview—
this song came out u n a n n o u n c e d
and was judged solely on its
merits. Did we like it? You
bet! And so, as all institutions
must, S t a t e h a s finally acquired
an official fight song.
Greek Councils
Choose Officers
Singer, Snyder Head
Fraternity Organizations
I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y a n d Intersorority
Councils a n d K a p p a Beta fraternity
have a n n o u n c e d their officers for
the coming year.
Harold Singer, '43, oi Edward
Eldred P o t t e r Club, succeeds Maxon
Reeves, '42, of Sigma Lambda Sigma,
as
president
of
Interfraternlty
Council. O t h e r officers for t h e coming year a r e Verne Marshall, '44, of
Sigma Lambda Sigma, secretary, a n d
Saul Stolbof. '44, of K a p p a Beta,
treasurer. T h e vice-president is as
yet u n a n n o u n c e d , but will be from
K a p p a Delta R h o .
O t h e r members for t h e coming
year a r e Owen Bombard a n d Jack
Smith, juniors, a n d William M a r s land, '44, of K a p p a Delta R h o ; Howard Lynch, '43, a n d Malcolm Evans,
"44, of P o t t e r Club; Joseph Levin a n d
Harold
Felgenbaum,
juniors, of
K a p p a B e t a ; a n d George Kunz, a n d
T h o m a s O'Connor, juniors, of Sigma
Lambda Sigma.
Verna Snyder, '43, of P h i Delta,
will serve as president of I n t e r sorority Council for t h e coming year,
succeeding J e a n Sears, '42, of Beta
Zeta sorority. J e a n Buckman, '43,
of K a p p a Delta, holds the office of
vice-president, Carolyn Burrows, '43,
of Psi G a m m a , is secretary, a n d
/Continued
on page .;, column
1)
Sayles Discloses
Workshop Plan
Teacher Representatives
To Discuss Air Age
Dr. J o h n M. Sayles, President of
t h e College, disclosed t h a t i n a d d i tion . t o t h e Faculty
Workshop
p l a n n e d for S t a t e College n e x t
m o n t h , a one-week workshop on
t h e Air Age is scheduled from J u n e
22 to 27.
Dr. Sayles pointed o u t t h e a d v a n tages of t h i s workshop as a preview
of a "new kind of life" after t h e
war, which will encourage student,
interest in aviation advances.
T h e plan for this workshop was
devised by t h e National Committee
on Air Age, a n organization a p pointed directly by t h e D e p a r t m e n t
of Commerce in Washington. Dr.
Benjamin Wood a n d Dr. Nicholas
E n g e l h a r d t of Columbia, a n d Dr.
Orton of California, a r e working on
the curricula for these workshops
in order to condition t h e faculties
of teacher training institutions in
the new implications of t h e Air Age.
Dr. Leslie Gregory, of Fredonia,
a n d Dr. D o n n a l V. Smith, Professor
of Social Studies, are in charge of
the workshop a t State College.
These two men, a n d Dr. H e r m a n n L.
Cooper, Assistant Commissioner of
Education for Teacher Education
and Certification, will meet in New
York City with Doctors Wood,
E n g e l h a r d t a n d Orton.
Owen Bombard, '43 member of t h e
newly chosen Myskania, h a s r e signed Ills position as President of
the Commerce Club. B o m b a r d h a d
been elected president of MAA a n d
of the Commerce Club, both of which
positions are major offices. Since
this was In violation of t h e majorminor office system existant a t State,
Bombard h a d to resign from one
T h e STATU COLUKM NHWK c o n t r i b office, which he did.
uted two of its staff to t h e new
Myskania—Slavin a n d Scovell. You
At a special meeting of t h e Comcan say t h a t again. Slavin a n d
merce Club yesterday
afternoon,
Scovell. No, p u t more emphasis on
Alma Jewell, '43, was chosen to fill
the Slavin. Isn't h e dynamic? Notice
the vacancy.
Miss Futterer Directs
Annual Spring Play
Tonight in Page Hall
Central Studio
Photo
Frosh Camp Counselors
Lois Hafley, '43, Director of F r e s h m a n C a m p foi Women, h a s a n nounced t h e n a m e s of this year's
counselors. They a r e : Seniors, M a r jorie Ackley, E m m a Baccari, Emily
Blasiar, Gloria C a m m o r a t a , Dorothy
Cox, Flora Gaspary, J a n e G r e e n m u n ,
Dorothy Huyck, Shirley Jennings,
Winifred Jones, Mary McCann, Mildred Mattice, Shirley Mosher, Verna
Snyder, Rose S t e r n .
Juniors, Trece Aney, Eunice Baird,
Patricia Carroll, K a t h r y n Devine,
Mary D o m a n n , K a y Doran, Patricia
Frey, Elaine Grogan, K a t h r y n Herdm a n , Theodora J a y , Patricia Latimer, Leda LaSalle, Natalie Levine,
Mary M c G r a t h , J a n e Pickert, H a n nelore Schoen, Osnlf Serabian, Dorothy Townsend, Nancy Wilcox.
Sophomores, J e a n Berger, M a r garet Bostwick, Helen Bushnell,
Florence Garfall, Nora Giavelli,
Elaine H a r r i s , J a n e t Mather, B a r bara P u t n a m , Eunice Smith, M a r t h a
Sprenger, Dorothy Taylor, Leah
Tischler, Betty K a y Walsh.
Varied,
by Bernard Skolsky
Although the ratio of m e n to
women at S t a t e College is about 3',a
women to 1 m a n , t h e 1942-43 Myskania can boast of an almost even
score, 7 m e n a n d B women. This
cither shows the superiority of t h e
male of t h e species where activities
are concerned, or proves
thac
women's m i n d s a r e on things other
Hum their work.
Today's Assembly, however, brings
to mind some very serious questions
in regard to t h e a p p e a r a n c e of t h e
newly chosen Myskania. Will Bombard a p p e a r alone, or will Georgia
come along with h i m ? Will Lynch
march on t h e stage in a slow, dignified m a n n e r or will he jitterbug on?
Will Halley a n d Feeney change their
seats in order to sit near eacli other?
Will Kunz forget where he is a n d
sing the Major General's song Instead of t h e Alma Mater? T h e
shadow knows, h e h l h e h ! h e h l
Advanced Dramatics Stages
The Royal Family7 Tonight
Hafley Makes Public
Personalities Moke
Interesting,
VOL. XXVI, NO. S9
Myskania
Unpredictable
the way h e p l a n t s his feet, with cuffless trousers of course, so as not to
trip on t h e too-long folds of his
gown. B u t Sccvell is glad Slavin
was placed next to her. They have
so m a n y memories to talk o v e r New York, e t c .
Vanas' first look after h e was
tapped wa.s toward t h e balcony
where a certain girl sat. W h a t h a s
t h - o t t girl got? While Bob Leonard
sits on t h e stage, he c a n s t a r t to
put his NFSA books in order for t h e
new representative.
Betty Barden will make an e n t r a n c e - u born actress always does.
And if she becomes bored: she c a n
rehearse h e r lines for tonight's performance. Win Jones, t h e athletic
type, c a n always take a soft-ball
with her to t h e stage, a n d if nothing
exciting h a p p e n s in Assembly, she
and Halley c a n have a catch.
Emily Blasiar a n d Millie Mattice
can coniide in each other about such
vital things as Spring, love, SCA
and Music Council.
These a r e all t h e things t h a t t h e
new Myskania could do. B u t which
they won't.
E L I Z A B E T H B A R D E N (top), and
J A N E C U R T I S , Juniors, who have
leads in t o n i g h t ' s p r e s e n t a t i o n , T h e
Royal Family,
NEWS Receives
Superior Rating
Notification of t h e award "AllAmerican College Newspaper," highest honor delegated by the Associated
Collegiate Press, was received yest e r d a y by the STATU CIII.I,KI;K N E W S .
Out of a possible credit r a t i n g of
1125, the Nuws w a s awarded 975
points, which placed it in the
"superior" class.
E a c h division in the publishing
of the newspaper w a s judged individually, with the viewpoint of pres e n t i n g a balanced consideration.
E v e r y d e p a r t m e n t of the NEWS r e ceived above-average mention,
Special commendation was given
to the NEWS' music critics, Bernard
P u r l m a n , '42, a n d Bernadotte Sullivan, '43, for their courage In criticizing the repertoire of F r a y a n d
Braggiotti. T h e editorial column
w a s cited for containing u constructive purpose.
T h e Associated Collegiate Press
service aids staffs to give their
colleges a n d communities a signiicant publication, a n d to help them
in the solution of their problems.
May 23 is 'Quarterly' Deadline
T h e deadline of t h e contest for
U n d e r g r a d u a t e E d i t o r of t h e Alumni
Quarterly
h a s been extended to
May 23. Bei.ty Barden, '43, present
U n d e r g r a d u a t e Editor, stated t h a t
t h e interest is much less t h a n t h a t
shown two years ago, possibly due
to t h e active interest in war activities.
T h e Advanced D r a m a t i c s class
presents Its a n n u a l t h r e e - a c t play,
The Royal Family, a t 8:30 t o n i g h t
in t h e Page Hall auditorium. Miss
Agnes E. F u t t e r e r , Assistant P r o fessor of English, is t o direct this
production for t h e second time in a
period of eight years. K a u f m a n a n d
Perber wrote t h e play, now being
sponsored by t h e D r a m a t i c a n d Arts
Association.
A satire on t h e B a r r y m o r e family,
t h e play c e n t e r s a r o u n d a family
of actors bound by t h e traditions of
t h e t h e a t e r . I t a t t e m p t s to show
t h e difference between two generations, t h e older a n d t h e younger.
Betty B a r d e n , '43, represents t h e
older in h e r p o r t r a y a l of F a n n y
Cavendish, t h e old m o t h e r , while t h e
younger generation is played by
Trece Aney, '44. a n d J a n e Curtis, '43,
in t h e roles of G w e n a n d Julie
Cavendish. J i m McFeeley, '44, as
Tony Cavendish is constantly i n volved in b r e a c h of promise suits
but with assistance always finds a
way out.
One Set Used
O n e set is used throughout t h e
whole play. T h e scene is laid in a
duplex a p a r t m e n t in t h e East 50's
in New York City. T h e action takes
place in a period of one year.
T h e complete cast is as follows:
F a n n y Cavendish, Betty Barden, '43;
Julie Cavendish, J a n e Curtis, '43;
Gwen Cavendish, Trece Aney, '44;
Tony Cavendish, J a m e s McFeeley,
'44; Herbert D e a n , J a c k Vose, '44;
Kitty LeMoyne, K a t h l e e n Martin,
'43: Oscar Wolfe, Morris Gerber, '43;
Perry Stewart, H a l Ashworth, '44;
Gilbert Marshall, George Seifert,
'42; Delia, J a n e t Wood, '43; Jo, Milton K. Adams, '44; McDermott, J o h n
F. Lubey, '45; a hallboy, D a n Began,
'45; a chauffeur, A r t Collins, '44;
Miss Peake, E t h e l m a y Tozier, '43;
a n d Gunga, Bob Loucks, '44.
Two c h a n g e s in t h e original cast
were necessitated w h e n Luke Zilles,
'43, was drafted a n d J u n e Melville,
'43, was sent h o m e with an attack
of appendicitis. J o h n Lubey, '45, a n d
Trece Aney, '44, a r e replacing them.
Off-campus recruits include a p a r rot, a monkey, a n d a G r e a t Dane.
Benton Is Stage M a n a g e r
Byron Benton, '43, is stage m a n ager for t h e production, assisted by
Lenora Davis, J u n e Melville, a n d
Elizabeth
B a r d e n , juniors. T h e
stagecraft group u n d e r Miss Vivian
Hopkins, I n s t r u c t o r in English, is
assisting t h e committee in t h e construction of t h e sets.
Other committees assisting in t h e
production a r e a s follows: costumes,
J a n e Curtis, c h a i r m a n , Jacqueline
Shaw, Morris Gerber, juniors; house,
Dorothy Huyck, c h a i r m a n , J a n e t
Wood, E t h e l m a y Tozier, juniors;
advertising, B a r b a r a Clark, c h a i r man, Ellen S w a r t h o u t , Betty M a r ston, juniors; props, Betty Taylor,
J e a n Tracy, juniors; a n d sound effects, B a r b a r a Kerlin, '43. Members
of t h e advanced d r a m a t i c s class for
n e x t year a r e supplementing t h e
committees.
Toepfer Named Editor
Of '42-43 Directory
Rolf Toepfer, '43, h a s been a p pointed Editor-in-Chief of t h e 19421043 Directory. Appointed by S t u d e n t Council, Toepfer will be aided
by a n editorial staff consisting of
J a n e Southwick. H e n r y Wise, j u n iors, a n d J o h n Sussina a n d M a r g a r e t Dee, sophomores. R u t h Dee,
'43, is t h e senior board member. B e r t
Kiley, '44, is advertising m a n a g e r ,
a n d Ills staff Includes G e r t r u d e
Bove, Ernest MennUo, a n d M a r g e
Curran.
•***A ,?!W*pf?Sft(
••»S-fE^gfflW!
^
PAGE t
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 1942
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY IS, 1941
V
•MAW REALLY CRAZY AtOUT M l . . . Hf SAVf I'M WORTH
MY WilftHT IN SAVINGS tTAMff *
Established May, 1916
by the Clan of 1918
Vol. X X V I
By Htrb Ltntktr
Xona card doesn't mean much to a college student,
but according to latest reports, it's all the rage among
motorists. . . .
ADDED VITAL STATISTICS—No less than 84 persons were crowded into one of the more popular
collegiate rendezvous last Sat. nite—celebrating in a
more or less decorous fashion, moving-up day. Fraternity and sorority walls were forgotten as all banded
together under the Purple & Gold for a night of mirth
and melody. . . .
No. 21)
F r i d a y , May 15, 1042
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Prese
Collegiate
Digest
T h e u n d e r g r a d u a t e new&paper of t h e New York State College for Teneliersi publluhed every F r i d a y of t h e college
y e a r b y t h e N E W S Hoard for the S t u d e n t Association.
P h o n e g : Office, 5-1X173; Slnvln, 2-07211; B u r r o w s , 2-27r»'.>.
• I P I M M N T I O rem NATIONAL AOVMTHINO BT
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Social Buzzings—
4 2 0 MADISON A V « .
N I W YORK. N . Y.
CHICAGO • IOSTOR • LOI JMMlUt • SAN FMUCISCO
The Newi Board
DAVID SLAVIN
.
FLORA M. GASPARY '/
R. MURIEL SCOVELL } "
CAROLYN BURROWS
BEVERLY PALATSKY
BERNADETTE SULLIVAN
PETER MARCHETTA
JANET BAXTER
BERNARD SKOLSKY
BETTY STENGEL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-MANAGING EDITORS
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGEn
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All c o m m u n i c a t i o n s should he addressed to ihi* editor ami
m u s t he sighed; Names will lie withheld upon request,
T h e S T A T E COhTMOB
N E W S assumes no resp'prtslbUUy
for opinlotis expressed In lis columns o r ciiiiimunlciitions,
a s such expressions do not necessarily reflect Its view.
Hail and Farewell
It is the end, and it is the beginning.
Paradoxical as these words may be, they have
a certain significance these days, when epochs
come to a close, and others begin.
This week's issue of the NEWS is the last
of the year, yet it is the first edited in its
entirety by the 1942-43 Board. It has been
impossible in a few hectic days to make any
distinct changes in policy, changes which are
inevitable when new individuals take charge
of an organization. Ideas are already shaping in the minds of the incoming editors, but
they must wait for next September 18 to go
into effect.
Myskania, too, is hovering this week between the old and the new order. This is no
less true of nearly every group in the college.
The new leaders stand ready to go into
action, in many cases their work has already
begun. They, too, must await the fall.
For the Seniors who will leave on Monday
next this is the end, and yet it is also the
start of a new kind of life, a different way of
living. Gone will be the sleepless nights, the
toiling and striving and yearning for marks
and recognition; instead there will be the
uneasy and unpredictable life in the outside
world. There may still be sleepless nights,
there may still be toiling and striving and
yearning; but all will be on a new and different basis, for the guidance and help of
trained minds will no longer be available. It
is the beginning of an independent existence.
For the United Nations this is the end of
defense and the beginning of offense. This is
the end of despair, it is the beginning of
hope; for our armies, navies, and air forces
are on the march, and nothing will stop them.
This is the beginning of a summer, the outcome of whose battles will decide the fate of
all of us for many decades to come. This is
the beginning of the era in which either
democracy or tyranny will emerge victorious.
We have no doubt as to the outcome; it must
be that way.
By next September and October we shall
be somewhere along the circumference of a
circle speeding rapidly toward the unknown
point which marks the end of another era.
Let us look ahead to those months with
courage and hope, for we know our efforts
will succeed.
To the new Myskania, to all the new officers, to the Seniors, above all, to the cause
of democracy, we say Godspeed.
O p e n Sesame
The hour of trial is upon us. In a few short
days another examination period falls due—
a time that means books, black coffee, and
headaches to the student body. To help the
"crammers," we suggest that the college
library be opened in the evening until dark
'ffor the duration." F.ven bombers of Japan
and Germany would have the compassion not
to pick exam week for a token air raid.
Wan Qn&dl
-by FeigenbaumThe next five or six months will
The continued advance of the Japs
tell the story on the Russian front, in the Southwest Pacific for the past
and consequently on every other few months has led many an Amerfront. The Germans have launched ican to ask: Where is the United
their vaunted offensive on the
southern Russian front. Attacking States Navy? Last week they found
on the Crimean Peninsula, the Nazis out. The navy was doing all right
are attempting to drive through to for itself. An American naval force
the Caucasian oil fields. The Rus- met up with a Japanese squadron.
sians, however, are attacking all Inflicting some damage, the Amerialong the rest of the line. Both cans were forced to sail toward
attacks are apparently succeding as Australia because of superior Jap
both sides admit withdrawals. It is numbers. The Japanese foolishly
much too early to get a clear picture pursued them. Running and shootof what is happening, but the Ger- ing for over 150 miles, American
mans are making their usual fan- planes and ships took a heavier and
tastic claims of large gains, hordes heavier toll of Jap ships. Arrival
of prisoners, and great amounts of
of reinforcements in the Coral Sea
booty.
Last week the Japs had a Moving- allowed the United Nations' forces
Up Day all their own. They were to turn on the Japs. After being
driving up the Burma Road as fast heavily battered, the Japanese ships
as they could travel. They made were forced to split up and limp
only one mistake which turned out home. This naval victory was posto be disastrous for them. After sible only because the Japanese
badly mauling General Stilwell's risked their large ships so far from
Chinese army on the northern border home for the first time. This victory
of Burma, they by-passed him in gives MacArthur at least six more
their haste to advance up the Burma weeks to prepare his forces in AusRoad. Fifty miles along the road tralia before the Japs try again,
they met the Chinese army under
the personal command of GeneralisAn axis submarine sunk three
simo Chiang Kai-Shek who stopped ships in the St. Lauwrence river.
them cold. Stilwell, meanwhile, had The Germans are apparently willing
reorganized his forces and cut off
to sacrifice many submarines in an
the Japanese column from the rest attempt to block the St. Lawrence.
of the Japanese army. Then the If they ever should succeed in blockJaps received a taste of their own ing the river, it would Interrupt outmedicine. Hammered from the front going sea freight from the United
and rear, the Japs were continually States and Canada. The last of the
strafed by the A.V.G. fliers who had three ships was sunk after the Canaa field day Hying up and down the dian Prime Minister had announced
Burma Road shooting the Jap that the United States and Canada
column to pieces. When the shoot- had long ago drawn up plans for
ing was over, 4500 Japs had been
such an attack and that these plans
killed.
had been put Into operation.
Moving-Up Malarkey
-Letters to the EditorTo the Editor!
To the Editor:
Although this Moving Up Day
Congratulations to the frosh and
stimulated the same emotions as sophs for their fine skits last Saturusual, the program could have been day. Moving-up Day skits were a
improved.
treat this year, after what we sat
Thus far. there have been no suit- through last year, when, as per
able explanations for transferring tradition, we had four skits, one by
the scheduled orchestra concert from each class. The sophs play was swell;
that afternoon to the previous
even the frosh play was OK. And
Thursday evening.
Certainly a larger attendance then we had the dubious presentawould warrant presenting the con- tions of the seniors and Juniors.
cert for the benefit of the guests The sophs and frosh were spurred
with no admission charge. Tills is on by thoughts and hopes for
the day on which State displays its rivalry points. The seniors and junleaders and line qualities. Certainly iors were, well, just fulfilling a reour musical organizations, tills year, quirement,
if In no other, have achieved a stanShuttering tradition doesn't usudard worthy of recognition and ally go, but in this cuse, It was u
praise.
good idea. This yeur we hud two
However, we must admit that tiie really good plays. Goldstein laid
evening's program was well crowded. eggs; Willie sneezed—but we liked
It was fairly obvious Unit the sing it. We hud dripping "ineller-druina"
wan unnecessarily repetitious and und "drufty dodgers." The sophs
exhausting. Maybe we can achieve even guve us a "bea-u-tlful" heroine.
a liner quality in the songs presented The frosh took olf with "Minnie"
and the method of presentation for and "Miscellanla." If this be the
the next year, There is no doubt best efforts of '44 und '45, I say let's
have more of it.
thai this muni be accomplished.
Miss Satisfied
lYlissatislled
Bill Forrest, now with the Marines at Chicago, was
recently guarding one of the big hotels, wherein were
glittering some of the brighter stars in our Hollywood
heaven. The upshot of the whole thing is that Bill
ended up by dancing with Eleanor Powell—an actress.
Like any true Marine, Bill had the situation well in
hand. . . .
Recently Inducted Into the army, Dan Buccl rated
high in the mechanic's section of the army aptitude
tests. The coefficient of correlation must have been
suitable, since Dan is now connected with the Air
Corps School, ground detachment, learning, in the
approved manner, the most efficient way to swing a
monkey wrench.
Dan wishes to be remembered to all, and In case
you wish to be remembered to Dan, write Pvt. D. J.
Bucci, Co. A—Platoon No. 6, Tent City, Spence Field,
Moultrie, Georgia. . . .
Van Ellis, one of '43's boys, was roaming around the
halls this week—looking quite healthy, and happy,
about the whole thing. Van is now a Staff Sergeant at
Fort Monmouth, a walking Illustration of the fact that
college-trained men, with ambition, wear the stripes—
and we do mean plural. . . .
Added Interviews—Verbalism Deluxe
Liz Simmons, in a writeup this week in one of the
downtown papers, gave a rather glorified account of
the exit of old man apathy at State
The article carried a lot of good sound ideas, and
it is unfortunate that it was slightly overdressed by
some ambitious journalist—but this seems usually to
be the case whenever anyone writes a feature showing
youth's part in the world fracas.
Take for instance the accompanying article on
Thorpe DeVold—-"Devoid of Fear, Devoid Enlists, To
Fly or Die . . ." Now this Is a very laudable patriotic
sentiment, but as a headline it is well buttered, and
on the cob. . . . Although by no means a criterion of
correctness, it is unlikely that such a headline would
ever appear in the Crimson and Wh—pardon us, The
STATIC COLLBUE NEWS. . . .
At the risk of degenerating into a gossip column,
we relate the following choice tidbit. Liz's eulogizer
coyly described John Ralph as "her particular boy
friend . . . ," so now you know why the fair haired,
as well as fair minded, No. 1 student wakes up screaming. . . .
Apathy has gone from State; we no longer take our
invincibility for granted—but having conquered this
deadliest of enemies (apathyI, we must put forth every
possible effort next year to help force Frankenstein's
kitchen cabinet out of business. . , .
Religion—A Challenge to Man
This presents a definite challenge to every organisation on the campus, and especially to the religious
groups—for if there was ever a time when a return to
religion was needed it Is now.
By this we do not mean a verbalistic display of
Hallelujahs, but a practical, working adoption of a
belief in the brotherhood of man. Only through this
can a permanent world order, insuring peace, be
established.
Without this, by continuing the past world policy
of national axe-grinding, many of us will be vainly
sacrificed on the altar of economic imperialism. . . .
The Weekly Bulletin
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PAGES
Mrs, Roosevelt Will Speak at Workshop Opening;
Eniif n Robinson to Spook
On Rottrvo CltMiAettiom
NYA , Housing
Hicks, Jones, Baker Selected as State's Delegates
Dr. Milton O. Nelson, Dean of
the College, stated that Ensign Edward S. Robinson of the United
States Naval Reserve will be at
State College Monday in order to
meet with those students who are
interested in V-l, V-5 and A-V(t;
Classifications.
Dr. Nelson stated also that the
Navy was anxious to contact all the
prospective candidates in the various
schools and colleges before graduation. Ensign Robinson will bring
with him a movie depicting llie in
the Navy.
The whole student body is invited
to attend the meeting Monday at
3:30 P. M. in Room 20 Richardson.
Any man wishing to attend will be
given an excuse from class.
Statement Issued
Inaugurating the first Faculty
Workshop presented at State College, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt will
lecture in Page Hall June 3 to the
professors of 37 various colleges and
universities of New York State. Her
speech, "Safeguarding the Children
and Young People," will constitute
an integral part of the courses offered.
Dr. John Allen Hicks, Professor of
Guidance, Dr. Ralph H. Baker, Instructor in Social Studies, and Dr.
Louis C. Jones, Instructor of English
will remain at State for the month
of June to participate in the conferences.
Complete college facilities will be
placed at the disposal of the Workshop for the entire month of June,
supplemented by the Arts and Crafts
room of Milne High School. Sayles
Hall and Pierce Hall will comprise
the residence accommodation fo;
the participating members,
An executive committee which will
make appointments for full time and
guest consultants, has been chosen
by the Workshop Planning Committee. It is composed of: President
John M. Sayles, New York State
College for Teachers, chairman; Dr.
Hermann L. Cooper, Assistant Commissioner of Teacher Education and"
Appointments of consultants will
be released in the next few days.
The major areas in which consultant service will be provided comprise :
I. Development and Behavior of
Children and Adolescents.
II. Reading, Writing and Speaking.
III. Professional
Education of
Teachers in Reference to Laboratory
and Practical Experiences.
A sub-group will be formed in the
art of discussion,
Dr. William H. Hartley, Assistant
Professor of Education, who is a
specialist in audio and visual aids,
will be available for consultation on
methods and methods and materials
in these fields.
No Survey Exams
Five College Men Adopt
U.S. Marines Theme Song
Newman to Induct
For SS Students
There will be no comprehensive
examination for Sophomore majors
or minors in social studies this year,
as announced by Donnal V. Smith
of the social studies department.
The change has been made to conform with the new five-year plan.
The purpose ol the comprehensive
examination was to select the field
of social studies for specialization.
However, since specialization will
now begin in the fifth year, the
exam will be given in the second
semester of the junior year, or in the
first semester of the senior year to
all majors and minors in social
studies, since these students may
elect to specialize in their minors
or majors during the fifth year.
The program of the fifth year will
be seminar work and one semester
of education in the field of special
interest.
This postponement will apply tu
all who will finish their fourth year
in June, 1944 and to subsequent
classes. That is, the conmprehensive
examination will be given In the
spring or fall semester of 1943.
New Literary Annual
'Of, By, For Students'
"State's new literary magazine is
going to be a magazine of, for, and
by the students." paraphrased Kay
Martin, '43, newly elected Editorin-Chief of the aforementioned publication. "Tills magazine is going
to be something different, and we
are going to print just the very best
of everything." Miss Martin added
that the Statesman has been buried
and that the new magazine will have
a new name, new cover, new format.
and even new type of features. That
every student should and must feel
that It Is his privilege and his duly
to submit articles, stories and such
to the staff of the magazine for
possible publication, were the parting words of Miss Martin
Greek Officers
(Continued from paga I, column 2)
Dorothy Cox, '43, of Chi .Sigma
Thelu, Is council treasurer
Oilier members of the council for
next year are Ellen Holly, of Beta
Zela; Thelma Lo Vinson, of Alpha
Epsilou Phi; and Eleanor Mapes, of
Gamma Kappa, juniors,
Maurice Joseph Levin, '43, was
elected president, ol Kappa Beta
fraternity Wednesday, Gilbert Snyder, '44, was elected vice-president;
David Slavln, '43, is the new secretary, and Harry Charles Keusk.v, '43,
is treasurer,
House Malinger for Hie coining
year is Kenneth Havitsky, '46; Mem.
per-ul-lurgc to the Executive Hoard
is irven Swire, '44; representative to
Iiitra-mural Council Is Arthur Flax,
'43, und members to Inlcrfrutcrnlty
Council are Levin and Harold Feigenbaum, juniors, and Haul Stolbof,
•44.
Certification, New York State Education Department, chairman of subcommittees; Dean Mary M. McCormlck Scot-Craig, Hobart and William Smith colleges, Area Committee
chairman; and Dr. Robert W. Frederick, Principal of Milne High
School, Executive Secretary of the
Committee. The latter three will have
general direction of the Workshop.
MRS.
F R A N K L I N D. R O O S E V E L T
To five more State men, the
Marine Hymn will now signify
the official marching accompaniment to their division of
the United States armed service.
In the past month, Fred Ferris, Louis Pasquini, Seniors,
Walter Grzywacz, Peter Marchetta, Juniors, and Benjamin
Reed, '44, have enlisted as candidates for ensigns in the United
States Marines.
After a four month trial training period in Quantlco, Virginia, following the completion
of their senior year, each will
receive the commission of Second Lieutenant.
Russian Relief Sponsors Film
The Russian War Relief will
sponsor the movie at the Grand
Theatre all this coming week. In
addition to a first-rate picture, the
news picture, Our Russian Front,
will be shown. However, the War
Relief gets a percentage only on
those tickets which are sold outside,
not those sold at the box office.
Therefore, If any students plan to
attend that mcvle, they are urged
by Dr. Caroline Lester, to obtain
their tickets either from her or from
the State College Co-op.
Officers Sunday
Newman Club has scheduled a
"Wlmpy's Woast," a hamburg party,
for Sunday, May 17, in the yard of
Newman Hall, At this time, the new
officers will be installed by retiring
president Fred Ferris. '42, and the
Reverend Wm. Cahill, Professor of
Philosophy iit the College ol Saint
Rose.
Incoming officers include: President, William Tucker, '44; VicePresident, Mae Whiting. '43; Secretary, Florence Garfall, '45; Treasurer, Loretta Sundstrom, '43; Editor
of Newmannews, Kathleen Martin,
'43; chairman of Religious Committee, Marie Hart, '43; chairman of
Meeting Committee, Shirley Wurz,
'43; chairman of Social Committee,
Lucille Gerg, '45; chairman of Publicity Committee, Benjamin Reed,
'44; chairman of Education Committee, Clifford Swanson, '43; and
other minor officers.
"Wimpy's Woast" feat'ires hamburgers, potato salad,
flee, and
doughnuts.
Following the roast and installation, there will be dancing and
entertainment in the recreation
room of Newman Hall, under the
chairmanship of Mildred Swain,
Madeline Grunwald, and Norma Dl
Lauro, Seniors.
W a r Activities
Increase in Scope
With the continuation of the present world conflict, the War Activities Board will assume an important
role in next year's college program.
Members of the Board anticipate a
full schedule,
On Activities Day next October,
there will be a booth in the Commons where students can register
for different classes In War Relief
Work. Committees will be formed
to salvage materials which will be
used to fill vital war needs. The
sewing group will continue its work
under the direction of Emily Blasiar,
while the blood bank will be given
more prominent place In the relief
program. It is hoped that more students will contribute.
This past year the Board has
sponsored stamp and bond campaigns. Members have cooperated
with outside workers in writing
scripts for radio programs dealing
with national defense. They have
enlisted volunteers for defense positions in tiie city and have assisted
with the enrollment of residents for
work in various fields.
Senior to Lead
Milne Conference
Virginia Polhemus, '42, and Adolph
Schabel, a faculty member from
Philip Schuyler High School will
have charge of the panel discussion
sessions of the annual spring conference of the Capital District Scholastic Press Association which will
convene at Milne High School on
May 10. Conferences and panel discussions will hold sway at these
sessions, with a luncheon In the
Huested cafeteria.
Staff members for the Milne High
weekly Tun CHIIWON AND WHITE will
Seniors, Sentenced to Life, View
Happy
Post and Hopeful
Anita Fefnslein
What are the seniors' feelings on
leaving school? The only way to
find out Is by asking the seniors
themselves. The Commons is a fertile place to find almost anyone.
Sure 'null', Fred Ferris gave forth
wllh, "As a senior, two thoughts are
in mind as I look back upon four
happy and profitable years at State.
I am glad that the requirements for
a degree are fulfilled, but at the
same time 1 i egret leaving college
and the friends among the faculty
and students who have made State
so pleasant, At the same time f am
looking forward to an exciting
period with the Marine Corps."
Curl "Behind the Eight-Ball"
Mitchell, looking rather sad, said,
"Just like everybody else feels. It's
lough to leave all the friends of
years. There's something bigger
ahead, though, I've got to llnd a
couple ol .laps to do my laundry."
Pete Fulvlo will also be fighting
Japs. When asked about his feelings,
Pete replied, "My feelings on leaving State? I've never spent four
years that were so marked for their
luck of food, money, sleep, and rest.
As for the war -It's u steady Job at
least."
Hill Dickson spouted poetry!
" 'Parting is such sweet sorrow.'
Future
Makes me think of poetry—things
like, 'So, we'll go no more a-rovlng.'
That's Byron. Outside of that I
haven't any definite feelings because
what I'm going into is so unknown.
It's Just a time interval as far as
I'm concerned."
With his mouth full of peach pie,
and his eyes full of tears, Al Stiller
spoke: "I am terribly sorry to be
leaving my old acquaintances and
the haunts I've infected for four
years." Kay Richards said, "I feel
bad because I'm finishing off a,
period of my life to which I can
never return and fit In. However, I
am glad to get out because four
years of college seems like enough."
Muriel "Rappie" Rapport stilted seriously, "After four years here, anyone would be glad to get out, I
know there's more to living than
Just what you find at Slate. So, I'm
all wet to go out and live."
ISci llolsleln was brief but to the
point, "Stute has treated me well.
I'm glad It's over and I'm sorry to
leave." Janet Kraafz adequately
summed up the feelings of the major
part of the class by saying, "To me,
leaving State Is a personal matter
which every individual will accept
In his own inimitable way, My feelings are various and probably trite
—as are these words."
play host to student reporters from
Mildred Elley, Nott Terrace of
Schenectady, South Glens Falls
Junior-Senior High, Altamont High,
and Heatly High of Green Island.
Miss Katherlne E. Wheeling of the
Milne English Department Is chairman for the conference; Robert S.
Kohn, student chairman. The Milne
Band and Choir will provide the
musical background for the conferences.
W A A to Hold Festival
The WAA awards festival will be
held Sunday at four o'clock on the
terrace of Pierce Hall. Mary Now
is general chairman for the affair,
Officers for the coming year will
bo Installed and keys will be
awarded to Juniors and seniors who
have earned credit, in four sports
a year for a period of three years,
Dcin Dclancy Releases
Junior Guide Deadline
Junior Guide and housing Information has been released by iiim
Sara Tod DeLaney, Dean of Women.
Miss DeLaney also requests that all
students who expect to work on
NYA this fall leave their names and
summer addresses In the NYA office by Wednesday, May 27.
No information has as yet come
through about State's NYA status.
The New York State NYA Office
does not know how much money will
be available, if any. However, if
any funds are granted, they will be
considerably smaller than those of
past years.
Notices will be posted if any news
comes about the funds. This summer, if an appropriation is received,
applications will be sent out to those
who have filed for NYA. These
blanks must be returned before
September 1.
Miss DeLaney asks that only students who absolutely need NYA help
sign up.
Miss DeLaney stressed the fact
•that the Junior guide system includes both men and women, Juniors
and Sophomores. She also wishes to
remind those students who do not
live at home or in college group
houses that they must have their
residence approved by her office.
The deadline for Junior Guide application is 12 noon, Monday, May
18. Notices will be sent before the
end of the examination period to
those Juniors and Sophomores selected.
The work of the Junior Guides
consists of introducing the Incoming
freshman class to life at State, They
will escort, the class of 1946 to receptions in the fall.
Commercial Fraternity
Elects New Officers
"Organization has been successfully accomplished this year. We
have been feeling our way and hope
that Interest manifested thus far
will be continued," said Jackson LeVarn, outgoing president of the Beta
Zeta chapter of Pi Omega PI fraternity, at its final meeting of the
year.
Officers for the coming year are:
Ellen Delfs, president; Leo Flax,
vice-president; Reglna Roth, secretary; Doris Sayles, historian. The
new executives were informally Installed at a meeting on Tuesday,
May 12.
The purpose of the fraternity,
which was chartered in January, Is
to advance an interest in commerce.
There are fifty chapters of PI Omega
PI In the United States. NYU and
State are the two chapters In New
York State.
New Officers Chosen
By Two Language Clubs
Officers for Classical Club and
Pan Amlgos have been selected for
the coming year. They are, for
Classical club: Lucy Massimllian,
'43, president; Gertrude Daram, '43,
vice-president; Ruth O'Neill, '43,
secretary; Laura Hughes, '43, treasurer; Reglna Slawskl, '45, Publicity
director.
Officers for Pan Amlgos are: Ira
Freedman, '43, president; Beverly
Palutsky, '43, vice-president; June
Semple, '43, secretary; Herman
Blumel, '44, treasurer.
There will be no other meetings
ol Pan Amlgos this year except an
officers' meeting next year,
Good Food in A Friendly,
Comfortable Atmosphere
%JL mmrrn at Quail
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 194*
PAGE 4
State Linksmen l-MCouncilCloses
Spat GUatU*
by Pttt MarchetU
Potter Predicted
To Finish First
by Shirley Wuri
Lose by Stroke
A Successful Year
With the college year coming to a
With high winds and driving
Our memories are perhaps our rains greatly hampering play, an close, intramural council can look
most precious possession. Yet we under-dog State College golf squad back upon a very successful year.
Due to circumstances over which
cannot live In the past—we must came within an inch of upsetting They have sponsored Intramural
they had no control, many colleges
plan for the future. This has been Siena's touted linksmen in a return football, basketball, bowling, a n d
In the country were forced to drop
a good year for the feminine sport match last Tuesday afternoon when softball as major sports, and feaIntercollegiate baseball from their
College House Wins;
fans of State College. WAA has Bert Kiley, State's number one man, tured ping pong singles and doubles
sports program. State was among
done a splendid job — yet it isn't saw his 20-foot putt idle past the tournaments, and a freshman tenPotter Noses Out KB
the schools who put their bats and
completed. There is much that can rim of the cup on the water-soaked nis tournament as minor sports.
balls in storage. The situation was
and should be done by WAA's new
by Stan Gipp
18th green of the Albany Municipal
regrettable but there was no alterThey were able to welcome a new
The intramural softball schedule officers next year.
Golf Course. The final score was member into their circuit, as Sayles
native.
suffered serious setbacks this week
We would like to see WAA em- 8-7.
Hall, the new dorm, elected a memIn viewing the college baseball due to rain, darkness, and a tie bark on a more intensive InterKiley, putting brilliantly on the ber In Its first year of existence.
situation, We can well understand game. Of the eight scheduled games house competitive program, There
the losing fight that the sport is only three were officially completed. is a keen spirit of rivalry here at back nine, took the tenth, tying his
The lion's share of the honors
match with "Red" Plynn, moved
facing today. The war situation
As this report goes to press the State among the sororities and into the lead two holes later with a were carried off by Potter Club as
they won the trophy in football, and
has created conditions which made eight teams appear to be arranged dorms. WAA can use this rivalry
in some places the maintenance in the order they will finish except to advantage by sponsoring various birdie two, lost his advantage when bowling, tied College House for first
parred the 14th and birdled
in basketball only to lose In the
of the diamond sport an impossi- for the possible interchange of Kap- leagues in which house teams may Plynn
the short 15th, re-tied the contest
play-off, and seem headed for albility.
pa Beta and Sayles Hall after their compete.
on the • next hole with a par, and most certain honors in the softball
meeting in the near future.
War Effects
Why doesn't WAA have the va- then matched Siena's top man
Almost without exception every
The Ramblers, though not exactly rious houses on campus hold elim- stroke for stroke the rest of the way
league.
college has abbreviated its semes- a dark horse aggregation, have ination ping-pong
This did not mean, however, that
tournaments, In a heavy downpour, splitting the
ters and consequently shortened the played better ball than expected. thus choosing a house champion to three match points.
there was a lack of Interest disalready short college baseball sea- Their position appears to be due represent the house In an InterIn the earlier engagements, Dave played by the other members of the
son.
Traveling difficulties, with mainly to their hitting, and to the house Plng-Pong Tourney?
Griffin had little difficulty with Joe council.
emphasis on the shortage of rubber
pitching of Clay Sprowls.
The coming year offers a chal- Brennan, disposing of the Siena inThe council has announced the
and rationing of gasoline offers an- SLS Takes Early Lead
lenge to WAA—a challenge to procoming senior class president, 5 out individual representatives for 1942other obstacle to collegiate baseball.
SLS enjoyed early season domin- vide many types of sports, an In- of 4, and John Sussina nosed out
With the exception of New York ation but does not really possess creased number of Inter-house Syl Rahab, 2 and 1, after having '43 will be Ed Reed, for Potter
Club, Hal Singer, nominated by the
City, colleges are not located within the power which would entitle them leagues and more tournaments for
been held even for the first nine. Ramblers, Hank Ruback, representclose range of each other and trans- to such a pcsitlon. In Ashworth, the women of State.
Griffin garnered three match points ing College House, Art Flax, chosen
portation is a very important ele- Guarino, and Griffin they have
We might as well begin our so- and Sussina two and one-half. Dave by Kappa Beta, Gene Guarino, for
ment In their schedule.
three stellar performers but their journ in this column in an atmos- Blttman and Howie Lynch ran afoul
The past few years have found talent does not include many more. phere of sweetness and light, tos- of P a t Peartree and Stan Kerbelis SLS, Bill Marsland, representing
KDR, and Stan Gipp for Sayles
baseball steadily decreasing in popKappa Beta has the power but sing bouquets hither and yon, but
Hall.
ularity as a college sport. The ath- lacks the pitching. The fact that only where deserved. We give a and lost.
letic moguls who direct the college many of their players have been large one to Glnny Polhemus of
sport program have for years eyed
DIAL 5 - 1 9 1 3
"Gin Mill" fame. Ginny contributed
G E O R G E D. JEONEY. PROP.
baseball reluctantly because It was
many hours of her time and gained
Standings Wednesday
not a paying proposition. The diaa few gray hairs in endeavoring to
Won !•»»*
mond sport does not compare with
let the State College fans know
I'olter Club
i> "
their million-dollar football busiwhat went on in feminine sports.
Itumlili'i-H
I
I
ness; nor does it approach their
Slitnm I.IIIIIIMIII SiKum . . .
H
I
We're well aware of the fact that
Kupnu
lli'tn
:l
'•!
Madison Square Garden profits of
the words and opinions of a woBuylos
Hull
'•!
8
the winter. Instead it cuts a large
man's sports editor are not going to
Kuppii I M t i i It ho
i
8
hole in their sports budget.
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
sway the world or change the fate
Colh'Ki' l l n n s e
I
5
ThomitN Mori'
0
ft
of nations. But we will do our best
Doubtful Future
to keep you informed about life as
The present war situation struck pre-occupied with tennis must be led by the lady athletes of State.
a staggering blow to collegiate base- considered in their showing, and
ball, a blow from which it may not with this In mind their play must
recover for some time. After De- be commended.
mocracy has conquered and the war ' Sayles Hall has failed to live up
will have been won, baseball will to its expectations, showing its posfind it very difficult to re-enter the sibilities very rarely. The defense
college sport curriculum. Interests, of this freshman team has sparkled
other than sports, will oppose base- at times and glared at others.
ball for the various colleges, Unless
KDrt, with a lack of available
a method Is found whereby the players, has alS'i played spotty ball.
Tomorrow State's tennis squad
great American game can become Its pitching has been its big weakwill face Cortland Normal on their
a business-like,
professionalized, ness, and Al Stone and Marsland Its home courts In the final match for
money making proposition, Its fu- main strength.
this season, Captain Hank Brauner
ture as a major college sport is
Is confident of victory, for once beCollege
House
and
Thomas
More
very doubtful.
fore this season Cortland has been
have presented few players or plays defeated by the nctsmen.
to rave about, but all representaHard luck in weather conditions
t i v e of these teams must be com- has been riding the Statesmen's
mended for their spirit.
shoulders for the past week. Both
EEP Noses Out KB
matches to have been played In the
The results of the games of last
past week were rained out, the ones
week were all close and exciting. with RPI and Siena. Due to the lack
Potter Club retained its lead by of time there will be no chance to
The final curtain has fallen on virtue of Its narrow 11-10 win over play the RPI squad. However, the
the frosh-soph rivalry for this year KB. Bob Seifcrt walked 1 men In cancelled Siena match was played
with the class of '44 emerging as the first Inning and spotted KB a on Thursday.
10 run lead. Evans relieved him and
the winner for the second consecuAt the time of this writing,
tive year. Overcoming their adver- pitched masterful ball. Meanwhile State's record for this season Is
saries in a much harder manner his teammates pecked away at the slightly better than that for last
than Is exhibited In the final tabu- 10 run lead until Dickson climaxed year. Last year's squad won three
lation, the Golden Horde came in the contest with a two run homer and lost lour. This year's, playing
to put Potter In the lead.
on the long end of a 30H-6'A
a heavier schedule has won four
College House and Thomas More and lost only three, with two more
score.
With 18 points still left to go, the battled to the season's only tie, matches to bo played.
In the opening match of the
freshman women, under Nora Gla- Ui-18, Monday night, being forced
velll, came thru with a 17-11 win to leave the outcome In balance be- season, Plattsburg bowed to the
cause
of
darkness.
In
a
repeat
perStatesmen. The squad then sallied
over the sophomore softball team.
The men of '44, however, avenged formance, College House won a 26- Into Troy, to play RPI only to be
turned back on the short end of
this loss and put an end to fresh- 10 victory behind the hitting and
the score. The racqueters then won
man hopes when they won the pitching of Onrr.
In another well played, exciting their next three matches In a row,
men's softball game, garnering 14
contest the Ramblers overcame a over Cortland Normal, Plattsbug,
runs to their opponents three.
The day before Movlng-Up Day, 7-1 lead to defeat Sayles Hall 11-0. and Hartwick. The long trip to
the sophs again sallied into the Sprowls did not pitch the type of
New York to play Brooklyn Poly
frosh camp and came out victor- ball that he did In his recent "no resulted In a setback,
ious. At noon, their Tug-of-War hitter," but his timely hits told the
team outpulled the Crimson Tide in story,
two out of two attempts. At 3:30
O T T O R. MENDE
that afternoon the BOph women Signum Laudis to Buy War Bond
Thirst won't take " n o "
struggled through the obstacle and
Slgnum Laudis will purchase a
"The
College
Jeweler"
handicap races winning two out of
$1000 defense bond with Its surplus
for an a n s w e r . , . n o t
three and gaining the rivalry points. funds, Dr. Ralph Beaver, treasurer
As a finale they knocked down and of the association, announced. This
103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. V.
when the answer is derolled over the frosh men to a 15-3 decision followed a meeting which
victory in pushball.
was held Tuesday, May 12.
licious, refreshing, ice-
In l-M Softball
•'
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
50c
StateTennis Squad
To Face Cortland
SophsOvercome
Frosh in Rivalry
Eat at John's Lunch
PLATES 20C AND UP
cold Coca-Cola. In this
KIMMEY'S BREAD
drink is the quality of
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
7 i 3 0 A. M. TO l l i O O f>. M,
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
Orchids
- Roses - Gardenias
CORSAGES
Madison Flowir Shop
CUT FIOWERB
i«.
T a l M r u u b Vlowerit Bverywl>»»«
» » ; i t S R • IK« Mritom Ay..
HOLSUM
genuine goodness... the
(White Bread)
KLEEN • MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
(Delicious Toasted)
J. L. KIMMEY BAKERY
Albany, N. Y.
quality of the real thing.
You trust its quality
IIOTTI ED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA.COLA COMPANY BY
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
226 No. Allen St.
Albany, N. Y.
i
r i
Jt
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